Virginia – Halifax County – 1700s to early 1800s

File:Vahalifax.jpg

FamilySearch.org Map of Halifax Co, Va.

FamilySearch.org wiki page for Halifax Co, Va:   https://www.familysearch.org/wiki/en/Halifax_County,_Virginia_Genealogy

FamilySearch.org catalogue page for Halifax Co, Va:   https://www.familysearch.org/search/catalog/results?count=20&query=%2Bsubject%3AVirginia%20%2Bsubject%3AHalifax

Halifax County, Virginia – Familysearch notes
Catalogue: https://www.familysearch.org/search/catalog/results?count=20&query=%2Bsubject%3AVirginia%20%2Bsubject%3AHalifax&subjectsOpen=598680-50

Plea, minute and order books, 1752-1902 ; general indexes, 1752-1900
Author: Virginia. County Court (Halifax County)
https://www.familysearch.org/search/catalog/401169?availability=Family%20History%20Library
(Review at Family History Center)

Order books, 1809-1831 ; general indexes, 1752-1900
Author: Virginia. Superior Court of Law (Halifax County)
(Review at Family History Center)

Antrim Parish, Halifax County, Virginia, vestry book, 1752-1817
Author: Antrim Parish (Halifax County, Virginia : Episcopal)
https://www.familysearch.org/search/catalog/375951?availability=Family%20History%20Library
(Review at Family History Center)

Deed books, 1752-1900; general indexes to deeds, 1752-1928
Author: Virginia. County Court (Halifax County)
https://www.familysearch.org/search/catalog/406522?availability=Family%20History%20Library
(Review at Family History Center)

Survey and plat books, 1746-1901, 1975-1976; general indexes, 1747-1966
Author: Halifax County (Virginia). County Surveyor
https://www.familysearch.org/search/catalog/367219?availability=Family%20History%20Library
(Review at Family History Center)

Will books, 1753-1903; general indexes, 1752-1949
Author: Virginia. County Court (Halifax County)
https://www.familysearch.org/search/catalog/417646?availability=Family%20History%20Library
(Review at Family History Center)

FACTS and SOURCES – Halifax County, Virginia – INFO

(Below are different Going, Goyen, Gowen related sources for those people were in the Virginia, North Carolina, or South Carolina areas in the early 1700’s to early 1800’s)

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1773 April 10:  The deposition of Alexander Gowin of lawfull age taken at the house of Mr. John Dix in the County of Pittsylvania the tenth day of April 1773 in a suit . . . . now depending and undetermined in the County Court of Halifax between John Mayo of the County of Cumberland, plantr and William Armstrong of Pittsylvania County, deft. . . .
This deponant deposeth and saith that to his certain knowledge Mr. James Terry acted as agent for the above sd. John Mayo in full to that part of his estate that lay in Orange County, North Carolina for many years beginning about the year 1759 and continued untill the sd. Mayo sold his land and estate in that County and further saith not . . .
Alexander (his “A” mark) Gowin.

Pittsylvania County
This day came Alexander Gowin before me and made oath to the trouth of the above deposition certified under my hand this 10th day of April 1773.

1778 In the case of “Aron Going vs. Philip Going” held in 1778, the defendant “confessed judgement £100 pounds current money,” according to Halifax County Court Minute Book 9, page 304.  (See Gowen Manuscript).

1782 Halifax Co, Va
Gutridge Going 1 tithe 2 horses, 8 cattle [frame 4] –
Shadrack Going 1 tithe, 3 horses 18 cattle
John Going 1 tithe, 1 horse, 3 cattle
David Going 1 tithe 1 horse 4 cattle
http://www.freeafricanamericans.com/HalifaxVa.htm

1783 Halifax Co, Va
Shadrack Going 1 tithe 4 horses, 11 cattle [frame 25]- Halifax Co, Va
John Going 1 tithe 2 horses 2 cattle
http://www.freeafricanamericans.com/HalifaxVa.htm

1783 – Shadrach Going
Virginia Census – head of household with 12 members white – no blacks. Halifax Co – pg 23.
Halifax Co, Va.
http://www2.census.gov/prod2/decennial/documents/1790m-02.pdf

1784 Halifax Co, Va
Shadrack Going 1 tithe 4 horses, 13 cattle – Halifax Co, Va.
http://www.freeafricanamericans.com/HalifaxVa.htm

1785 Halifax Co, Va
John Gowan 1 tithe 4 cattle Halifax Co, Va
Shadrack Gowan 1 tithe 4 horses 13 cattle
David Gowan 1 tithe, 1 horse, 4 cattle
http://www.freeafricanamericans.com/HalifaxVa.htm

1785 – Shadrack Going
Virginia Census – head of household with 10 members white – no blacks. Halifax Co, Va. – pg 89
Halifax Co, Va.
http://www2.census.gov/prod2/decennial/documents/1790m-03.pdf

1786 Dec 5 – I James Henry of Northumberland County am held firmly bound unto David Gowing Junr in the full sum of one hundred pounds . . . the condition of this obligation is such that if Henry shall convey over unto Gowing . . . one hundred acres of land to be laid off joining the land sold to Berry Lewis on Polecat Creek in the County of Halifax . . . when the said Gowing shall have paid for it then then present obligation to be void, otherwise to remain in full power and virtue. Signed: James Henry. Wit: Daniel Trammell. Halifax Co, Va.  (Exhibit in the 1798 case Isaac Wilson v. David Going in Halifax Co, Va).

1798 case Isaac Wilson v David Going in Halifax Va COMBINED_Page_17 in 1786 David Gowing land trans

1786 Dec 5 – … I David Going Junr at present of Henry County am held and firmly bound unto James Henry in the full sum of one hundred pounds current money of Virginia. To be paid unto the said Henry . . . The condition of this obligation is such that if the above bound Gowing or his heirs or assigns do pay unto the said Henry or his assigns 12 pounds 10 shillings in gold or silver current money of Virginia by the 19th day of December 1788 and 50 shillings like money in the mean time by the 29th of December 1787 as a rent for land this day agreed to sell to him the further sum of 12 pounds 10 shillings like current gold or silver by the 29th of Dec 1789 the further sum of 12 pounds ten shillings like current money by the 29th of Dec 1790 and the further sum of 12 pounds 10 shillings like money by the 29th of Dec 1791 in all 50 pounds current gold or silver of Virginia besides the 50 shillings for next years rent and also 50 shillings by way of rent for the same land any other of the said years that the said Gowing may or shall fail making punctual paymt and if the said Gowing or his assigns shall fail making payment two years then the said Henry or his heirs may sell the same land to any other person on the said contract . . . Signed: David Gowing. Wit: Daniel Trammell. Halifax Co, Va.  (Exhibit in the 1798 case Isaac Wilson v. David Going in Halifax Co, Va).

1798 case Isaac Wilson v David Going in Halifax Va COMBINED_Page_21 1786 Dec 1 David Gowing land trans

1789 Halifax Co, Va
David Goen 1 tithe 1 horse [frame 302] Halifax Co, Va
http://www.freeafricanamericans.com/HalifaxVa.htm

1789 Personal Tax List in Halifax County, Virginia
David Goen
Henry Goan  

1792 Halifax Co, Va
David Going Mo 1 tithe 2 horses – Halifax Co Va
http://www.freeafricanamericans.com/HalifaxVa.htm

1793 Halifax Co, Va
David Going Mulo 1 tithe 2 horses [frame 442] Halifax Co Va
http://www.freeafricanamericans.com/HalifaxVa.htm

1793 Jan 29 – … I Isaack WIlson of Halifax County am held bound unto David Goin of the same counto in the full sum of thirty two pounds . . . the condition of the above obligation is that if the above bound Isack Wilson shall well and truly pay or cause to be paid unto the sd David Goin . . . the sum of 16 pounds . . . before Dec 25 1795 then the above obligation to be void or else to remain in full forse and virtue . . . Signed: Isaac Wilson. Wits: William Moore. Henry Forman?. Halifax Co, Va.

1798 case Isaac Wilson v David Going in Halifax Va COMBINED_Page_19 in 1793 agrmt w Isaac Wilson and David Goin

1794 Halifax Co, Va
William Going Mulo 1 tithe [frame 538] Halifax Co Va
John Going Mulo 1 tithe
http://www.freeafricanamericans.com/HalifaxVa.htm

1795 Halifax Co, Va
William Going Mulo 1 tithe [frame 603] Halifax Co Va
John Going Mulo 1 tithe
http://www.freeafricanamericans.com/HalifaxVa.htm

1796 Halifax Co, Va
David Going (at Walnes) 1 tithe [frame 635] Halifax Co Va
http://www.freeafricanamericans.com/HalifaxVa.htm

1796 Isaac Wilson files petition against David Gowing claiming he sold him land he did not have title to.  David Gowing claims he sold his rights on the bond plus the improvements he made on the land to Isaac Wilson, and that Isaac Wilson knew this when the sale was made.  Halifax County, Va.

1798 case Isaac Wilson v David Going in Halifax Va COMBINED_Page_02 marked snip Petition

1798 case Isaac Wilson v David Going in Halifax Va COMBINED_Page_03 marked snip Petition 2

1798 case Isaac Wilson v David Going in Halifax Va COMBINED_Page_04 marked snip Answer

1798 case Isaac Wilson v David Going in Halifax Va COMBINED_Page_05 marked snip Answer 2

1797 Halifax Co, Va
David Going (at Walne’s) [frame 732] Halifax Co Va
http://www.freeafricanamericans.com/HalifaxVa.htm

1798 Halifax Co, Va
David Goines [frame 819] Halifax Co Va
http://www.freeafricanamericans.com/HalifaxVa.htm

1798 personal tax list in Halifax Co Va w David Goines marked snip

1800 Halifax Co, Va
Goin Edwards Junr F.N. 1 tithe Halifax Co Va
David Goin 1 tithe 1 horse [frame 59]
http://www.freeafricanamericans.com/HalifaxVa.htm

1801 July 6 – Page 52. Deed Book C, Page 290-1. FREDERICK GOWEN of Mecklenburg Co., to William Thaxton of Halifax Co., VA, for 40 lbs, 120 A on Blewing Cr adj Francis Ford, Reubin Jones, William Baird, 6 July 1801. Wit: James Thomson, Zachariah Averett, Charles Thaxton. Person County, North Carolina Deeds 1792-1825. By Katherine Kerr Kendall. Person Co, NC. http://lumbeeindiansandgoinsfamily.blogspot.com/2008/04/person-county-nc-early-records.html

1801 Halifax Co, Va
David Goin Planter D.C. 1 tithe 1 horse (free negro) Halifax Co Va
http://www.freeafricanamericans.com/HalifaxVa.htm

1802 Halifax Co, Va
Gutridge Goin Mulatto 1 tithe [frame 186] Halifax Co Va
David Goin Mulatto 1 tithe 2 horses [frame 187]
http://www.freeafricanamericans.com/HalifaxVa.htm

1803 Halifax Co, Va
David Goin Mulatto 1 tithe Halifax Co Va
Gutridge Goin Mulatto 1 tithe
http://www.freeafricanamericans.com/HalifaxVa.htm

1804 Halifax Co, Va
David Goin Mulatto 1 tithe 1 horse [frame 372] Halifax Co Va
Gutridge Goin Mulatto 1 tithe
http://www.freeafricanamericans.com/HalifaxVa.htm

1805 Halifax Co, Va
David Goin Mulatto 1 tithe 1 horse [frame 517] Halifax Co Va
Birbrige Goin Mulatto 1 tithe
http://www.freeafricanamericans.com/HalifaxVa.htm

1806 Halifax Co, Va
David Going (Mulatto) 3 tithes 2 horses [frame 626] Halifax Co Va
Berbridge Going F.N. 1 tithe
http://www.freeafricanamericans.com/HalifaxVa.htm

1809 Halifax Co, Va
List of Berryman Green
Going Edwards F.N. 1 tithe 1 horse
http://www.freeafricanamericans.com/virginiatax.htm

1810 Southern District by Berryman Green, Halifax County
Going Edwards F.N. 1 tithe [frame 848]
http://www.freeafricanamericans.com/virginiatax.htm

1811 B, Jacob Faulkner
Gowen Edwards F.N. 1 tithe [frame 941]
http://www.freeafricanamericans.com/virginiatax.htm

1812 B, List of Joseph Scott
Going Edwards 1 tithe F.N.
http://www.freeafricanamericans.com/virginiatax.htm

1813 Halifax County
(women over 16 years old included)
Going Edwards F.N. 1 tithe 1 horse
http://www.freeafricanamericans.com/virginiatax.htm

1818 A, Halifax County
Gowin Edwards F.N. 1 tithe
http://www.freeafricanamericans.com/virginiatax.htm

1819 B, Halifax County
Edward Gowin F.N. 1 tithe [frame 600]
http://www.freeafricanamericans.com/virginiatax.htm

1820 B List of Richard Bennett, Halifax County
Edward Gowin F.N. 1 tithe
http://www.freeafricanamericans.com/virginiatax.htm

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From Gowen Manuscript:  http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~gowenrf/Gowenms142.htm

HALIFAX COUNTY, VIRGINIA
Prepared from research developed
By Louise Goins Richardson
Editorial Boardmember

William Goings [or Gowan] was born in Virginia in 1764 of parents unknown. He enlisted in the First Regiment of the Vir­ginia Continental Line in 1780, at the age of 16 and served in the light infantry com­pany commanded by Capt. Tilman Dixon. The light infantry company was part of a regiment commanded by Col. Henry Dixon and Maj. Doniphan. In his pension application he stated that he partici­pated in the Battle of Brandywine, but it is likely that his scribe misunderstood. That battle was fought in Pennsylva­nia in 1777 when William Goings was 13 years old.

William Goings received his baptism of fire at the second Bat­tle of Camden, earlier called Pine Tree, South Carolina. Lord Cornwallis had routed Gen. Horatio Gates and the Americans there August 16, 1780. Four months later, the First Virginia came back to Camden under Gen. Nathanael Greene and this time was suc­cessful against the British De­cember 3, 1780. In this battle William Going received grapeshot wounds in his knee and ankle and carried the ef­fect of them to his grave.

This battle was followed by their victory in the Battle of Cowpens January 17, 1781 in Spartan­burg County under Gen. Daniel Morgan. The First Vir­ginia was handed back to Gen. Greene for the Battle of Guilford Court House which was fought to a draw March 15, 1781 near pre­sent-day Greensboro, North Car­olina. Under Greene they were successful in the Battle of Eu­taw Springs, the last battle of the war in South Carolina, September 8, 1781. When Lord Corn­wallis walked into the trap at York­town, the First Vir­ginia was quickly called home to partici­pate in the Battle of Yorktown in October.

After the surrender of Cornwallis at Yorktown, William Go­ings set out on foot to return to his home in Halifax County, and in his pocket was an honorable discharge, personally signed by Gen. George Wash­ington. In October 1793, at age 29 he was married in adjoining Caswell County, North Car­olina, wife’s name Elizabeth. She was born in 1769. Parts of three decades slip by before the couple is again located, ac­cording to research on them to date.

On May 25, 1819, at age 56, William Goings appeared before the Hawkins County, Tennessee County Court to file an affi­davit of his Revolutionary service in an application for a pen­sion. His war wounds had continued to plague him through the years, and combined with advancing age, they had made him unable to continue working as a farmer and a day la­borer.

“State of Tennessee
Hawkins County May Session, 1819

Personally appeared in open court this twenty-fifth day of May 1819 William Going or Gowan, aged about fifty-six years, a citizen of said county & State & being first duly sworn in open Court ac­cording to law maketh the following declaration, viz: That he enlisted in the Regular Service of the United States during the War of the Revolution sometime in the year 1780 in the Spring (of [——] this deponent [——] [—-] to oath) at Hali­fax Court House, State of Virginia under Captain Tilman Dixon of the 1st Regiment of Light Infantry commanded by Col. Henry Dixon & Major Doniphan attached to General George Wash­ington’s Command for the dura­tion of the War, that this depo­nent served under Col. Dixon in said First Regiment three years of one contin­ued time without leaving said Service any time and that having served his country honorably and faithfully dur­ing said period was hon­orably discharged at York Town, State of Virginia (when Cornwallis was taken in the Year 1781) by his Excellency General George Wash­ington. This depo­nent further declareth on oath that he was in the fol­lowing battles, viz: at the Bat­tle of Brandywine when he was wounded in his knee and an­kle by Grape Shot thrown by the Enemy, at the Battle of Camden (or Pine Tree) North Car­olina when General Greene commanded, in the Battle of Cowpens, at the Battle of Guilford Court­house, in the Battle of Eutaw Springs and at the Battle of York Town when Cornwal­lis with his army was taken by Grnl. Geo. Washington. He further saith that he has suffered great hardships, pri­vations and extreme fa­tigue while in said service of which he now feels the effects, that he is in ex­treme poverty & hardship and without the support of his Country he will suffer greatly, that his cir­cumstances are such as having nothing at all to support himself with, that he has never drawn any pension altho he believes he was entitled thereto on account of his wounds, but has hitherto sup­ported himself by his labors, and is now compelled to apply for relief by reason of his further de­bilitated state of health. He further states that his honor­able dis­charge which he received from the commander-in-chief he has lost sometime ago in Vir­ginia. That he knows of no per­son in this country by whom he could prove his service and that having served faithfully and honorably more than nine months, the period requisite to be placed on the pension list, at one continued time he hopes to re­ceive the benefit of the act passed for the re­lief of the Soldiers of the Revolution whose case is compre­hended by such act.

Sworn to & subscribed in open Court the day and date above.

P. D. Mitchel, Clk William “X” Going
By W. A. Mitchell, his deputy”

A pension of $8 per month was granted to him in Washing­ton, D. C. July 16, 1819:

“Pension No. 12757: East Tennessee

William Goings of Hawkins County in the state of Ten­nessee who was private in the regi­ment com­manded by Colonel Dixon of the Virginia line, for the term of the War. Inscribed on the Roll of East Ten­nessee at the rate of Eight Dollars per month, to com­mence on the 16 of July 1819 and sent to D. Alexan­der, Esq. Agt, Rogersville, Tennessee.”

Apparently a review board sought additional information about his financial status in the following year, and William Going had to return to the Rogersville, Tennessee court­house and file an amendment to his earlier affidavit, giving an in­ventory of his property and the number of people living in his household:

“On this 29th day of August 1820 personally appeared in open Court, being a court of record in the County of Hawkins in the state of Tennessee, William Going, aged about 56 years [57?], resident of said county of Hawkins and who being first duly sworn according to law did on his oath declare that he served in the revo­lutionary war as follows: Enlisted in Cap­tain Dixon’s Company, First Regiment, Virginia Line, that he has received a pension cer­tificate, now in his possession, November 12, 1819, that his first declaration was made out in said County Court of Hawkins County about the 6th day of May 1819, and I do solemnly swear that I was a resident citi­zen of the United States on the 18th day of March 1818 and that I have not since that time by Gift, Sale or in any manner dis­posed of my property or any part thereof with intent thereby to diminish it or to bring myself within the provi­sions of an Act of Congress entitled An Act to Provide for certain per­sons engaged in the land and naval service of the United States during the Revolu­tionary War passed the 18th of March 1818 and that I have not given to any person in trust for me any prop­erty or securities, con­tracts or notes due to me nor have I any income other than what is contained in the sched­ule herein assessed and by me subscribed, viz: four hogs, 1 pot & one oven, 1 old chair, 1 axe, 1 hoe, four forks, four knives, 2 tin plates. I am by occupa­tion a daily la­borer or farmer, but am frail and not able to support my­self and family which is composed of the following per­sons, viz: my wife aged about 48 years, 1 boy 11 years old, 1 girl 10 years, 1 girl aged 5 years and one boy aged two years and that I stand in great need of the assistance of my country for support. Sworn to & subscribed in open court.
William [X] Going

The Court values the property contained in the fore­going schedule to thirteen dollars and thirty cents.”

William Going wrote his will August 21, 1827 and died two days later. He named sons, “Sheard Going and Andrew Going” and appointed Nicholas Long to be his executor. Witnesses were John King, William Willeford. On December 18, 1847, Elizabeth Long was married to William willeford.

William Goings died in Hawkins County August 23, 1827. Elizabeth Goings, at age 70 filed an application for a widow’s pension June 8, 1839. Her affidavit, in part, read:

“On this 8th day of June in the year 1839 personally ap­peared before me, the undersigned Justice of the Peace for the County of Hawkins, Elizabeth Goings, a resident of this county & state, age Sev­enty Years, who first be­ing duly sworn according to law, doth on her oath state . . . that she is the widow of William Goings who honor­ably served in Captain Tilmon Dixon’s Company in the 1st North Carolina [Virginia] Regi­ment. . . She further declared that she was mar­ried to him in the month of October 1793 in Caswell County, North Carolina and that her said husband died at his residence in Hawkins County on the 23rd day of Au­gust in the year 1827 and since that time she had not been married. . . . She has no record of proof of said marriage.
Elizabeth X Go­ings”

Elizabeth Going was successful in her application and re­ceived the following pension:

“Pension No. W930: Tennessee

Elizabeth Goings, widow of William Goings, decd. who was a pensioner under the Act of 1818 and who died on the 23rd Aug. 1827 of Hawkins County in the State of Tennessee who was a private in the company com­manded by Captain Dixon of the regt. com­manded by Col. Dixon in the N. Car­olina. [Virginia] line for 2 years. Inscribed on the Roll of Tennessee at the rate of 80 Dollars per an­num to commence on the 4th day of March, 1836. Certifi­cate of Pension issued the 10th day of Feby. 1840.”

At least four children were born to William Going and Elizabeth Going.

Sherrod Going born about 1809
[daughter] born about 1810
[daughter] born about 1815
Andrew Going born about 1818

HALIFAX COUNTY, VIRGINIA

In the case of “Aron Going vs. Philip Going” held in 1778, the defendant “confessed judgement £100 pounds current money,” according to Halifax County Court Minute Book 9, page 304.
==O==
Mary Going was married July 25, 1842 to Henry Davis, according to “Halifax County, Virginia Marriages, 1781-1850.”

HALIFAX COUNTY, VIRGINIA

Halifax County was formed from Antrim Parish of Lunen­burg County in 1752.
==O==
Jacob Gowen, in his pension application, stated that he was born in Henry County, Virginia in 1762, how­ever in 1762, that area was in Halifax County. Henry County was created in 1776, and Jacob Gowen en­listed there in the Virginia Conti­nental Line, according to “Genealogical Abstracts of Revolu­tionary War Pension Files” abstracted by Virgil D. White.

“Jacob Goan of Henry County” received compensation of four pounds, six shillings for “150 bundles of fodder which had been taken for public service,” according to Henry County records published in “Virginia Magazine of His­tory and Bi­ography,” Vol. 10. The compensation was au­thorized by the Quartermaster General’s office during or shortly after the Rev­olutionary period. Jacob Gowen later re­ceived a pension, No. S32273. His name appeared in “List of Colonial Sol­diers of Virginia” by H. J. Eck­enrode.

He lived in Kentucky be­tween 1790 and 1820 and then moved to Vincennes, Indiana. On June 7, 1832, he was in Vermillion County, Illinois. From 1826 to 1838, he lived in Lawrence County, Illi­nois, the county where Shadrack Gowin died in 1878.
==O==
William Goings, born 1763, enlisted at Halifax Court House, Virginia for the period of the Revolutionary War. He was mar­ried in October 1793, wife’s name Elizabeth, in Caswell County, North Carolina, adjoin­ing Rockingham on the east. He applied for a pension in 1819 in Hawkins County, Ten­nessee and men­tioned his wife, two sons, ages 11 and 2 and two daughters, ages 10 and 8. He died there August 23, 1847. [See GRF Newsletter, August 1990.]

In 1776, Henry County, Virginia was formed from Pittsylva­nia County. Goin/Going/Gowin individuals appearing in Henry County in­clude; Charles, Clabourn, David, Elizabeth, Jacob, James, John, Josiah, Lit­tleberry “Berry,” Nancy, Si­mon, Su­sanna, Zacheriah, Zedekiah and Zephaniah32,33

John Goan received land in Pittsylvania County in 1770.34 “John Going” took the oath of allegiance Au­gust 30, 1777.35 Why? He received a land grant on March 1, 1784 of 374 acres on both sides of Black­berry Creek, adjoining his own land and that of John Witt. “John Gowin” patented an addi­tional 79 acres on Blackberry Creek April 16, 1788. In 1795 he pur­chased land from Bartlett Washington. “John Going” was granted 153 acres on both sides of Little Blackberry Creek.36 Henry County Will Book 2, page 37 records the will of John Going, Sr, proved in 1801. Heirs named were Clabourn, Eliz­abeth, John, Nancy, Josiah, Littleberry, Su­sanna, Simeon, Zedekiah and Zacheriah.37 Where did these seven sons live?

David Goan received land in Pittsylvania County in 1770.34 On March 30, 1789, “David Gowin” was granted 94 acres on Spoon Creek, adjoining the land of John Ward and 185 acres on the south side of Spoon Creek, “adjoining Collier.”36 [David Smith Goins was supposedly in Grayson County, Vir­ginia at this time.]

From Gowen Manuscript:  http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~gowenrf/Gowenms144.htm

HALIFAX COUNTY, VIRGINIA–B

David Goins was born about 1730, perhaps in Brunswick County, Virginia, parents unknown. Lunenburg County was formed from Brunswick County in 1746, and David Goins is regarded as a resident of the new county. Six years later Halifax County was formed from Brunswick County in 1752, and David Goins appeared in the new county. Henry County was formed in 1777, and David Goins again had a new county of residence.

“David Gowing and John Gowing” signed the oath of allegiance about 1777 in Henry County, according to “History of Henry County, Virginia” by Judith Parks America Hill. “John Going” took the oath of allegiance August 30, 1777 before Edmund Lyne, Esq, according to “Virginia Magazine of History and Biography,” Vol. 9.

In 1777, John Going was granted permission to build a water grist mill on Blackberry Creek, according to Henry County Court Minutes Book 1, page 5

David Going was granted permission in 1778 to build a water grist mill on Spoon Creek, according to Henry County Court Minutes, Book 2, page 15.

Jack Harold Goins noted that “David Gowing” was recorded in the 1782 tax list with a household of four. Adjoining him was Edward Henderson with a household of five. “David Gowing” removed to a new location, and Edward Henderson, suggested as a son-in-law accompanied him.

In 1783 and 1784 in Henry County, David Goins paid tax for himself and for “William Goins, Charles Goins and Jacob Goins,” regarded as his sons.

In the 1785 Henry County tax list of J. W. P. Martin the following appeared in a cluster: Sally Smith, nine in her household; Shadrack Going, 10 in his household; John Going, four in his household; Edward Henderson, five in his household and David Going, four in his household.

Patrick County, Virginia was formed from Henry County in 1790 and David Goins found himself in the new county.

“David Going and Zaph[aniah] Going” signed a petition opposing higher taxes in Henry County. “David Goin,” a white male, paid tax on “one horse” in Halifax County in 1800.

It is believed that David Goins died shortly after the turn of the century. Children born to him are believed to include:

[daughter] born about 1758
William Goins born about 1760
Jacob Goins born in 1762
Charles Gowens born in 1763

Edward Henderson is believed to have married a daughter who was born to David Goins about 1758. In 1782 Edward Henderson was reported in the tax list as the head of a household of five people in a location adjoining David Goins. When David Goins moved, Edward Henderson accompanied him. In 1785 Edward Henderson was listed in the Halifax County tax list with a household of five members.

The name “Henderson” was repeated for several generations in the families of the descendants of David Goins.

William Goins, regarded as a son of David Goins, was born about 1760, probably in Halifax County. David Goins paid a tax for him in the years 1783 and 1784.

William Goings, born 1763, enlisted at Halifax Court House, Virginia for the period of the Revolutionary War. He was married in October 1793, wife’s name Elizabeth, in Caswell County, North Carolina, adjoining Rockingham on the east. He applied for a pension in 1819 in Hawkins County, Tennessee and mentioned his wife, two sons, ages 11 and 2 and two daughters, ages 10 and 8. He died there August 23, 1847. [See GRF Newsletter, August 1990.] Names of children born to William Goings and Elizabeth Goings are unknown.

Jacob Goins, regarded as a son of David Goins, was born in 1762, according to his Revolutionary War pension application. David Goins paid taxes for him in the years of 1783 and 1784 in Henry County.

“Jacob Gowen,” in his pension application, stated that he was born in, Virginia in 1762, however in 1762, that area was in Halifax County. Henry County was created in 1776, and “Jacob Gowen” enlisted there in the Virginia Continental Line, according to “Genealogical Abstracts of Revolutionary War Pension Files” abstracted by Virgil D. White.

“Jacob Goan of Henry County” received compensation of four pounds, six shillings for “150 bundles of fodder which had been taken for public service,” according to Henry County records published in “Virginia Magazine of History and Bi­ography,” Vol. 10. The compensation was authorized by the Quartermaster General’s office during or shortly after the Rev­olutionary period. Jacob Gowen later received a pension, No. S32273. His name appeared in “List of Colonial Soldiers of Virginia” by H. J. Eckenrode.

“Jacob Going” was a taxpayer in Patrick County, Virginia in 1800.

He lived in Kentucky between 1790 and 1820 and then moved to Vincennes, Indiana. On June 7, 1832, he was in Vermillion County, Illinois. From 1826 to 1838, he lived in Lawrence County, Illinois, the county where Shadrack Gowin died in 1878.

“An earlier Jacob Gowen served as a private in Capt. Andrew Lewis’ Virginia infantry company during the French & Indian War in 1754, according to “Virginia Magazine of History and Biography,” Vol. 1. He was shown as “Jacob Going” en­titled to “£2:0:8” in the payroll records of Capt. Robert Stobo’s company from May 29 to July 29, 1754. During July, August and September of that year he was stationed in Augusta County on the frontier.

On July 9, 1754, just after the Battle of the Great Meadows, he appeared as “Jacob Gowing” on the roster of Capt. Stobo’s company under the command of Col. George Washington. For his service he received bounty money endorsed by Col. Wash­ington, according to “Washington Manuscripts,” Folios 11, 95, 111 and 112

Charles Gowens, regarded as a son of David Goins, was born in 1763, according to his Revolutionary War pension application. David Goins paid taxes for him in Henry County in 1783 and 1784.

Charles Gowens, a Revolutionary War soldier from Virginia saw much of the panorama of America unfold during his life­time. He died at the age of 106, according to the research of Anna Brooks Dobbin Gowens, a family researcher. She wrote in a letter May 1, 1952 from Del Rio, Texas, “Charles Gowens became an expert marksman during the war and retained this proficiency throughout his lifetime. At the age of 102, in an exhibition, he brought down a squirrel from the top of a tall tree with his old muzzle-loader.”

Henry [Halifax] County was the earliest documented place of residence for Charles Gowens. Henry County was formed in 1776 with land from Pittsylvania County. Pittsylvania County was formed in 1766 with land from Halifax County. Halifax County was formed in 1752 with land from Lunenburg County. Lunenburg County was formed in 1746 with land from Brunswick County. Brunswick County was formed in 1720 with land from Prince George County, Isle of Wight County and Surry County. Prince George County was formed in 1702 with land from Charles City County, an original shire. The ancestors of Charles Gowens might be found in the records of any of the above counties.

He may have been a kinsman of Ambrose Gowen, a Revolu­tionary patriot of Henry County who sold to the government “four double fortified six-pounders” on March 3, 1776 and “furnished wheat to the Hampton troops” March 18, 1776,” ac­cording to “Virginia Magazine of History and Biography,” Volume 28. Ambrose Gowen is identified as the son of William Gowen and Catherine Gowen of Stafford County, Vir­ginia. He was a brother of William Gowen who was killed by Indians in 1790 in Davidson County, Tennessee.

The pension application of Charles Gowens was published in “Abstracts of Pension Papers Pertaining to Soldiers of the Revolutionary War, War of 1812 and Indian Wars, Gallatin County, Kentucky:”

“Charles Gowans, Va. S31,072, Bounty Land Warrant No. 26106-160-55

On October 22, 1833 in Gallatin County, Kentucky, the said pensioner at the age of 70 years appeared in open court and stated that on September 1, 1779 in Henry County, Virginia he had first volunteered to serve in the capacity of a private soldier for a tour of six months du­ration in the company under the command of Capt. Jonathan Hanley and Lt. Edward Tatum.

He stated that they had first marched to the state of South Carolina and that there they were attached to the regiment under the command of Col. Monroe and they then marched to 96 near Charleston and they then marched to guard the prisoners from 96 to Williamsburg and there and then the said pensioner was honorably discharged.

Then again in the month of May 1781 the said pensioner again volunteered to serve in the capacity of a private soldier for a tour of 3 months duration to serve in the company under the command of Capt. Shelton and they then rendezvoused at Russell Creek Meeting House in Henry County, Virginia and they then marched up the Dan River and they were also often at the Hollow on the river. The said pensioner Charles Gowens was born in Henry County, Virginia in 1763 and came to Kentucky in 1797.

Then in the year 1815 the said pensioner removed from Harrison County, Kentucky to Gallatin County, Ken­tucky. In all his tours of duty the said pensioner had volunteered his services. The said pensioner stated and swore that he had seen Capt. Small, Col. Monroe and Col. Martin and that he had been honorably discharged at Williamsburg.
==O==
The affidavit of Benjamin Miller, a clergyman and James Furnish, [son-in-law of Charles Gowens] was also given. They stated that at one time and in the said county and state they had been well acquainted with the said pensioner, and the said deponents also stated that in the neighborhood in which the said pensioner resided he was reputed to have served in the Revolutionary War on the side of the United States.
==O==
April 7, 1855, in Gallatin County, Kentucky, the said pensioner at the age of 93 years appeared in open court again and stated that he had served in the capacity of a private in the company under the command of Capt Hamby and in the regiment under the command of Col Monroe. He stated that he had volunteered on Septem­ber 1, 1779 in Henry County, Virginia for a tour of six months duration and that he had been honorably dis­charged at Petersburg, Virginia. He applied for the Bounty Land that was due him and he also appointed Henry J. Abbott of Warsaw, Kentucky to be his attor­ney.
==O==
The affidavit of David Story and White Hawkins was also given, etc. They stated that the said pensioner had signed the foregoing declaration in their presence, and they also swore that Charles Gowens was the identical person that he claimed himself to be.

The said pensioner Charles Gowens was on the Ken­tucky roll of pensions at the rate of $30 per annum, and his certificate of pension for that amount was issued 12-14-1?, and it was sent to the Hon. R. M. Johnson, House of Representatives.”

Charles Gowens lived through a time period that embraced the turbulent events from the Revolutionary War through the Civil War. His longevity, remarkable as it is, was eclipsed by that of his wife who lived to be 110, according to descendants.

He was married about 1785 probably in Henry County to Eliz­abeth “Betsy” Blair, daughter of James Blair. She was born in 1770 in Maryland, according to Greg A. Bennett, a descendant. Charles Gowens stated in his pension application that they came to Kentucky in 1797. They may have lived in Kentucky briefly at that time or they may have simply passed through Cumberland Gap enroute to Claiborne County, Tennessee. Donna V. Gowin Johnston discovered that there they affiliated with Big Springs Baptist Church whose minutes make refer­ences to them.

The name of “Charles Gowen” appeared in an “Act Concerning Invalid Pensioners:”

“Be it enacted by the Senate and House of Representatives of the United States of American in congress assembled, That the Secretary of War be, and is hereby directed to place the following named persons whose claims have been transmitted to Congress, pursuant to a law passed the tenth of April, One Thousand Eight Hundred and Six on the pension list of invalid pensioners of the United States, according to the rates, and to commence at the time herein mentioned, that is to say:

Charles Gowen, at the rate of two dollars and fifty cents per month to commence on the thirty-first day of October, one thousand eight hundred and six.”

It is believed that they removed around the turn of the century to Claiborne County, perhaps to join other members of the family. The minutes of the Big Springs church recorded the names of over 100 members and noted its dealings with each of them. Sally Lane, Seleta Lane and Nancy Harper in May 1805 were “reprimanded for cutting their hair.”

Mentioned in the July 1800 minutes were “James Going, ——- Going, Elizabeth Going and Hannah Going”

Gowan Morgan was mentioned in the minutes of September 1, 1802:

“September the 1st Saturday 1802. Church met at Rob Camp meeting house and after worship proceeded to open a door for the reception of members and received by experience Obediah Harrison, Nancy Trent, Gowan Morgan, Jean Stephens, Sarah Medlock”

John Goin was mentioned in the minutes of October 1, 1802:

“October the 1st Saturday 1802. Church Met at Rob Camp and after worship proceeded to business. 1st opened a door for the reception of members and re-ceived by experience Sarah Morgan, John Morgan, Fanny Bryant, ___Morgan, James Hendricks, John Goin, John Stroud.”

The minutes recorded June 2, 1804:

“Opened a door for the reception of members and re-ceived Charles Going and Catherine Mason by letter.” Later in that month, the minutes reported, “And after divine service, opened a door for the reception of mem-bers and received the following members by letter: Jane Going, Elizabeth Going, Hannah Going, Edward Daniel, Ann Daniel, Rachel Mase, William Mase and Rachel Moody.”

The minutes of September 1804 included a “Report from Hol­ston, James Going excommunicated for the denying of a bar­gain that he had once told to Bro. David Davis, between him and John Braund.

Recorded in the minutes of March 1805 was the notation “Charles Going with William Weaver and John Evans to attend the Holston [meeting] on the 3rd Saturday in March.”

In the May 1805 minutes appeared the notation, “Thomas Hill, Charlie Going and Jesse Dodson appointed to attend at the Bud Spring.”

The minutes of August 1805 reveal that “Charles Going to at­tend at Holston the 3rd Saturday in August.” Appearing in the minutes for September 1805 was “Report from Holston Blue Springs received members dismissed by letter, namely, Edward Dannel, Ann Dannel, Jesse & Patty Johnson, Elizabeth Going, Hannah Going and Rachel Moody.”

The minutes for November 1807 state that “Bro. James Going came forward and complained that he was unjustly delt with by the force of evidence. The Church agreed to examine the matter and refer it to next meeting. The January 1808 minutes recorded, “The reference relative to James Going throwed out of meeting.”

“Elizabeth Going was received by experience, according to the October 1810 minutes. “Charles and Elizabeth Going dis­missed by letter” was recorded in the April 1812 minutes.

Charles Gowens apparently removed at this time, probably to Harrison County, Kentucky where a daughter was married February 16, 1814.

James Going and Elizabeth Going apparently remained in [or returned to] Claiborne County. The minutes in September 1824 state that “James Goings was received by recantation. They were “dismissed by letter” in October 1827.

In 1815, Charles Gowens removed to Gallatin County, Ken­tucky, according to his pension statement. He was enumerated there in 1830 as the head of a household, page 182:

“Goin, Charles white male 60-70
white female 50-60
white male 20-30
white male 10-15
white female 80-90”

The octogenarian in the household is possibly the mother of Charles Gowens or Elizabeth “Betsy” Blair Gowens. Ad­joining the household, page 182, was that of “Garrott Goin,” a son.

The family of George Goins, unidentified was enumerated in 1830 in Gallatin County near the residence of Charles Gowens, “above the Kentucky River,” page 180:

“Goins, George white male 30-40
white female 20-30
white male 10-15
white female 10-15
white female 0-5
white female 0-5”

He was the only individual named “George” in the 1830 census of Kentucky whose surname was of interest to Gowen chroni­clers.

In 1833 Charles Gowens received a pension as a Revolutionary soldier. He was pensioned on Certificate 25-242 issued under the act of June 7, 1832. He continued in Gallatin County June 1, 1840 when he was listed there in the “U.S. Census of Pen­sioners.” In another compilation of pensioners he was shown as “Charles Goins, born in 1769.”

Carl R. Bogardus, Sr, president of Gallatin County Historical Society made a study of Gallatin County Revolutionary sol­diers. It was supplemented and edited in 1994 by Doris Shell Gill. Their report read:.

“Listed herein are all the Revolutionary War soldiers and War of 1812 Militiamen who could be located in the official records and elsewhere, who had a Gallatin County connection. Many of these individuals actually served in the Continental Line and participated in many battles. Others saw active service in militia units, such as those who were involved in the action at the Battle of Blue Licks [said to have been the last battle of the Rev-olution]. Jesse Peak [1764‑1824], one of the survivors of the Battle of Blue Licks, eventually settled in Gallatin County. Others served under Gen. George Rogers Clark in his campaigns against the British and Indians north of the Ohio River.

These are people who lived at one time or another in the original county of Gallatin, which had been established in 1798, and which included all of present day Gallatin and Carroll Counties, part of Owen County and part of Trimble County; even a part of Boone County, Ken­tucky. Not all of those listed remained in Gallatin County. Some moved on to other parts of the country, but many lived and died here where most all of them rest in un­marked graves.

Many of these soldiers applied for and received pensions, but some were refused pensions, probably because of insufficient evidence of service. But those soldiers who were denied pen­sions are also listed here because they claimed to have served. Some of these may have been what is called a “Patriot” by the SAR and DAR; i.e. they furnished food, supplies and services to the armies, but were not participants in actual fighting. It could also mean that they lived on the frontier during those per­ilous times, where they were subjected to attack by the British and In­dians, and would also be classified as “Patriots”. This category included women, who in those dangerous days, were fully as much patriots as the men who fought in the militia units and the Continental Line. A prime example of a woman who provided patriotic service is the redoubtable Polly Hawkins Craig who led the heroic “Waterbearers” at Bryan Station in 1782.

By an Act of Congress March 18, 1818, as shown in the Ken­tucky Pension Roll, the Report of the Secretary of War, 1835, the following 13 men were pensioned in Gallatin County:

Name Age State
Henry Carter 83 Virginia
James Coghill 76 Virginia
David Driskell 71 North Carolina
Henry Easton 95 Pennsylvania.
Job Garvey 60 Virginia
Thomas Hardin 74 Virginia
Thomas Lester 77 Virginia
Darby McGannon 69 Virginia
Alexander McDowell 79 Pennsylvania
William McIntire 79 Virginia
David Severn 74 Washington Life Guards
John Short 74 Virginia
Cyrus Tubbs 74 Connecticut

All of the above were within the boundaries of old Gal­latin County. [The first territory to be cut off from the parent county was the northern half of Owen County in 1819.]

In this same 1835 report, there were three Gallatin Men who were “Invalid Pensioners,” meaning disabled while in service. They were:

Andrew Green who had served in Gen. Josiah Harmar’s disas­trous campaign in Ohio in 1790 and who was placed on the pen­sion roll January 18, 1823 with pay­ments of $96 annually to start from October 10, 1823.

Robert McMickle who was disabled while serving in the Ken­tucky Militia and was placed on the pension roll June 23, 1821 with payments to start from February 6, 1821. In 1833 his pay­ments were increased to $64 per year.

John Payne, Jr. [1795‑1887] who at the age of 17 had enlisted for service in the War of 1812 under his uncle, Col. Richard M. Johnson. But this pension, one of the earliest granted by the United States, was for injuries re­ceived July 4, 1814 [April 1, 1820?] while a cadet at West Point when the charge in a can-non ignited prematurely, tearing off his right arm and blinding his right eye. Under the Act of 1818, he was granted a pension of $96 annually, retroactive to April 25,1820.

By another Act of Congress, passed May 15, 1820, only one vet­eran from Gallatin County was listed with offi­cers who were men of higher rank than private or corpo­ral, as having received benefits, and that was William Thompson of Virginia who was a Dragoon. He was placed on the pension roll May 23,1829 with pay of $100 annually to begin March 3,1826.

Then by another act of Congress June 7, 1832, the following 14 names were added to the Pension Roll for Gallatin County: [Note: None of these names are on the above 1818 list, they probably having all died or moved out of the county. It is known that Darby McGannon moved to Jennings County, Indiana where he entered government land in 1821.

Name Age State
Benjamin Barnes 69 Virginia
Shadrach Barnes 70 Virginia
Samuel D. Davis 74 Maryland
Jarret Dement 74 Pennsylvania
John Dean 72 Pennsylvania
Charles Gowens 71 Virginia
Thomas Hawes 91 Virginia
Amos V. Matthews 75 Virginia
William McDowell 73 Virginia
Thomas Noel 72 Virginia
Abijah North 75 Connecticut
Robert Scott 70 Virginia
William Thompson, Sr. 74 New Jersey
John Wells 70 North Carolina

[Note: The above men in 1832 were in present‑day Gallatin, Carroll and the eastern part of Trimble Counties. Trimble County was created in 1837, and in 1838 Car­roll was formed from Gallatin and part of Trimble. Also in 1837, a part of Boone County was added to Gallatin, leaving it much the same as we see it today.]

The first U. S. Population Census to recognize and list pension­ers was that of 1840, which listed only eight names for Gallatin County. They were:

Name Age
John Birks 67 [War of 1812]
Abijah North 80
James Furnish 74
John Waters 55 [War of 1812]
Charles Gowens 71
Jeremiah Haydon, Sr. 78
William Thompson 77″

Charles Gowens was enumerated as the head of a household in the 1840 census of Gallatin County, page 19:

“Goins, Charles white male 70-80
white female 60-70”

Charles Gowens was shown as “age 71, military pensioner.” Both were shown as illiterate.

Nearby was enumerated in the 1840 census, page 23, “Charles Goins,” also age 71. This individual was shown as “free col­ored, [Melungeon?] insane and idiot, at private charge.”

“Elizabeth Goins,” regarded as a daughter-in-law, was also shown as the head of a household in the 1840 census of Gallatin County, also page 19:

“Goins, Elizabeth white female 30-40
white male 10-15
white female 10-15
white male 10-15
white female 5-10
white male 5-10”

William Goins, also unidentified, appeared as the head of a household in the 1840 census of Gallatin County, page 4:

“Goins, William white male 20-30
white female 20-30
white male 5-10
white female 0-5
white male 0-5”

Charles Gowens wrote his will June 18, 1847 in Gallatin County. A great-great grandson, Nor­man Bass Gowens of Waco, Texas retained the original copy of the will in 1975. It read:

“I, Charles Goens of Gallatin County in the State of Ken­tucky, being sensible from my advanced age and in­creasing infirmities that the close of my mortal life draws near and being of sound mind and disposing memory, do make and pub­lish this, my last will and tes­tament, hereby re­voking any and all wills and testaments by me hereto­fore made.

First, as I am not indebted to any one, in a pecu­niary man­ner, I shall give my executors no trou­ble on that sub­ject.

Second, as my wife, Betsey and myself have been living for a considerable time past with our son, James Goens, and as I expect to remain with him during my life and de­sire him to take care of and provide for us both while we live, I give and be­queath to my said son, James Goens the farm or tract of land in said county of Gal­latin, near Providence meeting house, being the same whereon I have lived for many years past, con­taining about 107 acres, be the same more or less, with all the appurte­nances thereof to be his and his heirs forever, upon the conditions as forestated, that the said James shall main­tain and comfortably provide for myself and my wife during our natural lives.

Third to my son, John Goens; my son, Garrett Goens, my daughter, Lucinda Rose; my daughter, Polly Bales; my daughter, Nancy Furnish; my daughter, Hannah Rose and my daughter, Sally Kidwell, I give and be­queath each the sum of two dollars to be paid out of my estate.

Lastly, I appoint my said son, James Goens as executor of this, my last will and testament, confidently believing that should my wife, his mother, survive me, that he will not suffer her to want during her life.

In witness whereof I have hereunto set my hand and seal this eighteenth day of June AD 1847.

Charles [X] Goens

Witnesses: K. I. Abbott, Benjamin Litter”

Charles Gowens was enumerated in the 1850 census of Gallatin County, page 176 as the head of Household No. 332-332:

“Goens, Charles 87, born in VA, white, laborer
Elizabeth 80, born in MD, white
Goens, James S. 10, born in KY, white”

In adjoining locations were the households of James Blair Gowens, No. 331-331 and Truman Kidwell, No. 333-333.

“Elizabeth Goens,” perhaps a daughter-in-law, was enumerated August 16, 1850 as the head of Household 394-395 in the fed­eral census of Gallatin County, page 180:

“Goens, Elizabeth 54, born in KY, illiterate
John 27, born in KY, illiterate, laborer
Galway* 20, born in KY, illiterate, laborer
Sally 15, born in KY”
*Galloway, a family name

Charles Gowens may have had periods of non compus mentis at times, and at the time of the 1850 census may not have been living at home.

In an affidavit made July 2, 1853 “Charles Goins, a citi­zen of Gallatin County, aged 86, states that he is well acquainted with Lucinda Rose, that she is his daughter, that she mar­ried Charles Rose.” On September 20, 1854 Charles Gowens deeded to Lu­cinda Gowens Rose 127.5 acres of land on Craig’s Creek “for $1 and the love and affection of my daugh­ter,” according to Gallatin County Deed Book O, page 139.

In 1855, at “age 92,” Charles Gowens made appli­cation for a land grant and received Bounty Land Warrant No. 26-106 for 160 acres under the Pen­sion Act of 1855. On April 7, 1855, at age 93, he gave his power of attorney to Henry J. Abbett of Warsaw, Kentucky

He lived to be 102 years old, dying in Kentucky in 1865, and Elizabeth “Betsy” Blair Gowens survived to 110 years old, ac­cording to Sylvester Bernard Gowens, a great-grandson of Lubbock, Texas. “Texas Society DAR Register of Revolutionary Ancestors” gives the date of his death as 1857 in Gal­latin County.

Children born to Charles Gowens and Elizabeth “Betsy” Blair Gowens include:

Galloway Gowens born about 1787
Lucinda Gowens born about 1788
Mary Ann “Polly” Gowens born about 1790
Nancy Gowens born about 1793
Sarah “Sally” Gowens born about 1794
Hannah Gowens born about 1796
John A. Gowens born about 1800
George Washington Gowens born June 2, 1802
Garrett Gowens born about 1805
James Blair Gowens born June 9, 1810

Galloway Gowens, son of Charles Gowens and Elizabeth “Betsy” Blair Gowens, was born in Virginia about 1787, ac­cording to Greg A. Bennett, family researcher. “Galloway Going” was married to Betsy Rose July 27, 1813, according to “Harrison County, Kentucky Marriages, 1794-1833.” Two other marriages between Gowens-Rose siblings were performed there in the early years of that decade. Galloway Gowens was remarried to Lucinda Goins June 17, 1862 in Gallatin County. Galloway Gowens died in Gallatin County in 1864. Children born to Galloway Gowens, Betsy Rose Gowens and Lucinda Goins Gowens are unknown.

Lucinda Gowens, daughter of Charles Gowens and Elizabeth “Betsy” Blair Gowens, was born about 1788, probably in Henry County. “Lucinda Goings” was married October 16, 1812 to Charles Rose in Harrison County, Kentucky as his second wife, according to a letter written December 3, 1989 by Eddy Alderson, a fifth-generation grandson of Linton, Indiana. She was married February 16, 1814 to Charles Rose, according to “Harrison County, Kentucky Marriages, 1794-1833.” William Henry Rose, a son of Charles Rose and Ursley Williamson Rose, his first wife, was mar­ried February 16, 1814 to “Hannah Goins,” sister of Lucinda Gowens.

Mary Ann “Polly” Gowens, daughter of Charles Gowens and Elizabeth “Betsy” Blair Gowens, was born about 1790, probably in Henry County, Virginia. Bernice Bayles Hazlett, a descendant, shows the name of her ancestor as “Mary Ann Goin.”

“Mary Goings” was married December 13, 1810 to Russell Bailes, according to “Harrison County, Kentucky Marriages, 1794-1833.” She was married December 30, 1810 in Harrison County, Kentucky to Russell Bales, according to Jeffery Alan Duvall, a descendant of Indianapolis, Indiana. Russell Bales was born about 1786 in Virginia. Mary “Polly” Gowens Bales was mentioned in the will of her father written June 18, 1847 as the recipient of $2.” Russell Bales died about 1858. On his War of 1812 pension papers, his widow was identified as “Mary Ann Gains.”

Enumerated in the 1850 census of Gallatin County, Isaiah Bales appeared as the head of Household 317-317:

“Bales, Isaiah 22, born in KY
Sarah 20, born in KY
Goens, Alfred 29, born in KY, cooper
John T. 22, born in KY, cooper”

Carol Caspur wrote November 28, 2000:

“Isaiah Bales [my gg-grandfather] and Sarah Goins are elusive. Marriage EntryRecord which was extracted from Gallatin County Kentucky Marriage records also list Sarah E. Goens/Goins death date as 1856. I found no evidence that they lived in Grayson County. Their son, Virgil Bales lived there. He was married to Louisa Hack. He was married five times. I am searching for information on Annie Lile, his fourth wife [my gg-grandmother.] When Virgil Bales married Louisa Hack the spelling was changed to Bailes.”

Children born to Russell Bales and Mary Ann “Polly” Gowens Bales include:

Charles Bales born in 1811

Charles Bales, son of Russell Bales and Mary Ann “Polly” Gowens Bales and namesake of his grandfather, was born in 1811 in Harrison County. He was married in Gallatin County to Maria Foley June 10, 1831. She was born in 1809 to Bayliss Foley and Mildred Breeden Foley, according to the research of Jeffery Alan Duvall. Charles Bales died in 1839, and Maria Foley Bales was remarried October 15, 1841 to James A. Ellis who was born about 1783 in Virginia.

Children born to Charles Bales and Maria Foley Bales include:

Mary Ann Bales born about 1831
David Bales born June 11, 1833
Jane “Jennetta” Bales born about 1835
William Russell Bales born about 1837

Children born to James A. Ellis and Maria Foley Bales Ellis in­clude:

Sarah Ellis born about 1842
Ellen Jane Ellis born about 1844
John Ellis born about 1846
Jesse Ellis born about 1849
James Ellis born about 1850

David Bales, son of Charles Bales and Maria Foley Bales, was born June 11, 1833 in Gallatin County. He was described with a dark complexion, dark eyes, black hair, six feet tall. He was married about 1854 to Lavinia Hamilton. She was born Febru­ary 4, 1833 in Gallatin County to Maurice Hamilton and Eliza­beth Ellis Hamilton, natives of Virginia.

He enlisted October 28, 1861 during the Civil War in Eigh­teenth Kentucky Infantry Regiment, Co. E, U.S.A. and served under Gen. William Tecumseh Sherman in his march across Georgia to the sea. He was discharged at Louisville, Kentucky July 18, 1865. He removed to Owen County, Kentucky about 1870. Lavinia Hamilton Bales died October 30, 1911, and David Bales died December 27, 1925.

Children born to them include:

Alice Elizabeth Bales born November 11, 1855
Milton David Bales born November 2, 1857
Franklin Bales born July 19, 1859
Charles Byron Bales born February 22, 1861
Sherman Bales born May 11, 1867

Alice Elizabeth Bales, daughter of David Bales and Lavinia Hamilton Bales, was born November 11, 1855. She was mar­ried about 1875 to James K. Morgan who was born in 1849 to Elijah Morgan and Jane Simpson Morgan. He died September 11 1924 in Carroll County, Kentucky, and she died there April 23, 1939.

Children born to James K. Morgan and Alice Elizabeth Bales Morgan include:

Eugene Forrest Morgan born December 12, 1877

Eugene Forrest Morgan, son of James K. Morgan and Alice Elizabeth Bales Morgan, was born December 12, 1877 in Mar­ion County, Indiana. He was married April 7, 1907 in Trimble County, Kentucky to Isabelle McClure. She was born there June 28, 1888 to James S. McClure and Laura Belle Taylor McClure. Eugene Forrest Morgan died February 19, 1954 in Carroll County, and she died February 21, 1974 in Milan, Indi­ana.

Children born to them include:

Alice Laura Morgan born about 1909
Zeba Augusta Morgan born about 1912
James Walton Morgan born August 31, 1915
Mary Addie Morgan born about 1918
Eugene Henry Morgan [twin] born about 1922
Forest Henry Morgan [twin] born about 1922

James Walton Morgan, son of Eugene Forrest Morgan and Is­abelle McClure Morgan, was born August 31, 1915 in Carroll County. He was married September 12, 1938 to Marguerite Fuller in Owen County. She was born October 28, 1915 in Carroll County to John P. Fuller and Leola Kemper Fuller.

James Walton Morgan was employed as a supervisor at Jeffer­son Proving Grounds, Jefferson, Indiana for the U.S. Army.

Children born to them include:

Wanda Jean Morgan born July 21, 1940
Susan Lee Morgan born October 21, 1952

Wanda Jean Morgan, daughter of James Walton Morgan and Marguerite Fuller Morgan, was born July 21, 1940 in Carroll County. She was married July 27, 1958 in Switzerland County, Indiana to William Edward Duvall, son of William Wesley Du­vall and Genola Gullion Duvall. He was born March 24, 1937 in Switzerland County, Indiana. Wanda Jean Morgan Duvall was a school social worker in the Indianapolis Public School System

Children born to them include:

Jeffery Alan Duvall born December 21, 1959
Lesa Carol Duval born April 12, 1962
Laura Lee Duval born September 16, 1966

Jeffery Alan Duvall, son of William Edward Duvall and Wanda Jean Morgan Duvall, was born December 21, 1959 in Madison, Indiana. He was graduated about 1981 with a B.A. degree in English history and a minor in Asian studies from Earlham College. He received a M.A. degree in United States history from Indiana University about 1983.

In 1995 he, a Foundation member, lived in Indianapolis where he was active in the research of the Gowens family. Pro­fessionally he worked as a research associate at Polis Research Center at Indiana University-Purdue University in Indianapolis.

Lesa Carol Duvall, daughter of William Edward Duvall and Wanda Jean Morgan Duvall, was born April 12, 1962 in Madi­son. She was graduated from Ball State University with a B.A. degree in music education. She was graduated from Indiana University of Indianapolis with a doctorate in jurisprudence. She was married about 1981 to Craig William Fall. She be­came an attorney.

Children born to them include:

Brandon Taylor Fall born July 1, 1983
Andrew William Fall born July 8, 1989

Laura Lee Duvall, daughter of William Edward Duvall and Wanda Jean Morgan Duvall, was born September 16, 1966 in Madison. She was graduated with a B.A. degree in education from Indiana University. She was married about 1989 to Tim­othy Lee Whitson. She became an actress, and, in 1995 was a performer and troup manager of Indianapolis Civic Theatre’s children’s theatre group.

Susan Lee Morgan, daughter of James Walton Morgan and Marguerite Fuller Morgan, was born in Madison October 21, 1952. She was married in 1971 to Kelly Warren Fisher of Lake Charles, Louisiana. They were divorced in 1994.

Children born to them include:

Adrienne Lee Fisher born in October 1972
Avery Luke Fisher born in November 1976

Nancy Gowens, daughter of Charles Gowens and Elizabeth “Betsy” Blair Gowens, was born about 1793, probably in Henry County. “Nancy Goins” was married October 1, 1820 in Warsaw, Kentucky in Gallatin County to James Furnish, a man 30 years her senior, according to his Revolutionary War pension application. Rev. William Thompson, another Revolutionary soldier, performed the wedding ceremony.

James Furnish was born in Orange County, Virginia May 14, 1763. On September 1, 1780, at age 17, he enlisted in Capt. Benjamin Johnson’s Company which served under the com­mand of the French General LaFayette. He had arrived in Kentucky by 1784, the first of our Furnish brothers to migrate to the new state. He appeared on the Bourbon County, Ken­tucky tax lists from 1788 to 1793. By 1795 he was recorded in Harrison County and continued there until about 1815. “James Furnace” was married there on a bond dated July 11, 1795 to Asinor Wells.

They were members of Baptist Church of Jesus Christ at Mill Creek in 1801. They sold 91 acres in Harrison County March 5, 1813, according to deed records. They applied for letters of dismission which were issued January 18, 1815, apparently in connection with a change of residence.

On January 14, 1833, James Furnish applied for a Revolutionary pension, but apparently he did not receive it.

James Furnish was enumerated as the head of Household 310-310 in the 1850 census of Gallatin County:

“Furnish, James 75, born in VA, farmer
Nancy 50, born in KY
James 30, born in KY
Noah 24, born in KY
Samuel 22, born in KY
Henry 14, born in KY
Eliza 13, born in KY
Lucy 10, born in KY
Adams, John 60, born in Ireland”

James Furnish [Jr.] may have been enumerated a second time in the nearby household of Samuel McGinnis, No. 313-313:

“McGinnis, Samuel, 32, born in KY, laborer, $400 real
estate
Lucinda 24, born in KY
Sarah G. 7, born in KY
John A. 5, born in KY
Uriah 2, born in KY
Furnish James 30, born in KY
Rose John 13, born in KY”

James Furnish died in Gallatin County September 29, 1851. Nancy Gowens Furnish, age 54, applied for a widow’s pension March 14, 1853. She was successful, receiving a pension and Bounty Land Warrant 26291-160-55. Like her father, she ap­pointed Henry J. Abbett her attorney.

The pension file of James Furnish contained several documents:

“On January 14, 1833 in Harrison County, Kentucky the said pensioner at the age of 69 years appeared in open court and stated that he was born in Orange County, Virginia May 14, 1763 and that he had entered the ser­vice September 1, 1780 when he was drafted to serve for a tour of three months by Ensign Richard White, Lt. Belfield Cave and in the company under the command of Capt. Benjamin Johnson in the militia of Virginia in the Fifth Regiment under command of Col Holt Richard and in the brigade under the command of Gen. Nelson.

They then joined the Virginia State Troops at Richmond and from there to Casin Point and from there on to Pe­tersburg, Virginia, and they marched back again to Richmond, and the said pensioner was honorably dis­charged in the month of December of said year.

Then again in May of 1781 the said pensioner was drafted to serve for a tour of three months to serve in the company under the command of Capt. Richard Webb, Lt. Smith and Ensign James Coward in the Fourth Regiment of Virginia State Militia under the command of Col. Edmonds. They then joined the army at Rich­mond in Virginia, and then they marched to Raccoon Ford on the Rappahannock River, and there Gen. An­thony Wayne joined them, and they were also under the command of the Marquis de LaFayette, and they then returned to Richmond, Virginia, they then pursued by the British to Jamestown, and from there they then marched to -ossin Hill.

In the month of October of the year 1784 they then re­moved to Kentucky where they had resided ever since that time.

The affidavit of William Moore and Larkin Garnett was also given at the same time and in the same place as the foregoing.

The said deponents stated that at one time and in the said county and state they had been well acquainted with the said pensioner, and they also swore that in the neighborhood in which the said pensioner resided he was reputed to have served in the War of the Rebellion on the side of the United States.

March 14, 1863 in Gallatin County, Kentucky. Nancy Furnish being at the age of 54 [64?] and being the widow and relict of the said pensioner, appeared in open court and stated that they had married in Gallatin County, Kentucky October 1, 1820 by the Rev. Wm. Thompson, and she also stated that her maiden name was Nancy Goins.

The affidavit of John A. Goins was also given at the same time and in the same place as the foregoing. The said deponent stated that he had been well acquainted with the said Nancy Furnish ever since his earliest rec­ollection, and he also stated that he was present at the wedding of said Nancy Furnish and her husband, the said pensioner, and this deponent also stated that they had lived together as man and wife and that said pen­sioner died as had been stated, and that Nancy Furnish still remained the widow and relict of said pensioner, James Furnish.

The affidavit of Mrs. Direty Goins was also given at the same time and in the same place as the foregoing. She stated that she had been well acquainted with the said Nancy Furnish for 30 years, and she also stated that she, the said deponent, had been present at the wedding of the said pensioner and the said Nancy Furnish. She stated and swore that James Furnish had received a pen­sion as has been stated, and she also swore that he had died as has been stated, and that Nancy Furnish still re­mains his widow and relict.

The affidavit of Garrett Goins was also given at the same time and in the same place as the foregoing. The said deponent stated he had been well acquainted in the said county and state with the said pensioner and his present widow ever since the year 1820, and this depo­nent also stated and swore that he was present at the wedding of the said pensioner to Nancy Goins. He also stated that James Furnish had received a pension as had been stated, and he further added that the said pensioner had died as had been stated, and that Nancy Furnish still remained the relict and widow of said pensioner.

Nancy Furnish appointed Henry J. Abbott to be her law­ful attorney.

Their marriage bond was signed by James Furnish and Charles Goins, and it was dated 9-30-1820, and their marriage return was dated 10-1-1820, and it was signed by Wm. Thompson.

January 21, 1870 in Gallatin County, Kentucky. Nancy Furnish being of the age of 70 and being widow and relict of the said pensioner appeared in open court and stated that she wanted to apply for an increase in her pension.

The affidavit of John W. Kirby and M. P. Johnson was also given at the same time and in the same place as the foregoing. They stated that Nancy Furnish was the identical widow of the pensioner that she claimed to be. On April 13, 1855 in Gallatin County, Kentucky Nancy Furnish at the age of 56 years and being the widow and relict of said pensioner, James Furnish again appeared in open court for the purpose of asking for the Bounty that was due to her.

The affidavit of Benjamin Tiller and James Arnold was also given at the same time and place as the foregoing. They stated that Nancy Furnish was the identical widow of the same pensioner as she claimed herself to be, and further they said that they were both well acquainted with both the said pensioner and his wife in the said county and state. They also stated that James Furnish did receive a pension, and that they had lived together as man and wife, and that the said pensioner had died as has been stated, and that Nancy Furnish still remained the widow and relict of the same James Furnish as aforesaid.

Nancy Furnish, the widow of said pensioner, was on the Louisiana Roll of Pensions at the rate of $96 per annum to commence July 27, 1868 and her certificate of pen­sion for that amount was issued May 6, 1870, and it was then sent to the claimant herself, Warsaw P.O. Box 35, Gallatin County, Kentucky.

She also receive $20 per annum to commence 2-31-1853 [sic], and her certificate of pension for that amount was issued May 28, 1853, and it was then sent to H. I. Abbott of Warsaw, Kentucky.”

Her father’s will written June 18, 1847 specified that Nancy Gowens Furnish was to receive $2 from the estate.

Nancy Gowens Furnish appeared as the head of Household 134-134 in the 1860 census of Gallatin County:

“Furnish, Nancy 60, born in KY, farmer, $200 real
estate, $600 personal property
Noah 27, born in KY, farmer
Harrison 22, born in KY, farmer”?

Nine children were born to James Furnish and Nancy Gowens Furnish including:

Noah Furnish born about 1833
Harrison Furnish born about 1838

Fourteen children were born to James Furnish and Asinor Wells Furnish, according to Donald Lee Furnish.

Fred West wrote April 27, 2000 that Sanford Furnish and Mary Frances Goins Furnish of Gallatin County were the parents of Alice G. Furnish. Alice G. Furnish was married to Harry Marsh who was born June 10, 1863. Sanford Furnish was in Switzerland County, Indiana in the 1880s and in Carroll County, Kentucky by 1890. Harry Marsh and Alice G. Furnish Marsh later lived in Missouri.

Sarah “Sally” Gowens, daughter of Charles Gowens and Eliza­beth “Betsy” Blair Gowens, was born about 1794 in Henry County. “Sally Goings” was married September 12, 1812 to Truman Kidwell on a license issued September 1, 1812, according to “Harrison County, Kentucky Marriages, 1794-1850.”

Bernice S. Ridgway, a descendant of Pensacola, Florida, identifies Truman Kidwell as the son of Vincent Kidwell of Madison County, Kentucky. Truman Kidwell appeared in the 1818 tax list of Gallatin County.

He was enumerated in the 1820 census as the head of a house­hold:

“Kidwell, Truman white male 26-45
white female 16-18
white male 0-10
white male 0-10
white female 0-10”

Living adjacent to the location of Truman Kidwell were “Charles Goings, Galloway Goings and Gilbert Gowings. In the 1827 tax list of Gallatin County Truman Kidwell was noted as “on Ohio River.”

Sally Gowens Kidwell was named in her father’s will written June 18, 1847 as the recipient of $2 from his estate.

Truman Kidwell was enumerated as the head of Household 333-333 in the 1850 census of Gallatin County in an adjoining location with Charles Gowens, his father-in-law.

“Kidwell, Truman 60, born in KY, white, laborer
Sarah 50, born in KY, white
Eliza 18, born in KY
James G. 16, born in KY
Mary W. 10, born in KY”

Living nearby were the families of “Charles Goens, James Goens, John Goens and Orpheus Webber.

Sarah “Sally” Gowens Kidwell was enumerated at “age 64” living in the household of her son, James G. Kidwell in the 1860 census of Gallatin County. It is believed that she died during the decade, not appearing in the 1870 census of Gallatin County.

Children born to Truman Kidwell and Sarah “Sally” Gowens Kidwell include:

John Kidwell born in 1817
William Kidwell born in 1821
Lucinda Kidwell born in 1822
Mary F. Kidwell born about 1827
Eliza Ann Kidwell born about 1832
James Garrett Kidwell born about 1834
Mary W. Kidwell born about 1840

John Kidwell, son of Truman Kidwell and Sarah “Sally” Gowens Kidwell, was born in 1817 in Madison County, ac­cording to the research of Bernice S. Ridgway. “John Kidwill” was married April 29, 1842 to Josephine McGinnis who was born in 1817 in Virginia.

William Kidwell, son of Truman Kidwell and Sarah “Sally” Gowens Kidwell, was born in 1821 in Gallatin County.

Lucinda Kidwell, daughter of Truman Kidwell and Sarah “Sally” Gowens Kidwell, was born in 1822 in Gallatin County. She was married there to Samuel McGinnis, marriage bond dated July 28, 1842.

Mary F. Kidwell, daughter of Truman Kidwell and Sarah “Sally” Gowens Kidwell, was born about 1827 in Gallatin County. She was married January 26, 1847 to Orpheus Webber in Frankfort, Kentucky.

Children born to them include:

Albert F. Webber born February 14, 1863

Albert F. Webber, son of Orpheus Webber and Mary W. Kid­well Webber, was born February 14, 1863. He was married to Miss Rosie E. Marshall about 1887. Children born to them in­clude:

Nettie B. Webber born March 3, 1890

Nettie B. Webber, daughter of Albert F. Webber and R. E. Mar­shall Webber, was born March 3, 1890. She was married September 26, 1907 in Frankfort, Kentucky to John Joseph Scannell. Children born to them include:

Vincent A. Scannell born June 5, 1913

Vincent A. Scannell, son of John Joseph Scannell and Nettie B. Webber Scannell, was born June 5, 1913 in Frankfort. He was married September 17, 1933 to Thelma Lehman in Jefferson­ville, Indiana. Children born to them include:

Bernice S. Scannell born about 1933

Bernice S. Scannell, daughter of Vincent A. Scannell and Thelma Lehman Scannell, was born about 1933 in Louisville. She was adopted by a great aunt, Marie Theresa Lehman Schmitt. She was married about 1952 to Dr. James S. Ridgway. In 1995 they lived in Pensacola, Florida where she, a Founda­tion member, was active in the research of the Gowens family and con­tributed much of the material on the descendants of Sarah “Sally” Gowens Kidwell.

Eliza Ann Kidwell, daughter of Truman Kidwell and Sarah “Sally” Gowens Kidwell, was born about 1832 in Gallatin County. She was married to Joseph C. Wells September 20, 1855 in Gallatin County.

James Garrett Kidwell, son of Truman Kidwell and Sarah “Sally” Gowens Kidwell, was born in Gallatin County about 1834. He was married December 29, 1853 to Elizabeth Goens, unidentified. She was born about 1853. He appeared as the head of Household 316-316 in the 1860 census of Gallatin County:

“Kidwell, James 28, born in KY, farmer
Elizabeth 23, born in KY
Alice M. 8, born in KY
Josephine 6, born in KY
Sarah T. 4, born in KY
James 2, born in KY
Kidwell, Thomas 11, born in KY
Kidwell, Sarah 64, born in KY”

Mary W. Kidwell, daughter of Truman Kidwell and Sarah “Sally” Gowens Kidwell, was born in Gallatin County about 1840.

Hannah Gowens, daughter of Charles Gowens and Elizabeth “Betsy” Blair Gowens, was born about 1796 just prior to her fam­ily’s departure from Virginia. “Hannah Going” was married February 16, 1814 to William Henry Rose, according to “Harrison County, Kentucky Marriages, 1797-1850.” William Henry Rose was the son of Charles Rose who had married her sister, Lucinda Gowens as his second wife. William Henry Rose was also a brother to Betsy Rose who was married to Galloway Gowens, her brother.
==O==

Following the death of William Henry Rose, Hannah Gowens Rose appeared as a widow in the 1850 census of Gallatin County:

“Rose, Hannah 50 [sic], born in KY
Emily J. 19, born in KY
Eliza A. 16, born in KY
Amanda 12, born in KY”

In an adjacent location was Household 394-394 headed by her son. John Ervin Rose:

“Rose, John E. 21, born in KY, farmer, $400 real
estate, illiterate
Zerilda 22, born in KY, illiterate
Mary H. 3/12, born in KY”

In an adjacent location in 1850 was enumerated the household of an unidentified Elizabeth Goens, apparently a widow. She was recorded as the head of Household 395-395:

“Goens, Elizabeth 54, born in KY
John 27, born in KY
Galway 20, born in KY
Sally 15, born in KY”

The family reappeared in the 1860 census of Gallatin County as Household 128-128, page 19:

“Goin, Elizabeth 50, born in KY, $280 real estate,
$50 personal property
Sarah 24, born in KY
Galloway 22, born in KY, farmer”,

On September 10, 1854 Hannah Gowens Rose received a deed to 127.5 acres of land on Craig’s Creek “for $1 and the love and affection of my daughter” from her father, ac­cording to Gallatin County Deed Book 0, page 139. Hannah Gowens Rose was remarried later in 1854 in Greene County, Indiana to John Harshfield.

According to the research of Eddy Alderson, 10 children were born to William Henry Rose and Hannah Gowens Rose, in­cluding:

William Henry Rose, Jr. born about 1815
James Rose born about 1816
Mary Rose born about 1818
Nancy Rose born about 1820
George W. Rose born about 1823
Thomas Jefferson Rose born in 1827
John Ervin Rose born in 1829
Emily J. Rose born in 1831
Eliza A. Rose born in 1834
Amanda Rose born in 1838

William Henry Rose, Jr, son of William Henry Rose and Han­nah Gowens Rose, was born about 1815. He was married about 1842, wife’s name Mary B.

He was enumerated as the head of Household 256-256 in the 1850 census of Gallatin County, page 166:

“Rose, Wm. H. 35, born in KY, laborer
Mary B. 35, born in KY
Nancy 7, born in KY
Montrecilla 5, born in KY, male
Wm. A. 3, born in KY
Frances M. 1, born in KY, male”

Mary Rose, daughter of William Henry Rose and Hannah Gowens Rose, was born about 1818. She was married about 1837 to Jacob Jackson.

Nancy Rose, daughter of William Henry Rose and Hannah Gowens Rose, was born about 1820. She was married about 1838 to Hugh W. Jackson.

George W. Rose, son of William Henry Rose and Hannah Gowens Rose, was born 1823 in Gallatin County. He was mar­ried about 1846 to Sally Swango.

Thomas Jefferson Rose, son of William Henry Rose and Han­nah Gowens Rose, was born about 1827 in Gallatin County. He was married about 1849, wife’s name Elizabeth R.

He was enumerated there in the 1850 census as the head of Household 257-257:

“Rose, Thomas J. 23, born in KY, laborer
Elizabeth R. 18, born in KY”

John Ervin Rose, son of William Henry Rose and Hannah Gowens Rose, was born in 1829. He was married in Gal­latin County April 1, 1849 to Zer­ilda Jane Carr. Their marriage bond was signed by Edward B. Carr.

They were enumerated in the 1850 census of Gallatin County in an adjoining location with his mother. They were recorded as:

“Rose, John E. 21, born in KY, farmer, $400 real
estate, illiterate
Zerilda 22, born in KY, illiterate
Mary H. 3/12, born in KY”

He was remarried September 11, 1856 to Eliza Jane Barker in Greene County, Indiana.

According to the research of Ed Alderson, two chil­dren were born to John Ervin Rose and Zerilda Jane Carr Rose:

Mary Hannah Rose born about January 1850
Joseph Rose born about 1853

Children born to John Ervin Rose and Eliza Jane Barker Rose include:

Zerrilda Rose born in 1857
Amanda E. Rose born in 1859
Sarah M. Rose born August 16, 1864
Howard G. Rose born February 26, 1866
Margaret Rose born in 1868
Julia Rose born in 1871
Obadiah Rose born October 13, 1876
James Rose born in 1879

Mary Hannah Rose, daughter of John Ervin Rose and Zer­ilda Jane Carr Rose, was born about January 1850. She ap­peared at the age of five months in the 1850 census of her fa­ther’s house­hold in Gallatin County.

Obadiah Rose, son of John Ervin Rose and Eliza Jane Barker Rose, was born October 13, 1876 in Green County, Indiana, ac­cording to Ed Alderson. He was married Septem­ber 30, 1899 to Dora Sanders in Knox County Indi­ana. Among chil­dren born to them was Edson Rose who was married July 12, 1922 in Greene County, In­diana to Bertha Madeline Moore. Their daughter, Mary Em­maline Rose was married to Herbert Bruce Alderson October 23, 1948 in Greene County, accord­ing to their son, Eddy Alder­son.

John A. Gowens, son of Charles Gowens and Elizabeth “Betsy” Blair Gowens, was born about 1800, probably in Claiborne County. “John Goens” was married September 22, 1827 to Dorothy Furnace, according to “Gallatin County, Kentucky Marriages, 1714-1835.” Her name may have been Dority Fur­nish, according to Greg A. Bennatt. They were married in Or­ange County, Virginia, according to Rosa Evelyn Ray Cordell.

“John Goins” was enumerated as the head of a household in the 1840 census of Gallatin County, page 6:

“Goins, John white male 30-40
white female 30-40
white male 15-20
white female 10-15
white male 5-10
white male 5-10
white female 0-5
white male 0-5”

John A. Gowens was mentioned as the recipient of $2 in his fa­ther’s will written June 18, 1847.

“John Goens” was recorded as the head of Household 335-335 August 14, 1850 in the Federal census of Gallatin County, page 176:

“Goens John 50, born in Kentucky, farmer,
$800 real estate, illiterate
Dority 52, born in Kentucky, illiterate
Solomon 18, born in Kentucky, laborer
Benjamin G. 14, born in Kentucky
Mary I. 12, born in Kentucky
Elmer A. 8, born in Kentucky
Lucy 6, born in Kentucky
Silas 3, born in Kentucky”

“John A. Goins” reappeared as the head of Household 249-249 in the 1860 census of Gallatin County, page 37:

“Goins, John A. 53, born in KY, farmer, $2,000 real
estate, $670 personal property
Dorty P. 53, born in KY, wife
Emily 17, born in KY, daughter
Bales, Elizabeth 27, born in KY, daughter
Anna 8, born in KY, granddaughter
Virgil 7. born in KY, grandson
Thompson 2, born in KY, grandson
Goins Winfield 5, born in KY, son
John T. 3, born in KY, son
Goins Benjamin 25, born in KY, farmer
Nancy 18, born in KY”

On March 14, 1863 John A. Gowens, along with his brother Garrett Gowens, appeared in court in Gallatin County and made an affidavit in support of their sister Nancy Furnish Gowens’ pension application.

“The affidavit of John A. Goins was also given at the same time and in the same place as the foregoing. The said deponent stated that he had been well acquainted with the said Nancy Furnish ever since his earliest rec­ollection, and he also stated that he was present at the wedding of said Nancy Furnish and her husband, the said pensioner, and this deponent also stated that they had lived together as man and wife and that said pen­sioner died as had been stated, and that Nancy Furnish still remained the widow and relict of said pensioner, James Furnish.

“The affidavit of Mrs. Dorety Goins was also given at the same time and in the same place as the foregoing. She stated that she had been well acquainted with the said Nancy Furnish for 30 years, and she also stated that she, the said deponent, had been present at the wedding of the said pensioner and the said Nancy Furnish. She stated and swore that James Furnish had received a pen­sion as has been stated, and she also swore that he had died as has been stated, and that Nancy Furnish still re­mains his widow and relict.”

Children born to John A. Gowens and Dorothy Furnace Gowens include:

Solomon L. Gowens born about 1832
Sarah Elizabeth Gowens born about 1833
Benjamin G. Gowens born about 1835
Mary I. Gowens born about 1838
Elvira A. Gowens born about 1842
Emily Gowens born about 1843
Lucy Gowens born about 1844
Silas Gowens born about 1847

Solomon L. Gowens, son of John A. Gowens and Dorothy Fur­nace Gowens, was born about 1832 in Gallatin County. He ap­peared as an 18-year-old laborer in the 1850 census of his fa­ther’s household. He was married about 1859, wife’s name Almeda. He reappeared in the 1860 census of Gallatin County, page 19, as the head of Household 319-319:

“Goins, Solomon L. 28, born in KY, farmer, $500 real
estate
Almeda 23 born in KY”

Nearby was enumerated W. C. Brown, head of Household 321-321, page 19:

“Brown, W. C. 51, born in KY, farmer, $6,000
real estate, $5395 personal
property
Henrietta 36, born in VA
Francis 7, born in KY
Brown, William 15, born in VA
Goins, James 12”

Sarah Elizabeth Gowens, daughter of John A. Gowens and Dorothy Furnatce Gowens, was born about 1833 in Kentucky. She was married about 1850, husband’s name Bales. Apparently her husband died about 1859. She and her children were enumerated in her father’s household in the 1860 census of Gallatin County:

“Goins, John A. 53, born in KY, farmer, $2,000 real
estate, $670 personal property
Dorty P. 53, born in KY, wife
Emily 17, born in KY, daughter
Bales, Elizabeth 27, born in KY, daughter
Anna 8, born in KY, granddaughter
Virgil 7. born in KY, grandson
Thompson 2, born in KY, grandson
Goins Winfield 5, born in KY, son
John T. 3, born in KY, son
Goins Benjamin 25, born in KY, farmer
Nancy 18, born in KY”

Sarah Elizabeth Gowens Bales later removed to Grayson County, Kentucky with her son Virgil Bales, according to the research of Lois Sharp, a descendant.

Benjamin G. Gowens, son of John A. Gowens and Dorothy Furnace Gowens, was born about 1835 in Gallatin County. He appeared in the 1850 census of his father’s household as a 14-year-old. He was married about 1858, wife’s name Nancy. Benjamin G. Gowens and Nancy Gowens appeared in the 1860 census of his father’s household.

George Washington Gowens, son of Charles Gowens and Elizabeth “Betsy” Blair Gowens, was born in June 2, 1802 in Kentucky or in Claiborne County, Tennessee. His father was a Revolutionary soldier of Henry County, Virginia. He was married about 1823 to Nancy Webb who was born August 29, 1805 to Hall Webb and Elizabeth Webb, according to Harold Frank Gowing, a descendant of Eugene, Oregon. He and his wife, Mary Ruth Marsh Gowing, Foundation members did extensive research into this branch of the family.

George Washington Gowens, shortly after marriage, adopted “Gowing” as his surname, and his descendants continue to use that spelling today.

It is believed that the young couple accompanied his parents in a move to Gallatin County shortly after they were married. By 1825, they moved westwardly again, to Washington County, Indiana. They were enumerated there in the 1830 census, page 341:

“Going, George white male 20-30
white female 20-30
white male 5-10
white female 0-5
white female 0-5″

About 1838, he removed to Washington County, Arkansas. He was enumerated there in the 1840 census in Providence town­ship, page 61:

Gowen, George W. white male 30-40
white female 30-40
white male 15-20
white female 15-20
white female 10-15
white male 5-10
white female 5-10
white male 0-5
white male 0-5
white male 0-5”

Three members of the household were engaged in “agriculture.” One of the parents was “illiterate.” No slaves were enumerated.

It is believed that they removed to Cass County, Mis­souri about 1841. He and his son, William Pleasant Gowing ap­peared in the 1848 tax list of the county, page 16. He paid 71 cents tax on “2 horses, value $80; 5 cows, value $74 and 1 time­piece, value $15,” and his son paid 53 cents tax on “1 horse, value $60, 1 cow, value $8 and military tax, $25.”

He was enumerated there in District 16 September 19, 1850 in the federal census as the head of Household 394-394:

“Going, George W. 48, born in Kentucky, farmer,
$1,000 real estate
Nancy 43, born in Virginia
Pleasant 25, born in Indiana
George W. 18, born in Indiana
Susannah 20, born in Indiana
Patsey 16, born in Indiana
Francis M. 14, born in Indiana
Jerome 12, born in Arkansas
Chauncy [Drury] 11, born in Arkansas
Nancy 8, born in Missouri
Clarinda 6, born in Missouri
Thomas 4, born in Missouri
Lafayette 2, born in Missouri”

Shortly after 1850 George Washington Gowing moved across the state line to Brooklin, Kansas, now extinct. On October 5, 1855 he moved to La Cygne, Kansas in extreme east­ern Linn County, Kansas very near the Missouri border. He was fre­quently in­volved in the border disputes that flared in “bleeding Kansas” in the 1850s and 1860s.

Some events illustrating the adversities the family of George Washington Gowing endured during that period were recorded in the March 22, 1895 edition of “La Cygne Weekly Jour­nal.” The ac­count was later published in “Kansas Histori­cal Collection, 1923-1925” printed by Kansas His­torical So­ciety. The account reads:

“In collecting memoranda for these articles there has been found a very high regard for the Gowing family who came here in 1855. the head of the family was George Washington Gowing, Sr. who had been born and raised in Kentucky and not op­posed to slavery, though he took no part in helping to establish it in Kansas. The family con­sisted of himself and wife and five sons–George W. Jr, Pleasant, Lafayette, Drury and Thomas. Lafayette be­came a soldier in Company L, Sixth Kansas Cav­alry and was killed in action April 5, 1864 in the Battle of Stone’s Farm, Arkansas. Wash, the younger, still lives in La Cygne, and Thomas re­cently moved to Missouri.

On coming west, the family lived for a while in Cass County, Missouri and then decided to come to Kansas, and as they were traveling in wagons, Wash, the son, came on in advance to find some old neighbors who had settled here, among them Skillman Fleming.

October 5, 1855, Wash crossed at the ford where the fair grounds at La Cygne are now located and contin­ued west till he found Brooklin, when he returned to pilot his peo­ple. At that time all that is Lincoln town­ship, and to a line north and south along the John Calvin farm three miles west in Scott township, was an Indian reservation held by the Miamis and Pottawatomies. The Miamis were wearing clothing, but the Pottawatomies were still in blankets. Wash says that none of them were troublesome. The Miamis nearly all lived in houses, but the Pottawatomies traveled around in bands.

When the Gowings located at Brooklin they were among old acquaintances, and as the family had origi­nally come from the slave state of Kentucky they were received as an accession to the pro-slavery forces. In the condition of so­ciety then, they did not find it conve­nient to assert that they had come to make homes and wanted no poli­tics, so they went along their way and trusted to luck to avoid trouble. Young Wash was not regarded with favor by old Skillman, and was frequently asked to declare himself, but he would only say that he had come to get a home and wanted no part in politics. This made it par­ticularly un­congenial for him, and after he had taken his wife and lo­cated a farm on the ridge north of Brooklin, he would sleep out in some friendly straw stack or fence corner. Neu­trality then seemed impossi­ble. He was dis­trusted among his father’s friends and unknown to the other side, and he felt uncomfortable, but as all he had was there, he stayed.

One night he ventured to stay within his house, and had a peaceful night till daybreak, when the sound of horse­men was heard. He was called and or­dered to come out, with which he complied, ex­pecting trouble. There were 15 mounted men at his door, whom he recognized at once as free-state men, who had evi­dently been out all night. They asked him for feed for them­selves and horses. He replied that he did not want to give it to them as it would give him the repu­tation of har­boring them and get him into trou­ble. He was assured that his principles were well known to them, and that they would see no trouble come to him and then dis­mounted. Mrs. Gowing got breakfast for them with much misgiv­ing as to what the result would be when the pro-slavery people heard of it. But be­yond severe criti­cism they were never disturbed, as by that time the free-state men were be­ginning to get control, and they did not forget to protect Wash.

Once, in 1856, when there were rumors of an inva­sion by marauders, they all went over into Missouri to camp un­til the trouble should blow over. At West Point, Mis­souri they saw a big camp of men living in a half-mili­tary style, but without any authority other than assumed. Old man Clarke was in command of it. Clarke tried to take a team from the elder Gowing, and the old man said they could not have it, that he would not part with it. They then took possession of horses and man, and the next morning the 400 ruffians of Clarke started to raid through Linn County, and took Gowing with them to haul their plunder.

There was also a young man named Smith, a son of El­isha Smith of Twin Springs impressed into their ser­vice, and when at Linnville Mr. Gowing took a hatchet and de­fied the mob, as related last week, he also re­leased young Smith from their bondage.”

The incident “as related last week” referred to an account in the March 15, 1895 edition of the “La Cygne Weekly Journal” which described the atrocities the mob committed and the courage of George Washington Gowing in a con­frontation with the mob. The account read:

“The crimes which followed are too foul for record. Old man Gowing witnessed them, and climbing into his wagon he threw all the plunder out on the ground, and with a hatchet to de­fend himself, denounced the fiends and told them he would die before he would obey their orders fur­ther, and drove away unmolested. On his way home he met Sheek and told him the de­tails of the af­fair. Mr. Sheek was a close friend of Pat Devlin, the origi­nator of the famous ‘Jayhawker’ patronymic, and had several adven­tures with him.”

George Washington Gowing was enumerated in the 1860 cen­sus of Linn County in Scott township, page 12, Household 84-84:

“Gowins, George 59, born in Kentucky, farmer
Nancy 53, born in Virginia
Lafayette 19, born in Missouri, farmer
Nancy, Jr. 16, born in Missouri
Clarinda 14, born in Missouri
Thomas 13, born in Missouri
Moore, Marion 20, born in Illinois, laborer”

During the Civil War he enlisted in Company K, Sixth Kansas Militia and appeared on the muster roll of that organiza­tion, along with Drury Gowing and Lafayette Gow­ing, his sons.

George Washington Gowing wrote his will March 10, 1870:

“State of Kansas
Linn County, Lincoln Township

I, George W. Gowing, considering the uncertainty of this life and being of sound mind and memory do make this, my last will and testament in manner and form following, to wit:

First. I give and bequeath to my grandchildren, heirs of my son Pleasant Gowing, the sum of One Hundred Dollars. I give and bequeath to the heirs of my son Jerome Gowing the sum of One Hundred Dollars to be paid to them within six month after they becum of [21] age legaly to do Busness for them selves and to be equaly divided between them.

I farther give and bequeath to my wife Nancy Gowing all of the residue of my Estate that may be left after the payment of the foregoing bequests and the pay­ment of all of my Debts both real estate and personal property, to have and to hold for her own use and benefit during her life and at her death to be equally between all of my heirs.

I also appoint my Beloved Wife sole executrix of this my last will and testament hereby revoking all former wills made by me in witness of which I have hereunto set my hand and seal this the 10th day of March AD 1870.
G. W. [X] Gowing”

He died shortly after the will was written. Nancy Webb Gow­ing, a widow was recorded as the head of Household 365-352 in Lincoln township, page 49:

“Gowing, Nancy 66, born in Virginia
Nancy, Jr. 25, born in Missouri
Clarinda 23, born in Missouri
Thomas 22, born in Missouri, farmer
Gowing, Francis M. 16, born in Missouri, works on farm, grandson
George C. 14, born in Kansas, works on
farm, grandson
Sarrah J. 10, born in Kansas, attends
school, granddaughter
Clarinda 8, born in Kansas, attends
school, granddaughter
William P. 5, born in Kansas, grandson
Gowing, Jane 12, granddaughter
James 10, grandson”

Nancy Webb Gowin died there in 1873 and was buried beside her husband in Star Valley Cemetery, east of La Cygne..

Children born to George Washington Gowing and Nancy Webb Gowing include:

William Pleasant Gowing born in 1825
Sarah Ann Gowing born about 1826
Susannah Gowing born in 1829
George Washington Gowing, Jr. born August 14, 1830
Patsey Gowing born in 1834
Francis M. Gowing born in 1836
Jerome Gowing born about 1837
Chauncy Drury Gowing born about 1838
Lafayette Gowing born about 1841
Nancy Gowing born November 25, 1844
Clarinda Gowing born in 1845
Thomas Benton Gowing born March 23, 1847

William Pleasant Gowing, son of George Washington Gow­ing and Nancy Webb Gowing, was born in Tennessee in 1825. He appeared as a 25-year-old in the 1850 census of his fa­ther’s household in Cass County, Missouri. He was married there January 6, 1853 to Priscilla Miller, daughter of John Miller and Margaret Miller. She, a sister to Elizabeth Miller, the first wife of George Washington Gowin, Jr, was born in 1830 in Bourbon County, Kentucky. They removed to Kansas about 1856.

They were enumerated in the 1860 census of Anderson County, Jackson township, Household 49-41:

“Gowing, Pleasant 35, born in Tennessee, farmer,
$700 real estate, $100 personal
property
Priscilla 30, born in Kentucky
Francis M. 7, born in Missouri
John S. 5, born in Missouri
George C. 3, born in Kansas
Sarah J. 1, born in Kansas
Nancy 2/12, born in Kansas”

“Pleasant Gowens” enlisted as a private in Morris Independent Company, Kansas State Militia October 12, 1863. He was mustered out five days later on October 16, 1863, according to “Kansas State Historical Society Quarterly,” Vol. 12, page 45.

William Pleasant Gowing died in a forest fire, and Priscilla Miller Gowing died two weeks later. An inventory of their es­tate was filed in the courthouse in Anderson County, Kansas. Ruby Miller transcribed a copy of the items in the estate which was appraised at $979.91 which was filed in probate court April 16, 1864..

Children born to William Pleasant Gowing and Priscilla Miller Gowing include:

Francis Marion Gowing born in December 1853
John S. Gowing born about 1855
George Columbus Gowing born March 4, 1857
Sarah Jane Gowing born about 1858
Nancy Gowing born about 1860
Clarinda Gowing born about 1862
William Pleasant Gowing, Jr. born about 1864

The four youngest children were declared orphans by the Linn County Court November 30, 1875, and Stephen H. Allen was appointed their guardian ad litem.

Francis Marion Gowing, son of William Pleasant Gowing and Priscilla Miller Gowing, was born in Cass County in December 1853. On April 21, 1876 he received a share of the estate of Francis Marion Gowing amounting to $296.39.

He was married about 1876, wife’s name believed to be Berne­ice. Later he was remarried to Amanda Foster. Children born to Francis Marion Gowing and Amanda Foster Gowing are un­known. Children born to him and Berneice Gowing include:

Daisy Gowing born about 1878

John S. Gowing, son of William Pleasant Gowing and Priscilla Miller Gowing, was born in Cass County about 1855. It is be­lieved that he died in childhood.

George Columbus Gowing, son of William Pleasant Gowing and Priscilla Miller Gowing, was born March 4, 1857 in Ander­son County, according to Mary Ruth Marsh Gowing, Founda­tion member. He was married April 17, 1879 in Linn County, Kansas to Emily May Davis, daughter of Jesse Washington Davis and Susan P. Chambers Davis. She was born April 17, 1859 in Hancock County, Illinois.

They joined a wagontrain travelling from Kansas to Oregon. Marshall C. Davis, brother of Emily May Davis, kept a diary of the trip:

“When We Crossed the Plains from Kansas to Oregon

April 22, 1879–Started from La Cygne, Kansas, seen the Insane Asylum at Os­awatomie, went through Paola, camped on Pull Creek.

April 23–Got lost and came through Wellsville and Black Jack. passed through some fine country.

April 24–Rained in the forenoon and in the afternoon we passed through Baldwin City. The roads were very muddy, camped eight miles south of Lawrence.

April 25–Crossed the Wakerrusa and came into Lawrence and crossed the Kaw River on the bridge and came on six miles northwest of Lawrence and into camp. Went fishing, but did not catch any.

April 26–Came through Williamstown and Perrysville and came through Media, stopped for noon on the Kansas River. After noon we crossed the Grasshopper River and the Big Muddy. Came through Grandville and went into camp three miles Northeast of Topeka. [Elev. 806′]

April 27, Sunday–Laid over in the forenoon, the weather was chilly. Hitched up and drove into Topeka, corralled and went to visit the Capitol building which was a fine sight. Lots of niggers, only 20,000. Was on guard half the night.

April 28–Crossed over on the north side of the river and came to Venike and came on to Silver Lake and stopped for noon. Came through Kingsville, then to Rossville. Camped three miles east of Wameg.

April 29–Started in the morning, came through St. Marys and stopped for noon on the Blue Vermillion. The country was beautiful. In the afternoon we came to Louisville and St. George and went into camp west of town at night. We went to town to hear the telephone and played the Banjo for them.

April 30–Laid over west of St. George on account of the rain, went through the grain elevator, up 73 feet from the ground. A very fine building.

May 1–Drove through Manhattan and crossed the Big Blue on the Iron Bridge. Manhattan is a very fine place. Came on through Wildcat. Camped on Wildcat. Went a fishing.

May 2–Started northwest over the prairie and came to Balla and stopped for noon. In the afternoon travelled over some fine prairie and camped on a little creek four miles east of Clay Center.

May 3–Came through Clay Center, a beautiful town. See Anderson & Company’s Circus and Menagerie. Came on through Morgan City and camped on little creek.

May 4, Sunday–Started and came on through Clifton, went into camp three miles east of Clyde, laid over in the afternoon.

May 5–Started in the a.m, came through Clyde and Ames Station. Stopped for noon four miles east of Concordia. In the afternoon came through Concordia and camped on a lake in a nice cottonwood grove. Stood guard two hours.

May 6–Started in the morning, came northwest over a fine looking prairie to Scan­dia. There we crossed the Republican River on a bridge, came on northwest over the prairie to White Rock. Camped there.

May 7–Rained in the forenoon, laid over all day on White Rock Creek, visited he White Rock Water Mill which is a fine structure.

May 8–Started northwest. It rained a little. We came on to the bridge over the Republican River, south of Superior [Nebraska. Stopped for noon on the Nebraska line. In the afternoon we came through Superior and came north over a beautiful prairie and camped two miles south of Guide Rock.

May 9–Started in the morning, came over some very rough roads to Guide Rock. Came northwest and stopped for noon on the prairie. In the afternoon I went a hunting. The train left me, walked about six miles, got our water kegs filled at a well and camped on the prairie. Not a twig in sight anywhere.

May 10–Stared in the morning over a high prairie ’til we came to Millington on the Little Blue stopped for noon. Visited the Water Mills. In the afternoon we came nine miles to Hastings and then six miles west to Juniata. Camped on the prairie.

May 11, Sunday–Started in the a.m. at Juniata and drove through Kenesaw. Stopped for noon in Platte Valley for the first time. In the afternoon drove four miles west to Lowell.

May 12–Started west in the morning, came to old Ft. Kearney, visited the old forti­fications. Came west to the bridge, camped on the south side of the river. Went to town and got caught in a fearful rainstorm.

May 13–Rained in the morning, cold as Greenland. In the afternoon drove over the river on the bridge, three-fourths mile long, camped west of town.

May 14–Started west in the a.m, along the U. P. road, stopped for noon on the prairie. After noon drove west and camped on the prairie. Drove through Elm Creek. At night we had an alarm which kept us all awake all night.

May 15–Started in the morning, came to Plum Creek. Stopped for noon and in the afternoon drove west along the U. P. Railroad and camped with the Montana Train.

May 16–Started west along the R.R. through the Platte Valley. Stopped for noon on the river. Had a very dull day of it. Camped with Montana Train on the Platte River.

May 17–Started in the a.m. Came west along the R.R. Seen some antelope. Stopped for noon on the prairie and camped in three miles of North Platte [Elev. 2821′]. Corralled the wagons for the first time.

May 18, Sunday–Started in the a.m. Drove over the R.R. and Wagon Bridge com­bined, came through North Platte. Stopped for noon on the prairie and seen five antelope. Camped at Odallon, corralled with the Montana Train, making 30 wag­ons all together. Stood guard with Robert Crawford ’til midnight.

May 19–Laid over all day. The women washed. The men went antelope hunting and got no meat. No one took a nap.

May 20–Started in the a.m. came over the prairie west and came through Alkali. Stopped for noon, and in the evening came to a section house and camped.

May 21–We came over the plains west along the R.R. and stopped at noon on the prairie. Then came through Ogallala [Elev. 3211′] and camped in the corral with the Montana Train on the Platte River.

May 22–We came west over some terrible sandhills ’til we came to Big Springs. Filled our water kegs and stopped for noon on the R.R. Big Springs is where the U. P. Express train was robbed in ’77. Afternoon we came over sandy roads to Jules­burg [Colorado]. There we had to give the parting hand to Jim McCawley and family, also some other fellow travellers that were going to Colorado. Julesburg was burned a few years ago by the Indians, and 45 people were killed. Camped one and one-half miles west of town on Lodge Pole Creek, in Colorado, as we just crossed the corner of the state.

May 23–We seen Antelope and stopped for noon on Lodge Pole Creek. In the af­ternoon we came through Lodge Pole and camped nine miles east of Sidney [Nebraska].

May 24–We came through Sidney which is a beautiful town of about 15,000 in­habitants. Stopped for noon west of town,. and in the afternoon we travelled up the Lodge Pole Valley which is a beautiful little valley about one mile wide. We camped about three miles east of Potter.

May 25–We came through Potter and stopped for noon on Lodge Pole Creek. In the afternoon we came through Antelope and camped two and one-half miles west of town [Kimball, Nebraska, Elev. 4,700′].

May 26–Drove west along the R.R. Went on an antelope chase; got no meat. Stopped for noon on Lodge Pole Creek. In the afternoon we came west. One of the boys killed an antelope and came on to Pine Bluffs [Wyoming]. Bade farewell to Nebraska. Camped in a beautiful valley one mile west of town and went up on the Bluff. Had a fine time. Also a good mess
of antelope for supper.

May 27–We travelled west over some fine country, had good roads, and we stopped for noon on a little branch, grazed our horses about two hours, then drove 10 miles and camped a sheep ranch.

May 28–We drove northwest over hills and sand and came in sight of the Grand Old Rockies. Came to Cheyenne [Elev. 6100′]. Stopped in town a while. Went out north of town two miles and camped at a lake. Went back to town and visited the [Railroad] Roundhouse and Machine Shops. Also took a look at the town and seen the first irrigating that I had ever seen.

May 29–Started in the a.m, drove northwest. The wind was very high. The dust blew fearfully. We came over the foothills and came to Cheyenne Pass and cor­ralled in the mountain pass. In the evening I went up on the mountain, about one mile high. Took a look at Longs Peak and Freeman Peak. Beautiful beyond de­scription. Go West, Young man and see the country!

May 30–Started in the a.m. and came up the mountains higher and higher, ’til we reached the summit. It rained and snowed all day. Cold enough for January. We stopped for noon in a canyon, plenty of wood and water. We soon had a rousing fire which was comfortable beyond description, had dinner and drove about one hour. All at once we looked over in the valley west of the Rockies. Had a look at Laramie City [Elev. 7100′], the we began to descend and soon found ourselves in the city. Went one mile east and corralled at a big spring. Frequent showers of rain and snow. Turned in for the night.

May 31–Laid over in camp all day. Mended boots and shoes all day, had a stam­pede at night. Big excitement!

June 1, Sunday–Rained and hailed all day. Laid over. I took a nap in the morning. In the evening we went to town and hunted up some old friends. Visited the Roundhouse and came back to camp.

June 2–Came through town, crossed the Big Laramie and came to Little Laramie. Stopped for noon. In the evening we crossed Five Mile Creek and camped on Seven Mile Creek.

June 3–We came on an crossed Three Mile Creek and forded Rock Creek and camped on a little stream.

June 4–We laid over all day, went hunting and killed one sage hen. After noon we went into the mountains. Seen more fine timber than a little. Seen bear and elk tracks.

June 5–Started in the a.m. and came to Medicine Bow, forded the river and stopped ’til noon. Afternoon we came to the range of foothills, crossed and came to Pass Creek and camped.

June 6–We came on to the Platte River and stopped for noon. The Montana gang crossed on the boat and went down to the ford. Crossed on horseback and over to the government buildings. Had a fine time. Came back and corralled the wagons. Stood guard until midnight.

June 7–Came across the Platte River on a flat boat and came up into Ft. Fred Steele. Left town and came 15 miles to Rawlins [Elev. 6785′]. Halted there about an hour and came six miles north to a little lake and camped. Cold enough for Christmas!

June 8, Sunday–Still cold. Wore an overcoat all day. Came about 14 miles, stopped for noon in a sage desert. After noon we came about six miles and camped.

June 9–Started in the a.m. and came over some very sandy hills til noon. It was very heavy pulling [at] the last. We stopped for noon on a little stream. After noon we had a wild hunt, but failed to kill anything. We came to Whiskey Gap, seen where a party of U.S. Troops were massacred by the Indians. Visited the graves of the poor boys, 30 in number. Came on two miles and camped.

June 10–Father [Jesse Davis] went a antelope hunting and came back and re­ported one killed. Next was to go and bring it in. I was one of the detail who brought it back and skinned it and divided it out. Came on and stopped for noon at Sweetwater. Capt. Nichols brought in another antelope. After noon we travelled northwest and camped at a cattle ranch on the Sweetwater

June 11–Started in the a.m. and came past Three Crossings. Got some wood and came on and stopped for noon. After noon we drove 12 miles to Sweetwater and camped again.

June 12–Laid over all day, and the women washed. The men went hunting. About 2:00 o’clock father came in and reported three antelope killed. George C. Gowing, Bill gage and myself started to hunt for them, but only found one of them and came back.

June 13–We drove about ten miles, stopped for we had some very rough roads. After noon we arrived Rock Creek and Strawberry and camped at Willow Creek.

June 14–Drove west in the a.m. across Sweetwater about 10:00 o’clock and then we came on the ridges ’til noon. We came to Sweetwater and nooned at an aban­doned mine. After noon we came on to Pacific Springs. Cross the summit of the mountain and camped at what is called the Big Meadows.

June 15, Sunday–Started in the a.m. and came to Dry Sandy and filled our kegs and made a dry camp at noon. After noon we came to the Little Sandy again and camped. I was good and sick.

June 16–We came to the Big Sandy and crossed at a stage station and stopped without any grass. I was very sick. After noon we came to Big Sandy again and camped. Only 50 wagons were in camp. I felt some better at night.

June 17–Started early in the morning and made a 15-mile drive to Green River [Wyoming, Elev. 6080]. Stopped for noon and in the afternoon we crossed the rive on a ferry boat and drove about four miles and camped on the river.

June 18–Drove northwest 10 miles and came to the river and stopped for noon on Green River. After noon we came northwest over the roughest roads in the terri­tory, wind and dust prevailed. Stopped overnight on Slate Creek.

June 19–Started in the morning and came about eight miles and stopped for noon on a little creek, Slate Creek by the way. After noon we came about 15 miles over the mountains and camped on the Little Branch, plenty of good wood for a change.

June 20–Started over the mountains in the morning and came to Hams Fork at noon. After noon we laid over and went fishing.

June 21–Laid over all day and grazed the horses. I went out prospecting and found some fine views. Stood guard ’til midnight.

June 22, Sunday–Started early and came across the creek and up the mountain which was nine miles to the top. We seen a Snake Indian family, the first red-skins we have seen. Came down the mountain which was very steep and stopped for noon in a canyon. Afternoon we came over some high mountains and down steep hills. The wind high and the dust blew fearful. Went into camp on Bear River.

June 23–Started in the morning and came up to Coalville, made a halt there and came across Thompson Creek on a little Toll Bridge. Came up the river and stopped for noon. Dick Polito was too sick to ravel and we laid over.

June 24–Dick was no better, and we laid over all day. Cold in the morning, ice ½ inch thick. In the p.m. Susie [wife, Susie Miller Davis] and May, [sister May Davis Gowing] and George [brother-in-law George Columbus Gowing] and myself went fishing. Caught some trout. It was my night to be on guard, and I turned in early. In the p.m. we had a Shawnee Indian family visit our camp.

June 25–Felt very poorly. Started early and come over some foothills ’til noon. Stopped for noon on Bear River. In the p.m. we came through a fearful canyon in the mountains to Montpelier [Idaho]. Done some trading, a very nice little town. Our first night in Idaho.

June 26–Started in the a.m, came three miles to Bennington, a little Mormon town, came through quite a settlement. By irrigating, there is considerable grain raised in Bear River Bottom. Stopped for noon on a little branch nine miles south of Soda Springs. At noon we had some Indians come to camp. After having some fun with them, we gave them some bread, and they took a walk. We also came to a little town by the name of Washington.

June 27–In the morning the guards reported 10 head of horses gone. Soon the boys were out on the hunt. About nine a.m. they found them up on the foothills. We started out and came to Soda Springs for noon. We went into camp and vis­ited the springs, a natural Soda Fountain. After noon we up the creek one mile to the big spring. The greatest curiosity I ever seen in my life. After drinking ’til we thought we would have to use a stomach pump, we came back to camp. Then we visited Formation Spring where grass and leaves petrify. Then came up and while writing my memoranda supper was called. Stopped now and dealt on potatoes for a while.

June 28–Started early in the a.m. Came down Bear River about five miles and got lost and divided from part of the train. Came over some high mountains and camped on a little creek about three o’clock. Concluded to stay ’til a.m.

June 29, Sunday–Started in the morning and recrossed the mountains. Had a hard time of it over the prairie ’til about 3:00 o’clock. We found water than then we got our horses and mules poisoned and we drenched them with lard, and by sundown they were better.

June 30th–Stared in the a.m. Some of our horses which were poisoned were very sick. We drove ’til noon and camped on a little creek. In the p.m. we came up with the rest of the train. Explanations were made, and at night I stood guard ’til 1 o’clock.

July 1, Tuesday–In the a.m. it was cold. The ice was ½ inch thick. We drove to a new foothill and came two miles northwest. Stopped for noon. After noon we drove eight miles to Blackfoot Creek. Crossed on an old rickety bridge and came up the creek a little ways and corralled. Had plenty of wild currants.

July 2–We drove northeast ’til noon and made a dry camp. In the p.m. we came to Eagle Rock and had some shoeing done and got some feed. We concluded not to cross the river there, so we left town and came down the river about three miles and camped our first night on the Snake River.

July 3–We travelled down Snake River ’til noon. After noon we came to Central Ferry. Stopped there a few minutes and came one mile below and camped. I stood guard from 12 ’til day. The old Fourth of July dawned clear and bright.

July 4–Independence Day was fine in the a.m. About 7:00 a.m. the wind began to blow. We decided to cross the Snake River and made arrangements to ferry the stream. The wind was high and the current was swift. At last we were all safely over. We came down river ’til noon, stopped two hours. The wind and sand blew ’til we started, and after noon we came on down the river and camped at a big spring.

July 5–Laid over all day and went fishing. Caught a fine mess of trout and mended some boots and shoes, also shod the mules.

July 6–Laid over all forenoon. In the p.m. we came eight miles to a spring and camped. Was on guard til midnight and had a stampede and brought the horses into the corral.

July 7–We all turned out early in the a.m, filled our kegs and jugs and started on the long drive over lava beds and dust six inches thick. A rough road, lost a wag­ontire and stopped and replaced it. Came on and stopped on the desert. No water and no grass. Afternoon we came on to one of those three buttes and found some water. The hardest days drive we have had on the trip, 30 miles without water or grass over lava bed and sand.

July 8–Started early in a.m, drove eight miles to Little Lost River. Watered and came on up the stream a few miles and stopped for noon. After noon we came eight miles and camped on Lost River. The grass was very poor.

July 9–Started early, came west about 10 miles to a little branch and stopped ’til noon. We came on over lava beds, rough beyond description. There had been a volcano eruption there years ago, said to have been in ’49. We came on and camped at the foot of a mountain, good wood, water and grass.

July 10–Started and came over lava beds ’til noon. We had the roughest road on the trip. The lava bed is a perfect mass of rocks, hard as flint and in all manner of shapes, just as it ran when it was melting hot. After noon we came around the base of the mountains and camped on a little branch. After supper, songs were sung by some cowboys which were listened to with much interest by all.

July 11–We started in the a.m. and came on to a little brook and stopped for noon. After noon we came on and cross Little Wood River. Then we came three miles over the mountain to Silver Creek and camped.

July 12–Laid over all day and went fishing. Caught a fine lot of trout, and the women washed.

July 13, Sunday–Started early and drove 10 miles to Big Wood River, crossed and came on about a mile to the Hill. Stopped for noon, fine grass. After noon we came over some very rocky roads. We travelled about 25 miles and camped on a little branch. Was on guard ’til midnight.

July 14–We came west over fine roads, through a beautiful valley ’til noon when we stopped and grazed our horses by a little brook. After noon we came on over to Camas Prairie, as fine a valley as I even seen. Water every mile or two. We camped on Soldier Creek. We had a big stampede about 10 o’clock.

July 15–We came on west up the valley ’til noon. Caut six sage chickens. Stopped for noon on a nice little brook. After noon we came on over some hills and got three more sage hens and camped in a little canyon.

July 16–We came over some of the darndest of hills that we have ever seen ’til noon and stopped on a little branch on the Little Camas Prairie. After noon we came over another range of mountains and stopped on a little branch for night.

July 17–Drove over some high mountains ’til noon and stopped on a little branch. After noon we drove over one of the highest mountains I have ever seen. We de­cided not to go the Toll Road. We came to the hill, hitched four horses to each wagon and came up to the top. We at last came to water and camped.

July 18–Started and came over the mountains ’til noon. After noon came on and stopped at Indian Creek Store for a few minutes, then drove on six miles and camped.

July 19–Started and came seven miles and stopped to graze. When we came on to Boise City. There I concluded to stop a while.

August 19–After a stay of a month in Boise City, we were once more on the road to Oregon. During our stay in Boise, I worked at a mill for $40 per month. We came down the river 12 miles and camped. Had a jolly good time once more.

August 20–Started in the morning and came down the valley, a very pretty valley, came to Middletown and stopped for noon west of town. After noon we came on down the valley ’til evening and camped at a ranch.

August 21–Started early in the morning and came down the valley to McDowell’s Ferry. Crossing the Snake River on a good boat and at noon found ourselves in Oregon. After noon we came on an 18-mile drive to Willow Creek and camped. Slept rather late. Got up and took a boat ride and after two or three hours we started and came to Tub Springs for noon. After noon we came on to Birch Creek and camped.

August 23–Started about 7:00 a.m. and came three miles to the Ferry. There we struck the Burnt River Toll Road, bought our ticket and came about six miles to Burnt River. Stopped for noon. After noon we came up Burnt River, past the mines and camped on the River.

August 24, Sunday–Laid over all day, went to the top of the mountain, took a look at the hills, came down and stayed in camp all day.

August 25–Started in the a.m. Came up Burnt River Valley, passed some mines and a few ranches. After noon we came on northwest over some hills and up the valley and camped on a little brook at the head of Burnt River.

August 26–Started early and drove 12 miles to Baker City. Stopped there a little while, came on four miles and stopped for noon. After noon we came on to Sand Creek and camped.

August 27–Very cool in the morning. Came north, stopped for noon seven miles from Union at a schoolhouse. After noon we came down and into Grande Rounde Valley. Came through Union and camped on Catherine Creek.

August 28–Started in the morning and west northwest about four miles and then we went north and then east, having taken the wrong road. We lost some time. We got to Grande Rounde River about noon. Stopped for noon. After noon we came on to Summerville and stopped two miles east of town. [In Oregon for good!]”

On September 11, 1889 George Columbus Gowing purchased 160 acres from James Henry Barton and Olive J. Barton in Wallowa County, Oregon for $700, according to Wallowa County deed records.

They celebrated their golden wedding anniversary April 17, 1929 at the home of their daughter Effie Susan Gowing Barton in Eugene, Oregon. They were residents of Cottage Grove at that time. Susie Davis of Buckley, Washington, a bridesmaid of Emily May Davis Gowing attended.

They were enumerated in the 1900 census of Wallowa County, Oregon, Prairie Creek township:

Gowing, George C. 44, born in Texas, farmer
May 41, born in Illinois
Frank C. 20, born in Oregon
Earl H. 17, born in Oregon
Effie S. 15, born in Oregon
Jessie 2, born in Oregon”

Emily May Davis Gowing died October 2, 1931 in Cottage Grove, Oregon. George Columbus Gowin died there January 23, 1940 of arteriosclerosis, according to his death certificate. They were buried in Prairie Creek Cemetery at Joseph. He died at the home of his daughter Jessie Fern Gowing Moon, accord­ing to his obituary published in the “Eugene Register-Guard.” He was “survived by one son, Earl H. Gowing, Lorane; two daughters, Effie Barton, Eugene and Jessie Fern Gowing Moon, Cottage Grove; one brother, William Gowing, La Cygne, Kansas; one sister, Clara Early, Joseph, Oregon, 17 grandchildren and two great-grandchildren.”

Children born to George Columbus Gowing and Emily May Davis Gowing include:

Frank Clark Gowing born March 24, 1880
Harlan Earl Gowing born September 2, 1881
Effie Susan Gowing born September 16, 1884
Lois May Gowing born May 20, 1892
Jessie Fern Gowing born June 25, 1898

Frank Clark Gowing, son of George Columbus Gowing and Emily May Davis Gowing, was born March 24, 1880 in Union County, Oregon. He was married to Helen Eliza Shaw, daugh­ter of Edward Shaw, June 16, 1904. She was born in LaPorte, Indiana March 6, 1881. He died March 29, 1935 at Joseph. No children were born to Frank Clark Gowing and Helen Eliza Shaw Gowing.

Harlan Earl Gowing, son of George Columbus Gowing and Emily May Davis Gowing, was born September 2, 1881 in Is­land City, Oregon, according to Mary Ruth Marsh Gowing. He was married October 4, 1908 at Joseph, Oregon to Nellie Ruth Vaughan, daughter of Frank E. Vaughan and Minnie Ruth Adams Vaughan. She was born June 11, 1891 at Imnaha, Ore­gon. The wedding took place at the home of the bride’s grand­father, A. W. Adams with Guy Barton and Effie Barton as wit­nesses.

They lived at Joseph until 1916, and removed to Eugene, Ore­gon before 1919. He died February 9, 1955 at Cottage Grove. She died there December 1, 1973.

Children born to Harlan Earl Gowing and Nellie R. Vaughn Gowing include:

George Ralph Gowing born December 3, 1910
Lena May Gowing born August 9, 1913
Lois Ruth Gowing born July 9, 1916
Lucille Geraldine Gowing born September 12, 1919
Harold Frank Gowing born November 18, 1921
Nina Effie Gowing born December 28, 1923
Willard Earl Gowing born December 20, 1926
Mildred Maxine Gowing born April 4, 1928
Melvin Lee Gowing born April 12, 1931
Wilma Ione Gowing born April 23, 1933
Marvin Dale Gowing born in April 1935

George Ralph Gowing, son of Harlan Earl Gowing and Nellie Ruth Vaughan Gowing, was born December 3, 1910 at Joseph. He was married March 25, 1933 to Cleo Wanda Gunter. She was born March 4, 1914 to Osburn Russell Gunter and Lena Pyritz Gunter. George Ralph Gowing died December 2, 1979 at Cottage Grove, and she died there June 28, 1989.

Children born to George Ralph Gowing and Cleo Gunter Gowing include:

Janet Evelyn Gowing born March 8, 1936
Marilyn Kay Gowing born October 14, 1937

Janet Evelyn Gowing, daughter of George Ralph Gowing and Cleo Gunter Gowing, was born March 8, 1936 at Eugene. She was married March 25, 1957 to John Dilon Collingwood, son of Clayton Collingwood and Lisa Garter Collingwood. He was born March 21, 1930 at Moarhead, Minnesota, according to Janet Evelyn Collingwood. In 1960 they lived in Mountain Home, Idaho and in 1977 at Eugene.

Children born to them include:

George Clayton Collingwood born April 29, 1960
David Allen Collingwood born April 24, 1961
Wanda Lee Collingwood born February 7, 1963
Mark Ray Collingwood born March 3, 1965
Linda Marie Collingwood born April 17, 1977

Marilyn Kay Gowing, daughter of George Ralph Gowing and Cleo Gunter Gowing, was born October 14, 1937 at Eugene. She was married in 1960 at Creswell, Oregon to John Wayne Hooton Jr,. son of John Wayne Hooton and Naomi Ginniger Hooton. He was born December 24, 1932 in California.

Children born to them include:

Susan Kay Hooton born January 21, 1962
Jerry Wayne Hooton born June 18, 1964

Lena May Gowing, daughter of Harlan Earl Gowing and Nellie Ruth Vaughan Gowing, was born August 9, 1913 at Joseph. She was married June 11, 1933 to James Robert Horn at Lu­rane, Oregon. He was born May 4, 1909 to Frank Horn and Flossie Donners Horn. James Robert Horn died April 28, 1981 at Eugene. No children were born to them.

Lois Ruth Gowing, daughter of Harlan Earl Gowing and Nellie Ruth Vaughan Gowing, was born July 9, 1916 at Joseph. She was married November 23, 1939 to Herbert Oscar Peterson, son of Oscar Peterson and Celia Erickson Peterson at Eugene. He was born June 5, 1908. He died August 28, 1987.

Children born to them include:

Duane Herbert Peterson born July 31, 1943
Richard Lee Peterson born November 27, 1946

Lucille Geraldine Gowing, daughter of Harlan Earl Gowing and Nellie Ruth Vaughan Gowing, was born September 12, 1919 at Eugene. She was married to Lyle Gordon July 21, 1938 at Cottage Grove. He was born September 8, 1909 at Globe, Ore­gon to Charles F. Gordon and Elva Gordon. He died October 14, 1972 at Cottage Grove. No children were born to them.

Harold Frank Gowing, son of Harlan Earl Gowing and Nellie Ruth Vaughn Gowing, was born November 18, 1921 at Eugene, Oregon. He was married there May 8, 1952 to Mary Ruth Marsh. She was born February 28, 1927 to Mills Barton Marsh and Martha Elizabeth Torrence Marsh at Nate, Oregon.

Following discharge from the U.S. Navy, he was employed as a lift truck operator. They were members of Friends Church.

Children born to Harold Frank Gowing and Mary Ruth Marsh Gowing include:

Darold Frank Gowing born May 27, 1953
Harlan Mills Gowing born May 4, 1961

Darold Frank Gowing, son of Harold Frank Gowing and Mary Ruth Marsh Gowing, was born May 27, 1953 at Eugene. He was married at Seattle to Catherine Lane Collins February 23, 1980. She was born there June 25, 1952 to Wetherill Collins and Josephine Lane Collins.

Children born to Donald Frank Gowing and Catherine Lane Collins Gowing include:

Crystal Dawn Gowing born June 18, 1981
Amber Gwen Gowing born April 20, 1986
Jeffrey John Gowing born July 8, 1989

Harlan Mills Gowing, son of Harold Frank Gowing and Mary Ruth Marsh Gowing, was born May 4, 1961 at Eugene. He was married to Nancy Kay Woodruff July 6, 1985. She was born on Okinawa April 16, 1961 to Harlan Woodruff and Emmeline Woodruff.

Children born to Harlan Mills Gowing and Nancy Kay Woodruff Gowing include:

Thomas Harlan Gowing born December 10, 1988
Don Harold Gowing born March 31, 1991

Nina Effie Gowing, daughter of Harlan Earl Gowing and Nellie Ruth Vaughan Gowing, was born December 20, 1923 at Eu­gene. She was married about 1941 to Morris Barger. She was remarried in California October 24, 1955 to Calvin Arley Aubrey. He was born April 24, 1925 in Cottage Grove to Rowe Arley Aubrey and Eva May Goodul Aubrey.

Children born to them include:

Barbara Jean Barger Aubrey born December 4, 1946

Willard Earl Gowing, son of Harlan Earl Gowing and Nellie Ruth Vaughan Gowing, was born in Eugene December 20, 1926. He was married to Rena Ruth Rieck July 2, 1949 at Eu­gene. She was born October 31, 1930 at Eugene to Wilhelm Gustine Rieck and Helen M. Gilbert Rieck.

Children born to William Earl Gowing and Rena Ruth Reick Gowing include:

Louise Diane Gowing born July 24, 1952
Clifford Gowing born January 21, 1954

Louise Diane Gowing, daughter of William Earl Gowing and Rena Ruth Reick Gowing, was born July 24, 1952 at Eugene. She was married January 13, 1976 to Richard Neil Finn, son of William Finn and Blanche Finn. No children were born to them.

Clifford Gowing, son of William Earl Gowing and Rena Ruth Reick Gowing, was born January 21, 1954 at Eugene.

Mildred Maxine Gowing, daughter of Harlan Earl Gowing and Nellie Ruth Vaughan Gowing, was born April 4, 1928 in Eu­gene. She was married to Robert Donald Reed August 17, 1946 in Eugene. They were divorced about 1973.

Children born to them include:

Robert Donald Reed, Jr. born June 19, 1951
Beverly Lee Reed born April 8, 1953
Brenda Kay Reed born January 3, 1957

Melvin Lee Gowing, son of Harlan Earl Gowing and Nellie Ruth Vaughan Gowing, was born in Eugene in April 1931. He was married to Phyllis Ann Perkins at Cottage Grove July 29, 1954. She was born at Bagley, Minnesota to Raleigh Walter Perkins and Lulu Glendell Hanks Perkins. No children were born to Melvin Lee Gowing and Phyllis Ann Perkins Gowing.

Wilma Ione Gowing, daughter of Harlan Earl Gowing and Nel­lie Ruth Vaughan Gowing, was born April 23, 1933 at Eugene. She was married November 27, 1954 to Jack R. Ryder at Lo­rane. He was born November 5, 1930 in Oregon to John Ryder and Helen Bethel Ryder.

Children born to them include:

Dale Ryder born August 13, 1960
Michael Ryder born September 12, 1961
Bruce Ryder [twin] born July 18, 1967
Glenn Ryder [twin] born July 18, 1967

Marvin Dale Gowing, son of Harlan Earl Gowing and Nellie Ruth Vaughan Gowing, was born April 6, 1935 in Eugene. He was married to Marie Arlene Yearous July 1, 1956 at Cottage Grove. She was born March 17, 1938 at Eugene to Lester Al­bert Yearous and Gennieve Loretta Buffington Yearous.

Children born to Marvin Dale Gowing and Marie Arlene Yearous Gowing include:

Kelly Marie Gowing born June 12, 1958
Jeffrey Dale Gowing born December 1, 1961

Effie Susan Gowing, daughter of George Columbus Gowing and Emily May Davis Gowing, was born September 16, 1884 in Union County, Oregon. She was married to Guy Earl Barton May 16, 1906. She died in February 1966 at Eugene.

Children born to them include:

Maecel Avelyn Barton born July 28, 1908
Minnie “Lois” Barton born May 3, 1910
Mina Fern Barton born July 3, 1914

Lois May Gowing, daughter of George Columbus Gowing and Emily May Davis Gowing, was born May 20, 1892 at Joseph. She died there June 9, 1896.

Jessie Fern Gowing, daughter of George Columbus Gowing and Emily May Davis Gowing, was born June 25, 1898 at Joseph. She was married June 16, 1921 to Herbert Vance Moon who was born February 15, 1893. She died May 10, 1956 at Springfield, Oregon and he died there in 1977.

Children born to them include:

Mae Etta Moon born August 27, 1922
Agnes Fern Moon born October 24, 1923
Velda Eileen Moon born July 15, 1935

Sarah Jane Gowing, daughter of William Pleasant Gowing and Priscilla Miller Gowing, was born about 1858 in Anderson County, Kansas. She was married to John Calvin in Linn County about 1880. He was born in 1837 in Missouri. They removed to Wallowa County, Oregon about 1883. She died there during the 1930s.

Children born to them include:

Fred Calvin born about 1881
Lee Calvin born about 1883
Hama Calvin born about 1884

Nancy Gowing, daughter of William Pleasant Gowing and Priscilla Miller Gowing, was born about 1860. It is believed that she died in childhood.

Clarinda Gowing, daughter of William Pleasant Gowing and Priscilla Miller Gowing, was born about 1862 in Anderson County. She was married about 1880 to Jerome Early in Linn County.

Children born to them include:

Minnie Early born about 1884

William Pleasant Gowing, Jr, son of William Pleasant Gowing and Priscilla Miller Gowing, was born about 1865 in Anderson County. On September 9, 1883 J. H. Jones was appointed his guardian in regard to his inheritance in his father’s estate.

He was married about 1898 in Linn County to Rosa Lee McKinley. She was born in June 1875 in Linn County. He died in 1952.

Children born to William Pleasant Gowing, Jr. and Rosa Lee McKinley Gowing include:

William P. Gowing born about 1900
Clarence C. Gowing born about 1902
Albertis N. Gowing born about 1905
George Earl Gowing born about 1908
Frederic D. Gowing born about 1909
Charles Dell Gowing born in 1912

William P. Gowing, son of William Pleasant Gowing, Jr. and Rosa Lee McKinley Gowing, was born about 1900 in Kansas. He was married to Blessing Caito about 1923. He died in 1970. Children born to William P. Gowing and Blessing Caito Gow­ing are unknown.

Clarence C. Gowing, son of William Pleasant Gowing, Jr. and Rosa Lee McKinley Gowing, was born about 1902 in Kansas. He died in 1968.

Albertis N. Gowing, son of William Pleasant Gowing, Jr. and Rosa Lee McKinley Gowing, was born about 1905 in Kansas. He was married to Pauline Bates about 1928. He died in 1980. Children born to Albert N. Gowing and Pauline Botts Gowing are unknown.

George Earl Gowing, son of William Pleasant Gowing, Jr. and Rosa Lee McKinley Gowing, was born about 1908 in Kansas. He died in 1952.

Frederic D. Gowing, son of William Pleasant Gowing, Jr. and Rosa Lee McKinley Gowing, was born about 1909 in Kansas. He died in 1959.

Charles Dell Gowing, son of William Pleasant Gowing, Jr. and Rosa Lee McKinley Gowing, was born about 1912 in Kansas.

Sarah Ann Gowing, daughter of George Washington Gowing and Nancy Webb Gowing, was born about 1826. She was mar­ried February 19, 1846 in Cass County to Joseph Cummings.

Susannah Gowing, daughter of George Wash­ington Gowing and Nancy Webb Gowing, was born in 1829 in Washington County, Indiana. In the 1850 census of Cass County she was reported at age 20. She was married to James S. Cox April 17, 1853 in Cass County. They removed to Kansas about 1858.

They were enumerated in the 1860 census of Linn County, Scott township, Household 160-60:

“Cox, James 35, born in Kentucky, farmer
Susan 33, born in Indiana
John 8, born in Missouri
Sarah 6, born in Missouri
Josephine 1, born in Kansas
Going, Drewery 21, born in Arkansas.”

George Washington Gowing, Jr, son of George Washington Gowing and Nancy Webb Gowing, was born August 14, 1830 in Washington County. He as reported as an 18-year-old in the 1850 census of his fa­ther’s house­hold. On November 12, 1854 he was married to Eliza­beth Miller, daughter of John Miller and Margaret Melton Miller, according to Cass County Mar­riage Book B, page 244.

In the fall of 1855 they removed to Linn County, Kansas. where she died about 1859, possibly in childbirth. He was a sol­dier in the Civil War. He was remarried about 1866 to Sarah Webb Town, widow of Ezay Town. In 1895 he was a resident of Le Cygne. He died September 1, 1902 in Linn County.

Children born to George Washington Gowing, Jr. and Elizabeth Miller Gowing include:

William Thomas Gowing born about 1856
Cordelia “Delia” Gowing born about 1858
Mary Gowing born about 1859

Children born to George Washington Gowing, Jr. and Sarah Webb Town Gowing include:

John R. Gowing born about 1867
Isaac Gowing born about 1869

William Thomas “Big Tom” Gowing, son of George Washing­ton Gowing, Jr. and Elizabeth Miller Gowing, was born about 1856 in Linn County, Kansas. He was married February 20, 1883 to Ella Trinkle, daughter of Henry Trinkle and Mary Ann Froman Trinkle. She was born in 1862 in Kansas.

Children born to William Thomas Gowing and Eula Trimble Gowing include:

Edith Gowing born in August 1884

Edith Gowing, daughter of William Thomas Gowing and Mary Ann Froman Gowing, was born in August 1884. She was mar­ried about 1902, husband’s name Priser and lived in La Cygne.

Cordelia “Delia” Gowing, daughter of George Washington Gowing, Jr. and Elizabeth Miller Gowing, was born about 1858. She was married January 1, 1882 to Bronson Sherman who was born in 1856 in Linn County. They removed to Col­orado where a son was born in 1888.

Children born to them include:

Stanley Sherman born in 1888

Mary Gowing, daughter of George Washington Gowing, Jr. and Elizabeth Miller Gowing was born about 1859.

John R. Gowing, son of George Washington Gowing, Jr. and Sarah Webb Town Gowing, was born about 1867. On January 5, 1882, “John R. Gowing, minor heir of H. R. Webb, de­ceased” received $200 from his estate.

Isaac Gowing, son of George Washington Gowing, Jr. and Sarah Webb Town Gowing, was born about 1869.

Patsey Gowing, daughter of George Washington Gowing and Nancy Webb Gowing, was born in Washington County in 1834. She ap­peared as a 16-year-old in the 1850 census of Cass County.

Francis M. Gowen, son of George Washington Gowing and Nancy Webb Gowing, was born in 1836 Washington County. He was recorded at age 14 in the 1850 cen­sus of Cass County.

“Francis Goin” was enumer­ated as the head of a household in the 1880 cen­sus of Stafford County, Kansas, Enumera­tion Dis­trict 329, York township:

“Goin, Francis 43, born in Kentucky
Mourning 33, born in Kentucky
Mabel 4, born in Kansas
Francis 2, born in Kansas
Perry 6/12, born in Kansas”

Also in York township nearby was enumerated the house­hold of:

“Goin, William 42, born in Kentucky
Eliza 37, born in Iowa
Mary E. 17, born in Iowa
Edward 13, born in Iowa
Daniel 12, born in Iowa
Forrest 6, born in Iowa”

Jerome Gowing, son of George Wash­ington Gowing and Nancy Webb Gowing, was born in 1838 Washington County, Arkansas. He was re­ported as a 12-year-old in the 1850 census of his father’s house­hold. He was enumerated in the 1860 cen­sus of Linn County at age 21, living in the household of his sister, Susan Gowing Cox.

Jerome Gowing was married about 1860, wife’s name Malita. He was enumerated as the head of a household in the 1860 cen­sus, Household 82-82, very near to his father in Scott township:

“Gowing, Jerome 24, farmer
Malita 22,
Nancy 2
James 11/12”

On October 9, 1864 he was shown with his fa­ther on the muster roll of Company K, Sixth Kansas Cavalry Regiment. He may have been killed during the Civil War.

Children born to Jerome Gowing and Malita Gowing in­clude:

Nancy Gowing born about 1858
James Gowing born about 1859

Nancy Gowing and James Gowing were enumerated in the 1870 census of Linn County living with their grandmother.

Lafayette Gowing, son of George Washington Gowing and Nancy Webb Gowing, was born about 1841 in Washington County. He en­listed at Ft. Scott, Kansas March 1, 1863 in Company L, Sixth Kansas Cavalry Regiment to serve for three years.

He was killed in the Bat­tle of Stone’s Farm in Arkansas April 5, 1864 by guerillas. His party of 25 cavalrymen was attacked by 300 Confederates and overwhelmed en route to Rossville, 30 miles from Ft. Smith, according to a statement filed by Capt. Henry P. Ledger, his commanding officer. He was due $28.27 for pay and horse equipment. He was described as “age 22, 5’11” tall, dark complexion, dark eyes, dark and by occupation a farmer.”

Chauncy Drury Gowing, son of George Washing­ton Gowing and Nancy Webb Gowing, was born in 1839 in Arkansas. He was shown as an 11-year-old in the 1850 census of Cass County.

Nancy Gowing, daughter of George Washington Gowing and Nancy Webb Gowing, was born November 25, 1844 in Cass County, Missouri. She was recorded as an eight-year-old in the 1850 census of Cass County. She was married about 1871 to Joseph Cox in Linn County, Kansas. Joseph Cox died July 4, 1906, according to Gertrude Elizabeth Gowing Tracy. Nancy Gowing Cox died March 15, 1919 in Linn County..

Clarinda Gowing, daughter of George Wash­ington Gowing and Nancy Webb Gowing, was born in 1844 in Missouri. She was enumerated as a six-year-old in the 1850 census of Cass County.

Thomas Benton Gowing, son of George Washington Gowing and Nancy Webb Gowing, was born March 23, 1847 in Bates County, Missouri, according to Mary Ruth Marsh Gowing. He appeared in the 1850 census of Cass County as “Thomas Going, age 4.” He lived with his father in Linn County, after the Civil War and then removed to Missouri. He was recorded in the 1860 and 1870 census enumerations of Linn County, Kansas.

He was married February 23, 1873 to Rosanna Johnston who was born in 1854. She died December 14, 1881, and he was remarried to Arminda Elizabeth Dyer January 1, 1883. She was born February 7, 1858 in Doniphan County, Kansas to William Jasper Dyer and Rhoda Jane Wheeler Dyer. He died February 18, 1930, and Arminda Elizabeth Dyer Gowing died February 17, 1953 in Centerview, Missouri.

Children born to Thomas Benton Gowing and Rosanna John­ston Gowing include:

William Pinkney Gowing born July 8, 1874
Samuel Drury Gowing born March 12, 1877

Children born to him and Arminda Elizabeth Dyer Gowing in­clude:

Dow Dyer Gowing born June 30, 1884
Terra Benton Gowing born June 3, 1886

A granddaughter of Thomas Benton Gowing, Gertrude Eliza­beth Gowing Tracy, died at Salinas, Kansas about 1981.

William Pinkney Gowing, son of Thomas Benton Gowing and Rosanna Johnston Gowing, was born July 8, 1874. He was married January 4, 1899 to Eva Gibson. He died in 1935.

Children born to William Pinkney Gowing and Eva Gibson Gowing include:

Glen Gibson Gowing born March 12, 1906

Samuel Drury Gowing, son of Thomas Benton Gowing and Rosanna Johnston Gowing, was born March 12, 1877. He was married to Nora Shaffer November 25, 1900. She died in 1951, and he died October 2, 1953.

Children born to Samuel Drury Gowing and Nora Shaffer Gowing include:

Milburn Lorene Gowing born April 22, 1901
Marjorie Gowing born August 17, 1903
Samuel Drury Gowing, Jr. born October 20, 1918

Milburn Lorene Gowing, daughter of Samuel Drury Gowing and Nora Shaffer Gowing, was born April 22, 1901. She was married June 30, 1930 to Julius Holt.

Marjorie Gowing, daughter of Samuel Drury Gowing and Nora Shaffer Gowing, was born August 17, 1903. She was married June 30, 1951 to Hugo Peterson. Children born to them in­clude:

Lois Lou Peterson born August 6, 1932

Samuel Drury Gowing, Jr, son of Samuel Drury Gowing and Nora Shaffer Gowing, was born October 20, 1918. He was married June 30, 1951 to Ruth Craghan. Children born to Samuel Drury Gowing, Jr. and Ruth Craghan Gowing are un­known.

Dow Dyer Gowing, son of Thomas Benton Gowing and Ar­minda Elizabeth Dyer Gowing, was born June 20, 1884 at La Cygne, Kansas. He was married January 1, 1908 to Minnie Bell Hughes. She died August 30, 1955 and was buried in Oaklawn Cemetery at La Cygne. He died February 6, 1963 at Long Beach, California and was buried beside his wife..

Children born to Dow Dyer Gowing and Minnie Bell Hughes Dyer include:

Ethel Nevoe Gowing born September 29, 1909
Fay Ileen Gowing born December 31, 1911
Mary Alcena Gowing born December 22, 1913
Dow Dyer Gowing, Jr. born July 7, 1920

Ethel Nevoe Gowing, daughter of Dow Dyer Gowing and Min­nie Belle Hughes Gowing, was born September 29, 1909 at Gandy, Nebraska. She was married January 1, 1930 to Eugene F. Massey.

Fay Ileen Gowing, daughter of Dow Dyer Gowing and Minnie Belle Hughes Gowing, was born December 31, 1911 at La Cygne, Kansas. She was married November 9, 1935 to Charles Austin Morgan.

Mary Alcena Gowing, daughter of Dow Dyer Gowing and Minnie Belle Hughes Gowing, was born December 22, 1913 at Willow Springs, Missouri. She was married February 14, 1934 to Ivan George Karr. He was born July 29, 1910 to Leroy Hampton Karr and Alpha Smith Karr. In 1935 they lived at Fontana, Kansas.

Children born to them include:

Georgia Alcena Karr born March 22, 1935
Glen Elton Karr born November 8, 1938

Dow Dyer Gowing, Jr, son of Dow Dyer Gowing and Minnie Belle Hughes Gowing, was born July 7, 1920 at Towanda, Kansas. He was married September 27, 1941 to Stella Hill.

Children born to Dow Dyer Gowing, Jr. and Stella Hill Gowing include:

Sharon Dowlene Gowing born June 19, 1942
Tommy Louis Gowing born March 6, 1944

Sharon Dowlene Gowing, daughter of Dow Dyer Gowing, Jr. and Stella Hill Gowing was born June 19, 1942 at Downey, California. She was married May 6, 1963 to James Michael Moore who was born at Lamar, Missouri January 17, 1937, ac­cording to Sharon Dowlene Gowing Moore.

Children born to them include:

Sandra Dee Moore born July 13, 1961
Cynthia Lee Moore born March 19, 1963
Michael Dow Moore born September 26, 1965

Tommy Louis Gowing, son of Dow Dyer Gowing, Jr. and Stella Hill Gowing, was born March 6, 1944 at Weeksville, North Carolina. He was married at Simi Valley, California October 8, 1966 to Sandra Lee who was born February 11, 1942 at Cantopolis, California.

Children born to Tommy Louis Gowing and Sandra Lee Gow­ing include:

Kerri Lynn Gowing born May 15, 1967

Terra Benton Gowing, son of Thomas Benton Gowing and Ar­minda Elizabeth Dyer Gowing, was born June 3, 1886 at La Cygne. He was married to Mrs. Effie Leone Hughes Knutson September 3, 1906 at Emporia, Kansas. She was the daughter of Joel Jackson Hughes and Laura Sage Hughes and was born March 10, 1885 in Custer County, Nebraska. In 1909 they lived at Lincoln, Nebraska. In 1924 they lived in Miami County, Kansas.

She died March 14, 1955 at Bradenton, Florida, and he died June 20, 1965 at Parsons, Kansas. He was buried in Oaklawn Cemetery at La Cygne.

Children born to Terra Benton Gowing and Effie Leone Hughes Knution Gowing include:

Arthur Loyd Gowing born May 27, 1907
Gertrude Elizabeth Gowing born December 9, 1909
Laura Verne Gowing born December 18, 1911
Samuel Leroy Gowing born August 14, 1913
Joel Thomas Gowing born June 26, 1915
Oscar Richard Gowing born May 2, 1919
Glena Leone Gowing born February 9, 1921
Hazel Eunice Gowing born April 29, 1923
Myrta Louise Gowing born October 9, 1924

Arthur Loyd Gowing, son of Terra Loyd Gowing and Effie Leone Hughes Knution Gowing, was born May 27. 1907. He was married May 19, 1929 to Anna Louise Barkley, daughter of Robert Barkley and Addie Carpenter Barkley. She was born May 28, 1912 at Parker, Kansas.

Children born to Arthur Loyd Gowing and Anna Louise Barkley Gowing include:

Dwight Eldon Gowing born December 20, 1932
Raymond Everett Gowing born February 6, 1935
John Phillip Gowing born April 19, 1938
Thelma Lorraine Gowing born August 29, 1939

Dwight Eldon Gowing, son of Arthur Loyd Gowing and Anna Louise Barkley Gowing, was born December 20. 1932 at North La Cygne, Kansas. He was married April 1, 1956 to Betty Lou Hanley at Parsons, Kansas where she was born December 4, 1936. No children were born to Dwight Eldon Gowing and Betty Lou Hanley Gowing.

Raymond Everett Gowing, son of Arthur Loyd Gowing and Anna Louise Barkley Gowing, was born February 6, 1935 near Fontana, Kansas in Linn County. He was married March 23, 1959 to Leah Rose Rausherberger who was born February 28, 1938 at Grandview, Iowa. In 1960 they lived at Rockford, Illi­nois.

Children born to Raymond Everett Gowing and Leah Rose Rausherberger Gowing include:

Steven Ray Gowing born March 17, 1960
Melody Joy Gowing born February 17, 1961

John Phillip Gowing, son of Arthur Loyd Gowing and Anna Louise Barkley Gowing, was born April 19, 1938 at Parsons, Kansas. He was married there February 21, 1959 to Marquetta Len Tallman, daughter of Donald Tallman and Ruth Morland Tallman. She was born February 28, 1941 in South Lyon, Michigan. In 1961 they lived in Rockford, Illinois.

Children born to John Phillip Gowing and Marquetta Len Tall­man Gowing include:

Marcia Lynn Gowing born June 26, 1961
Mark John Gowing born November 9, 1964

Thelma Loraine Gowing, daughter of Arthur Loyd Gowing and Anna Louise Barkley Gowing, was born August 29, 1939 at Parsons. She was married there June 27, 1959 to Rev. Jack Ray Hooten who was born at Exeter, Missouri October 26, 1933. In 1961 they lived in Oelwein, Iowa and at Newton, Iowa in 1966.

Children born to them include:

Anita Kay Hooten born August 3, 1961
Jack Ray Hooten born December 5, 1962
Lynda Renae Hooten born September 20, 1966

Gertrude Elizabeth Gowing, daughter of Terra Benton Gowing and Effie Leone Hughes Gowing, was born December 9, 1909 at Millard, Nebraska. She was married November 6, 1929 in Olathe, Kansas to Theodore Jackson, son of Peter Jackson and Elizabeth Jackson. She was remarried to Ralph L. Tracy June 1, 1933 at Paola, Kansas. He was born in November 1907. In 1939 they lived at Cortez, Colorado. She died at Salinas, Kansas about 1981

Children born to Theodore Jackson and Gertrude Elizabeth Gowing Jackson include:

Harold Emmett Jackson born October 17, 1930

Children born to Ralph L. Tracy and Gertrude Elizabeth Gow­ing Jackson Tracy include:

Naomi Beth Tracy born September 30, 1939

Naomi Beth Tracy, daughter of Ralph L. Tracy and Gertrude Elizabeth Gowing Jackson Tracy, was born September 30, 1939 at Cortez, Colorado. She was married June 1, 1958 at Salina, Kansas to Homer Edward Arnold, son of Oliver Arnold and Livia Reigle. He was born August 13, 1938 at West Plains, Missouri.

Children born to Homer Edward Arnold and Naomi Beth Tracy Arnold include:

Kimberly Beth Arnold born September 12, 1959
Edward Lee Arnold born July 21, 1961
Guy Ray Arnold [twin] born October 31, 1966
Ty Oliver Arnold [twin] born October 31, 1966

Samuel Leroy Gowing, son of Terra Benton Gowing and Effie Leone Hughes Gowing, was born August 14, 1913 in DeSoto, Kansas. He was married at La Cygne December 25, 1934 to Rena Lucille Calbein, daughter of Walter Ulysses Calbein and Eulah Elliott Calbein who was born April 3, 1916 in Drexel, Missouri.

Children born to Samuel Leroy Gowing and Rena Lucille Cal­bein Gowing include:

Eulah Leone Gowing born June 25, 1942

Eulah Leone Gowing, daughter of Samuel Leroy Gowing and Rena Lucille Calbein Gowing, was born June 25, 1942 at Ben­nington, Kansas. She was married October 13, 1958 at Bakers­field, California to Virgil Holt, son of Oswald Holt and Tivia Holt. He was born in Oklahoma November 7, 1942. She was remarried in Reno, Nevada December 31, 1976 to John L. Botzman, son of Peterman Botzman and Marion Kasswell Botzman.

Children born to them include:

Charles Leroy Holt born March 3, 1951
Cindy Ann Holt born February 22, 1952
Ricky Ray Holt born February 6, 1954
Ronny Dean Holt born January 21, 1960

Joel Thomas Gowing, son of Terra Benton Gowing and Effie Leone Hughes Gowing, was born June 26, 1915 at Minneapo­lis, Kansas in Ottawa County. He was married July 30, 1935 at Wellman, Iowa to Katheryn Lucille Winegarten who was born October 8, 1915 at Victor, Iowa. He served in the U.S. Army during World War II. He died April 13, 1969 at Winfield, Kansas.

Children born to Joel Thomas Gowing and Katheryn Lucille Winegarten Gowing include:

Patricia Anne Gowing born May 18, 1941
Evelyn Kay Gowing born July 8, 1943

Patricia Anne Gowing, daughter of Joel Thomas Gowing and Katheryn Lucille Wingarten Gowing, was born May 18, 1941 at Tama, Iowa. She became an airline hostess.

Evelyn Kay Gowing, daughter of Joel Thomas Gowing and Katheryn Kay Gowing, was born July 8, 1943 at Bennington, Kansas. She also became an airline hostess.

Oscar Richard Gowing, son of Terra Benton Gowing and Effie Leone Hughes Gowing, was born May 2, 1919 at Towanda, Kansas. He was married July 9, 1941 at Salina to Ruth Cobler, daughter of Charles Cobler. She was born September 29, 1922. Oscar Richard Gowing served in the U.S. Army during World War II.

Children born to Oscar Richard Gowing and Ruth Cobler Gowing include:

Dennis Lynn Gowing born June 23, 1944
Donna Faye Gowing born October 17, 1946
Deanna Jean Gowing born August 5, 1949
David Gowing born November 27, 1951

Dennis Lynn Gowing, son of Oscar Richard Gowing and Ruth Cobler Gowing, was born June 23, 1944 at Salina. He was married about 1967, wife’s name Gale. She was born April 8, 1947.

Children born to Dennis Lynn Gowing and Gale Gowing in­clude:

Shawn Gowing born July 7, 1969
Shannon Lynn Gowing born November 22, 1977

Donna Faye Gowing, daughter of Oscar Richard Gowing and Ruth Cobler Gowing, was born October 17, 1946 in Salina. She was married at Lecompton, Kansas August 2, 1965 to Walter Confer.

Children born to them include:

Scott Dwaine Confer born August 1, 1966
Todd Confer born about 1968
Donette Confer born January 5, 1970

Deanna Jean Gowing, daughter of Oscar Richard Gowing and Ruth Cobler Gowing, was born August 5, 1949 at Salina. She was married about 1975 to John E. Newman who was born Jan­uary 29, 1947. In 1978 they lived at Lawrence, Kansas.

Children born to them include:

Charles Patrick Newman born August 3, 1978

David Gowing, son of Oscar Richard Gowing and Ruth Cobler Gowing, was born November 27, 1951 at Salina.

Glena Leone Gowing, daughter of Terra Benton Gowing and Effie Leone Hughes Gowing, was born February 9, 1921 at Fontana, Kansas. She was married May 21, 1943 to an insur­ance man, Gerald R. Rose, son of Frank Rose and Lola Carroll Rose. He was born January 29, 1912 at Ft. Morgan, Colorado.

Children born to them include:

Lorraine Kay Rose born January 31, 1945
Linda Jo Rose born June 15, 1946
Laura Lee Rose born September 27, 1952
Lynn Marie Rose born August 9, 1955

Hazel Eunice Gowing, daughter of Terra Benton Gowing and Effie Leone Hughes Gowing, was born April 23, 1923 at Louisburg, Kansas. She was married July 24, 1945 to Neal Hill, a plumber of Salina, Kansas. Later she was remarried to Ray Swarts and again to David Frankl.

Children born to them include:

Gloria Sue Hill born August 28, 1945
Barbara Gail Hill born April 12, 1951

Myrta Louise Gowing, daughter of Terra Benton Gowing and Effie Leone Hughes Gowing, was born October 9, 1924 at Louisburg. She was married about 1947, husband’s name Lu­cart. In 1949 they lived in Sioux City, Iowa.

Children born to them include:

Terra Joe Lucart born September 16, 1949
Pamela Lucart born June 19, 1951

Garrett Gowens, son of Charles Gowens and Elizabeth “Betsy” Blair Gowens, was born about 1805, probably in Claiborne County, Tennessee. He was married about 1828, wife’s name Hulda. In 1830 he appeared in the census of Gallatin County, page 182, as the head of a household adjoining that of his fa­ther. His family was recorded as:

“Goin, Garrott white male 20-30
white female 20-30
white male 0-5”

He was to receive $2 from his father’s estate, according to his father’s will written June 18, 1847.

“Garret Goens” was enumerated August 13, 1850 as the head of Household 305-305 in the federal census of Gallatin County, page 174:

“Goens, Garrett 45, born in KY, farmer, $500 real
estate, illiterate
Hulda 42, born in KY, illiterate
Molley 20, born in KY, illiterate
Elizabeth 18, born in KY
Mary F. 16, born in KY
Lucynda 14, born in KY, attending school
Ellen H. 12, born in KY, attending school
Nancy I. 10, born in KY. attending school
Paschal T. 8, born in KY, attending school
Lemuel 6, born in KY,
Julia 1, born in KY
Thomas A. 4, born in KY”

“Garet Goens” reappeared living near Warsaw in the 1860 cen­sus of Gallatin County, page 64:

“Goens, Garet 51, born in KY, farmer, $400 real
estate
Lucinda 21, born in KY
Nancy Jane 19, born in KY
Pascal Todd 16, born in KY, farmer
Lennie 14, born in KY, female
Thomas I. 12, born in KY
Malvina 10, born in KY
Furnish, Sandford 24, born in KY, laborer
Mary 23, born in KY
Goens, Freelove 4, born in KY
Garet, Jr. 2, born in KY”

Garrett Gowens made an affidavit March 14, 1863 in Gallatin County in regard to the pension application of his sister Nancy Gowens Furnish in which he stated that he was present at her wedding in 1820.

Children born to Garrett Gowens and Hulda Gowens include:

[son] born about 1828
Lucynda Gowens born about 1829
Molley Gowens born about 1830
Nancy Jane Gowens born about 1831
Elizabeth Gowens born about 1832
Mary F. Gowens born about 1833
Lennie Gowens born about 1835
Ellen H. Gowens born about 1836
Thomas A. Gowens born about 1837
Lemuel Gowens born about 1838
Malvina Gowens born about 1840
Paschal Todd Gowens born November 6, 1844
Freelove Gowens born about 1846
Garrett Gowens, Jr. born about 1848
Julia Gowens born about 1849

Paschal Todd Gowens, son of Garrett Gowens and Hulda Gowens, was born November 6, 1844 in Gallatin County, Kentucky. He was married about 1866, wife’s name un-known.

He was remarried February 15, 1870 in nearby Trimble County, Kentucky, at age 26 to Margaret Mariah Ashby who was born in Indiana about 1842, according to the research of Virginia G. Taylor.

They were enumerated in the 1880 census of Trimble County:

“Goins, Pascal 38, born in KY, father born in KY,
mother born in KY
Mariah 38, born in IN, father born in KY,
mother born in VA
Charles 8, born in KY, father born in KY,
mother born in IN
Garriet 7, born in KY, father born in KY,
mother born in IN”

When he died he was buried in Holsclaw-Richmond Cemetery in Mt. Carmel community in Trimble County.

Charles R. Goins, son of Pascal Goins and Mariah Ashby Goins and namesake of his great-grandfather, Charles Gowens, a Revolutionary soldier, was born in February 1872 in Trimble County. He appeared in the 1880 census as an eight-year-old.

Garrett Goins, son of Pascal Goins and Mariah Ashby Goins and namesake of his grandfather, was born about 1873 in Trimble County. He was enumerated as a seven-year-old in the 1880 census of his parents’ household.

Freelove Gowens, daughter of Garrett Gowens and Hulda Gowens, was born about 1846. “Freelove Goins” was married in 1876 to George West, according to Gallatin County Marriage Book 3, page 126.

James Blair Gowens, son of Charles Gowens, a Revolutionary soldier of Virginia and Elizabeth “Betsy” Blair Gowens of Maryland, was born June 9, 1810, probably in Claiborne County, Tennessee. He was married September 14, 1835 to Mary An Livinia Jackson in Gallatin County, Kentucky. She was born there December 11, 1816 to George Jackson and Su­sannah Ray Jackson who were married there November 11, 1814, according to Greg A. Bennett.

George Jackson was enumerated August 14, 1850 as the head of Household 330-330 in Gallatin County, page 176:

“Jackson, George 67, born in Virginia, farmer,
$1,000 in real estate, illiterate
Susannah 56, born in Kentucky, illiterate
Joshua 25, born in Kentucky, illiterate
Leticia 18, born in Kentucky
Goens, Mary I. 7, born in Kentucky
Spoonman, Sally 56, born in Kentucky”

James Blair Gowens was enumerated in the 1840 census of Gallatin County, page 18:

“Goins, James white male 20-30
white female 20-30
white female 0-5
white female 0-5
white female 0-5”

Another unidentified “James Goins” was enumerated as the head of a household in the 1840 census of Gallatin County, page 19:

“Goins, James white male 20-30
white female 40-50
white female 5-10
white male 0-5”

James Blair Gowens con­tinued in Kentucky in 1842. It is be­lieved that Mary An Livinia Jackson Gowens died about 1843, probably in childbirth with their sixth child. When his father wrote his will June 18, 1847 in Gallatin County, he mentioned that he and his wife “have been living for a considerable time past with our son, James Goens” and specified that his 107-acre farm where they then lived would go to James Blair Gowens.

James Blair Gowens was then married to 16-year-old Sarah Lu­visa Jackson January 13, 1844 in Warsaw, Kentucky.. She, a younger sister of Mary An Livinia Jackson Gowens, was born March 8, 1827 in Gal­latin County to George Jackson and Su­sannah Ray Jack­son.

James Blair Gowens was enumerated as the head of House­hold 331-331 August 14, 1850 in Gallatin County between his father and his father-in-law:

“Goens James 45, born in KY, farmer,
$1,000 real estate, illiterate
Louisa 28, born in KY, illiterate
Alice 16, born in KY, attending sch.
Susan 14, born in KY, attending sch.
Elizabeth 12, born in KY, attending sch.
Luvina 10, born in KY, attending sch.
George James 8, born in KY, attending sch.
Julia 6, born in KY
Sarah F. 4, born in KY
Liticia 2, born in KY”

About 1852, they moved to Mills County, Iowa, near Council Bluffs, probably to join his brother, George Washington Gowens who had apparently moved to Iowa about 1824. A guardianship application was filed by “James Going” February 5, 1855 naming “Allisa, Susan Ann, Elizabeth Ellen, Lovinna and George James Going.” The document was probably filed to comply with Iowa laws.

In the 1856 state census of Mills County the household of James Blair Gowens which had “been in Iowa for four years” was recorded as Dwelling 52:

“Goins, James 39, farmer, born in Kentucky
Lovisa 28, born in Kentucky
Elizabeth E. 16, born in Kentucky
Lovina 14, born in Kentucky
George James 13, born in Kentucky
Julia Ann 8, born in Kentucky
Serena 3, born in Iowa
James Samuel 14, born in Kentucky”

The household of James Blair Gowens were enumerated June 19, 1860 in Mills County, Oak township, Household 236-187:

“Goings, James 50, born in Kentucky
Louisa 33, born in Kentucky
Lavina 18, born in Kentucky
George J. 16, born in Kentucky
Julian 14, born in Kentucky
Serine 7, born in Iowa
Washington 4/12, born in Iowa”

Nearby was the household of his son-in-law, Daniel Turner, Household 139-104:

“Turner, Dan 25, born in England, farmer
Susan 22, born in Kentucky
John 3, born in Iowa
Elizabeth 1, born in Iowa
Goin, Sam 18, born in Kentucky, laborer”

They reappeared there in the next census taken July 14, 1870 as Household 125-124:

“Gowens James 59, born in Kentucky
Laura 39, born in Kentucky
Julia 22, born in Kentucky
Serena 17, born in Iowa
Washington 10, born in Iowa
Turner Frederic 28, born in England, farm lab”

Adjoining, as Household 124-123, was the family of Daniel Turner, son-in-law of James Blair Gowens:

“Turner Daniel 34, born in England
Susan 33, born in Kentucky
Emma 9, born in Iowa
Laura 1, born in Iowa”

Nearby in Household 139-129 was enumerated:

“Turner Freelove 30, born in England
Elizabeth 30, born in Kentucky
Mary 9, born in Iowa
Laura 4, born in Nebraska
George 2, born in Nebraska

Three Turner brothers were married to daughters of James Blair Gowens, according to Walter Earl Turner, Foundation member of Orem, Utah.

In 1876 James Blair Gowens and Sarah Luvisa Jackson Gowens removed to Coleman County, Texas, according to “Roots in Young County, Texas.” He received a land patent from the State of Texas November 14, 1883, a week after his son, Gen­eral Washington Gowens received a patent. The patent was issued to “James H. Gowens,” according to Coleman County Deed Book L, page 244.

The land, 160 acres, adjoined that of his son on Hord’s Creek “10 miles northwest of Coleman City.” James Blair Gowens sold his patent to F. M. May April 16, 1891 for $800, according to Coleman County Deed Book 65, page 41. Sarah Luvisa Jackson Gowens died May 31, 1892 and was buried at White Chapel Cemetery, according to Coleman County Cemetery Book 2, page 61.

James Blair Gowens received a judgement November 28, 1893 in litigation with Mrs. Virginia A. Huff, according to Coleman County Deed Book 35, page 111. He received his patent back from F. M. May September 18, 1895 in exchange for May’s promissory notes, according to Coleman County Deed Book 35, page 229. The land was valued at $1,126.70 at that time.

On January 17, 1896 James Blair Gowens gave a deed to one-half interest in his patent to his son, General Washington Gowens for $300, according to Coleman County Deed Book 34, page 624. James Blair Gowens received a redemption cer­tificate from the State Comptroller July 29, 1896 showing re­ceipt of delinquent taxes for 1895, according to Coleman County Deed Book 40, page 33.

James Blair Gowens died October 5, 1898 in Old Silver Val­ley community, according to Coleman County Cemetery Book 2, page 61 and was buried beside his wife in White Chapel Cemetery.

Children born to James Blair Gowens and Mary An Livinia Jack­son Gowens include:

Alice “Alisa” Gowens born August 15, 1836
Susannah “Susan” Gowens born March 9, 1838
Elizabeth Ellen Gowens born March 17, 1839
Lovnah/Levina Gowens born October 6, 1840
George James Gowens born April 3, 1842
Eva Gowens born in 1843

Children born to James Blair Gowens and Sarah Luvisa Jackson Gowens in­clude:

Julia Ann Gowens born February 3, 1846
Sarah F. Gowens born about 1847
Leticia Gowens born about 1848
Lillie “Lela” Gowens born about 1849
Serenah Gowens born March 24, 1853
General Washington Gowens born March 8, 1860
Charity Elizabeth Gowens born about 1861

W. N. Whittington and William N. Pharis made affidavits con­cerning the births of three of the children, “Julia, Serenah and General Washington Gowens” October 21, 1902, ac­cording to in Cole­man County Deed Book 51, page 214.

Alice “Alisa” Gowens, daughter of James Blair Gowens and Mary An Livinia Jackson Gowens, was born August 15, 1836 in Gallatin County. A family tradition states, “The mother of Alice Gowen was a Jackson, a relative to Pres. Andrew Jack­son.”

She was married March 22, 1854 in Glenwood, Iowa to Chris­tian Statler. He died about 1860, and she, a widow with two daughters, was remarried to Benjamin Henry Berryman April 10, 1862 in Glenwood. He was born January 5, 1826 at Glas­gow, Kentucky. They removed to Nebraska soon after their marriage.

They removed to Coleman County, Texas in 1882 and affiliated with the First Baptist Church of Talpa, Texas. She died there October 24, 1891. She was buried in White Chapel Cemetery in Coleman County. He died October 2, 1915 and was buried beside his wife.

Children born to Christian Statler and Alice “Alisa” Gowens Statler include:

Mary Anne Statler born April 3, 1856
Alice Statler born October 9, 1857

Children born to Benjamin Henry Berryman and Alice “Alisa” Gowens Statler Berryman include:

James Freelove Berryman born April 2, 1863
William Henry Berryman born May 11, 1865
George Carroll Berryman born May 25, 1867
Benjamin Berryman born April 17, 1869
John Green Berryman born May 23, 1871
Minnie Berryman born December 4, 1873
Ida Belle Berryman born February 15, 1876

Susannah “Susan” Gowens, daughter of James Blair Gowens and Mary An Livinia Jackson Gowens, was born March 9, 1838 in Gallatin County. She was married November 18, 1855 at Glenwood, Iowa to Daniel P. Turner. He was born June 10, 1835 in England.

Daniel P. Turner was enumerated in the 1860 census of Mills County as the head of Household 139-104:

“Turner, Dan 25, born in England, farmer
Susan 22, born in Kentucky
John 3, born in Iowa
Elizabeth 1, born in Iowa
Goin, Sam 18, born in Kentucky, laborer”

Susannah “Susan” Gowens Turner and her husband joined her father in moving to Coleman County, Texas in 1876. He died there March 9, 1894 and was buried in White Chapel Cemetery. She died there September 3, 1909 and was buried beside her husband.

Children born to Daniel P. Turner and Susannah “Susan” Gowens Turner include:

John Turner born about 1857
Elizabeth Turner born about 1859
Emma Turner born about 1861
Laura Turner born about 1869
Ed Turner born about 1872
Ida Mae Turner born December 8, 1873
William P. Turner born June 22, 1881
Allie Turner born about 1885

John Turner, son of Daniel P. Turner and Susannah “Susan” Gowens Turner, was born in Iowa about 1857. He was enu­merated as a three-year-old in the 1860 census, but did not reappear in the 1870 census.

Elizabeth Turner, daughter of Daniel P. Turner and Susannah “Susan” Gowens Turner, was born about 1859. She was enu­merated in the 1860 census of her parents household as a one-year-old. She did not reappear in 1870.

Emma Turner, daughter of Daniel P. Turner and Susannah “Susan” Gowens Turner, was born about 1861 in Mills County. She was married about 1879, husband’s name Delmeator, ac­cording to the research of Evelyn Cordell.

Laura Turner, daughter of Daniel P. Turner and Susannah “Susan” Gowens Turner, was born about 1869.

Ed Turner, son of Daniel P. Turner and Susannah “Susan” Gowens Turner, was born about 1872 in Mills County.

Ida Mae Turner, daughter of Daniel P. Turner and Susannah “Susan” Gowens Turner, was born December 8, 1873 at Coun­cil Bluffs. She was brought to Coleman County by her parents in 1876. She was married there August 2, 1891 to Theodore McDowell “Mac” Griffis. He was born December 14, 1869 in Green County, Missouri. He died October 17, 1956 and was buried in Valera Cemetery, Valera, Texas. She died February 4, 1960 and was buried beside her husband.

Children born to them include:

Augustus Benton “Gus” Griffis born March 13, 1893
Laura Leola Griffis born January 12, 1895
Ralph Hershell Griffis born August 11, 1897
Theodore McDowell Griffis, Jr. born January 12, 1901
Emmett Roy “Bill” Griffis born March 17, 1903
Lois G. Griffis born March 27, 1905
Olive Griffis born November 4, 1907
Birdie Alice Griffis born September 26, 1910
Marjorie Myrl Griffis born June 20, 1913
Leitha Pauline Griffis born January 9, 1916
Geraldine Gwendolyn Griffis born July 6, 1919

William P. Turner, son of Daniel P. Turner and Susannah “Susan” Gowens Turner, was born June 22, 1881 in Coleman County. He was married August 11, 1901 to Lily Maud Sewell. She was born there November 14, 1884 to Peter Whittenburg Sewell and Arminta Madelyn Jameson Sewell. William P. Turner died about 1906.

Children born to William P. Turner and Lily Maud Sewell Turner include:

Caroline Idell Turner born June 14, 1902

Allie Turner, daughter of Daniel P. Turner and Susannah “Susan” Gowens Turner, was born about 1885 in Coleman County. She was married about 1905, husband’s name Neiman. One son was born to them:

Rudolph Neiman born about 1908

Elizabeth Ellen Gowens, third daughter of James Blair Gowens and Mary An Livinia Jackson Gowens [Newsletter, February 1993], was born in Gallatin County March 17, 1838. She was married, at age 20, standing in her parents’ parlor, to Freelove Turner November 19, 1858 at Glenwood, Iowa, in Mills County, according to Greg A. Bennatt, a descendant. Her older sister, Susannah “Susan” Gowens and his older brother, Daniel Turner had repeated the same vows there a short time earlier. Their siblings, Serenah Gowens and Albert Wright Turner [Newsletter, December 1994], were destined to follow in their matrimonial steps a few years later.

Freelove Turner was born November 10, 1839 at Grimsby, Lin­colnshire to George Freelove Turner and Elizabeth Neal Turner. He came with his mother and some siblings in March 1853 aboard the S. S. Indian to the United States, entering at New Orleans. His father had preceded them to America three years earlier. The family took passage on a steamboat up the Mississippi River, then up the Missouri River to St. Marys, Iowa where his father awaited them.

The young couple settled on a farm in Mills County surrounded by other members of their two large families. Their story was first written by Greg A. Bennatt, U. S. Coast Guard, Seattle, Washington. It is through his courtesy that much of the Turner-Gowens material is included in this manuscript.

Later Freelove Turner sold out and removed to Plattsmouth, Nebraska where they were living when the Civil War com­menced. There he volunteered November 3, 1862 to serve in Company H, Nebraska Second Cavalry Regiment. He was dis­charged December 8, 1863. His wife’s family, being from Kentucky, were Southern sympathizers. [I wonder how well he got along with his in-laws?]

After his tour of duty, he took his family and moved back to Iowa. There he purchased land in 1869 in Mills County Sec­tion 33, Township 73, Range 43, and settled down to continue his life with his wife and family. A few years after their return, Elizabeth Ellen Gowens Turner died of typhoid fever Septem­ber 27, 1880 at the age of 42. Her 12-year-old son, George William Turner also died in the same epidemic. Only one photograph of Elizabeth Ellen survives. Both were buried on the top of the hill in the Gowens‑Turner Cemetery. During their 20-year mar­riage it seems they had a good life together and enjoyed happi­ness.

Freelove was married a second time to his sister-in-law Mary Rebecca Baker Gowens, widow of George James Gowens.

Freelove Turner died December 28, 1922 in Pottawattamie County, Iowa and was buried at Glenwood. His widow sur­vived him for many years and married for a third time, hus­band’s name Tally. She died Jan 1, 1944 in Sulphur, Oklahoma.

Children of the first marriage, all born in Mills County, in­clude:

Freelove Turner born about 1856
Mary Frances Turner born March 8, 1861
Henry Turner born in 1863
Dora Luvica Turner born October 29, 1866
George William Turner born April 10, 1868
Clara Ramona Turner born September 21, 1870
Alice Suanna Turner born February 20, 1873
Carl James Turner born November 2, 1875
Eva Loreign Turner born August 23, 1878

Four sons and a daughter were born, also in Mills County to Freelove Turner and Mary Rebecca Baker Gowens Turner:

Minnie Minerva Turner born March 29, 1883
John Earl Turner born August 23, 1885
Benjamin Franklin Turner born April 21, 1887
Luther Daniel Turner born January 2, 1889
Curtiss Turner born in 1891

Mary Frances Turner, daughter of Freelove Turner and Eliza­beth Ellen Gowens Turner, was born March 8, 1861 in Mills County. She was married February 7, 1881 to Ebenezer Netherton Dosh at Glenwood. He was born August 10, 1859 in Cass County, Nebraska to Joseph M. Dosh and Lucy Ann Rease Dosh. They accompanied her father to Coleman County, Texas

Children born to them include:

Albert C. Dosh born about 1883
Grace Turner Dosh born June 20, 1885
Lucy Ann M. Dosh born about 1887
Freelove O. Dosh born about 1890

Grace Turner Dosh, daughter of Ebenezer Netherton Dosh and Mary Frances Turner Dosh, was born June 20, 1885 in Coleman County, Texas. She was married there November 22, 1903 to Chester Hogan Brooks who was born September 11, 1879 in Vernon County, Missouri to Joseph Franklin Brooks and Sara E. Finch Brooks.

Children born to them include:

Frank E. Brooks born about 1905
Mary Alice Brooks born August 16, 1907
Helen G. Brooks born about 1909
Edna J. Brooks born about 1912

Mary Alice Brooks, daughter of Chester Hogan Brooks and Grace Turner Dosh Brooks, was born August 16, 1907 in Coleman County. She was married to Caryl V. Webster November 28, 1928 in Yakima Washington. He was born Jan­uary 20, 1908 in Laport City, Iowa to Frank A. Webster and Ellen P. Tallman Webster.

Children born to them include:

Diane Rae Webster born about 1930
Carla M. Webster born about 1933
Joanne J. Webster born about 1936
Valery Nan Webster born October 22, 1941

Valery Nan Webster, daughter of Caryl V. Webster and Mary Alice Brooks Webster, was born in Seattle, Washington Octo­ber 22, 1941. She was married there August 18, 1960 to William Lee Bennatt. He was born July 18, 1938 in Tacoma, Washington to William D. Bennatt and Helen L. Nelson Ben­natt.

Children born to William Lee Bennatt and Valery Nan Webster Bennatt include:

Gregory Allen Bennatt born April 2, 1962
Todd Andrew Bennatt born about 1965
David Bennatt born about 1968

Clara Ramona Turner, daughter of Freelove Turner and Elizabeth Ellen Gowens Turner, was born September 21, 1878 in Mills County. “She was married twice; first to my great grandfather, Daniel Livingstone Wilson who died of cancer in 1907, leavving her a widow with five children, wrote Viola Lawrence, a descendant.

She died in Mills County at age 103.

Viola Lawrence, a great-granddaughter, wrote October 25, 1999:

“It was common knowledge from the time I was a small child, there was something different about her. She had unusual features, compared to the rest of the family. She had a very broad nose from the bridge to the tip, very full lips, coal black hair, dark eyes. She was a small woman. On her 100th birthday, I was sent a picture of her and a newspaper story about her life. I had not seen her for 30 years, yet the picture still looked like the woman I remembered. She died at 103 years.

One of Clara’s daughters is alive now [October 25, 1999] and in her 90s, and I regret to say, the subject of the Gowens past is not open for discussion. It was a taboo all these years until I found “us” through the Foundation. There’s so much I would like to know about our family, unfortunately it will stay with the past. Just recently I tried to get some answers without being specific, inquiring about great-grandma’s nationality. The best I could get was ‘you know we are all a bit of many peoples.'”

Lovnah Gowens, daughter of James Blair Gowens and Mary An Livinia Jackson Gowens, was born October 6, 1840 in Gallatin County. She appeared as an 18-year-old in the household of her father in the 1860 census of Mills County.

George James Gowens, son of James Blair Gowens and Mary An Livinia Jackson Gowens, was born in Gal­latin County April 3, 1842, according to a granddaughter, Etta Mary Lavica Gowens Baker. He was married about 1868 to Mary Baker who was born April 23, 1850 in Iowa. In 1869 they lived in Sarpy County, Nebraska. They were located in Iowa in 1870 and in Glenwood, Iowa in 1875.

He was enumerated as the head of a household in the 1880 cen­sus of Mills County, Iowa, Enu­meration District 27, page 23 in St. Mary’s township:

“Goings, George, 38, born in Kentucky
Mary 28, born in Iowa
James 10, born in Nebraska
Loisa J. 8, born in Nebraska
Sarah 7, born in Iowa
William 6, born in Iowa
Charles 4, born in Iowa”

They continued in Glenwood, Iowa in 1895. After his death Mary Rebecca Baker Gowens was remarried to Freelove Turner, her brother-in-law. He died December 28, 1922 in Pottawattamie County, Iowa. Mary Rebecca Baker Gowens Turner was married for the third time, husband’s name Tally. Mary Rebecca Baker Gowens Turner Tally died January 1, 1944 in Sulphur, Oklahoma

George James Gowens and Mary Rebecca Baker Gowens were the parents of:

James Freelove Gowens born September 15, 1869
Louisa J. “Lou” Gowens born October 23, 1870
Sarah Gowens born October 23, 1872
George William Gowens born December 13, 1873
Charles Gowens born December 3, 1875

James Freelove Gowens, son of George James Gowens and Mary Rebecca Baker Gowens, was born September 15, 1869 at Plattsmouth, Nebraska. Early in his life his parents moved to Iowa, where he was reared, according to “Reverend John Haynie” by Loyce Haynie Rossman. He was enumerated in the 1880 census of Mills County, Iowa as a 10-year-old.

In 1895 he was living in Fredericksburg, Texas where he was married on May 7, 1895 to Annie Brooks Dobbin, who was born in March 1875 at Fayetteville, Texas. Annie Brooks Dob­bin Gowens was an enthusiastic genealogist and spent 50 years researching her family history.

Annie Brooks Dobbin Gowens, a consummate genealogist, was one of the first family researchers in Texas. Working with lim­ited resources in largely rural sections of the state, she amassed an excellent genealogical collection.

At the time of her death in 1961, she had qualified for mem­bership in Colonial Dames of the Na­tion, Colonial Dames of the XVII Century, Magna Charta Dames, Daughters of the Ameri­can Revolution on eight accepted lines, Daughters of the War of 1812 and United Daughters of the Confederacy [on two grandfa­thers and several uncles]. She was the subject of a sec­tion in “Notable Women of Texas” by Ina Mae Ogletree McAdams published in 1962.

She enthusiastically pursued family lore for 50 years. She be­gan her family history research in 1911 under most primitive condi­tions compared with advantages offered to genealogists today. She started with a lead pencil that cost a penny and a Big Chief tablet that cost a nickel.

She did not have the 1850 census, the Soundex or even the ball­point pencil. There were no electric typewriters, no copy ma­chines, no Polaroids, no fax machines, no transistors, no com­puters, no modems, no laser printers, no satellite communica­tions and no surname foundations.

Besides her work in genealogy, Annie Brooks Dob­bin Gowens was known for a treasured heir­loom, an Oriental silk spread highly decorated with embroidered flowers, birds, and butter­flies. Its main feature is a bird of paradise surrounded in a per­fect circle by flowers and butterflies in the center.

It contains scores of embroideries, no two are exactly alike. The spread, reportedly purchased by Jean Lafitte, the pirate, in the Orient, was brought to his Galveston Island pirate colony, about 1820. Mrs. Gowens’ grandfather, Robert Hardin Tobin, bought the spread in 1859, and it became a prized family pos­session.

At various times the spread was exhibited in the Smithsonian Institution, the Metropolitan Museums, and at the Chicago World’s Fair of 1933 and was featured in “The Designer” maga­zine in 1905.

The spread and Mrs. Gowens were featured in the August 21, 1949 issue of the “San Antonio Express Magazine.” In 1994, the spread is owned by a grand­daughter, Lou Edith White Smith of Del Rio.

James Freelove Gowens was a 32nd degree Mason, ac­cording to “Reverend John Haynie.” In 1900 the couple lived at West Point, Fayette County, Texas. In 1905 they lived in Milam County, Texas. In De­cember 1913 they lived at Cameron, Texas.

James Freelove Gowens lived in Bay City, Texas. He died in 1924 in Del Rio, Texas. Mrs. Gowens remained there at 218 East Gibbs Street and worked for J. C. Penney Company for over 20 years. She died in Del Rio on July 21, 1961, according to Texas BVS File 43006.

Children born to James Freelove Gowens and Annie Brooks Dobbin Gowens include:

Etta Mary Levica Gowens born March 4, 1896
James Haynie Gowens born September 23, 1897
Robert A. Gowens born March 20, 1900
Blackstone White Gowens born December 6, 1905
Annie Louise Hardin Gowens born May 16, 1908
John Witherspoon Gowens born De­cember 18, 1913

Etta Mary Levica Gowens, daughter of James Freelove Gowens and Annie Brooks Dobbin Gowens, was born March 4, 1896 in Kerrville, Texas. She was a school teacher in Bay City, Texas for approximately 20 years. She was mar­ried on February 21, 1926 to Calvin E. Baker.

James Haynie Gowens, son of James Freelove Gowens and An­nie Brooks Dobbin Gowens, was born September 23, 1897 in Rosebud, Texas. He was married in 1922 to Lau­ramay Rich­mond, ac­cording to Annie Brooks Dobbin Gowens. He was a railway station agent and telegraph opera­tor at Cline, Uvalde County, Texas for many years.

Robert A. Gowens, son of James Freelove Gowens and An­nie Brooks Dobbin Gowens, was born March 20, 1900 in West Point, Texas. He was married first to Hattie Gooch and a sec­ond time to Ruby Dennis Howard. Later he was an insurance consultant in Los Angeles, California. He was married to Artie Webb, according to An­nie Brooks Dobbin Gowens. Of Artie Webb Gowens nothing more is known.

Children born to Robert A. Gowens and Hattie Gooch Gowens include:

Robert A. Gowens, Jr. born about 1925

Children born to Robert A. Gowens and Ruby Dennis Howard Gowens include:

Annette Gowens born about 1930

Blackstone White Gowens, son of James Freelove Gowens and Annie Brooks Dobbin Gowens, was born December 6, 1906 in Rockdale, Texas, according to BVS File 138892.

He was married about 1927 to Edna Turman and became a salesman. In 1958 he was assistant manager of Singer Sewing Machine Company at Corsicana, Texas. According to the city directory he and his wife lived at 308 W. 6th Av­enue in 1958 and 1960.

In 1973 Blackstone White Gowens and Edna Turman Gowens were living at 1305 Taylor, Sonora, Texas. He died at age 67, of heart fail­ure, at Hudspeth Hospital in Sonora. He was buried in Masonic Cemetery, Del Rio, ac­cording to Sut­ton County Death Book 10, page 105.

Annie Louise Hardin Gowens, daughter of James Freelove Gowens and Annie Brooks Dobbin Gowens, was born May 16, 1907 in Rockdale, ac­cording to BVS File 180150. About 1926 she was married to Andy White, a Val Verde County, rancher.

Children born to Andy White and Annie Louise Hardin Gowens White include:

Lou Edith White born about 1928

John Witherspoon Gowens, son of James Freelove Gowens and Annie Brooks Dobbin Gowens, was born December 18, 1913 in Cameron, Texas. He was listed as a waiter for E&E Sandwich Shop and lived at 1010 San Anto­nio, Austin, Texas in the 1935 city directory of Austin.

He was married to Patricia Kelley March 5, 1938 in Austin, ac­cording to Travis County Mar­riage Book 36, page 11. Of Pa­tricia Kelly Gowens nothing more is known.

John Witherspoon Gowens was remarried November 12, 1938 in Uvalde to Nettie Mae Smith who was born August 8, 1915 in Huffman, Texas.

In 1940 John Witherspoon Gowens, a civil engi­neer and Net­tie Mae Smith Gowens lived in Del Rio. In 1946 they resided at Lampasas, Texas. On March 23, 1948 they gave a war­ranty deed to A. J. Hall to a lot in Lampasas, ac­cording to Lampasas County Deed Book 87, page 228.

John Witherspoon Gowens, an engineer for Texas State High­way Department and Nettie Mae Smith Gowens, were shown in residence in Amarillo, Texas from 1949 through 1972. In 1949 they lived at 1610 Lincoln, in 1951 at 410 West 17th Street, from 1952 until 1964 at 4208 Monroe, from 1962 through 1969 at 4701 Lamar Street and from 1970 to 1972 at 4803 Journey Street.

John Witherspoon Gowens and Nettie Mae Smith Gowens re­ceived a warranty deed from C. L. Munday October 25, 1950 to a lot in Broad­moor Addition, Amarillo, according to Ran­dall County Deed Book 124, page 426. Nettie Mae Smith Gowens was a public school clerk, working at the Wilson School from 1951 until 1958 and at Forrest Hill School from 1959 until 1972.

Children born to John Witherspoon Gowens and Nettie Mae Smith Gowens include:

John Witherspoon Gowens II born October 8, 1940
Bobby Louis Gowens born November 12, 1946

John Witherspoon Gowens II, son of John With­erspoon Gowens and Nettie Mae Gowens, was born October 8, 1940 at Del Rio, accord­ing to BVS File 92353. In the 1957 and 1958 editions of the Amarillo City Directory he was living with his parents. In 1957 he was a parking lot atten­dant and in 1958 was a packer for Amarillo Hardware Company. In 1960 he was listed as a student in the house­hold of his par­ents.

John Witherspoon Gowens II was graduated from the United States Naval Academy June 5, 1963. He was mar­ried June 15, 1963 to Margaret Ann Cox who was born July 7, 1941 in El Paso, Texas, according to Potter County Mar­riage Book 31, page 100. In the 1968 edition of the Amar­illo city directory he was shown to be in the military and maintaining a home at 4201 Tulia Drive. In 1995 he was a professor at Georgia Tech and lived in Tucker, Georgia. Nothing more is known of John Wither­spoon Gowens II, and Mar­garet Ann Cox Gowens.

Bobby Louis Gowens, son of John Witherspoon Gowens and Nettie Mae Smith Gowens, was born November 12, 1946 at Lampasas, according to Lampasas County Birth Book 8, page 14. In the 1967 and 1968 editions of the Amarillo city direc­tory he was shown living in the household of his parents at 4701 Lamar and employed as a technician by the Texas State High­way Depart­ment. He was married to Cheryl Ann Sills on July 19, 1966 at Amarillo, according to Potter County Marriage Book 34, page 309. In 1972 Bobby Louis Gowens and Cheryl Ann Sills Gowens were living at 6007 Fontelle Drive, Houston, Texas where he was shown as an accountant for Milton & Melton. In 1996, he was Executive Vice-President and Chief Financial Officer of Randalls Food Markets in Houston. Chil­dren born to Bobby Louis Gowens and Cheryl Ann Sills Gowens are unknown.

Louisa J. “Lou” Gowens, daughter of George James Gowens and Mary Rebecca Baker Gowens, was born Oc­tober 23, 1870 in Ne­braska. She appeared as an eight-year-old in the 1880 cen­sus of Mills County, Iowa.

Sarah Gowens, daughter of George James Gowens and Mary Rebecca Baker Gowens, was born October 23, 1872 in Iowa. She appeared as a seven-year-old in the 1880 census of her fa­ther’s house­hold.

George William Gowens, son of George James Gowens and Mary Rebecca Baker Gowens, was born December 13, 1873 in Iowa. He ap­peared as a six-year-old in the 1880 census of Mills County, Iowa.

Charles Gowens, son of George James Gowens and Mary Re­becca Baker Gowens, was born December 3, 1875 in Glen­wood, Iowa in Mills County, according to Etta Mary Gowens Baker. He ap­peared as a four-year-old in the 1880 census of Mills County.

Eva Gowens, daughter of James Blair Gowens and Sarah Lu­visa Jackson Gowens, was born in Gallatin County in 1843. She was married there about 1860 to W. P. Dancer. Later they moved to Taylor County, Texas.

On December 18, 1899 W. P. Dancer of Buffalo Gap, Texas gave a deed to his brother-in-law General Washington Gowens to 1/3 interest in 80 acres of the original patent to James Blair Gowens for $210, according to Coleman County Deed Book 42, page 176. “W. P. Dancer and Eva Dancer” were named among the list of defen­dants sued by W. O. Cross April 15, 1921 to se­cure title to land sold by General Washington Gowens.

Children born to W. P. Dancer and Eva Gowens Dancer in­clude:

Jesse P. Dancer born March 19, 1861

Jesse P. Dancer, son of W. P. Dancer and Eva Gowens Dancer, was born in Gallatin County March 19, 1861. He was married to Mary Garner Thomason September 28, 1885. They lived at Talpa, Texas. He died there May 29, 1943 and was buried in Talpa Cemetery. She died November 30, 1957 and was buried beside her husband.

Children born to them include:

Lenora Dancer born July 12, 1886
Susan Katherine Dancer born October 7, 1888
Willie F. Dancer born February 25, 1889
James Aubrey Dancer born July 22, 1897
Cora Belle Dancer born about 1898
Opal May Dancer born in 1902
Raymond Dancer born May 19, 1906

Julia Ann Gowens, daughter of James Blair Gowens and Sarah Luvisa Jackson Gowens, was born February 3, 1846 at Council Bluffs. She accom­panied her parents in their move to Cole­man County about 1876. She was married about 1873 to John Thomas Hamilton in Mills County as his second wife. His first wife was Martha McBee, according to the research of Evelyn Cordell. He was born June 25, 1842 to Aaron Hamilton and Elizabeth Lay Hamilton.

John Thomas Hamilton and Julia Ann Gowens Hamilton were listed as heirs-at-law in the estate of James Blair Gowens and Sarah Luvisa Jackson Gowens December 20, 1899, according to Coleman County Deed Book 46, page 14. They inherited a 1/3 interest in 80 acres remaining in the patent of her father and a 1/3 in­terest in 10 acres he purchased from James Needham.

John Thomas Hamilton died about 1900, and Julia Gowens Hamilton was listed as a feme sole when she gave a release to Gen­eral Washington Gowens on the inheritance he had pur­chased from her, ac­cording to Coleman County Deed Book 49, page 16. She, a widow of Silver Valley, Texas, was men­tioned in an af­fidavit of heirship October 21, 1902, ac­cording to Cole­man County Deed Book 51, page 214. She died there in Jan­uary 1940.

Children born to John Thomas Hamilton and Martha McBee Hamilton include:

Minnie Hamilton born about 1866
Mary Ann Hamilton born about 1868

Three sons and three daughters were born to John Thomas Hamilton and Julia Ann Gowens Hamilton. Of the six Archie Hamilton and Bertha Hamilton were living in March 1975.

The children included:

Aaron “Arie” Hamilton born about 1874
Ettie Hamilton born January 18, 1875
Benjamin Freelove Hamilton born April 9, 1881
Eva Hamilton born November 7, 1883
Archie Hamilton born March 16, 1886
Bertha Idella Hamilton born in 1889

Sarah F. Gowens, daughter of James Blair Gowens and Mary An Livinia Jackson Gowens, was born in Gallatin County about 1847.

Leticia Gowens, daughter of James Blair Gowens and Mary An Livinia Jackson Gowens, was born in Gallatin County about 1848.

Lillie “Lela” Gowens, daughter of James Blair Gowens and Mary An Livinia Jackson Gowens, was born in Gallatin County about 1849. She was married to Ernest Campbell about 1869.

Serenah Gowens, daughter of James Blair Gowens and Sarah Luvisa Jackson Gowens, was born March 24, 1853 in Mills County, Iowa. according to Gregg A. Bennatt. She was married there December 31, 1871 to Albert Wright Turner. In 1902 they continued to live near Council Bluffs, Iowa. They were the parents of six sons and three daugh­ters. In 1929 Serenah Gowens Turner vis­ited a daughter, “Mrs. Drake” in Pampa, Texas, according to Sylvester Bernard Gowens. She also vis­ited in the home of her brother, General Washington Gowens at that time.

Walter Earl Turner, a descendant of Orem. Utah, wrote in November 1994 of the Turner brothers and the Gowen sisters:

“Who would have thought that Charles Gowens, Revo­lutionary War veteran of Henry County, Virginia and his wife Elizabeth Blair Gowens would have anything in common with Edward Turner of Lincolnshire, England and his wife Isabelle Freelove Turner. They had a lot in common—three Turner sons were to marry three Gowens daughters.

On December 3, 1801 a son was born to Edward Turner and Isabelle Freelove Turner in Wrangle, Lincolnshire. Isabelle named him George Freelove Turner after her father, George Freelove. On June 9, 1810 a son was born in Harrison County, Kentucky to Charles Gowens and Elizabeth “Betsy” Blair Gowens. “Betsy” named him James Blair Gowens after her fa­ther, James Blair of Maryland. James Blair Gowens [Newsletter, February 1993], the youngest of nine children, became the pro­genitor of my many Texas cousins.

George Freelove Turner grew up in Lincolnshire as a city boy. He was a laborer there and then became a clerk in Grimsby in the coal-mining area of England. He was married October 19, 1823 to Elizabeth Neal who was born January 7, 1809. She was recorded as a 14-year-old “spinster” in the parish record. They became the parents of about 16 children.

James Blair Gowens grew up in Harrison County and nearby Gallatin County, Kentucky. He was married September 14, 1835 to Mary An Li­vinia Jackson in Gallatin County. She was born there December 11, 1816 to George Jackson and Susan­nah Ray Jackson who were married there November 11, 1814.

They had six children when she died, apparently at childbirth, because they had a total of seven. James Blair Gowens was then married to 16-year-old Sarah Luvisa Jackson January 13, 1844. She, a younger sister of Mary An Livinia Jackson Gowens, was born March 8, 1827 in Gallatin County. James Blair Gowens was enumerated as the head of House­hold 331-331 August 14, 1850 in Gallatin County located between his father and his fa­ther-in-law.

George Freelove Turner apparently emigrated to Amer­ica about 1850; he did not appear in the British census of 1851. A daughter who came with him stated that she had been in this country five years in the 1856 state cen­sus of Mills County, Iowa. The younger children ac­companied by their mother came to the United States in March 1853 aboard the SS Indian.

They landed at New Orleans and apparently took a steamboat up the Mississippi to where the Missouri River entered, then up the Missouri to St. Marys, Iowa in Mills County where George Freelove Turner was awaiting them. Apparently Elizabeth Neal Turner did not live long after her arrival. George Freelove Turner had a new wife, Sophia listed in the 1856 census. He died prior to February 1867.

About 1852, James Blair Gowens also moved his family to Mills County, settling near Council Bluffs, probably influ­enced there by a brother who had preceded him. The house­hold of James Blair Gowens which had “been in Iowa for four years” was recorded there in the 1856 census.

Now the stage is set in Mills County, and the entire cast is as­sembled. The only children of James Blair Gowens that this se­ries will deal with are Susannah “Susan” Gowens, Elizabeth Ellen Gowens and Serena Gowens. The only children of George Freelove Turner under con­sideration are Daniel P. Turner, Freelove Turner and Al­bert Wright Turner. They are the three brothers who married the three sisters. Act One deals with my great-grandparents, Albert Wright Turner and Serena Gowens Turner.

Albert Wright Turner was born in Grimsby, Lin­colnshire Au­gust 21, 1843. His birth was registered on the 22nd, so he ended up celebrating his birthday on August 22, and when he died, his headstone was erro­neously engraved with 1853, the year of his arrival in this country as the year of his birth.

Being adventurous, Albert Wright Turner joined a Mormon [Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints] oxen team going west under the command of Capt. Isaac A. Canfield in Council Bluffs July 28, 1862. My feeling is that he must have had rela­tives living in Utah. They arrived in Salt Lake City October 16, 1862. While there he drove stages and wagons and probably rode for the Pony Express. His stage route ran from Salt Lake City to St. Joseph, Missouri via Denver. In the west he be­came a crack shot. Descendants claim that he could put a bullet clean through a silver dollar flipped into the air. It would hit the ground with a hole in it.

Frances Osler of Council Bluffs, my first cousin, once-removed, writes that she can picture him as a “red-headed imp driving a stagecoach across the plains, red hair flying in the wind, his vio­lin slung over his back, a bottle of whiskey in his pocket and a song in his heart.”

He loved music and taught his son, my grandfather, to play the violin also. He was possessive and hot-tem­pered. Once, in later years, at a dance hall in Nebraska, a brash fellow asked Serena for a dance. Albert laid him out.

According to the federal census, Albert Wright Turner was back in Iowa in 1870, and Serena Gowens, who was born March 24, 1853, had grown up. On December 31, 1871 in the home of the bride’s parents, he took Serena to be his wife for always. Eleven children, eight sons and three daughters, were born to them in Mills County. Albert became a vegetable farmer and had a small store in Council Bluffs where he sold his produce. Serena worked diligently by his side.

They lived and died in Council Bluffs and were buried there. Two of their sons who died in childhood were buried in Mills County in the Turner-Gowens hillside Cemetery. there. Their aunt, Elizabeth Ellen and her son were buried there after succumbing to typhoid fever.

Ordinances passed long ago prohibit the type of burials that were done there, so no family members have been buried there for many, many years. When I was there, I saw fieldstones apparently marking other graves inside the fenced enclosure. Outside, cattle are grazing over other graves, some marked, some unmarked. Our family is grateful to the Mills County Historical Society who tend the cemetery regularly and see that it is kept up. I believe the cemetery and the farm now belong to God­sey family who are also descendants of George Freelove Turner and Elizabeth Neal Turner.

Serena was a well-loved person. She was a religious woman, reading the bible every day. She taught her children to be in­dustrious, and they all worked as they grew up. She died when I was five years old and was buried beside her husband. She has no marker, and his has the wrong birth date on it. ”

Children born to Albert Wright Turner and Serena Gowens Turner include:

Oliver Freelove Turner born January 25, 1873
Lewis Collier Turner born June 25, 1874
James Albert Turner born April 10, 1876
George Walter Turner born December 13, 1877
Clarence Calvin Turner born November 2, 1879
Frederick Fletcher Turner born June 7, 1882
Alfred Cleveland Turner born November 5, 1884
William Clyde Turner born April 15, 1886
Augusta Adella Turner born December 1, 1887
Stella Luella Turner born December 4, 1888
Anne Elizabeth Turner born July 3, 1896

Oliver Freelove Turner, son of Albert Wright Turner and Ser­ena Gowens Turner, was born January 25, 1873 in Mills County. He was married about 1896 to Letha E. Hutchins. He died May 8, 1948 in North Platte, Nebraska.

Lewis Collier Turner, son of Albert Wright Turner and Serena Gowens Turner, was born June 25, 1874 in Mills County. He was married to Ida Mae Hutchins, regarded as a sister to Letha E. Hutchins, about 1896. He died May 18, 1959 in Council Bluffs.

James Albert Turner, son of Albert Wright Turner and Serena Gowens Turner, was born April 10, 1876 at Glenwood, Iowa in Mills County. He died there at age five, June 16, 1881.

George Walter Turner, son of Albert Wright Turner and Serena Gowens Turner, was born December 13, 1877 at Glenwood in Mills County, according to Walter Earl Turner, a descendant of Orem, Utah. He was married February 26, 1898 to Hester May Bevington in Council Bluffs. She was born to Milen Emerson Bevington and Mary Isadora Wilson Bevington January 15, 1881 at Ringgold, Iowa. He died in Los Angeles October 11, 1945, and she died at Torrance February 21, 1966..

Children born to George Walter Turner and Hester May Bev­ington Turner include:

Ruth May Turner born February 4, 1899
Harley Leroy Turner born January 12, 1901
Walter Turner born in 1903
Earl Albert Turner born November 18, 1905
Milen George Turner born November 23, 1910
Mary Margaret Turner born March 29, 1921

Earl Albert Turner, son of George Walter Turner and Hester May Bevington Turner, was born November 18, 1905 at Sar­gent, Nebraska. He was married September 1, 1928 at Papil­lion, Nebraska to Ora Avis Matthews, daughter of Edward Franklin Matthews and Emeline Cynthia Little Matthews. She was born March 2, 1902 at Modale, Iowa. He died October 19, 1967 at San Bernardino, California.

Children born to them include:

Wanda Evelyn Turner born about 1929
Carolyn Alma Turner born in June 1931
Walter Earl Turner born April 8, 1932
Milan Edward Turner born August 12, 1935

Wanda Evelyn Turner, daughter of Earl Albert Turner and Ora Avis Matthews Turner, was born about 1929 at Perth Amboy, New Jersey. She died in infancy.

Carolyn Alma Turner, daughter of Earl Albert Turner and Ora Avis Matthews Turner, was born in June 1931 at Fords, New Jersey. She died shortly afterward.

Walter Earl Turner, son of Earl Albert Turner and Ora Avis Matthews Turner, was born April 8, 1932 at Council Bluffs. He was married to Eleanor Lenora Davis Waltham June 1, 1956 at Las Vegas, Nevada. Later they were divorced. Following service in the U.S. Navy, he was married August 13, 1968 to Margaret Katherine Harlan Brown at Winterhaven, California. In 1995 both were engaged in genealogical research and sup­plied much of the data in this section of the manuscript. No children were born to Walter Earl Turner and Margaret Katherine Harlan Turner.

Milan Edward Turner, son of Earl Albert Turner and Ora Avis Matthews Turner, was born August 12, 1935 at Torrance, Cali­fornia. He died September 7, 1949, at age 14, at Auburn, Cali­fornia.

Children born to Walter Earl Turner and Eleanor Lenora Davis Waltham Turner include:

Walter Eugene Turner January 20, 1965

Clarence Calvin Turner, son of Albert Wright Turner and Ser­ena Gowens Turner, was born November 2, 1879 in Mills County. He died there August 14, 1880 at nine months

Frederick Fletcher Turner, son of Albert Wright Turner and Serena Gowens Turner, was born June 7, 1882 in Mills County. in Mills County. He was married about 1905 to Rose Hutchins. He died in 1963.

Alfred Cleveland Turner, son of Albert Wright Turner and Ser­ena Gowens Turner, was born November 5, 1884 in Mills County. He was married about 1904 to Nettie Cavett. He died in 1954 in Milburn, Nebraska.

William Clyde Turner, son of Albert Wright Turner and Serena Gowens Turner, was born April 15, 1886 in Mills County. He was married about 1907 to Luella Martin. He died June 10, 1972 at Norfolk, Nebraska.

Augusta Adella Turner, daughter of Albert Wright Turner and Serena Gowens Turner, was born December 1, 1887 in Mills County. She was married to William Harvey Barkoff Novem­ber 25, 1908. She died June 10, 1972 at Norfolk.

Stella Luella Turner, daughter of Albert Wright Turner and Serena Gowens Turner, was born December 4, 1888 in Mills County. She was married to Jesse Michael Gorman September 24, 1913. She died May 25, 1967 at Council Bluffs.

Anne Elizabeth Turner, daughter of Albert Wright Turner and Serena Gowens Turner, was born July 3, 1896 in Mills County. She was married about 1916 to Robert Drake. She died September 25, 1955 at Levelland, Texas.

General Washington Gowens, son of James Blair Gowens and Sarah Luvisa Jackson Gowens, was born March 8, 1860 near Council Bluffs in Mills County, Iowa. He accompanied his parents in a move to Coleman County in 1876. He was mar­ried May 30, 1880 to Rachael Ann Needham by John C. Averitt, minister of the gospel, according to Cole­man County Marriage Book 1, page 70.

On November 7, 1883 General Washington Gowens re­ceived a patent from the State of Texas to 160 acres of land on Hord’s Creek lo­cated 10 miles northwest of Coleman. The land ad­joined the land patented to his father one week later. Appar­ently Racheal Ann Needham Gowens died about 1890.

General Washington Gowens was married February 18, 1892 to Miss Frances Emily Pharis, second cousin to Rachael Ann Needham Gowens. She was a daughter of William Newton Pharis and Georgia Ann Jackson Pharis and was born August 11, 1871 in John­son County, Texas. William Newton Pharis was born in Texas, and Georgia Ann Jackson Pharis was born in Mis­souri, accord­ing to Stella Vera Gowens Perry of Cros­byton, Texas.

In 1895 and in 1897 General Washington Gowens and Frances Emily Pharis Gowens were living on the land patented to him near Silver Valley. On December 18, 1899 he received a deed from W. P. Dancer, Buffalo Gap for 1/3 interest in the remain­ing half of the land patented to James Blair Gowens for $210, according to Coleman County Deed Book 42, page 176. The purchase also in­cluded a 1/3 interest in 10 acres which James Blair Gowens had purchased from James Need­ham.

On December 30, 1899 General Washington Gowens re­ceived a deed from J. T. Hamilton and Julia Gowens Hamilton, “heirs-at-law of the Estate of James Gowens and Louisa Gowens, both deceased” for 1/3 interest in the two tracts for $210, according to Coleman County Deed Book 46, page 14. General Wash­ington Gowens claimed a homestead designation for 240 acres of land December 1, 1902, according to Coleman County Deed Book 52, page 128. The declaration mentioned his wife and five children.

General Washington Gowens purchased from his daughter, Artie Mishie Gowens Wofford, child of his first wife, her in­terest in her mother’s share of the state patent. On May 4, 1904 she received payment of $533.33, according to Coleman County Deed Book 46, page 623. On May 10, 1905 he pur­chased the interest of two other daughters, Mary Fineta Gowens Roberts and Charity Eveline Gowens Ray for an equal amount, according to Coleman County Deed Book 54, page 209.

On October 9, 1907 General Washington Gowens sold his original patent to T. W. Bartholomew and John N. Need­ham for $4,000, according to Coleman County Deed Book 61, page 541. He received a release November 12, 1907 from C. M. Alexan­der who had received his notes from James Jeffrey Wof­ford, his son-in-law on “1/3 of 1/2 of 160 acres,” ac­cording to Cole­man County Deed Book 60, page 485. On November 30, 1907 he received a similar release from J. E. McCord et al, accord­ing to Coleman County Deed Book 64, page 58.

On February 1, 1910 General Washington Gowens “of Young County, Texas” transferred two notes of T. W. Bartholomew to the Coleman National Bank. The notes were used in the pur­chase of the land of General Washington Gowens in Coleman County, according to Coleman County Deed Book 75, page 4. On December 10, 1910 he discounted $2,240 worth of Bartholomew’s notes to E. B. Chandler, according to Coleman County Deed Book 75, page 80. General Washington Gowens gave a release to John N. Needham February 19, 1897 on the land he had purchased in 1907, according to Coleman County Deed Book 98, page 10.

About 1908 “G. W. Goen” purchased 320 acres of land in Crosby County, Texas from H. C. Pearson and H. F. Pear­son, according to Crosby County Deed Book 11, page 115. He re­ceived a release on the land December 1, 1909 from the court­house at Old Emma, Texas.

On April 15, 1921 W. O. Cross, plaintiff brought suit against the heirs of James Blair Gowens as Case 2510 in the Dis­trict Court of Coleman County to secure title to the 240 acres that General Washington Gowens had sold in 1907, according to Coleman County Deed Book 124, page 617. The plaintiff won a judgement by default, the defendants not appearing.

Mentioned in the lists of defendants, living and deceased, were: “James Gowens, G. W. Gowens, Serenah Turner, Al­bert W. Turner, W. P. Dancer, Eva Dancer, Louisa Gowens, Lucin­ina Gowens, F. E. Gowens, R. King, Wash­ington Gowens, Artie Wofford, J. J. Wofford, M. F. Roberts, G. A. Roberts, G. I. Ray, W. R. Gaddie, George Keeney, Julia Hamilton, J. T. Hamilton, Frances Emily Gowens, Lucinna Gowens, F. E. Gowins, Lillie Hilton, Charles Hilton, Ervin Keeney, Bert Keeney, Bertha Keeney, Della Keeney, Oma Keeney, Estes Keeney, Leo Keeney, Vito Marcella Keeney, W. R. Gaddie, M. F. Roberts, G. A. Roberts, George W. Keeney, William Mike Keeney, Lela Campbell, Ernest Campbell, Jack Keeney, Charity Elizabeth Keeney and Mat­tie Keeney.”

By 1928 General Washington Gowens and Frances Emily Pharis Gowens had removed to Crosby County. From 1924 through 1930 they dealt in oil leases in Andrews County, Texas, according to deed records of that county.

On December 4, 1928 they traded 880 acres of Andrews County land to T. F. Easter of Lorenzo, Texas for 660 acres in Dickens County, Texas, according to Dickens County Deed Book 41, page 567. On January 11, 1929 they received a sec­ond tract of 326 acres from Easter, according to Dick­ens County Deed Book 42, page 100.

Frances Emily Pharis Gowens died in Crosbyton, Texas “after a three-year residence” March 19, 1942 of hyperstatic pneumo­nia and was buried in Crosbyton Cemetery, ac­cording to Crosby County Death Book 4, page 54. On June 19, 1945, General Washington Gowens, “retired farmer,” died at Crosby­ton at age 85 “of apoplexy,” according to Crosby County Death Book 4, page 148. He was buried there beside his wife, ac­cording to Cloyce Washington Gowens, his son, informant.

Children born to General Washington Gowens and Rachel Ann Needham Gowens include:

Artie Mishie Gowens born about 1881
Mary Fineta Gowens born about 1884
Charity Eveline Gowens born August 29, 1887

Children born to General Washington Gowens and Frances Emily Pharis Gowens include:

Moses Gowens born January 23, 1893
Lena Georgia Gowens born March 18, 1894
James William Gowens born September 11, 1895
Sylvester Bernard Gowens born July 17, 1897
Lola Mae Gowens born December 19, 1898
Cordia Loraine Gowens born November 12, 1900
Crystal Elizabeth Gowens born July 25, 1902
Clarence Preston Gowens born December 30, 1904
Stella Vera Gowens born July 10, 1906
Joseph Calvin Gowens born February 16, 1908
Cloyce Washington Gowens born July 25, 1910
Maggie Lucille Gowens born August 31, 1913

Three children died in infancy.

Artie Mishie Gowens, daughter of General Washington Gowens and Racheal Ann Needham Gowens, was born about July 31, 1881 in Coleman County. She was married January 28, 1900 to James Jeffrey Wofford, according to Coleman County Mar­riage Book 3, page 192. He was born July 22, 1879 at Hope, Arkansas.

On May 25, 1904 they deeded to her father her interest in the land patent of General Washington Gowens which she had in­herited from her deceased mother for $533.33, according to Coleman County Deed Book 46, page 623. On April 15, 1921 they were mentioned among the defendants in a suit to se­cure title to the land patents her father had sold, accord­ing to Cole­man County Deed Book 124, page 617.

In 1911 they lived in Haskell County, Texas. Artie Mishie Gowens Wofford died July 25, 1965 at Stamford, Texas and was buried in Capron Cemetery. He died there March 7, 1968 and was buried beside his wife.

Children born to them include:

Ollie Henry Washington Wofford born August 4, 1901
Curtis Bascomb Wofford born June 28, 1905
James Jerome Wofford born April 28, 1907
Arabella Marygold Wofford born in 1909
General Vernon Wofford born December 6, 1911
Lowell Ernest Wofford born January 26, 1917
Gladys Irene Wofford born Dec. 28, 1923

Mary Fineta Gowens, daughter of General Washington Gowens and Racheal Ann Needham Gowens, was born December 3, 1884 in Coleman County. She was married April 26, 1904 to George Albert Roberts as his second wife. He was previously married to Delia Needham. He was born in England June 12, 1877 and was brought to America in 1886 when he was nine years old, according to Rosa Evelyn Ray Cordell.

On May 10, 1905 they received an ex­change of prop­erty with her father to settle her mother’s es­tate, accord­ing to Coleman County Deed Book 54, page 209 and Deed Book 56, page 543. On April 15, 1921 they were mentioned among the defendants in a suit to secure title to the land patents her father had sold, according to Coleman County Deed Book 124, page 617.

George Albert Roberts died at Haskell, Texas October 7, 1958 and was buried in Willow Cemetery. She died May 25, 1972 at Abilene, Texas and was buried beside her husband.

Children born to them include:

William Albert Roberts born May 20, 1905
Rachel Evelyn Roberts born April 16, 1907
Ruby Rozella Roberts born January 31, 1909
Delia Finetta Roberts born February 2, 1911
George Albert Roberts, Jr. born March 12, 1913
Artie Harriet Roberts born January 5, 1915
George Washington Roberts born August 2, 1917
James Jeffrey Roberts born December 27, 1920
Mary Elenor Roberts born November 5, 1922
Cecil Roberts born September 16, 1926

Charity Evelyn Gowens, daughter of General Washington Gowens and Racheal Ann Needham Gowens, was born August 29, 1887 in Cole­man County. She was married to George Leonard Ray Septem­ber 25, 1904 in Silver Valley community, according to Coleman County Marriage Book 3, page 346. George Leonard Ray was born May 16, 1876 in Jackson County, Illinois to__Cornelius Newkirk Ray and Sarah Catherine Rice Ray.

They were residents of Coleman County May 10, 1905 when her father exchanged property with them to settle the es­tate of her deceased mother, according to Coleman County Deed Book 54, page 209 and Deed Book 56, page 543. They were listed among the defendants in a case tried in Coleman County Dis­trict Court April 15, 1921 which established ownership of some land patents her fa­ther had sold, according to Coleman County Deed Book 124, page 617.

As a young man, George Leonard Ray damaged his eyes while working with lime on a waterwell drilling rig. For many years he was unable to read, but later his eyesight improved to the point where he could read with difficulty. He was a farmer and a service station operator.

George Leonard Ray died January 12, 1957 of coronary occlu­sion, according to his death certificate and was buried in Cole­man County Cemetery. His widow continued the operation of their service station until 1975. She died August 12, 1983 and was buried beside her husband. They were members of the Coleman Church of Christ.

Children born to them include:

George Washington Ray born November 2, 1905
Ida Mae Ray born August 23, 1907
Willis Raymond Ray born May 17, 1910
Jerry Dan Ray [twin] born February 12, 1914
Charity Ann Ray [twin] born February 12, 1914
Rosa Evelyn Ray born March 25, 1926

George Washington Ray, son of Charity Eveline Gowens Ray and George Leonard Ray, was born November 2, 1905 at Old Silver Valley community in Coleman County. Rosa Evelyn Ray Cordell wrote of him:

“He was married to Jesse Lee Shafer December 18,1932 at Coleman. She was born there September 12, 1911 to Jess Shaffer and Mattie B. Tucker Shaffer. Her father died when she was small and her mother remarried to a Carroll. George went to Draughons Business College in Abilene. When he and Jessie married, he built a small store on the land by their home in Coleman which was her inheritance. He later rebuilt “Ray’s Food Market” and ran it until he went into the Army Air Force during WWII. He made Corporal in the Air Force Band and was stationed for two years at Goodfellow Field in San Angelo, Texas.

He was transferred to Omaha, Nebraska for the last two years of his service. He was in the National Guard for about 13 years subsequently. After the war, he went back to running the super market. He owned the grocery for about 50 years. During the first few years of their marriage, George played in a small dance band all over the country. He played trumpet in the band and then in the service he played the bass horn and bass fiddle in the orchestra. He also played the violin.”

George Washington Ray died March 9, 1984 in Coleman and buried at Coleman Cemetery. No children were born to George Washington Ray and Jessie Lee Shaffer Ray.

Ida Mae Ray, daughter of George Leonard Ray and Charity Eveline Gowens Ray, was born August 23, 1907 in Coleman County. Rosa Evelyn Ray Cordell wrote of her:

“Ida Mae was married to Charlie Pirl Gray December 21, 1922 at Coleman by the Justice of the Peace. He was born July 31, 1895 in San Saba County, Texas to William Marion Gray, Jr. and Sally Theodoshia Anding Gray.

Charlie Pirl Gray and Ida Mae Ray Gray lived on the old Livingston place, and the Pendington place, and then they moved to the J. P. McCord place in the 1930s. Later they moved to Mrs. Freelove Hamilton’s place in the early 1940s, and then they sold out to Mrs. Hamilton and moved to Coleman and put in a grocery store in 1946.

They ran the grocery until about 1972 when they retired. Charlie and Ida Mae never had any children. After Charlie died, March 11, 1988, Ida Mae Ray Gray was remarried January 7, 1990 to John Chaney. He was born September 22, 1907 in Moran, Texas. They resided in Coleman in 1992.”

Willis Raymond Ray, son of George Leonard Ray and Charity Eveline Gowens Ray, was born May 17, 1910 in Old Silver Valley community. Rosa Evelyn Ray Cordell wrote of him:

“Willis played in the dance band with his brother, George for quite a few years. He played the guitar, and in school he played baritone and alto horns. He was a produce manager in several grocery stores in several lo­cations–Ft.Worth, Coleman, Hereford, and Amarillo, Texas. They were in Ft. Worth for five or six years sur­rounding WWII. He was an inspector on B29 Bombers at Consolidated Aircraft. They lived in Amarillo for about 25 years. They have been living in Coleman for the last 10 years prior to 1992.”

Children born to Willis Raymond Ray and Alma Loy Amick Ray include:

Willis Eugene Ray born October 12, 1935
Jackie Lynn Ray born July 1, 1938
Brenda Lois Ray born December 15, 1940

Jerry Dan Ray, twin son of George Leonard Ray and Charity Eveline Gowens Ray, was born February 12, 1914 at Coleman. He died the following day and was buried in Coleman Ceme­tery.

Charity Ann Ray, twin daughter of George Leonard Ray and Charity Evelyn Gowens Ray, was born February 12, 1914. She died one hour after her twin brother and was buried in the same grave with him.

Rosa Evelyn Ray, daughter of George Leonard Ray and Charity Eveline Gowens Ray, was born March 25, 1926 at Old Silver Valley community. She was graduated from Coleman High School in May 1944. Of her life she wrote:

“Rosa worked at Jinwright’s shirt manufacturers for about six months after graduation and then went to work for her brother, George at “Ray’s Food Market” as book­keeper and clerk for 11 years. She was married to Jerold J. Cordell January .21, 1958 at Brownwood, Texas. They lived in Abilene for about six months and then moved to Ballinger, Texas for about 18 months. Rosa worked in Mercer’s Shoe Factory for about nine months. They returned to Coleman in March of 1960, and Jerold was a salesman for Toms Toasted Peanut Co. for about four years. Rosa went back to work for her brother again and worked for about three years before quitting to have a son.

Later she worked as a news distributor for “Abilene Reporter” for Coleman. Jerold went to work for Rowan Drilling Co. in February 1967. He retired with that company Feb. 15, 1988. Rosa worked at Lizanne Dress Manufacturing Co. in New Braunfels, Texas for about 30 months. They lived in Coleman, Ballinger, Abilene, Iraan, Pecos, Floydada, Seguin and Canyon Lake, Texas and Glenrock, Wyoming. They have owned a second home on Canyon Lake in Comal County, Texas for the past 20 years. They moved to Ballinger to take care of his mother in 1988 when he re­tired. She died in February 1991, and they returned to Coleman to take care of her sister, Ida Mae Gray Chaney. Jerold was a tool pusher for Rowan Compa­nies, Inc. for quite a few years and was in the Persian Gulf for about 10 years, every other 28 days. The com­pany had a plane that flew them back and forth. He loves fishing, gardening, CB radios and is a computer nut. He was a sergeant in the U.S. Army Air Force from 1946 to 1949.

He played basketball in school, in the Air Force and with a semi-professional team in Ballinger from 1949‑1958. He was a Boy Scout assistant leader for nine years. He went one year to Texas Christian Uni­versity in Ft. Worth, Texas.

Rosa was in the band in Coleman schools for nine years and played in Comal County Community Band for six years. She was a Girl Scout leader for five years and a Cub Scout den mother for three. She was secretary for the Canyon Lake Boy Scout Chapter for nine years.”

Additionally, Rosa Evelyn Ray Cordell has researched her family history and has published a book on her forebears. She is a member of Gowen Research Foundation and has served on its Editorial Board. It is through her kindness that much of the material in this section appears in the Foundation manuscript

Children born to Jerold J. Cordell and Rosa Evelyn Ray Cordell include:

Rosa June Cordell born September 6, 1958
Diana Lynn Cordell born July 28, 1960
Guy Leonard Cordell born February 3, 1965

Rosa June Cordell, daughter of Jerold J. Cordell and Rosa Evelyn Ray Cordell, was born September 6, 1958 at Coleman. Of her, her mother wrote:

“In November 1975, she received her GED at New Braunfels and came out in the top 15% of already-grad­uated students. She is a bookkeeper and secretary. She loves puzzles, arts and crafts, Nintendo and computers. She is the treasurer of the Girl Scout Chapter at Bul­verde and a leader of two troops.

Rosa June was married to Donald Lawrence “Larry” Holloway June 26, 1976 at Church in the Wildwood at Canyon Lake. He was born June 25, 1958 to Gerald Holloway and Barbara Key Holloway. Larry is a press­men for Deluxe Check Printers in San Antonio. He en­joys fishing and gardening.”

Children born to them include:

Liana Michelle Holloway born December 21, 1978
Travis Daniel Holloway born August 31, 1982
Kristin Nicole Holloway born January 21, 1985

Diana Lynn Cordell, daughter of Jerold J. Cordell and Rosa Evelyn Ray Cordell, was born July 28, 1960 at Coleman. Her mother wrote:

“Diana was graduated in May 1978 from Smithson Valley High School at Canyon Lake. She was in the band for seven years. She also played in the Comal County Community Band with her mother one year. She played clarinet in the CCC Band and bass clarinet in school. She loves sewing, arts and crafts, music and computer. She has served as a Brownie troop leader.

Diana Lynn married to Christian Leonard “Chris” Cooper in the Church in the Wildwood August 19, 1978 at Canyon Lake, Comal County, Texas. In 1980 they lived at Plano, Texas. They were divorced in March 1982. She was remarried to Roger Alan Archer July 28, 1984 at San Antonio. He was born July 30, 1955 to Robert Archer and Pauline Archer.”

Children born to them include:

Karen Amanda Cooper born January 4, 1980
Joshua Brandon Cordell born March 6, 1984
Justin Tyler Archer born March 30, 1985
Clayton Ray Archer born October 27, 1987

Guy Leonard Cordell, son of Jerold J. Cordell and Rosa Evelyn Ray Cordell, was born February 3, 1965 at Coleman.

“In May 1984 he was graduated from Smithson Valley High School and attended one year at San Antonio Col­lege to study drafting. He took Computer his last two years in high school and was so adept that his teacher requested him to come in every morning and program all the computers for the classes for the day. He was recognized in “Who’s Who in the Nation” for his last two years in high school. He was in the Boy Scouts for nine years and was the troop leader most of the last five years. At Philmont Boy Scout Camp in New Mexico he participated in an 87-mile hike in 10 days. He also at­tended the National Boy Scout Jamboree at Ft. A. P. Hill in Virginia.

He received a first place award in Austin with a drafting design in his junior year in high school. He is a cook at his wife’s father’s restaurant in Sattler, Canyon Lake part time and is a traffic controller at Brooks Air Force Base. He is also in the Air Force Reserves in communications and intelligence.

Guy Leonard Cordell and Cathryn Lynn Boege were married June 4, 1983 at Solms, Texas. She was born November 28, 1965 at Chicago, Illinois. She was in May 1983 from Smithson Valley High School and man­ages her father’s Italian restaurant.”

Children born to Guy Leonard Cordell and Cathryn Lynn Boege Cordell include:

Sasha Ilene Cordell born December 6, 1983
Heather Marie Cordell born August 31, 1988

Moses Gowens, son of General Washington Gowens and Frances Emily Pharis Gowens, was born January 23, 1893 in Coleman County and died about 1896.

Lena Georgia Gowens, daughter of General Washington Gowens and Frances Emily Pharis Gowens, was born March 18, 1894 in Coleman County. She was married in 1912 to Henry Matt McCallister who was born May 18, 1885. Later she was remarried to Stanley Henderson. In 1975 she lived in a con­valescent home in Canon City, Colorado. She died there June 23, 1981.

Children born to them include:

Rayven Prescott McCallister born in 1913
Frances Delilah McCallister born about 1915
James Bernard McCallister born about 1917
Henry Washington McCallister born about 1919
Monroe Gowens McCallister born about 1922

James William Gowens, third child of General Washington Gowens and Frances Emily Pharis Gowens, was born Septem­ber 11, 1895 at Silver Valley, Texas, according to Coleman County Probate Birth Book 4, page 274. He moved with his parents to Graham, Texas in 1907. He served in France in the U.S. Army during World War I and was dis­charged as a private July 23, 1918.

He was married June 18, 1924 to Zena Blanche Choate in Gra­ham, according to Young County Marriage Book E, page 339. She was the daughter of James Gabriel Choate and Freddie Au­gust Keiling Choate and was born in 1900 in Bryan County, Texas.

They continued to live in Young County during the 1920s where James William Gowens was a farmer. From 1924 un­til 1938 he dealt in oil properties in Andrews County, ac­cording to deed records of that county. About 1930 they re­moved to Crosbyton. They continued to live there in 1954 when he gave a warranty deed to M. E. Powell, ac­cording to Crosby County Deed Book 93, page 52. In November 1973 they lived on Bunger Road, Graham, Texas. He died there July 25, 1974 and was buried in Med­lan Chapel Cemetery.

Children born to James William Gowens and Zena Blanche Choate Gowens include:

Truman Gabriel Gowens born May 20, 1925
William Rex Gowens born January 5, 1927
Herman Preston Gowens born February 22, 1930
Zena Ruth Gowens born October 8, 1935

Truman Gabriel Gowens, son of James William Gowens and Zena Blanche Choate Gowens, was born May 20, 1925 in Gra­ham, according to Young County Birth Book 2, page 29. His name was given on his birth record as “Gabriel Truman Gowens.” He enlisted in the U. S. Army October 25, 1943 and was discharged May 1, 1946. He was described as an auto me­chanic, and his address was listed as Box 68, Murray Route, Graham at that time.

On September 16, 1946 he was married to Velma Jo Ford at Graham Methodist Church, according to Young County Mar­riage Book H, page 267. She was born in Olney, Texas in 1929. In November 1973, they continued to live at 824 Car­olina in Graham where she was a nurse. They continued there in 1997.

Children born to Truman Gabriel Gowens and Velma Jo Ford Gowens include:

Patricia Marilyn Gowens born December 6, 1947
Kenneth Robert Gowens born February 14, 1949
Charles Dale Gowens born December 9, 1951
Jo Ann Gowens born September 22, 1953

Patricia Marilyn Gowens, daughter of Truman Gabriel Gowens and Velma Jo Ford Gowens, was born December 6, 1947 at Graham, according to BVS File 167238. She con­tinued to live with her parents in February 1972. Afterward she was married to Joe Ward, son of Max Ward and Evelyn Moudy Ward and lived in Abilene, Texas. No children were born to them.

Kenneth Robert Gowens, second child of Truman Gabriel Gowens and Velma Jo Ford Gowens, was born February 14, 1949 at Graham, according to Young County Birth Cer­tificate No. 1842. In 1972 he lived at 1024 Pioneer Parkway West in Ft. Worth, Texas, according to the city directory.

He was married January 3, 1976 at Bedford, Texas to Pamela Kay Smith, daughter of Chester L. Smith and Lula Faye Lane Smith, who was born June 26, 1955. They lived in Garland, Texas.

Chil­dren born to Kenneth Robert Gowens and Pamela Kay Smith Gowens include:

Melissa Kay Gowens born January 3, 1979
Amberly Crystal Gowens born June 17, 1982

Charles Dale Gowens, third child of Truman Gabriel Gowens and Velma Jo Ford Gowens, was born December 9, 1951 at Gra­ham, according to Young County Birth Certifi­cate 3197. He was married to Helen Jeanene Brown at Gra­ham August 8, 1972, according to Young County Mar­riage Book J, page 395. She was born May 8, 1952 to Ray Brown and Ruth Driver Brown.

In 1973 Charles Dale Gowens and Helen Jeanene Brown Gowens continued to live at Graham. Children born to them include:

Amy M. Gowens born April 13, 1975
Charles Aaron Gowens born November 20, 1978

Jo Ann Gowens, fourth child of Truman Gabriel Gowens and Velma Jo Ford Gowens, was born at Graham September 22, 1953, according to Young County Birth Certificate 3960. She was married about 1974 to Gary Nolan Davis. He was born August 17, 1947 to Nolan Q. Davis and Naydene Woods Davis. Later they lived in Houston, Texas.

Children born to them include:

Christopher Nolan Davis born August 2, 1975
Justin Gabriel Davis born June 23, 1979

William Rex Gowens, son of James William Gowens and Zena Blanche Choate Gowens, was born January 5, 1927 at Graham, according to Young County Birth Book 2, page 36. He enlisted in the U.S. Army August 27, 1945. He was mar­ried January 30, 1946 at Graham to Sethal Mavis Perry, accord­ing to Young County Marriage Book H, page 137. He was dis­charged De­cember 11, 1946, according to Young County Dis­charge Record No. 531. In 1959 they were liv­ing in Mesquite, Texas where they were operating a grocery store. He continued there in 1997.

Six children were born to William Rex Gowens and Sethal Mavis Perry Gowens:

Jimmy Rex Gowens born April 20, 1951
Richard Wayne Gowens born July 13, 1952
Susan Elaine Gowens born July 7, 1953
Lesa Rebecca Gowens born March 5, 1956
Ronald David Gowens born January 13, 1959
William Ray Gowens born April 18, 1961

Jimmy Rex Gowens, son of William Rex Gowens and Sethal Mavis Perry Gowens, was born April 20, 1951 at Graham. He was married to Lydia Ruth Carnaghan October 12, 1969 at Mesquite, Texas. She was born January 9, 1952 to Richard Dale Carnaghan and Betty Evelyn Pendleton Carnaghan at Ft. Worth, Texas. In 1972 they lived in Providence, Rhode Island.

Children reared by Jimmy Rex Gowens and Lydia Ruth Car­naghan Gowens include:

Jacqueline DeNece Gowens born April 25, 1972
Jimmy Rex Gowens, Jr. born October 21, 1979
Melissa Ann Gowens born June 8, 1981

Jacqueline DeNece Gowens, daughter of Jimmy Rex Gowens and Lydia Ruth Carnaghan Gowens, was born April 25, 1972 at Providence, Rhode Island.

Jimmy Rex Gowens, Jr, adopted son of Jimmy Rex Gowens and Lydia Ruth Carnaghan Gowens, was born October 21, 1979 in Dallas, Texas. He was a brother to Melissa Ann Gowens who was adopted at the same time.

Melissa Ann Gowens, adopted daughter of Jimmy Rex Gowens and Lydia Ruth Carnaghan Gowens, was born June 8, 1981 at Wylie, Texas.

Richard Wayne Gowens, son of William Rex Gowens and Sethal Mavis Perry Gowens, was born at Graham July 13, 1952, ac­cording to Young County Birth Certificate No. 3194. He was married June 3, 1969 in Dallas to Geraldine Lemley. Their mar­riage license was recorded June 10, 1969. Following a di­vorce, Richard Wayne Gowens was remarried June 8, 1986 to Linda Dee James who was born July 4, 1967.

Children born to Richard Wayne Gowens and Geraldine Lem­ley Gowens include:

Richard Wayne Gowens, Jr. born July 17, 1970
Nikki Lynn Gowens born September 23, 1972
John Christopher Gowens born October 1, 1974

One daughter was born to Richard Wayne Gowens and Linda Dee James Gowens:

Amanda Michele Gowens born September 26, 1986

Richard Wayne Gowens, Jr, son of Richard Wayne Gowens and Geraldine Lemley Gowens, was born July 17, 1970 in Dal­las, according to Dallas County Birth Registra­tion B70001, page 2292.

Susan Elaine Gowens, daughter of William Rex Gowens and Sethal Mavis Perry Gowens, was born July 7, 1953 at Brecken­ridge, Texas. In 1978 she lived at Denton State School, Den­ton, Texas.

Leesa Rebecca Gowens, daughter of William Rex Gowens and Sethal Mavis Perry Gowens, was born March 5, 1956 at New Boston, Texas. She was married to Jerry George Allred June 16, 1972. He was born November 5, 1953.

Children born to them include:

Rebecca Elaine Allred born June 19, 1973
Sarah Elizabeth Allred born May 13, 1975
Emily Renee Allred born August 2, 1977
Erin Lydia Allred born July 16, 1980

Ronald David Gowens, son of William Rex Gowens and Sethal Mavis Perry Gowens, was born January 13, 1959, ac­cording to Dallas County Birth Book 65, page 163. He was married to Pamela Ann McClure January 14, 1978 who was born March 4, 1961. Following a divorce, Ronald David Gowens was remar­ried to Betty Ann Patterson April 29, 1983. Later they were also divorced.

Children born to Ronald David Gowens and Pamela Ann Mc­Clure Gowens include:

Ronald David Gowens, Jr. born February 5, 1979

Children born to Ronald David Gowens and Betty Ann Patter­son Gowens include:

Frances Michele Gowens born August 9, 1985
William Justin Gowens born November 12, 1986

William Ray Gowens, son of William Rex Gowens and Sethal Mavis Perry Gowens, was April 18, 1961 in Dallas. He was married to Lee Ann Pletcher February 2, 1985. She was born June 15, 1962.

Children born to William Ray Gowens and Lee Ann Pletcher Gowens include:

Michael Ray Gowens born September 20, 1987
Jeremy Lee Gowens born May 3, 1990

Herman Preston Gowens, son of James William Gowens and Zena Blanche Choate Gowens, was born February 22, 1930 in Gra­ham, according to Young County Birth Book 4, page 201. He served in the Korean Campaign in the U.S. Army. He was married December 28, 1958 to Bernice Elizabeth Simek in Megargel, Texas. She was born there February 4, 1937 to Frank Stanley Simek and Mary Elizabeth Cernosek Simek.

In 1958 they lived at 3529 W. 7th Street, Ft. Worth, according to the city di­rectory. From 1959 through 1963 he was the man­ager of the Save­way Store in Snyder, Texas and lived at 400 E. 35th Street, accord­ing to the city directory. Bernice E. Simek Gowens was listed as a nurse in the 1960 edition. In the 1965 and 1966 editions of the Big Spring, Texas city directory he was listed as the man­ager of Safeway Stores, Inc. They lived at 2617 Central Drive at that time.

On May 2, 1966 Herman Preston Gowens and Bernice E. Simek Gowens purchased property in Abilene, Texas, ac­cording to Taylor County Deed Book 803, page 408. He was the manager of a Safeway store there. In 1972 they lived at 2834 Edgemont in Abilene. He retired after 37 years with Safeway. In 1994 he owned Dura Clean Carpet Cleaning at 2834 Edgemont Drive, Abilene. He died of cancer in Abilene February 16, 1997 at the age of 66. He was buried in Ellott-Hamil Garden of Memories.

Children born to Herman Preston Gowens and Bernice Eliza­beth Simek Gowens include:

Stephanie Ann Gowens born August 6, 1951
Sandra Elizabeth Gowens born August 16, 1963
Sheila Kay Gowens born about 1967

Stephanie Ann Gowens, believed to be a daughter of Her­man Preston Gowens and Bernice Elizabeth Simek Gowens, was born Au­gust 6, 1961 at Snyder, Texas, according to BVS File 149366. She was married in Abilene to Roland Dale Laird who was born December 17, 1959. In 1997 they lived in Brown­field, Texas.

Two children were born to them:

Christopher Earl Laird born May 28, 1987
Kelly Michelle Laird born April 19, 1990

Sandra Elizabeth Gowens, daughter of Herman Preston Gowens and Bernice Elizabeth Simek Gowens, was born August 16, 1963 in San Angelo, Texas. In 1991 she was living in Dallas, and in 1997 she lived in Irving, Texas.

Sheila Kay Gowens, daughter of Herman Preston Gowens and Bernice Elizabeth Simek Gowens, was born about 1967. In 1991 she was a senior at North Texas State University in Den­ton, Texas. In 1997 she lived in Brownfield, Texas.

Zena Ruth Gowens, daughter of James William Gowens and Zena Blanche Choate Gowens, was born October 8, 1935 in Young County where her father was a farmer at that time, ac­cording to Young County Birth Certificate No. 1925. She was married June 10, 1961 to Bobby G. Lyman. In Novem­ber 1973 they lived in Garland, Texas. Later they lived in Houston with three children. They continued there in 1997.

Children born to them include:

Jerry Keith Lyman born September 10, 1963
Karen Denise Lyman born December 30, 1964
Darrell Glenn Lyman born May 7, 1968
Perry Don Lyman born March 19, 1971

Sylvester Bernard Gowens, son of General Washington Gowens and Frances Emily Pharis Gowens, was born July 17, 1897 in Coleman County, according to BVS File 1330612. He served in the U.S. Army in World War I and was discharged as a private November 10, 1918, according to Young County Dis­charge Book 1, page 150.

On June 7, 1924 he deeded a mineral lease in Andrews County to his brother, James William Gowens, according to Andrews County Deed Book 11, page 111. Both lived in Young County at that time.

On December 7, 1929 he was married to Minnie Bell Bass who was born December 17, 1902 in Hopkins County, Texas, ac­cording to Dickens County, Texas Mar­riage Book 4, page 157. They continued there in 1930. By 1934 they had moved to Crosby County where he was a farmer. In 1938 they lived in Haskell County, Texas.

On May 11, 1939 he gave a warranty deed to George S. Bond to 10 lots in Crosbyton, according to Crosby County Deed Book 54, page 588. On January 21, 1944 he deeded property to O. B. Buck, according to Crosby County Deed Book 64, page 529.

By 1950 they had removed to Lubbock, Texas where he was listed in the city directory as a public school janitor living at 2115 5th Street. In 1952 the family removed to 3306 Bates Street which was to be his home until his death. He contin­ued to be employed in custodial work, with Lubbock Inde­pendent School District in 1952 and 1953, with Matthews Ju­nior High School in 1954-1956, at Texas Tech University in 1957, with Texas Board of Education in 1958 and at Wolf­forth School from 1959 through 1964. He retired in 1965, but worked as a gas station attendant through 1971. He died Au­gust 3, 1984 and was buried in Crosbyton Cemetery.

Sylvester Bernard Gowens and two of his sons, Harrold Bernard Gowens and Clifford Benjamin Gowens, were or­dained ministers in the Primitive Baptist Church.

Children born to Sylvester Bernard Gowens and Minnie Bell Bass Gowens include:

[son] born Dececember 12, 1930
Harrold Bernard Gowens born April 29, 1934
Gwendolyn Belle Gowens born June 15, 1935
Norman Bass Gowens born September 21, 1938
Geraldine Bonnelle Gowens born February 16, 1940
Clifford Benjamin Gowens born July 14, 1942
Jimmie Belverd Gowens born October 6, 1947

A son, apparently unnamed, was born in Spur, Texas De­cember 12, 1930 to Sylvester Bernard Gowens and Min­nie Bell Bass Gowens, according to Dickens County Birth Book 4, page 292. He died the same day.

Harrold Bernard Gowens, son of Sylvester Bernard Gowens and Minnie Bell Bass Gowens, was born April 29, 1934 in Crosbyton, according to Crosby County Birth Book 10, page 532. From 1952 through 1957 he was living in the household of his parents in Lubbock, according to the city directory. In 1952 he was employed as a grocery checker at Furr’s Super­market. In 1953 he was a student at Tech University. In 1957 he was at student at Draughons Business College. He enlisted in the U. S. Army in 1954 and was discharged in 1957.

He was married September 17, 1957 to Maxie Lynn McBride, according to Lubbock County Marriage Book 24, page 305. She, a daughter of Estella McBride, was born in Roswell, New Mexico. In 1958 he was a clerk for Bob’s Grocery and lived at 2111-A 5th Street in Lubbock.

On April 27, 1962 they received a warranty deed from Ed­son L. Rawson for a residence in Tulia, Texas. Considera­tion was $9,500, according to Swisher County Deed Book 165, page 198. He continued to own the property in 1972.

He was listed as a freshman at West Texas State College, Canyon, Texas and lived at 622 N. El Paso Street in 1964-65. In 1965-66 he continued in the college and showed his resi­dence at 1211 N. Pierce, Friona, Texas. From 1968 through 1973 he was listed in the city directory of Amarillo, Texas as an accountant for Glover, Graham & Brown with residence in Friona. He purchased a residence in the Lakeview Addi­tion there February 1, 1971 from High Plains Development Com­pany, according to Parmer County Deed Book 150, page 670. He became a certified public accountant and a minister for the Primitive Baptist Church in Friona.

Children born to Harrold Bernard Gowens and Maxie Lynn McBride Gowens include:

David Lee Gowens born July 7, 1958
Michael Lynn Gowens born July 19, 1962
Daniel Bernard Gowens born April 2, 1968

David Lee Gowens, son of Harrold Bernard Gowens and Maxie Lynn McBride Gowens, was born July 7, 1958 in Roswell, New Mexico. He was married August 1, 1981 to Vivian La Delle Noland in Floydada, Texas. In 1992 he was an insurance salesman in Amarillo. Children born to David Lee Gowens and Vivian La Delle Noland Gowens are unknown.

Michael Lynn Gowens, son of Harrold Bernard Gowens and Maxie Lynn McBride Gowens, was born July 19, 1962 at Tu­lia, according to BVS File 128164. He was ordained as a minister in the Primitive Baptist Church. He was married about 1980 to Karen Sue Cunningham who was also born in 1962. In 1981 they lived in Canyon, Texas. In 1984 and in 1990 they lived in Americus, Georgia.

Children born to Michael Lynn Gowens and Karen Sue Cun­ningham Gowens include:

Amber Tanea Gowens born in 1981
Bradley Nathaniel Gowens born in 1984
Ashley Megan Gowens born in 1986
Jared Michael Gowens born in 1990

Daniel Bernard Gowens, son of Harrold Bernard Gowens and Maxie Lynn McBride Gowens, was born April 2, 1968 at Friona. In 1990 he was a computer science senior at Texas Tech University in Lubbock. He was married there December 27, 1991 to Melissa Pelligrosk. Children born to Daniel Bernard Gowens and Melissa Pelligrosk Gowens are unknown.

Gwendolyn Belle Gowens, third child of Sylvester Bernard Gowens and Minnie Bell Bass Gowens, was born June 15, 1935, according to Young County Birth Record No. 1776. In 1953 she was listed in the Lubbock city directory as a saleswoman for King’s Jewelry residing with her parents at 3306 Bates. From 1954 through 1957 she was a student at Texas Technological College. She was married June 4, 1957 to Richard Wesley Gentry, ac­cording to Lubbock County Mar­riage Book 24, page 53. In 1973 and in 1990 they lived at Lamesa, Texas where he owned a farm implement business

Children born to them include:

Gregory Van Gentry born in 1960
Arlan Wesley Gentry born in 1962
Kayla Dawn Gentry born in 1966

Norman Bass Gowens, fourth child of Sylvester Bernard Go­wens and Minnie Bell Bass Gowens, was born Septem­ber 21, 1938 in Jones County, Texas while his family was in residence at Haskell, according to BVS Files 1279965 and 80510. In 1957 he was listed in the city directory of Lub­bock as a clerk at Bob’s Grocery and residing with his parents at 3306 Bates. On July 24, 1957 he was inducted into the U. S. Army and was dis­charged July 23, 1959.

In 1960 he was a student living at 613 31st Street. On Febru­ary 27, 1959 he was married to Priscilla Ruth Breedlove, ac­cording to Lubbock County Marriage Book 26, page 191. In 1961 he was listed as a maintenanceman for Texas Highway Department living at 2601 East Bates, an ad­dress he main­tained through 1965. In 1961 he was employed by the Veter­ans Administra­tion. He was dis­charged a second time from the U. S. Army June 30, 1963 as a sergeant, ac­cording to Lubbock County Dis­charge Book 21, page 327.

In 1967 he was transferred to Waco, Texas by the Veterans Administration. He received a deed to property there from Idis Ray Lawrence May 27, 1967, according to McLennan County Deed records. He and Priscilla Ruth Breedlove Gowens were living at 1818 Rambler Drive, according to the 1968 Waco city directory. He, a claims adjuster, main­tained a residence at 724 Kipling in Waco from 1969 through 1972. He continued with the Veterans Administra­tion in 1975 and in 1990.

Children born to Norman Bass Gowens and Priscilla Ruth Breedlove Gowens include:

Shelly Gowens born in 1960
Kari Gowens born in 1963

Shelly Gowens, daughter of Norman Bass Gowens and Priscilla Ruth Breedlove Gowens, was born in 1960. She was married about 1981 to Charles Wayne Raines who was born May 23, 1958 at Clifton, Texas.

They became the parents of triplets:

Jeffrey Charles Gowens born in 1986
Kristen Elizabeth Gowens born in 1986
Brian Matthew Gowens born in 1986

Kari Gowens, daughter of Norman Bass Gowens and Priscilla Ruth Breedlove Gowens, was born in 1963 in Lubbock. She was married November 11, 1989 to Robert Cocke III. In 1990 they lived in Lubbock where he was employed as a paramedic and she as a respiratory therapist.

Children born to them include:

Morgan Lianna Cocke born June 8, 1990

Geraldine Bonnelle Gowens, fifth child of Sylvester Bernard Gowens and Minnie Bell Bass Gowens, was born February 16, 1940 in Crosbyton, according to Crosby County Birth Book 5, page 250. In 1958 she was listed as a student in the Lubbock city directory, living in the home of her parents. On October 1, 1958 she was married to Francis Jayne Gentry, according to Lubbock County Marriage Book 25, page 569. In 1973 they lived in the Lakeview community in Floyd County, Texas. They continued in Floydada in 1990 where he was employed as a farmer and a ginner.

Children born to them include:

Tamara Gayle Gentry born February 6, 1960
Trava Jane Gentry born August 20, 1961
Terri Susan Gentry born January 3, 1963
Teresa Gwen Gentry born October 21, 1967
Tiffany June Gentry born September 18, 1970

Clifford Benjamin Gowens, sixth child of Sylvester Bernard Gowens and Minnie Bell Bass Gowens, was born July 14, 1942 in Crosby County, according to Crosby County Birth Book 7, page 36. From 1958 to 1965 he lived in the resi­dence of his parents at 3306 Bates, according to the Lub­bock city directory.

In 1958 and 1959 he was a gateman for Red Raider Drive-in Theatre. In 1960, 1961 and 1962 he was employed as a clerk for Louthan-Dowell Motors. In 1962, 1963 and 1964 he was listed as a salesman for the firm. In 1965 he was a partsman for Lubbock Dodge. In 1966 he became a carrier for the post office in Lubbock and continued in that capacity in 1970.

He was married June 5, 1965 to Lenora Oma Winfield, ac­cording to Lubbock County Marriage Book 34, page 394. In 1966 they lived at 1608 42nd Street in Lubbock. In 1967 their address was 2823 63rd Street; in 1969 it was 115 Av­enue V and in 1970 they again lived at 2823 63rd Street.

In March 1972 Clifford Benjamin Gowens and Lenora Oma Wenfield Gowens lived at 1510 Avenue L, Plano, Texas. In November of that year they were shown living near Wylie, Texas, and he was a property owner in Collin County, Texas. He became a Primitive Baptist preacher.

Children born to them include:

Nikki Shel Gowens born August 14, 1967
Dena Shea Gowens born September 23, 1969

Jimmie Belverd Gowens, seventh child of Sylvester Bernard Gowens and Minnie Bell Bass Gowens, was born October 6, 1947, according to Crosby County Birth Book 9, page 294. In 1966 and 1967 he was listed in the city directory living at 3306 Bates, Lubbock, the address of his par­ents. He enlisted in the U. S. Army April 22, 1970 and was dis­charged as a private Au­gust 29, 1970, according to Lubbock County Discharge Book 23, page 330. In 1971 and 1972 he was a postal clerk, accord­ing to the Lubbock city di­rectory.

He was married June 7, 1968 to Vicki Kay Poe, according to Lubbock County Marriage Book 39, page 134. In 1971 Jim­mie Belverd Gowens and Vicki Kay Poe Gowens were living at 115 Avenue V and in 1972 at 5004 35th Street. In 1974 he, a postal employee, lived in a mobile home at 4702 4th Street. After a divorce, he was remarried to Sandra Kay Martin in New Deal, Texas May 15, 1976. One child was born to Sandra Kay Martin Gowens, name unknown.

Children born to Jimmie Belverd Gowens and Vicki Kay Poe Gowens include:

Sean Lennon Gowens born May 29, 1969
Lance Shelby Gowens born October 6, 1970

Lola Mae Gowens, daughter of General Washington Gowens and Frances Emily Pharis Gowens, was born December 19, 1898 in Coleman County. She died two days later and was buried in White Chapel Church Cemetery.

Cordia Loraine Gowens, daughter of General Washington Gowens and Frances Emily Pharis Gowens, was born Novem­ber 12, 1900 in Coleman County. She was married at Stam­ford, Texas in 1939 to Charlie Wilson as his second wife. She died in 1945 of leukemia after having some teeth pulled, ac­cording to Rosa Evelyn Ray Cordell and was buried at Stam­ford.

Crystal Elizabeth Gowens, daughter of General Washing­ton Gowens and Frances Emily Pharis Gowens, was born July 25, 1902 in Coleman County. She was married July 26, 1922 to Charlie Lesley Reedy at Graham, according to Young County Mar­riage Book E, page 130. He was born in Mesquite, Texas July 3, 1895 to Thomas Henry Reedy and Alice Johnson Reedy. He served in World War I.

In November 1973 they lived next door to her brother, James William Gowens on Bunger Road in Gra­ham. She died July 10, 1980 and was buried in Murray Cemetery. He died October 29, 1986 and was buried beside his wife.

Children born to them include:

Virginia Lea Reedy born in 1924
Lila Mae Reedy born in 1925
Leslie Reedy born in 1927

Clarence Preston Gowens, son of General Washington Gowens and Frances Emily Pharis Gowens, was born at Coleman De­cember 30, 1904, according to Coleman County Birth Book 2, page 2. In 1924 they removed to Crosbyton, Texas to work at a grain elevator. He continued there until her death. On Decem­ber 25, 1927, he was married there to Lora Eva Atchison who was born in Comanche, Texas in 1908 to John Robert Atchison and Maggie Haynes Atchison.

At the time of his death, February 25, 1966 he lived on South Berk­shire Street in Crosbyton and was employed as a ser­vice station attendant. He died of coronary thrombosis at age 42 and was buried in Crosbyton Cemetery. Lora Eva Atchison Gowens continued in Crosbyton in 1980.

Children born to Clarence Preston Gowens and Lora Eva Atchison Gowens include:

Arvil Lee Gowens born in 1929
Donnell Dale Gowens born February 27, 1931
Dalmer Harild Gowens born March 16, 1933
Margie Nell Gowens born November 19, 1936
Ella Louise Gowens born June 10, 1943
Robert Preston Gowens born January 19, 1946

Arvil Lee Gowens, son of Clarence Preston Gowens and Lora Eva Atchison Gowens, was born in 1929 and died the same year.

Donnell Dale Gowens, son of Clarence Preston Gowens and Lora Eva Atchison Gowens, was born Febru­ary 27, 1931 at Crosbyton, according to Crosby County Birth Book 3, page 203 and Book 16, page 428. He was married there to Wilma Lee Aldredge December 20, 1950, accord­ing to Crosby County Marriage Book 4, page 288. She was the daughter of Sam Al­dredge and Stella Aldredge. They contin­ued there in 1953. In 1954 they lived at 4912 Avenue G in Lubbock, according to the city directory. At that time he was a salesman for Ameri­can National Insurance Com­pany. By 1957 the couple had re­turned to Crosbyton.

On January 14, 1971 he gave a warranty deed to his mother to two lots in Crosbyton, according to Crosby County Deed Book 147, page 340. They continued there in 1975. In 1980 they lived in Floydada where he was employed by Texas Highway Department..

Children born to Donnell Dale Gowens and Wilma Lee Aldridge Gowens include:

Arvin Vaughn Gowens born February 1, 1953
Rick Douglas Gowens born December 17, 1954
Kelton Dee Gowens born June 24, 1957

Arvin Vaughn Gowens, first child of Donnell Dale Gowens and Wilma Lee Aldridge Gowens, was born February 1, 1953 in Crosbyton, according to Crosby County Birth Book 13, page 103. He was married to Kaye Lynn Nash April 25, 1992 at Huntington Beach, California. Children born to Arvin Vaughn Gowens and Kaye Lynn Nash Gowens are unknown.

Rick Douglas Gowens, second child of Donnell Dale Gowens and Wilma Lee Aldridge Gowens, was born about 1953. He was a freshman student at West Texas State University, Canyon in 1971-72. In 1975 he lived in Lubbock where he was em­ployed by Furrs Supermarkets. He was married about 1976 to Mrs. Sally Moore McClure who had a son by a previous mar­riage who Rick Douglas Gowens adopted. Rick Douglas Gowens died April 26, 1982 at Crosbyton.

Children reared by Rick Douglas Gowens and Sally Moore McClure Gowens include:

Jody Lee Gowens [adopted] born February 20, 1972
Ricci D’Ann Gowens born July 16, 1974

Kelton Dee Gowens, third child of Donnell Dale Gowens and Wilma Lee Aldridge Gowens, was born June 24, 1957 at Cros­byton, according to Crosby County Birth Book 14, page 311. He was married about 1980 to Richie Lynn Sudduth who was born in 1960 to Richard Sudduth and Sarah Rotheal Sudduth in Crosbyton.

Children born to Kelton Dee Gowens and Richie Lynn Sudduth Gowens include:

Angela Marie Gowens born in 1982
Erica Diane Gowens born in 1986

Dalmer Harild Gowens, son of Clarence Preston Gowens and Lora Eva Atchison Gowens, was born March 16, 1933 at Cros­byton, according to Crosby County Birth Book 4, page 53 and Birth Book 17, page 438-A. He was married Septem­ber 29, 1951 to Mary Kathryn Brinlee in Crosbyton, accord­ing to Crosby County Marriage Book 4, page 313. She was born in Oklahoma in 1936. He was a truckdriver when he enlisted in the U. S. Army at Crosbyton May 9, 1953 and served in the Ko­rean War. When discharged December 22, 1954 he had been awarded the Korean Service Medal, ac­cording to Crosby County Discharge Book 3, page 294.

In 1955 he was a service station operator in Crosbyton. He was a member of the Cros­byton Volunteer Fire Department and the Masonic Lodge. He coached Little League baseball, girl’s soft­ball and worked with Cub Scouts. He died Febru­ary 8, 1980 after a lengthy illness and was buried in Crosbyton Cemetery.

Children born to Dalmer Harild Gowens and Mary Kathryn Brinlee Gowens include:

Michael Harold Gowens born December 12, 1953
Gary Lee Gowens born September 23, 1955
Kittie Gail Gowens born in 1957

Michael Harold Gowens, son of Dalmer Harild Gowens and Mary Kathryn Brinlee Gowens, was born December 12, 1953, according to Crosby County Birth Book 13, page 231. He was married May 1, 1974 to Eletia Elaine Griffin, daughter of George Griffin.. In 1980 they continued at Crosbyton.

Children born to Michael Harold Gowens and Eletia Elaine Griffin Gowens include:

Michael Blair Gowens born January 20, 1976
Jared Blane Gowens born August 21, 1978
April L’Nae Gowens born April 5, 1980

Gary Lee Gowens, son of Dalmer Harild Gowens and Mary Kathryn Brinlee Gowens, was born September 23, 1955, ac­cording to Crosby County Birth Book 14, page 107. He was married about 1976 to Susan Genelle Allen. They re­mained in Crosbyton in 1980.

Children born to Gary Lee Gowens and Susan Genelle Allen Gowens include:

Jill Deniece Gowens born January 9, 1978
James Lee Gowens born January 4, 1983

Kittie Gail Gowens, daughter of Dalmer Harild Gowens and Mary Kathryn Brinlee Gowens, was born in 1957. She was married to Gary Dale Hamersley February 7, 1976. In 1980 and in 1991, they continued in Crosbyton.

Children born to them include:

Maggie Dale Hamersley born October 29, 1981
Megan Lee Hamersley born November 10, 1984

Margie Nell Gowens, daughter of Clarence Preston Gowens and Lora Eva Atchison Gowens, was born November 19, 1936 at Crosbyton, according to Crosby County Birth Book 4, page 382. She was married March 1, 1952 at Portales, New Mexico to Luther Wayne Scog­gins. He was born March 16, 1930 at Id­abelle, Oklahoma. In 1980 and in January 1990 they lived in Lubbock.

One son was born to them:

Larry Wayne Scoggins born November 9, 1953

Larry Wayne Scoggins, son of Wayne Scoggins and Margie Nell Gowens Scoggins, was born November 9, 1953 at Cros­byton. He was married about 1976 to Teresa Gail Garrett. In 1990 they lived in Achille, Oklahoma, and he was employed by the City of Du­rant, Oklahoma.

Children born to them include:

Christina Gail Scoggins born August 19, 1978
Buster Wayne Scoggins born July 6, 1980
Lawrence Otto Scoggins born October 28, 1983

Ella Louise Gowens, daughter of Clarence Preston Gowens and Lora Eva Atchison Gowens, was born June 10, 1943 at Cros­byton, according to Crosby County Birth Book 7, page 344. She was married about 1961 to Floyd Vernon Rogers. In 1980 and in 1991 they lived in Haskell.

Children born to them include:

Darrell Vernon Rogers born May 7, 1962
Darlia Rogers born January 2, 1968
Deniece Rogers born March 6, 1972

Robert Preston Gowens, son of Clarence Preston Gowens and Lora Eva Atchison Gowens, was born January 19, 1946 at Crosbyton, according to BVS File 2463. He was married about 1966, wife’s name Barbara. In 1967 he was listed an engineer­ing aide for Texas State Highway Department with residence at Crosbyton, according to the Lubbock city directory. In 1980 he continued at Crosbyton. Following a divorce, he was remar­ried, wife’s name Bryson. He was married a third time to Mrs. Laura Gann Ward April 16, 1983.

Children born to Robert Preston Gowens and Barbara Gowens include:

Jason Gowens born about 1968

Children born to the second marriage include:

Jodie Nicole Gowens born about 1971

Children born to Robert Preston Gowens and Laura Gann Ward Gowens include:

Robert Ward Gowens born in March 1974
Kathryn Evi Gowens born January 26, 1985

Stella Vera Gowens, daughter of General Washington Gowens and Frances Emily Pharis Gowens, was born July 10, 1906, ac­cording to Coleman County Birth Book 2, page 38. She was married November 24, 1930 to Clyde Washington Perry, ac­cording to Dick­ens County Marriage Book 4, page 186. They lived in Crosbyton in 1942. Later they removed to Stockton, Califor­nia. She died there July 7, 1982 of leukemia and was buried in Lodi Cemetery, Lodi, California.

Children born to them include:

Mary Nadine Perry born January 12, 1926
Frances Beatrice Perry born November 14, 1931
Clyde Washington Perry, Jr. born March 27, 1933
Zelma Bernice Perry born October 14, 1935
Troy Alvin Perry born in 1936
John Earl Perry born in 1939
Vera Jane Perry born in 1943
Gloria Jean Perry born in 1945

Mary Nadine Perry, daughter of Clyde Washington Perry and Stella Vera Gowens Perry, was born January 12, 1926. A grandson of Mary Nadine Perry, Donnie O’Neal of Austin, Texas, wrote November 13, 1999 that he had photographs of some of his Gowens ancestors.

Joseph Calvin Gowens, son of General Washington Gowens and Frances Emily Pharis Gowens, was born February 16, 1908 at Graham, Texas and died two days later.

Cloyce Washington Gowens, son of General Washington Gowens and Frances Emily Pharis Gowens, was born July 25, 1910 at Graham, according to Young County Birth Book 1, page 172. On November 27, 1939 he gave a warranty deed to H. I. Bass to two lots in Crosbyton, according to Crosby County Deed Book 60, page 68. He enlisted in the U.S. Army July 17, 1942, but was discharged October 6, 1942 be­cause of poor health. After his discharge he continued to live in Graham at 610 4th Street. He died there February 10, 1954, unmarried. He was buried in Crosbyton Cemetery.

Maggie Lucille Gowens, daughter of General Washington Gowens and Frances Emily Pharis Gowens, was born August 31, 1913 at Graham, according to Young County Birth Book 3, page 375. Her birth date was listed as August 13, 1912 in BVS File 446339. She was married February 5, 1933 to Sammie Radford Gal­loway. He died January 20, 1962 at Huntington Beach, California. She was remarried August 12, 1977 at Reno, Nevada to Floyd Funkner.

Children born to them include:

Rooney Emily Galloway born October 31, 1933
Sammie Radford Galloway, Jr. born April 5, 1935
Wendol Ray Galloway born August 20, 1936
Juanita Maxine Galloway born March 8, 1939
Royce Eugene Galloway born March 13, 1940
Linda Mae Galloway born January 17, 1942
Oleta Faye Galloway born September 9, 1943

Charity Elizabeth Gowens, daughter of James Blair Gowens and Mary An Livinia Jackson Gowens, was born in Gallatin County about 1846. She was married about 1881 to Zack Keeney.

Children born to them include:

Mattie Keeney born about 1882
Leo Keeney born about 1883
Vito Marcella Keeney born about 1884
Ervin Keeney born about 1886
Bert Keeney born about 1888
Della Keeney born about 1891
Oma Keeney born about 1894

A reunion of the descendants of General Washington Gowens is held at Stamford, Texas on the first Sunday fol­lowing the an­nual Stamford Rodeo & Cowboy Reunion.
==O==
Monroe Goen, a North Carolinian who moved to Henry County about 1879, appeared as the head of a household in the 1880 census of Henry County, Enumeration District 128, page 46, Horse Pasture District as:

“Goen, Monroe 23, born in North Carolina
Jennie 20, born in North Carolina
Lillie 4, born in North Carolina
James 3, born in North Carolina
Sarah 2, born in North Carolina
[daughter] 1/12, born in Virginia”
==O==
Edward Goin, age 8, appeared in the 1880 census of Henry County, Enumeration District 128, page 32, Horse Pasture Dis­trict as a servant in the household of Frank Grogan. Ed­ward Goin was born in North Carolina in 1872.
==O==
David Going paid a tax on “two polls” in Henry County, ac­cording to “Virginia Taxpayers, 1782-1787” by Fothergill. “David Gowing of Henry County” took the oath of allegiance in 1777 before James Lyons, Esq, according to “Virginia Maga­zine of History and Biography.”
==O==
Elizabeth Going was married August 29, 1795 to Charles Moore, according to “Henry County Marriage Bonds, 1778-1849” by Virginia Anderson Dodd.

Charles Moore and Elizabeth Going Moore removed across the state line to Rockingham County, North Carolina “prior to 1810 and joined the Goins and Moore families [their relatives?] already living there near Goinstown, North Carolina,” according to James Hall, a descendant of Columbus, Ohio.

James Hall, a Foundation member, wrote July 28, 1998:

“I just visited the Goinstown are last month, and it is still one of the most rural areas of the county. Goinstown Road, which runs through northeastern Stokes to the rockingham County line, is still not paved. Just off Victory Hill Churchy road, close to the Stokes County line, is the old the old Harris Cemetery. Most of the people buried there are named Goins. Just off Bennett Road and only a couple of miles from the Harris Cemetery is the old Gibson Cemetery. Most of the people buried in the Gibson Cemetery are also named Goins.”
==O==
Moses Going made oath that he enlisted April 27, 1760 in Henry County as a soldier in a company commanded by Capt. James Gunn in Col. Byrd’s Second Virginia Regiment, accord­ing to “Land Bounty Certificates, Virginia Colonial Militia” by William Armstrong Crozier. The regiment was raised primarily in Charles City County, Virginia and was active on the western frontier during the French & Indian War. He was a resident of Henry County when he made the statement of his military record, according to “Virginia Magazine of History and Biography,” Vol. 9. Moses Going stated that he “never received his bounty of land agreeable to his proclamation.”

He paid tax on “one poll” in Henry County, according to “Virginia Taxpayers, 1782-1787.”

Moses Going was authorized by the Henry County Court in 1783 to build a water grist mill on the North Mayo River.
==O==
William Going was a soldier in a militia company of Henry County which was ordered to go to the assistance of Gen. Nathanael Greene in March 1781.
==O==
William Gowen was married to Sarah Griggs in October 1794, according to “Some Marriages of Virginia Residents, 1607-1800.” Children born to William Gowen and Sarah Griggs Gowen are unknown.
==O==
Jake Gowin, “mulatto,” appeared as the head of a household in the 1880 census of Henry County, Enumeration District 127, page 20, Horse Pasture District as:

“Gowin, Jake 54, born in Virginia
Judy A. 23, born in Virginia, wife
John 16, born in Virginia
Ella 7, born in Virginia”
==O==
==O==
David Goens, unidentified was married February 22, 1848 to Nancy Swango, according to Gallatin County marriage records. David Goens was enumerated August 8, 1850 as the head of Household 198-198 in the federal census of Gallatin County, page 166:

“Goens, David 23, laborer, illiterate
Nancy 23, illiterate
Andrew 1”

“David Goins” reappeared at Warsaw, Kentucky as the head of Household 247-247 in the 1860 census of Gallatin County, Kentucky, page 37:

“Goins, David 27, born in KY, farmer, $250 real
estate
Nancy 24, born in KY
Andrew 9, born in KY
Malvina 4, born in KY
Jacob 2, born in KY”

Children born to David Goens and Nancy Swango Goens in­clude:

Andrew Goens born about 1849
Malvina Goens born about 1855
Jacob Goens born about 1858

Sally Goens, unidentified was married February 7, 1854 to Wesley Swango, according to Gallatin County marriage records.
==O==
Mary S. Goins, unidentified, was married in 1878 to James W. Walton, according to Gallatin County Marriage Book 3, page 127.
==O==
James Goins, unidentified was born in Kentucky about 1848. He appeared as a 12-year-old in the 1860 census of Gallatin County living in the household of W. C. Brown, Household No. 321-321, page 19.

 

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Virginia Counties
Accomack  •  Albemarle  •  Alleghany  •  Amelia  •  Amherst  •  Appomattox  •  Arlington  •  Augusta  • Bath  •  Bedford  •  Bland  •  Botetourt  •  Brunswick  •  Buchanan  •  Buckingham •  Campbell  •  Caroline  • Carroll  • Charles City •   Charlotte  •  Chesterfield  •  Clarke • Craig  •  Culpeper •  Cumberland  •  Dickenson  •  Dinwiddie  • Essex  •  Fairfax  •  Fauquier  •  Floyd  •  Fluvanna  •   Franklin  •  Frederick  • Giles  •  Gloucester  •   Goochland  •  Grayson  •  Greene  •  Greensville  •  Halifax  •  Hanover  •  Henrico  • Henry  •  Highland  •  Isle of Wight • James City •  King and Queen •  King George  •  King William  • Lancaster  •  Lee  •  Loudoun  •  Louisa  •  Lunenburg  •  Madison  •  Mathews  •  Mecklenburg  •  Middlesex  •  Montgomery  •  Nansemond  – Nelson  •  New Kent  •  Northampton  •  Northumberland  •  Nottoway  •  Orange  •  Page  • Patrick •  Pittsylvania  •  Powhatan  •  Prince Edward  •  Prince George  •  Prince William  •  Pulaski  •  Rappahannock   •  Richmond  •  Roanoke  •  Rockbridge  •  Rockingham  •  Russell  •  Scott  • Shenandoah  •  Smyth  •  Southampton  •  Spotsylvania  •  Stafford  •  Surry  •   Sussex  •  Tazewell  • Warren  •  Washington  •  Westmoreland  •  Wise  •  Wythe  •  York

MAPS:  Link to VA, NC, SC area Maps

LIST OF U.S. STATES:

Alabama, Alaska, Arizona, Arkansas, California, Colorado, Connecticut, Delaware, Florida, Georgia,Hawaii,Idaho, Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Kansas, Kentucky, Louisiana, Maine, Maryland, Massachusetts,Michigan,Minnesota, Mississippi, Missouri, Montana, Nebraska, Nevada, New Hampshire, New Jersey, New Mexico,New York, North Carolina, North Dakota, Ohio, Oklahoma, Oregon, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island,South Carolina, South Dakota, Tennessee, Texas, Utah, Vermont, Virginia, Washington, West Virginia,Wisconsin,Wyoming
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