1763 Charles Gowen b. Henry Co., Va.

Charles Gowen b. 1763 in Henry Co, Va married to  Elizabeth “Betsy” Blair

Parents:

Children:

  • John Gowen born about 1786
  • Lucinda Gowen Rose born about 1788 m. Charles Rose
  • Polly Gowen Bales born about 1790
  • Garrett Gowen born about 1792
  • Nancy Gowen Furnish born about 1793
  • Hannah Gowen Rose born about 1796
  • Sally Gowen Kidwell born about 1800
  • George Washington Gowen born in 1802
  • James Blair Gowen born in 1810

Siblings:

  • William Going b.abt 1761 (Rev War Pension app)(son of David Going b. abt 1735-40)
  • Charles Going b. abt 1763 (Rev War Pension app)(son of David Going b. abt 1735-40)
  • Jacob Gowen b. abt 1762 (Rev War Pension app)(son of David Going b. abt 1735-40)

FACTS:

Charles Gowen 1833 application in Gallatin Co, KY
70 yrs of age in 1833 – b. 1763
Resident of Henry Co, Va when entered service Sept 1, 1779
Private – 6 months, under Capt Jonathan Hamby
reentered service in May 1781 under Capt Shelton
Born 1763 in Henry Co, Va
Lived in Henry Co, Va until 1797 and then moved to Harrison Co, Kentucky.
In 1815 moved to Gallatin Co, Ky.

In 1855 Charles Gowen age 93 in Gallatin Co, Ky
Has never received warrant of land, asks for one.

Charles Gowens wrote his will June 18, 1847 in Gallatin County. A great-great grandson, Norman Bass Gowens of Waco, Texas retained the original copy of the will in 1975. It read:

“I, Charles Goens of Gallatin County in the State of Kentucky, being sensible from my advanced age and increasing infirmities that the close of my mortal life draws near and being of sound mind and disposing memory, do make and publish this, my last will and testament, hereby revoking any and all wills and testaments by me heretofore made.
First, as I am not indebted to any one, in a pecuniary manner, I shall give my executors no trouble on that subject.
Second, as my wife, Betsey and myself have been living for a considerable time past with our son, James Goens, and as I expect to remain with him during my life and desire him to take care of and provide for us both while we live, I give and bequeath to my said son, James Goens the farm or tract of land in said county of Gallatin, near Providence meeting house, being the same whereon I have lived for many years past, containing about 107 acres, be the same more or less, with all the appurtenances thereof to be his and his heirs forever, upon the conditions as forestated, that the said James shall maintain and comfortably provide for myself and my wife during our natural lives.
Third to my son, John Goens; my son, Garrett Goens, my daughter, Lucinda Rose; my daughter, Polly Bales; my daughter, Nancy Furnish; my daughter, Hannah Rose and my daughter, Sally Kidwell, I give and bequeath each the sum of two dollars to be paid out of my estate.
Lastly, I appoint my said son, James Goens as executor of this, my last will and testament, confidently believing that should my wife, his mother, survive me, that he will not suffer her to want during her life.
In witness whereof I have hereunto set my hand and seal this eighteenth day of June AD 1847.
Charles [X] Goens
Witnesses: K. I. Abbott, Benjamin Litter”

In an affidavit made July 2, 1853 “Charles Goins, a citizen of Gallatin County, aged 86, states that he is well acquainted with Lucinda Rose, that she is his daughter, that she married Charles Rose.”

On September 20, 1854 Charles Gowens deeded to Lucinda Gowens Rose 127.5 acres of land on Craig’s Creek “for $1 and the love and affection of my daughter,” according to Gallatin County Deed Book O, page 139.

In 1855, at “age 92,” Charles Gowens made application for a land grant and received Bounty Land Warrant No. 26-106 for 160 acres under the Pension Act of 1855. He lived to be 102 years old, dying in Kentucky in 1865, and Elizabeth “Betsy” Gowens survived to 110 years old, according to Sylvester Bernard Gowens, a great-grandson of Lubbock, Texas. “Texas Society DAR Register of Revolutionary Ancestors” gives the date of his death as 1857 in Gallatin County.

Children born to Charles Gowens and Elizabeth “Betsy” Gowens include:
John Gowens born about 1786
Lucinda Gowens born about 1788
Polly Gowens born about 1790
Garrett Gowens born about 1792
Nancy Gowens born about 1793
Hannah Gowens born about 1796
Sally Gowens born about 1800
George Washington Gowens born in 1802
James Blair Gowens born in 1810

1783  Henry Co Va
tithes/ whites over 21/ slaves over 16/ slaves under 16/ horses/ cattle
frame 37,
John Going, Zephaniah Going, Claiborn Going, James Going 42005/14
David Going, William Going, Charles Going, Jacob Going 420068
frame 38,
Going, James 110026
Going, Moses 11
http://www.freeafricanamericans.com/henry.htm

1784 Henry Co Va
frame 86,
Going, Jesse 110025
Going, John & 2 sons 3112006
frame 87,
Going, Moses 110025
frame 88,
David Going, Wm, Chas. & Jacob 43109/13
Going, John 1100022
Going, James 1100210
http://www.freeafricanamericans.com/henry.htm

1785 Henry Co Va
Going, Moses 2200088
frame 158,
Going, James 1100015
Going, John 1100015
David Going, & 3 sons 43100/10/8
John Going, Claiborn Going & Asaiah Going 31200413
frame 159,
Going, Zephaniah 11000010
http://www.freeafricanamericans.com/henry.htm

1787  Henry Co Va
A free tithes 16 and over/ slaves over 16/slaves under 16/ horses/cattle –
frame 253,
Going, John Senr.: Jno & Zephaniah 20011/30
Going, Claiborne 0000
Going, Shadrack 1009/13
Going, Nathan 0001
Going, James 00025
Going, Jno (Mayo River) 10014
Going, David, Wm, Jacob 20010/5
Going, Jno (Dan River) 00015
Going, Charles 0001
http://www.freeafricanamericans.com/henry.htm

1788B Henry Co Va
whites 21+/whites 16-21/ slaves over 16, slaves under 16/horses/cattle
frame 301,
Gowing, David 5009
Going, James, Junr. 1001
Going, Claiborne (Dan River) 1001`
Going, Benjamin 1005
Going, Shadrack 3006
Going, James (Dan River) 1002
Going, John (Mayo River) 1003
Going, Nathan 1001
frame 302,
Going, Charles 1001
Going, John (Black Berry) 4008
Going, Zephaniah 1001
http://www.freeafricanamericans.com/henry.htm

1789A Henry Co Va
Going, Benjamin 1003
frame 314,
Gowing, William 1002
Going, Shadrack 3006
Going, Nathan 1001
Going, Claborne (Dan River) 1001
Going, David 3008
frame 315,
Going, James 1003
Going, John (Black Berry) 6009
Going, Isaiah 1
Going, John (Mayo River) 1001
Going, Charles 1001
http://www.freeafricanamericans.com/henry.htm

1790B Henry Co Va
frame 352,
Gowing, Nathan 1001
Gowing, Charles 1003
Gowing, Isaac 1001
Gowing, David 1006
Gowing, Shadrack 2006
Gowing, Labon 1
Gowing, Benjamin 2004
Gowing, Claborn 1001
Gowing, John (Russell’s Creek) 1001
Gowing, William 1002
Gowing, John (Black Berry) 50011
Gowing, James 1002
http://www.freeafricanamericans.com/henry.htm

1791 Patrick Co Va
frame 150,
Going, Shadrack 2005
Going, Claborn (Dan River) 1001
Going, Labon 1001
Going, Benjamin Senr. 2005
Going, Nathan 1001
Going, Joseph 1202
Gowing, John 1001
Going, Isaac 1001
Going, James (Dan River) 1003
Going, William 2003
Going, Benjamin Junr. 1001
Gowing, David 1006
frame 151,
Gowing, Jacob 1001
Gowing, Charles 1001
http://www.freeafricanamericans.com/patrick.htm

1792 Patrick Co Va
frame 163,
Gowing, David 2008
Gowing, Isaac 1001
Gowing, Benjamin Sr. 3006
Gowing, Shadrack 2005
Gowing, Labon 1001
Going, Nathan 1002
Gowing, Claborn 1001
Gowing, James Junr. 1001
Going, Joseph 1201
Going, Benjamin Jr. 1001
Going, Charles 1002
Going, Jacob 1001
Going, John Junr. 1
Going, James 1003
http://www.freeafricanamericans.com/patrick.htm

1793 Patrick Co Va
frame 177,
Gowing, Shadrack 2005
Gowing, William 1003
Gowing, Benjamin Junr. 1001
Gowing, Charles 1001
Gowine, Joseph 1102
Gowin, James Senr. 1004
Gowin, James Junr. 1001
Gowin, Labon 1001
Gowin, Shadrack Junr. 1001
Gowin, Claborn 1001
Gowin, Nathan 1
Gowin, John (Mayo) 1
Gowin, David 2006
Gowin, Benjamin 3006
http://www.freeafricanamericans.com/patrick.htm

1794 Patrick Co Va
Goin, Shadrack Senr. 2005
Goin, Clabon 1001
Goin, Labon 1001
Goin, James Junr. 1001
Goin, Shadrack Junr. 1001
Going, James Senr. 1003
Goin, Charles 1001
Gowin, Isaac 1001
Goin, William 1006
Goin, Benjamin Junr. 1001
http://www.freeafricanamericans.com/patrick.htm

1795 Patrick Co Va
frame 207,
Gowing, David 2007
Gowing, Isaac 1001
Gowing, William 1005
Gowine, Joseph 1102
Goin, Shadrack Sen. 3007
Goin, Shadrack Junr. 1001
Goin, James, Jr. 1001
Goin, Benjamin Junr. 1001
Goin, Charles 1001
Goin, James 1005
http://www.freeafricanamericans.com/patrick.htm

1820 KY Gallatin Co US Census Charles Goins

1820 KY Gallatin Co US Census Charles Goins

1820 KY Gallatin Co US Census Charles Goins

1830 KY Gallatin Co US Census Charles Goin

1830 KY Gallatin Co US Census Charles Goin

1830 KY Gallatin Co US Census Charles Goin

In 1832, Charles Gowens applied for his Revolutionary War pension benefits.  The following is an abstract of the documents in that application:

1832 KY Charles Gowens rev war pension app_Page_1

1832 KY Charles Gowens rev war pension app_Page_1

1832 KY Charles Gowens rev war pension app_Page_2

1832 KY Charles Gowens rev war pension app_Page_2

https://www.fold3.com/image/21819909 , https://revwarapps.org/s31072.pdf

1840 KY Gallatin Co US Census Charles Goins age 71 veteran.

1840 KY Gallatin CO US Census Charles Goins veteran age 71

1840 KY Gallatin CO US Census Charles Goins veteran age 71

1840 KY Gallatin Co US Census Charles Goins veteran info 2 age 71

1840 KY Gallatin Co US Census Charles Goins veteran info 2 age 71

1840 KY Gallatin Co US Census Charles Goins

1840 KY Gallatin Co US Census Charles Goins

1850 KY Gallatin Co US Census Charles Goens age 87
Wife Elizabeth age 80

1850 KY Gallatin Co US Census Charles Goens

1850 KY Gallatin Co US Census Charles Goens

Charles Goins died in August of 1857 in Gallatin County, Kentucky

With Revolutionary Training . . .
Charles Gowens, Sharpshooter
Bagged Squirrels at 102

Charles Gowens, a Revolutionary War soldier from Virginia saw much of the panorama of America unfold during his lifetime.

He died at the age of 106, according to the research of Anna Brooks Dobbin Gowens, a family researcher. She wrote in a letter May 1, 1952 from Del Rio, Texas, “Charles Gowens became an expert marksman during the war and retained this proficiency throughout his lifetime. At the age of 102, in an exhibition, he brought down a squirrel from the top of a tall tree with his old muzzle-loader.”

Henry County was the earliest documented place of residence for Charles Gowens. Henry County was formed in 1776 with land from Pittsylvania County. Pittsylvania County was formed in 1766 with land from Halifax County. Halifax County was formed in 1752 with land from Lunenburg County. Lunenburg County was formed in 1746 with land from Brunswick County. Brunswick County was formed in 1720 with land from Prince George County, Isle of Wight County and Surry County. Prince George County was formed in 1702 with land from Charles City County, an original shire.

The ancestors of Charles Gowens might be found in the records of any of the above counties.

Charles Gowens was born in 1763 in Henry [Halifax] County, according to his Revolutionary War pension application, No. S31,072 which was published in “Abstracts of Pension Papers Pertaining to Soldier of the Revolutionary War, War of 1812 and Indian Wars, Gallatin County, Kentucky:” “Charles Gowans, Va. S31,072, Bounty Land Warrant No. 26106-160-55 On October 22, 1833 in Gallatin County, Kentucky, the said pensioner at the age of 70 years appeared in open court and stated that on September 1, 1779 in Henry County, Virginia he had first volunteered to serve in the capacity of a private soldier for a tour of six months duration in the company under the command of Capt. Jonathan Hanley and Lt. Edward Tatum.

He stated that they had first marched to the state of South Carolina and that there they were attached to the regiment under the command of Col. Monroe and they then marched to 96 near Charleston and they then marched to guard the prisoners from 96 to Williamsburg and there and then the said pensioner was honorably discharged.

Then again in the month of May 1781 the said pensioner again volunteered to serve in the capacity of a private soldier for a tour of 3 months duration to serve in the company under the command of Capt. Shelton and they then rendezvoused at Russell Creek Meeting House in Henry County, Virginia and they then marched up the Dan River and they were also often at the Hollow on the river. The said pensioner Charles Gowens was born in Henry County, Virginia in 1763 and came to Kentucky in 1797.

Then in the year 1815 the said pensioner removed from Harrison County, Kentucky to Gallatin County, Kentucky. In all his tours of duty the said pensioner had volunteered his services. The said pensioner stated and swore that he had seen Capt. Small, Col. Monroe and Col. Martin and that he had been honorably discharged at Williamsburg.

==O==

The affidavit of Benjamin Miller, a clergyman and James Furnish, [his son-in-law] was also given. They stated that at one time and in the said county and state they had been well acquainted with the said pensioner, and the said deponents also stated that in the neighborhood in which the said pensioner resided he was reputed to have served in the Revolutionary War on the side of the United States.

==O==

April 7, 1855, in Gallatin County, Kentucky, the said pensioner at the age of 93 years appeared in open court again and stated that he had served in the capacity of a private in the company under the command of Capt Hamby and in the regiment under the command of Col Monroe. He stated that he had volunteered on September 1, 1779 in Henry County, Virginia for a tour of six months duration and that he had been honorably discharged at Petersburg, Virginia. He applied for the Bounty Land that was due him and he also appointed Henry J. Abbott of Warsaw, Kentucky to be his attorney.

==O==

The affidavit of David Story and White Hawkins was also given, etc. They stated that the said pensioner had signed the foregoing declaration in their presence, and they also swore that Charles Gowens was the identical person that he claimed himself to be.

The said pensioner Charles Gowens was on the Kentucky roll of pensions at the rate of $30 per annum, and his certificate of pension for that amount was issued 12-14-1?, and it was sent to the Hon. R. M. Johnson, House of Representatives.”

Charles Gowens lived through a time period that embraced the turbulent events from the Revolutionary War through the Civil War. His longevity, remarkable as it is, was eclipsed by that of his wife who lived to be 110, according to descendants.

He was married about 1785 probably in Henry County, wife’s name Elizabeth. Elizabeth “Betsy” Gowens was born in 1770.

In 1797 they removed to Kentucky, probably Harrison County where a daughter was married February 16, 1814.

In 1815, Charles Gowens removed his family to Gallatin County, Kentucky, according to his pension statement. He was enumerated there in 1830 as the head of a household, page 182:

“Goin, Charles white male 60-70
white female 50-60
white male 20-30
white male 10-15
white female 80-90”

The octogenarian in the household is believed to be the mother of Charles Gowens or Elizabeth “Betsy” Gowens. Adjoining the household, page 182, was that of “Garrott Goin,” a son.

The family of George Goins, unidentified was enumerated in 1830 in Gallatin County near the residence of Charles Gowens, “above the Kentucky River,” page 180:

“Goins, George white male 30-40
white female 20-30
white male 10-15
white female 10-15
white female 0-5
white female 0-5”

He was the only individual named “George” in the 1830 census of Kentucky whose surname was of interest to Gowen chroniclers.

In 1833 Charles Gowens received a pension as a Revolutionary soldier. He was pensioned on Certificate 25-242 issued under the act of June 7, 1832. He continued in Gallatin County June 1, 1840 when he was listed there in the “U.S. Census of Pensioners.” In another compilation of pensioners he was shown as “Charles Goins, born in 1769.”

Charles Gowens wrote his will June 18, 1847 in Gallatin County. A great-great grandson, Norman Bass Gowens of Waco, Texas retained the original copy of the will in 1975. It read:

“I, Charles Goens of Gallatin County in the State of Kentucky, being sensible from my advanced age and increasing infirmities that the close of my mortal life draws near and being of sound mind and disposing memory, do make and publish this, my last will and testament, hereby revoking any and all wills and testaments by me heretofore made.

First, as I am not indebted to any one, in a pecuniary manner, I shall give my executors no trouble on that subject.

Second, as my wife, Betsey and myself have been living for a considerable time past with our son, James Goens, and as I expect to remain with him during my life and desire him to take care of and provide for us both while we live, I give and bequeath to my said son, James Goens the farm or tract of land in said county of Gallatin, near Providence meeting house, being the same whereon I have lived for many years past, containing about 107 acres, be the same more or less, with all the appurtenances thereof to be his and his heirs forever, upon the conditions as forestated, that the said James shall maintain and comfortably provide for myself and my wife during our natural lives.

Third to my son, John Goens; my son, Garrett Goens, my daughter, Lucinda Rose; my daughter, Polly Bales; my daughter, Nancy Furnish; my daughter, Hannah Rose and my daughter, Sally Kidwell, I give and bequeath each the sum of two dollars to be paid out of my estate.

Lastly, I appoint my said son, James Goens as executor of this, my last will and testament, confidently believing that should my wife, his mother, survive me, that he will not suffer her to want during her life.

In witness whereof I have hereunto set my hand and seal this eighteenth day of June AD 1847.

Charles [X] Goens
Witnesses: K. I. Abbott, Benjamin Litter”

In an affidavit made July 2, 1853 “Charles Goins, a citizen of Gallatin County, aged 86, states that he is well acquainted with Lucinda Rose, that she is his daughter, that she married Charles Rose.” On September 20, 1854 Charles Gowens deeded to Lucinda Gowens Rose 127.5 acres of land on Craig’s Creek “for $1 and the love and affection of my daughter,” according to Gallatin County Deed Book O, page 139.

In 1855, at “age 92,” Charles Gowens made application for a land grant and received Bounty Land Warrant No. 26-106 for 160 acres under the Pension Act of 1855. He lived to be 102 years old, dying in Kentucky in 1865, and Elizabeth “Betsy” Gowens survived to 110 years old, according to Sylvester Bernard Gowens, a great-grandson of Lubbock, Texas.

“Texas Society DAR Register of Revolutionary Ancestors” gives the date of his death as 1857 in Gallatin County.

Children born to Charles Gowens and Elizabeth “Betsy” Gowens include:

John Gowens born about 1786
Lucinda Gowens born about 1788
Polly Gowens born about 1790
Garrett Gowens born about 1792
Nancy Gowens born about 1793
Hannah Gowens born about 1796
Sally Gowens born about 1800
George Washington Gowens born in 1802
James Blair Gowens born in 1810

The descendants of Charles Gowens and Elizabeth “Betsy” Gowens became quite numerous and scattered. Their children, like other branches of the family, used diverse spellings of the surname. They were usually recorded as “John Goin,” whose descendants remained in Kentucky; “Lucinda Goen,” whose descendants removed to Indiana; “Polly Goen,” whose descendants remained in Kentucky; “Garret Goin,” whose descendants remained in Kentucky; “Nancy Goen,” whose descendants went to Indiana and Illinois; “Hannah Goins” whose descendants went to Indiana; “Sally Goens” whose descendants remained in Kentucky; “George Washington Gowing” whose descendants went to Iowa, Missouri and Kansas, and James Blair Gowens whose descendants went to Iowa, Nebraska and Texas.

From GRF Newsletter Dec 1994:

Three Gowens Sisters Married To
Three Turner Brothers in Iowa

By Walter Earl Turner
Editorial Boardmember
611 East 1600 South, Orem, Utah, 84058

Who would have thought that Charles Gowens, Revolutionary War veteran of Henry County, Virginia and his wife Elizabeth Blair Gowens would have anything in common with Edward Turner of Lincolnshire, England and his wife Isabelle Freelove Turner. They had a lot in common—three Turner sons were to marry three Gowens daughters.

It is fortunate for me that they got together—else I would not be here to write this article. To do it justice, a series of three articles is required, to give some space to each couple and to include some photographs.

On December 3, 1801 a son was born to Edward Turner and Isabelle Freelove Turner in Wrangle, Lincolnshire. Isabelle named him George Freelove Turner after her father, George Freelove. On June 9, 1810 a son was born in Harrison County, Kentucky to Charles Gowens and Elizabeth “Betsy” Blair Gowens. “Betsy” named him James Blair Gowens after her father, James Blair of Maryland. James Blair Gowens [Newsletter, February 1993], the youngest of nine children, became the progenitor of my many Texas cousins.

George Freelove Turner grew up in Lincolnshire as a city boy.

He was a laborer there and then became a clerk in Grimsby in the coal-mining area of England. He was married October 19, 1823 to Elizabeth Neal who was born January 7, 1809. She was recorded as a 14-year-old “spinster” in the parish record. They became the parents of about 16 children.

James Blair Gowens grew up in Harrison County and nearby Gallatin County, Kentucky. He was married September 14, 1835 to Mary An Livinia Jackson in Gallatin County. She was born there December 11, 1816 to George Jackson and Susannah Ray Jackson who were married there November 11, 1814.

They had six children when she died, apparently at childbirth, because they had a total of seven. James Blair Gowens was then married to 16-year-old Sarah Luvisa Jackson January 13, 1844. She, a younger sister of Mary An Livinia Jackson Gowens, was born March 8, 1827 in Gallatin County. James Blair Gowens was enumerated as the head of Household 331-331 August 14, 1850 in Gallatin County located between his father and his father-in-law.

When two brothers marry two sisters, their children are referred to as double cousins. If three brothers marry three sisters, would their children be triple cousins . . . ?

Serena Gowens Turner and Albert Wright Turner were photographed shortly after their wedding day December 31, 1871 in Council Bluffs, Iowa. Laserprint courtesy of Walter Earl Turner, great-grandson, Foundation member of Orem, Utah.

George Freelove Turner apparently emigrated to America about 1850; he did not appear in the British census of 1851. A daughter who came with him stated that she had been in this country five years in the 1856 state census of Mills County, Iowa. The younger children accompanied by their mother came to the United States in March 1853 aboard the SS Indian.

They landed at New Orleans and apparently took a steamboat up the Mississippi to where the Missouri River entered, then up the Missouri to St. Marys, Iowa in Mills County where George Freelove Turner was awaiting them. Apparently Elizabeth Neal Turner did not live long after her arrival.

George Freelove Turner had a new wife, Sophia listed in the 1856 census. He died prior to February 1867.

About 1852, James Blair Gowens also moved his family to Mills County, settling near Council Bluffs, probably influenced there by a brother who had preceded him. The household of James Blair Gowens which had “been in Iowa for four years” was recorded there in the 1856 census.

Now the stage is set in Mills County, and the entire cast is assembled. The only children of James Blair Gowens that this series will deal with are Susannah “Susan” Gowens, Elizabeth Ellen Gowens and Serena Gowens. The only children of George Freelove Turner under consideration are Daniel P. Turner, Freelove Turner and Albert Wright Turner. They are the three brothers who married the three sisters. Act One deals with my great-grandparents, Albert Wright Turner and Serena Gowens Turner.

Albert Wright Turner was born in Grimsby, Lincolnshire August 21, 1843. His birth was registered on the 22nd, so he ended up celebrating his birthday on August 22, and when he died, his headstone was erroneously engraved with 1853, the year of his arrival in this country as the year of his birth.

Being adventurous, Albert Wright Turner joined a Mormon [Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints] oxen team going west under the command of Capt. Isaac A. Canfield in Council Bluffs July 28, 1862. My feeling is that he must have had relatives living in Utah. They arrived in Salt Lake City October 16, 1862. While there he drove stages and wagons and probably rode for the Pony Express. His stage route ran from Salt Lake City to St. Joseph, Missouri via Denver. In the west he became a crack shot. Descendants claim that he could put a bullet clean through a silver dollar flipped into the air. It would hit the ground with a hole in it.

Frances Osler of Council Bluffs, my first cousin, onceremoved, writes that she can picture him as a “red-headed imp driving a stagecoach across the plains, red hair flying in the wind, his violin slung over his back, a bottle of whiskey in his pocket and a song in his heart.”

He loved music and taught his son, my grandfather, to play the violin also. He was possessive and hot-tempered. Once, in later years, at a dance hall in Nebraska, a brash fellow asked Serena for a dance. Albert laid him out.

According to the federal census, Albert Wright Turner was back in Iowa in 1870, and Serena Gowens, who was born March 24, 1853, had grown up. On December 31, 1871 in the home of the bride’s parents, he took Serena to be his wife for always. Eleven children, eight sons and three daughters, were born to them in Mills County. Albert became a vegetable farmer and had a small store in Council Bluffs where he sold his produce. Serena worked diligently by his side.

They lived and died there and were buried in Mills County in the Turner-Gowens hillside Cemetery. Albert and Serena are not alone there. Two of their sons who died in childhood are buried there. Their aunt, Elizabeth Ellen and her son were buried there after succumbing to typhoid fever.

Ordinances passed long ago prohibit the type of burials that were done there, so no family members have been buried there for many, many years. When I was there, I saw fieldstones apparently marking other graves inside the fenced enclosure. Outside, cattle are grazing over other graves, some marked, some unmarked. Our family is grateful to the Mills County Historical Society who tend the cemetery regularly and see that it is kept up. I believe the cemetery and the farm now belong to Godsey family who are also descendants of Albert and Serena.

Serena was a well-loved person. She was a religious woman, reading the bible every day. She taught her children to be industrious, and they all worked as they grew up. She died when I was three years old and was buried beside her husband.

She has no marker, and his has the wrong birth date on it.

Children born to Albert Wright Turner and Serena Gowens Turner include Oliver Freelove Turner, Lewis Collier Turner, James Albert Turner, George Walter Turner, Clarence Calvin Turner, Frederick Fletcher Turner, Alfred Cleveland Turner, William Clyde Turner, Augusta Adella Turner, Stella Luella Turner and Anne Elizabeth Turner.

George Walter Turner, born December 13, 1877, died in Los Angeles. All the others lived and died in Iowa and Nebraska. died. From James Blair Gowens and Edward Turner through me, I can count eight generations. Their grandchildren are my great-grandparents, and I have grandchildren, making a total of 10 generations.

I am very proud of my heritage. All of them were honest, upright, God-fearing people, but best of all they were good fathers and good mothers. They were steady. They persevered in their tasks, day in and day out, and set a good example for us to follow. I am particularly proud of these worthy women, these pioneer wives, because I have one myself. I was married August 13, 1968 to Margaret Katherine Harlan in Winterhaven, California, and through 26 good years, she has been right with me all the way, and I am very thankful for her.

From GRF Newsletter June 1998:

With Revolutionary Training . . . Charles Gowens, Sharpshooter Bagged Squirrels at 102

Charles Gowens, a Revolutionary War soldier from Virginia saw much of the panorama of America unfold during his lifetime. He died at the age of 106, according to the research of Anna Brooks Dobbin Gowens, a family researcher. She wrote in a letter May 1, 1952 from Del Rio, Texas, “Charles Gowens became an expert marksman during the war and retained this proficiency throughout his lifetime. At the age of 102, in an exhibition, he brought down a squirrel from the top of a tall tree with his old muzzle-loader.”

Henry County was the earliest documented place of residence for Charles Gowens. Henry County was formed in 1776 with land from Pittsylvania County. Pittsylvania County was formed in 1766 with land from Halifax County. Halifax County was formed in 1752 with land from Lunenburg County. Lunenburg County was formed in 1746 with land from Brunswick County. Brunswick County was formed in 1720 with land from Prince George County, Isle of Wight County and Surry County. Prince George County was formed in 1702 with land from Charles City County, an original shire. The ancestors of Charles Gowens might be found in the records of any of the above counties.

The research of Jack Harold Goins, Editorial Boardmember of Rogersville, Tennessee, indicates that Charles Gowens was a son of David Goins of Halifax County. In 1783 and 1784, David Goins paid tax for himself and for “William Goins, Charles Goins and Jacob Goins,” regarded as his sons. “David Goin, white male” paid tax in Halifax County in 1800 on “one horse.”

Charles Gowens was born in 1763 in Henry [Halifax] County, according to his Revolutionary War pension application, No. S31,072 which was published in “Abstracts of Pension Papers Pertaining to Soldier of the Revolutionary War, War of 1812 and Indian Wars, Gallatin County, Kentucky:”

“Charles Gowans, Va. S31,072, Bounty Land Warrant No. 26106-160-55

On October 22, 1833 in Gallatin County, Kentucky, the said pensioner at the age of 70 years appeared in open court and stated that on September 1, 1779 in Henry County, Virginia he had first volunteered to serve in the capacity of a private soldier for a tour of six months duration in the company under the command of Capt. Jonathan Hanley and Lt. Edward Tatum.

He stated that they had first marched to the state of South Carolina and that there they were attached to the regiment under the command of Col. Monroe and they then marched to 96 near Charleston and they then marched to guard the prisoners from 96 to Williamsburg and there and then the said pensioner was honorably discharged.

Then again in the month of May 1781 the said pensioner again volunteered to serve in the capacity of a private soldier for a tour of 3 months duration to serve in the company under the command of Capt. Shelton and they then rendezvoused at Russell Creek Meeting House in Henry County, Virginia and they then marched up the Dan River and they were also often at the Hollow on the river. The said pensioner Charles Gowens was born in Henry County, Virginia in 1763 and came to Kentucky in 1797.

Then in the year 1815 the said pensioner removed from Harrison County, Kentucky to Gallatin County, Kentucky. In all his tours of duty the said pensioner had volunteered his services. The said pensioner stated and swore that he had seen Capt. Small, Col. Monroe and Col. Martin and that he had been honorably discharged at Williamsburg.

The affidavit of Benjamin Miller, a clergyman and James Furnish, [his son-in-law] was also given. They stated that at one time and in the said county and state they had been well acquainted with the said pensioner, and the said deponents also stated that in the neighborhood in which the said pensioner resided he was reputed to have served in the Revolutionary War on the side of the United States.

April 7, 1855, in Gallatin County, Kentucky, the said pensioner at the age of 93 years appeared in open court again and stated that he had served in the capacity of a private in the company under the command of Capt. Hamby and in the regiment under the command of Col. Monroe. He stated that he had volunteered on September 1, 1779 in Henry County, Virginia for a tour of six months duration and that he had been honorably discharged at Petersburg, Virginia. He applied for the Bounty Land that was due him and he also appointed Henry J. Abbott of Warsaw, Kentucky to be his attorney.

The affidavit of David Story and White Hawkins was also given, etc. They stated that the said pensioner had signed the foregoing declaration in their presence, and they also swore that Charles Gowens was the identical person that he claimed himself to be.

The said pensioner Charles Gowens was on the Kentucky roll of pensions at the rate of $30 per annum, and his certificate of pension for that amount was issued 12-14-1?, and it was sent to the Hon. R. M. Johnson, House of Representatives.”

Charles Gowens lived through a time period that embraced the turbulent events from the Revolutionary War through the Civil War. His longevity, remarkable as it is, was eclipsed by that of his wife who lived to be 110, according to descendants.

He was married about 1785, probably in Henry County, to Elizabeth “Betsy” Blair, daughter of James Blair. Elizabeth “Betsy” Gowens was born in 1770 in Maryland.

About the turn of the century, they removed to Claiborne County, Tennessee, perhaps to join other members of the family there. The research of Donna V. Gowin Johnston, Editorial Boardmember of Casper, Wyoming, discovered them there in the minutes of the Big Spring Baptist Church. Mentioned in the July 1800 minutes were “James Going, —— Going, Elizabeth Going and Hannah Going.” The minutes of April 1812 mentions “Charles and Elizabeth Going, dismissed by letter.”

Two years later, they lived in Harrison County, Kentucky where a daughter was married February 16, 1814.

In 1815, Charles Gowens removed his family to Gallatin County, Kentucky, according to his pension statement. He was enumerated there in 1830 as the head of a household, page 182:

“Goin, Charles white male 60-70
white female 50-60
white male 20-30
white male 10-15
white female 80-90”

The octogenarian in the household is believed to be the mother of Charles Gowens or Elizabeth “Betsy” Gowens. Adjoining the household, page 182, was that of “Garrott Goin,” a son.

The family of “George Goins” [George Washington Gowens] was enumerated in 1830 in Gallatin County near the residence of Charles Gowens, “above the Kentucky River,” page 180:

“Goins, George white male 30-40
white female 20-30
white male 10-15
white female 10-15
white female 0-5
white female 0-5”

In 1833 Charles Gowens received a pension as a Revolutionary soldier. He was pensioned on Certificate 25-242 issued under the act of June 7, 1832. He continued in Gallatin County June 1, 1840 when he was listed there in the “U.S. Census of Pensioners.” In another compilation of pensioners he was shown as “Charles Goins, born in 1769.”

Charles Gowens wrote his will June 18, 1847 in Gallatin County. A great-great grandson, Norman Bass Gowens of Waco, Texas retained the original copy of the will in 1975. It read:

“I, Charles Goens of Gallatin County in the State of Kentucky, being sensible from my advanced age and increasing infirmities that the close of my mortal life draws near and being of sound mind and disposing memory, do make and publish this, my last will and testament, hereby revoking any and all wills and testaments by me heretofore made.

First, as I am not indebted to any one, in a pecuniary manner, I shall give my executors no trouble on that subject.

Second, as my wife, Betsey and myself have been living for a considerable time past with our son, James Goens, and as I expect to remain with him during my life and desire him to take care of and provide for us both while we live, I give and bequeath to my said son, James Goens the farm or tract of land in said county of Gallatin, near Providence meeting house, being the same whereon I have lived for many years past, containing about 107 acres, be the same more or less, with all the appurtenances thereof to be his and his heirs forever, upon the conditions as forestated, that the said James shall maintain and comfortably provide for myself and my wife during our natural lives.

Third to my son, John Goens; my son, Garrett Goens, my daughter, Lucinda Rose; my daughter, Polly Bales; my daughter, Nancy Furnish; my daughter, Hannah Rose and my daughter, Sally Kidwell, I give and bequeath each the sum of two dollars to be paid out of my estate.

Lastly, I appoint my said son, James Goens as executor of this, my last will and testament, confidently believing that should my wife, his mother, survive me, that he will not suffer her to want during her life.

In witness whereof I have hereunto set my hand and seal this eighteenth day of June AD 1847.

Charles [X] Goens

Witnesses: K. I. Abbott, Benjamin Litter”

In an affidavit made July 2, 1853 “Charles Goins, a citizen of Gallatin County, aged 86, states that he is well acquainted with Lucinda Rose, that she is his daughter, that she married Charles Rose.” On September 20, 1854 Charles Gowens deeded to Lucinda Gowens Rose 127.5 acres of land on Craig’s Creek “for $1 and the love and affection of my daughter,” according to Gallatin County Deed Book O, page 139.

In 1855, at “age 92,” Charles Gowens made application for a land grant and received Bounty Land Warrant No. 26-106 for 160 acres under the Pension Act of 1855. He lived to be 102 years old, dying in Kentucky in 1865, and Elizabeth “Betsy” Gowens survived to 110 years old, according to Sylvester Bernard Gowens, a great-grandson of Lubbock, Texas. “Texas Society DAR Register of Revolutionary Ancestors” gives the date of his death as 1857 in Gallatin County.

Children born to Charles Gowens and Elizabeth “Betsy” Gowens include:

Galloway Gowens born about 1787
Lucinda Gowens born about 1788
Mary “Polly’ Gowens born about 1790
Nancy Gowens born about 1793
Sarah “Sally” Gowens born about 1794
Hannah Gowens born about 1796
John A. Gowens born about 1800
George Washington Gowens born June 2, 1802
Garrett Gowens born about 1805
James Blair Gowens born June 9, 1810

Find a Grave site:  http://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi?page=gr&GRid=96138788&ref=acom

Info from Find a Grave:

Birth: 1763
Halifax County
Virginia, USA
Death: Aug., 1857
Gallatin County
Kentucky, USA

Charles was a Revolutionary War veteran. He married Elizabeth Blair of Northumberland County, Va. Moved to Henry County, Va (later Patrick Co.) and raised a large family. About 1800, migrated to Cumberland Gap, then to Harrison Co, KY. Before 1820, removed to Gallatin Co, KY where he settled on Craigs Creek.
Son James married two of George Jackson’s daughter’s. After the death of 1st wife Maryan, married Louisa, then migrated to Iowa and Texas.
Charles and Elizabeth’s daughter’s married into the Swango, Furnish, Rose, Bales, and Kidwell families. Burial ground for Charles, wife Elizabeth, daughter Maryan, and many others has overgrown or was obliterated over time.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s