State – Tennessee

Rotating County Formation in Tennessee:  http://www.mapofus.org/tennessee/

Facts and Events in Chronological Order:

1770 – birth of Joseph Going (approx) Rev. Arthur Hamilton Taylor, a Presbyterian minister who researched the Goins families in Hancock County, Tennessee and who assisted them economically, showed the birthplace of Joseph Goins as Albemarle County, Virginia. (Likely son of first Joseph Going). William P. Grohse, Sneedville historian, reported that he was the son of Joseph Goins, Sr. who fought in the Revolutionary War and was wounded in battle. Albemarle Co, Virginia

(1775 to 1782): Goings in the Revolution: https://goyengoinggowengoyneandgone.com/revolutionary-war-goings-in-the-revolution/

1776 March 18 – Ambrose Gowan “furnished wheat to the Hampton troops,” according to “Virginia Magazine of History & Biography,” Volume 28. On April 5, 1786 ” Va. Ambrose Goins” appeared on a jury panel in Davidson County, North Carolina [later Tennessee] in which Peter Barnett sued John Rice. Davidson Co, NC.

1778 Feb – Capt. John “Buck” Gowen and his troops appeared in District 96 in February 1778 on military duty.  His brother-in-law John Bearden filed a pension application, recorded in “Kings Mountain Manuscripts,” Volume 2, page 239:
“Declaration in order to obtain the benefit of an Act of Congress passed June 7, 1832. State of Tennessee, Bedford County John Bearden, Senior, a resident of this county and aged eighty-nine [89] years, two [2] months, four [4] days. Entered service of United States under following officers and served as here stated.  Born in Spottsylvania County, Virginia, March 11, 1744, agreeable to his family record, but has no record of it at this time.  He says he entered the service of the United States as a private and volunteered in a company of rangers, or spies, commanded by Capt. Joseph Wofford and Lt. D. Graham, Spartanburg District, South Carolina some time in the month of April, 1777, the precise day he cannot recollect.  He was marched to a fort on the head of Enoree River to Prince’s Fort, and there was stationed, but was frequently out on a scouting or spying expeditions against the Cherokee Indians and a Tory family named Bates.  [The town of Batesville, South Carolina is located 10 miles east of Greenville on the Enoree River.]  Four in number: William, Harry, Isaac and their father–who were skulking about with the Indians, were frequently engaged with the Indians in murders of frontier settlers; and there remained in service until some time in January, 1778, when he was dismissed agreeable to orders.  Thinks in February, 1778 he volunteered again and joined a company of spies or rangers under command of Captain John Gowen, and marched to a fort on the south side of the Pacolet River [probably near present-day Landrum, South Carolina] and was frequently raiding on the frontier settlement on the Tyger River.
He states that on one of the scouting expeditions he was on, Captain Gowen arrested and took prisoner two men, one by the name of Fanning, the other by name of Smith; that they brought them back into a white settlement [probably Gowensville] and delivered them up to a magistrate, as they were both Tories, and both had stolen horses, each taken from a Mr. James Ford and a Mr. John Patten.  Deponent says he was marched back to the last-mentioned fort [near Landrum] on the south fork of the Pacolet River, where he remained in service until some time in the month of August, 1778, and was again dismissed, it being thought and frequently said by Captain Gowen that the Indians had become quiet and that there was no further use for the troops at that time.  He states that he served in the last-mentioned town [Landrum] not less than six months.
Deponent further says that he removed shortly after that into Union District, S.C, and there entered the service of the United States again, about one week before the siege of Ninety-Six.  That he was marched off that place a drafted soldier and was in the engagement at that place.
He says he was then transferred from Captain Blassingame’s company and marched through the country in a different direction in search of a band of Tories under the command of Jesse Gray.  That he continued in service under the last-mentioned captain a tour of duty of not less than four months, and says he was finally dismissed from service, after serving in all, a tour of actual service of not less than nine months, for which he claims a pension.
Applicant says he remained a citizen of South Carolina until 1824 when he removed to Bedford County, Tennessee, where he now lives.  He further says that he was not acquainted with any regular officers with the troops when he served or any regiment of regulars whatever.   s/s John Bearden”.  http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~gowenrf/Gowenms007.htm

1784 Jan 15 – John Gowan receives 640 acr on the E side of Mill Creek. Other names: Levi Gowan, David Gowan
1793 June 26. Davidson Co., TN. http://www.nclandgrants.com/grant/?mars=12.14.2.1816&qid=82716&rn=3

1784 Jan 15 – William Gowan receives 640 acr on the Et. branches of Mill Creek. Other names: Ebenezer Titus, 1787 Apr 17. In Davidson Co., TN.  http://www.nclandgrants.com/grant/?mars=12.14.2.1043&qid=82716&rn=4

1787 Apr 17 – William Gowan 640acres – east side Mill Cr, adj to Ebenezer Titus. Davidson Co, TN
http://interactive.ancestry.com/2882/33118_290595-00004?pid=15545&backurl=http%3a%2f%2fsearch.ancestry.com%2f%2fcgi-bin%2fsse.dll%3findiv%3d1%26db%3dTNNCLandRecordc%26gss%3dangs-d%26new%3d1%26rank%3d1%26msT%3d1%26gsln%3dgoin%26gsln_x%3d0%26MSAV%3d0%26uidh%3dm37%26pcat%3d36%26fh%3d31%26h%3d15545%26recoff%3d9%26ml_rpos%3d32&treeid=&personid=&hintid=&usePUB=true

1786 Aug 14 – The indents, issued by the Treasury August 14, 1786, were approved long after the death of David Gowen of Fairfield County, son of Daniel Gowen and Rebecca Gowen.  David Gowen was killed by Indians in the winter of 1779-80 at Manskers Station in Davidson County, Tennessee.  William Gowen, regarded as his grandfather, was the executor of his estate at Nashville.  Levi Gowen, “who passes for mulatto,” brother of David Gowen, applied successful for the administration of the estate in Fairfield County and gave “John Gowen, gentleman of Daverson County” his power of attorney.  John Gowen, son of William Gowen, was a kinsman of Levi Gowen and David Gowen. Fairfield Co, SC. http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~gowenrf/Gowenms007.htm

1786 Oct 26 – Thos Goin received 225 acres joining Tipton’s Line upon the waters of Cherokee Cr. Washington Co., Tenn.
http://www.nclandgrants.com/grant/?mars=12.14.20.660&qid=82710&rn=17

1791 July – Alexander Gowen, Jr. –  Land: grant from TN, Jul 1791, Nashville, Davidson, Tennessee, USA. Alexander Gowen, Jr. appeared in July 1791 in the Nashville, Tennessee area. He received a land grant from the State of Tennessee in 1814, and it is known that this recipient had formerly lived in Orange County, North Carolina. Nothing more is know of this individual or his descendents. Nashville, Tenn

1793 James Gownes – 340 acrs granted in NC, Hawkins County
Hawkins Co, NC (TENN now)
http://interactive.ancestry.com/2882/33118_290604-00249?pid=195594&backurl=http%3a%2f%2fsearch.ancestry.com%2f%2fcgi-bin%2fsse.dll%3findiv%3d1%26db%3dTNNCLandRecordc%26gss%3dangs-d%26new%3d1%26rank%3d1%26msT%3d1%26gsln%3dgoin%26gsln_x%3d0%26MSAV%3d0%26uidh%3dm37%26pcat%3d36%26fh%3d14%26h%3d195594%26recoff%3d9%26ml_rpos%3d15&treeid=&personid=&hintid=&usePUB=true

1793 Virginia Jane “Gincie” Goins daughter of Joseph Goins and Millie Loving Goins, was born in 1793 in Fairfax County, according to William P. Grohse. She was married about 1822 to Solomon Dickinson Collins who was born in Wilkes County, North Carolina in 1799. He was the son of a Revolutionary soldier, Solomon Collins and his wife Edy Dickinson Collins. Solomon Collins was born in Cumberland County, Pennsylvania in 1760. Solomon Dickinson Collins appeared in the 1830 census with nine members in his household. He appeared on the 1836 tax list of Hawkins County, Tennessee. Solomon Dickinson Collins was enumerated as the head of household in the 1840 census of Hawkins County: “Collins, Solomon white male 40-50 white female 40-50 white male 10-15 white male 10-15 white male 5-10 white male 5-10 white female 0-5 white female 0-5” Fairfax Co, Va.

1793 Jun 26 – John Gowen . wits: William Gowen, Luke Anderson. John Buchanan warrant.
640 acres to John Gowen – on the east side of Mill Creek, on the NW corner of James Mences land, adj to Ebenezer Titus west land (on east). Witnessed by William Gowen, and Luke Anderson. Warrant by John Buchanan. Davidson Co., TN
http://interactive.ancestry.com/2882/33118_290595-00094?pid=15895&backurl=http%3a%2f%2fsearch.ancestry.com%2f%2fcgi-bin%2fsse.dll%3findiv%3d1%26db%3dTNNCLandRecordc%26gss%3dangs-d%26new%3d1%26rank%3d1%26msT%3d1%26gsln%3dgoin%26gsln_x%3d0%26MSAV%3d0%26uidh%3dm37%26pcat%3d36%26fh%3d37%26h%3d15895%26recoff%3d9%26ml_rpos%3d38&treeid=&personid=&hintid=&usePUB=true

1795 Aug 2 – Charles Barnett was a “mulatto” who enlisted in Charlottesville in the 7th Virginia Regiment. Sharod Going testified that he was with him at Chesterfield Courthouse. In 1800 he moved to Carter County, Tennessee, then to Georgia, and to Granville County, North Carolina, about 1808 [Dorman, Virginia Revolutionary Pension Applications, IV:87]. He obtained a certificate of freedom in Albemarle County on 2 August 1796: a Dark mullatto man aged about thirty years, of a yellow complexion, five feet seven and three quarter inches high, having proved to the satisfaction of this Court that he was born a free man within this County [Orders 1795-8, 137]. Granville Co, NC
http://lumbeeindiansandgoinsfamily.blogspot.com/2007/12/granville-county-nc-early-records.html

1799 – James Goen 350 acres and 1 white poll
and John Goen 90 acres and 1 white poll, in Grainger County, Tenn
http://interactive.ancestry.com/2883/33119_290483-00691?pid=22634&backurl=http%3a%2f%2fsearch.ancestry.com%2f%2fcgi-bin%2fsse.dll%3findiv%3d1%26db%3dTNEarlyTaxList%26gss%3dangs-d%26new%3d1%26rank%3d1%26msT%3d1%26gsln%3dGoin%26gsln_x%3d0%26MSAV%3d1%26uidh%3dm37%26pcat%3d36%26fh%3d49%26h%3d22634%26recoff%3d7%26ml_rpos%3d50&treeid=&personid=&hintid=&usePUB=true

1799 – Thomas Goen 1 white poll in Grainger Co, Tenn
http://interactive.ancestry.com/2883/33119_290483-00678?pid=22041&backurl=http%3a%2f%2fsearch.ancestry.com%2f%2fcgi-bin%2fsse.dll%3findiv%3d1%26db%3dTNEarlyTaxList%26gss%3dangs-d%26new%3d1%26rank%3d1%26msT%3d1%26gsln%3dGoin%26gsln_x%3d0%26MSAV%3d1%26uidh%3dm37%26pcat%3d36%26fh%3d53%26h%3d22041%26recoff%3d7%26fsk%3dBEHpYewIgAALQwABYqQ-61-%26bsk%3d%26pgoff%3d%26ml_rpos%3d54&treeid=&personid=&hintid=&usePUB=true

1800 Goins in Jefferson Co, Tenn
Daniel Goen – 1 white poll
Ezekial Goen – 1 white poll, 100 acres
William Goen – 1 white poll
Daniel Goen – 1 white poll, 100 acres
http://interactive.ancestry.com/2883/33119_290485-00513?pid=219571&backurl=http%3a%2f%2fsearch.ancestry.com%2f%2fcgi-bin%2fsse.dll%3findiv%3d1%26db%3dTNEarlyTaxList%26gss%3dangs-d%26new%3d1%26rank%3d1%26msT%3d1%26gsln%3dGoin%26gsln_x%3d0%26MSAV%3d1%26uidh%3dm37%26pcat%3d36%26fh%3d0%26h%3d219571%26recoff%3d7%26ml_rpos%3d1&treeid=&personid=&hintid=&usePUB=true

1801 Dr. John Byrns died in Charleston in a yellow fever epidemic in 1801.About 1805, Mary Anne Baxter Goyne Byrns and her children moved to Cairo, Sumner County, Tennessee, perhaps to join other family members there.John Byrn, James Byrn and Lithey Byrn appeared in Sumner County records in 1808, 1809 and 1810.
http://www.genealogy.com/forum/surnames/topics/guynes/246/
http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~gowenrf/gowenms005.htm

1803 James Goyne Following his Georgia residence, he apparently lived in Tennessee in 1803. Tennessee

1818 “Daniel Going, formerly a private in the Fifth Regiment, Virginia Continental Line was living in East Tennessee in 1818,” according to “Pension List of 1818,” published in 1820 in Washington, D. C. “William Goings of Hancock County, Tennessee” was listed on the same page.
Hancock Co, Tenn

1818 May 12: Tuesday. p. 49. Amy Pucket v. James B Shackleford. This day came the parties by their attorney and thereupon came a jury to wit Peter Luger, Danie Slavens, Jacob Coots, Oliver Dodson, Charles Shearmon, William Stallins, William Wallice, Jacob Cloud, Jacob Pike, Jeremiah Hurst, Levi Gowins, David Wilson, who being Elected tried and sworn well and truly to try and the truth to speak in the matter in dispute wherein Amy Pucket is plaintiff and James B. Shackleford is Defendant. Records of Claiborne County, Tennessee. Minutes of Pleas and Quarter Sessions 1818-1819
https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:2:77TV-TK98?i=40&cat=262701

1818 June 3 – Daniel Going made an affidavit in Campbell County Court asking for a pension based on his Revolutionary service. The earliest general pension act for Revolutionary service was enacted by Congress May 18, 1818. Daniel Goins applied for a Revolutionary pension June 3, 1818 in Campbell County, Tennessee at “age 60.”
“Pension No. S-38744:
State of Tennessee }
Campbell County }
On the 3rd day of June, 1818 before me the presiding Justice of the governing court for said county of Campbell which court is a court of record personally appeared Daniel Going aged 60 years resident in said county of Campbell who being by me first duly sworn according to law doth on his oath makes the following declaration in order to obtain the provision made by the act of Congress entitled an act to provide for certain persons engaged in the land & have service of the United States in the Revolutionary War. That the said Daniel Going enlisted in February 1777 in the State of Virginia in the company commanded by Capt. Scruggs of the 5th Virginia in the Regiment commanded by Colonel Josiah Parker for two years, that he continued in said Regiment in the United States service until the month of February 1778 when he was discharged at the Valley Forge in Pennsylvania—that he was in the battle at Germantown and the battle at Brandywine—that he is reduced circumstances and needs the assistance of his country for support, that he has lost his discharge and that he has no other evidence now in his power of his said service. That he has never been a pensioner and does hereby relinquish claim to pensions heretofore provided for. Sworn to and declared Daniel [X] Going
before me, Date and year aforesaid. Sampson Davis, Presiding Justice Of the Court of Campbell County, Tennessee”. Cert. 13511, West Tennessee

1818 Aug 10: Monday. p. 73. On motion of Levi Gowens it is ordered by the court that Indentures heretofore signed by the said Levi Gowen and John Vanbebber Chairman of the Court of Claiborne binding Jane Hornback, Sally Hornback, Nancy Hornback, James Hornback, and John Hornback, children of John and Ann Hornback to the Levi Gowen be received. Records of Claiborne County. Minutes of Pleas and Quarter Sessions 1818-1819. Claiborne County, Tennessee.
https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:2:77TV-TK9G?i=51&cat=262701

1818 Aug 10: Monday. p. 75. Ordered by the court that the following named persons be appointed jurors to the next Term of this court to wit: . . . (William Gowen is listed as one of the jurors). Records of Claiborne County. Minutes of Pleas and Quarter Sessions 1818-1819. Claiborne County, Tennessee.
https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:2:77TV-TK9P?i=52&cat=262701

1818 Nov 10: Tues. p. 130. Dennis Condray Esqr. Sheriff of the County of Claiborne returned the venire facias executed on the following named persons to wit: (. . . William Gowen is one of many names listed . . .) who was sworn as the Law directs and received their charge from Sterling Cocke Solicitor General. Records of Claiborne County. Minutes of Pleas and Quarter Sessions 1818-1819. Claiborne Co, TN
https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:2:77TV-TKSF?i=74&cat=262701

1818 Nov 10: Tues. p 133. Deed of conveyance from William Goan to David Chadwell for 100 acres of land was duly acknowledged in open ct by the grantor thereof was admitted to record and ordered to be registered. Records of Claiborne County. Minutes of Pleas and Quarter Sessions 1818-1819. Claiborne Co, TN.
https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:2:77TV-TKSN?i=75&cat=262701

1818 Nov 11: Weds. p. 144. A deed of convey from Abraham Murphey to William Gowin for one hundred acres of land is duly acknowledged in open court and admitted to record and ordered to Registered. Records of Claiborne County. Minutes of Pleas and Quarter Sessions 1818-1819. Claiborne Co, TN.
https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:2:77TV-TKSL?i=80&cat=262701

1819 Feb 9: Tues. p. 179. Thomas Gowen is appointed as a juror in Claiborne County, Tennessee. Records of Claiborne County. Minutes of Pleas and Quarter Sessions 1818-1819
https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:2:77TV-TK3W?i=95&cat=262701

1819 Nov 9. Tues. p. 8. Samuel Goins is a juror in Claiborne County, Tennessee.
Records of Claiborne County. Minutes of Pleas and Quarter Sessions 1818-1819
https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:2:77TV-TKW4?i=186&cat=262701

1820 May 11: Thurs. p. 125. Uriah Gowing is appointed as a juror in Claiborne County, Tennessee. Records of Claiborne County, TN. Minutes of Pleas and Quarter Sessions 1818-1819
https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:2:77TV-TKHS?i=241&cat=262701

1820 Aug: p. 183. A deed of conveyance from James Glasgow to Susannah Stone was duly proven in open court by the oaths of Hugh Graham and William Gowing subscribing witnesses thereto submitted to record and ordered to be registered. Records of Claiborne County, TN. Minutes of Pleas and Quarter Sessions 1818-1819
https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:2:77TV-TKCM?i=269&cat=262701

1820 Nov 18: Saturday. p. 243. A deed of conveyance for fifteen acres of land in Claiborne County from Charles Goin to Robert G. Parks was duly proved by the oath of Thomas R McClary one of the subscribing witnesses who also proves the death of Anderson Watson the other subscribing witness and that he saw him sign said deed as a corresponding witness whereupon it is ordered by the court that the same be recorded and let it be registered. Records of Claiborne County, TN. Minutes of Pleas and Quarter Sessions 1818-1819
https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:2:77TV-TKCR?i=294&cat=262701

1821 Feb 13: Tues. p. 262 and 263. Nathl Cary v. Jas. Ellison, and Robt W. McClary v. John Bundren, John Davenport v. Martin Fugate. Levy Goin testifies as witness all three cases.
Records of Claiborne County, TN. Minutes of Pleas and Quarter Sessions 1818-1819
https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:2:77TV-TKZQ?i=303&cat=262701

1828 Sept 17: William signed his will:
“I, William Goin, in the county of Claiborne, being in the State of Tennessee, being in good health and in my perfect mind, and memory, but advanced in life, do make and publish this my last will and testament. Hereby revoking all other and formal wills. First: It is my will and desire that all the just debts I may owe, shall be first paid out of my estate by my executor. Secondly: I give and bequeath to my loving wife Elizabeth, the mare she usually rides called Lili, two sows, and pigs to be a good quality, two cows and calves to be set apart to her by my executor, and it is my wish and desire that my wife have possession and enjoy the plantation or cleared land where I now live and have sufficient timber for firewood, and timber to keep up the farm and grainnery and said plantation as long as she may live, and remain my widow but no longer. And it is my will that she also have the negro woman, and all the property left her by her former husband Christopher Dameron. Thirdly: I give and bequeath to my two sons, Levi and Pleasant Goin the tract of land whence where I now live containing two hundred and sixty acres conveyed to me by three separate deeds. I also give to my two sons a part of the tract of land that I purchased from Adam Peck to be bordered by Big Spring Branch to the head of the same to include ½ of the brand and spring then to run eastwardly to the line of the tract of two hundred and sixty acres, above given. Then run with the lines of the Peck tract, until it strikes the said tract. I also give to my son Pleasant Goin, a negro woman named Nell and her three children named David, Casamay and Louisa Jane and their increase forever, one set of blacksmith tools, and a sorrel horse colt, one year old last June, also one ax and hoe, one handsaw and mattock. Fourthly: I give and bequeath to my son, William Going one negro man named George, one negro woman named Eliza, one negro boy named Jim and one part of the residence of the land I purchased from Adam Peck, also one plow, hoe, and a pair of iron chains and one cow. I also give to my three sons, Levi, William and Pleasant each one their part of the money I have in my hand at the time of my death. Fifthly: I give and bequeath to my daughter Sophia Dameron, one negro woman named Delia and her two children Sue and Nell and her increases and also one third part of the tract of land purchased of Peck and not given to my two sons, Pleasant and Levi, the chestnut sorrel mare, she now has in her possession.
Sixthly: I give and bequeath to my daughter Elizabeth Murphy one negro boy named Philip, a negro girl named Linda, a negro boy named Abraham, a negro girl named Nance, a negro girl named Tilda, one wagon and gears, a feather bed, and furniture, a horse bridle, and saddle, one bay horse colt, one year old last June, two cows and calves, all the stock of hogs not given to my wife, two ewes and lambs, all the household and kitchen furniture not given to ay of my children and the balance of my farming tools not previously given.
Eighthly: it is my will and desire that my executors use the lawful means to emancipate and forever set free my negro woman Nance after the date and before my death that such child or children be equally divided among all my children, but in making such division the child or children not be sold out of my family. Ninthly: It is my will and desire that all the money or other debts that shall be owing to me be collected and equally divided among all my children.
Lastly, I appoint my two sons Levi and William executors in this my last will and testament in testimony where of thereunto set my hand and sealed this the 17th day of September, 1828.
Signed sealed and published and declared in the presence of I. A. Howard, John Cocke, Will Reece, John M. Brabston
William Goin (His mark). Claiborne County, Tennessee.

1830 US Census – Name: Joseph Gowin
Home in 1830 (City, County, State): Greene, Tennessee
Free White Persons – Males – Under 5: 1
Free White Persons – Males – 20 thru 29: 1
Free White Persons – Females – 20 thru 29: 1
Free White Persons – Under 20: 1
Free White Persons – 20 thru 49: 2
Total Free White Persons: 3
Total – All Persons (Free White, Slaves, Free Colored): 3
Year: 1830; Census Place: Greene, Tennessee; Series: M19; Roll: 180; Page: 157; Family History Library Film: 0024538
https://www.ancestry.com/discoveryui-content/view/745363:8058?_phsrc=qEf154&_phstart=successSource&gsln=Goin&ml_rpos=7&queryId=4a6e8e39859cb5276d6b5d30d8efa6ab

1830 “Joseph Gwinne” was enumerated as the head of a household in the 1830 census of Hawkins County, Tennessee:: “Gwinne, Joseph white male 50-60 white female 50-60 white female 10-15”

1838: INVENTORY OF THE ESTATE OF PLEASANT GOWEN DECEASED RETURNED BY LEVI GOWIN. Pg 8. Pg 34-35. CLAIBRONE COUNTY TENNESSEE WILL BOOK 1837 to 1846

1838 Aug 6: p. 33. Inventory of the Estate of Pleasant Gowen, decd. . . . A true statement of the property . . . Levi Gowin. Records of Claiborne County, TN. Will Book “A” 1837-1838.
https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:2:77TV-TK28?i=610&cat=262701

1838 Aug 6: p. 45. Amount of sales of the Estate of Pleasant Gowin decd. (Viz): Buyers: Jo Hall, Permelia Gowin, Berton Gowin, Hugh Jones, John Phillips, Elizabeth Gowin, William Mays, George Cupp, John Cupp, Lewis Moor, William Gowin, George Singer, John Kibert, Levi Gowin. Records of Claiborne County, TN. Will Book “A” 1837-1838.
https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:2:77TV-TK2J?i=616&cat=262701

1839: Amount of Sales of the Estate of Pleasant Gowin decd
Names of purchasers of the estate: Jo Hall: Permelia Gowin, Hugh Jones, Berton Gowin, John Philips, Elizabeth Gowin, William Mays, William Gowin, George Cupp, George Singer, Levi Gowin, John Cupp, John Kibert, Lewis Moore, pg 10.
CLAIBRONE COUNTY TENNESSEE WILL BOOK 1837 to 1846

1839 April 1: REPORT OF JAMES A HAMILTON AS GUARDIAN OF FRANCIS M.
GOWENS. ELENDER GOWINS: JOSEPH G GOWINS THE CHILDREN AND HEIRS AT LAW OF PLEASANT GOWIN DECD APRIL 1 1839. signed James A Hamilton. Wm Neil clerk. pg 81. CLAIBRONE COUNTY TENNESSEE WILL BOOK 1837 to 1846
https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:2:77TV-TKLH?i=637&cat=262701

1840 “Joseph Gowin, age 70-80,” living alone, was listed in the 1840 census of Hawkins County, page 234.
Apparently in 1840 Joseph Goins and Millie Loving Goins were living in separate, adjoining households.
Hawkins Co, Tenn

1840: SETTLEMENT OF THE ESTATE OF PLEASANT GOWIN DECEASED. LEVI GOWIN ADMINISTRATOR, Elijah Gowins and William Gowins also mentioned. pg 200; pt 115. CLAIBRONE COUNTY TENNESSEE WILL BOOK 1837 to 1846
https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:2:77TV-TKPJ?i=706&cat=262701

1841 June Term: Settlement of Estate of L. Gowen with J Hamilton Guardian of Minor Heirs of Pleasant Gowen Decd. To Francis Marion, Elender, and Joseph Green Gowen, Minor heirs of Pleasant Gowen Decd. Wiley Huffaker, Clerk. James A Hamilton, Guardian. pg 59. pg. 225. CLAIBRONE COUNTY TENNESSEE WILL BOOK 1837 to 1846
https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:2:77TV-TK5S?i=721&cat=262701

1841 Dec term: Settlement with James A Hamilton: Guardian to minor heirs of Pleasant Gowen, decd. pg 62. pg 250-251. CLAIBRONE COUNTY TENNESSEE WILL BOOK 1837 to 1846
https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:2:77TV-TK5V?i=737&cat=262701

1842 Jan 3: William Hamilton: Guardian’s report of minor heirs of Pleasant Gowen, Decd: Namely, Eleanor Gowin: Greenberry Gowen, Francis Marian Gowin. pg 62. pg 247. CLAIBRONE COUNTY TENNESSEE WILL BOOK 1837 to 1846
https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:2:77TV-TK5F?i=734&cat=262701

1850 – “Joseph Goings” appeared as the head of Household 302-302 in the 1850 census of Hancock County, 33rd subdivision, east part. The family was enumerated November 27, 1850 as: “Goings, Joseph 84, born in Virginia, cooper, illiterate Milli A. 80, born in Virginia Leathey 36, born in North Carolina, female, illiterate”
Hancock County had been created in 1844 with land from Hawkins County and Claiborne County.
Hancock Co, Tenn

1859 Joseph Goins died in 1859 in Hancock County, a nonagenarian. Millie Loving Goins also died there, before 1860.”
Children born to them include:
Virginia Jane “Gincie” Goins born in 1793
George Goins born in 1803
Harden Goins born in 1805
Aletha Goins born about 1814
Hancock Co, Tenn

From Gowen Manuscript:  http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~gowenrf/Gowenms108.htm

108 Tennessee

TENNESSEE

James Goan was listed in Bunch’s Regiment of the East Tennessee Militia, according to the War of 1812 military roster.
==O==
Nathan Goens was listed in Bayle’s Regimen of the East Tennessee Militia in the War of 1812, according to the War of 1812 military roster.
==O==
Isaac Goin was listed in Bayles’ 4th Regiment of the East Tennessee Militia in the War of 1812, according to Tennessee military records.
==O==
John Goin was listed in Lillard’s 2nd Regiment of the East Tennessee Volunteers, according to the War of 1812 military roster.
==O==
William Goin was listed in Bayles’ 4th Regiment of the East Tennessee Militia, according to the War of 1812 military roster.
==O==
H. Goings was listed in the 26th Tennessee Infantry Regiment in the Civil War, according to the Civil War military roster.
==O==
George Goins was born in 1874 in TN, and died in 1949 in Texas, according to Tennessee birth records.
==O==
H. Gowan was listed in the 30th Tennessee Infantry Regiment in the Civil War, according to the Civil War military roster.
==O==
Hayward B. Gowan was listed in the 13th Tennessee Infantry regiment in the Civil War, according to the Civil War military roster.
==O==
James Gowan was listed in the regiment of cavalry and mounted gunmen for the Tennessee Volunteers in the War of 1812, according to the War of 1812 military roster.
==O==
James T. Gowan was listed in the 18th Tennessee Infantry Regiment as an assistant surgeon in the Civil War, according to the Civil War military roster.
==O==
W. F. Gowan was listed in the 13th Tennessee Infantry Regiment in the Civil War, according to the Civil War military roster.
==O==
Alfred Gowen was listed in the Seventh Tennessee Infantry Regiment in the Civil War, according to the Civil War military roster.
==O==
Andrew Gowen was listed in Metcalfe’s Regiment in the West Tennessee Militia for the War of 1812, according to the Tennessee military roster.
==O==
Dodson G. Gowen was listed in the Seventh Tennessee Infantry Regiment in the Civil War, according to the Civil War military Roster.
==O==
Lieutenant Edward H. Gowen was listed in the Fifth Tennessee Calvary Regiment in the Civil War, according to the Civil War military Roster.
==O==
Fielding Gowen was listed in the 11th Tennessee Calvary Regiment in the Civil war, according to the Civil War military roster.
==O==
Francis M. Gowen was listed in the Seventh Tennessee Infantry Regiment in the Civil War, according to the Civil War military roster.
==O==
Harrison H. Gowen was listed in the 26th Tennessee Infantry Regiment in the Civil war, according to the Civil War military roster.
==O==
H. B. Gowen was listed in the 13th Tennessee Infantry Regiment in the Civil War, according to the Civil War military roster.
==O==
H. C. Gowen was listed in the Fourth Consolidated Tennessee Infantry Regiment in the Civil War, according to the Civil War military roster.
==O==
Henry C. Gowen was listed in the 30th Tennessee Infantry Regiment in the Civil War, according to the Civil War military roster.
==O==
Isaac M. Gowen was listed in the 18th Tennessee Infantry Regiment in the Civil War, according to the Civil War military roster.
==O==
Joseph Gowen was listed in Cannon’s Regiment of West Tennesse Volunteers in the War of 1812, according to the Tennessee military roster.
==O==
L. M. Gowen was listed in the 42nd Tennessee Infantry Regiment of the Civil War, according to the Civil War military roster.
==O==
Nenoah Gowen was listed in Metcalfe’s Regiment of the West Tennessee Militia in the War of 1812, according to the Tennessee military roster.
==O==
John Gowen was listed in Bunch’s Regiment of the East Tennessee Militia in the War of 1812, according to the War of 1812 military roster.
==O==
S. E. Gowen was listed in Carter’s 21st Tennessee Calvary Regiment in the Civil War, according to the Civil War military roster.
==O==
T. A. Gowen was listed in Russell’s 20th Tennessee Calvary Regiment in the Civil War, according to the Civil War military roster.
==O==
W. F. Gowen was listed in the 13th Tennessee Infantry Regiment in the Civil War, according to the Civil War military roster.
==O==
Washington Gowen was listed in the 24th Tennessee Infantry Regiment of the Civil War, according to the Civil War military roster.
==O==
James Gowin was listed in Bunch’s Regiment of the East Tennessee Militia in the War of 1812, according to the Tennessee military roster.
==O==
Alfred Gowings was listed in the Seventh Tennessee Infantry Regiment in the Civil War, according to the Civil War military roster.
==O==
Francis Gowings was listed in the Seventh Tennessee Infantry Regiment in the Civil War, according to the Civil War military roster.
==O==
Jefferson Gowings was listed in the Seventh Tennessee Infantry Regiment in the Civil War, according to the Civil War military roster.
==O==
Drury Gowins was listed in Bayles’ 4th Regiment in the East Tennessee Militia in the War of 1812, according to the War of 1812 military roster.
==O==
Wishock Gowins was listed in Bayles’ 4th Regiment in the East Tennessee Militia in the War of 1812, according to the War of 1812 military roster.

ANDERSON COUNTY, TENNESSEE

Oscar Goans, was born October 26, 1932 in Anderson County. He passed away Friday, April 28, 2000, at Methodist Medical Center in Knoxville, according to “The Knoxville News-Sentinel”.

He was a retired Lather with Gilbert Construction Company in Knoxville. He was a veteran of the United States Army. His Hobbies were attending flea markets in the Clinton area, fishing, and gardening.

He is preceded in death by parents, Frank and Bertha Reynolds Goans; brothers, Wade and Wesley Goans. Survivors include: wife, Wilma Vann Goins, Clinton; son, Bill Goans, Clinton; sisters, Dora and Husband Bob Stinnett, Maryville, Madeline Moore, Claxton; brother, Fred Goans, Oak Ridge; sister in law, Shirley and husband Ross Adcock, Clinton; Mother in law Ola Vann, Clinton.

The family held visitation Sunday, April 30, 2000, from 6-8 p.m. at the Holley-Gamble Funeral Home in Clinton with funeral services following at 8 p.m. in the chapel with Rev. Jim Mcpherson officiating. Interment was held at 10:30 a.m. Monday at McCarty Woodhaven Memorial Gardens.

Andrew Gowen
BLEDSOE COUNTY, TENNESSEE

Loiza May Gowans died in 1909 in Bledsoe County according to “Tennessee Deaths,” redord number 2205.

BRADLEY COUNTY, TENNESSEE

Mary M. Goin was married March 10, 1877 to Theodore Hook, according to “Bradley County, Tennessee Marriages, 1864-1887.”
==O==
Maston Goin was married December 19. 1881 to Jane London, according to “Bradley County, Tennessee Marriages, 1864-1887.” Children born to Maston Goin and Jane London Goin are unknown.
==O==
Anderson Goins was born November 22, 1853, according to his tombstone.

Anderson Goins was married to Miss Martha C. Carson February 9, 1872, according to “Roane County, Tennessee Marriages, 1801-1855.”

He listed as the head of a household in the 1900 census of Bradley County, Enumeration District 8, page 12, 2nd Civil District:

“Goines, Anderson 47, born in November 1853 in TN
Martha 52, born in December 1847 in TN
Hattie R. 22, born in November 1877 in TN
Robbert 20, born in April 1880 in TN
Oscar E. 12, born in December 1887 in TN”

The grave of Anderson Goins, “born November 22, 1853, died March 6, 1922” was located in Chilcut Cemetery in Bradley County.

Children born to Anderson Goins and Martha C. Carson Goins include:

Hattie R. Goins born in November 1877\
Robbert Goins born in April 1880
Oscar E. Goins born in December 1887
==O==
In 1909 B. B. Goins received a deed for a number of acres in the Old Second District from Charley Goins for a consideration of $84, according to Bradley County deed records.

For $50 B. B. Goins received a deed in 1909 from E. G. Kirkpatrick for 20 acres in the Old Second District .

B. B. Goins and wife sold to John P. Manis 40 acres in the First District for $125 in 1909.
==O==
Cornelia Goins died in 1910 in Bradley County according to “Tennessee Deaths,” record number 3577.
==O==
Geneva Goins was born about 1916 to parents unknown. She was married about 1934 to Jim Odom. In 2001 Geneva Goins Odom, a widow, lived in Cleveland, Tennessee.
==O==
John Goins, born October 20, 1837-died July 6, 1914, was buried in Chilcutt Cemetery in Bradley County.
==O==
Rev. John R. Goins “of the Holiness Church” was referred to in an obituary in the November 30,1909 edition of the “Cleveland Banner & Journal”of Cleveland, Tennessee

“Rev. John B. Goins” officiated at another funeral held in the Hayes Cemetery for Cora Tallent who died November 26, 1909, according to the same newspaper.
==O==
Tombstones in Moores Chapel Cemetery in Bradley County include:

A. D. Goins March 23, 1893–
Clemmie T. Goins June 28, 1896–
Virgie Irene Goins November 26, 1913–April 8, 1917
Daughter of A. D. and C. T. Goins
Johnny Goins July 26, 1915–June 3, 1931
Sally F. Goins June 16, 1875–July 22, 1960
==O==
Tombstones in Sunset Memorial Gardens in Bradley County include:

Arlin Goins 1891–1970
Adelia Goins 1893–
==O==
Tombstones in Chilcutt Cemetery in Bradley County include:

Infant son of Ham Goins died 1928
Infant daughter of Ham Goins died 1938
Bertha Goins February 7, 1884-May 13, 1967
Jasper Goins March 8, 1878-Sept. 24, 1953
Pledger Goins April 22, 1906-March 1, 1926
Myrtle Goins born and died July 4, 1904
Hattie Mae Goins October 21, 1905-Dec. 11, 1923
Lula Evans Goins January 27, 1880-Oct. 21, 1938
Eli E. Goins February 16, 1875-Feb. 9, 1954
Robert Goins April 15, 1880-July 16, 1950
Easter Goodner Goins September 11, 1880-Dec. 15, 1947
Della May Goins March 15, 1895-August 25, 1907
Taylor George Goins May 11, 1933, Sgt, U.S.M.C.
Alice Goins February 15, 1875-Dec. 1897
Leonard Thomas Goins December 11, 1897-Jan. 4, 1898
Lela Jane Goins November 24, 1890-June 10, 1906
Henry P. Goins August 10, 1950-October 14, 1907
Elizabeth Goins April 1, 1850-September 25, 1918
J. W. Goins September 30, 1842-July 9, 1900
Dinah E. Goins August 27, 1842-June 14, 1926
W. Thomas Goins April 12, 1879-September 3, 1963
Lola I. Goins March 19, 1880-April 21, 1931
John Goins October 20, 1837-July 6, 1914,
Amanda Goins July 4, 1837-April 27, 1918
Henry Goins February 11, 1871-Oct. 15, 1924
Hass Goins February 16, 1871-April 28, 1944
Vivian Cornell Goins Sept. 18, 1939-March 3, 1942
William H. Goins April 4, 1873-December 29, 1945
Jess C. Goins 1878-1954
Lucy A. Goins March 22, 1875-June 24, 1939
Edward D. Goins August 21, 1900-March 5, 1958
Cemore L. Goins February 7, 1925-July 20, 1925
Ralph J. Goins May 6, 1921-December 9, 1921
Myrtle Goins December 31, 1919
Mary C. Goins February 28, 1854-May 27, 1890
Anderson Goins Nov. 22, 1853-March 6, 1922
Roy R. Goins March 1, 1907-November 8, 1960
Mamie B. Goins May 15, 1907-March 17, 1958
Donald Max Goins June 11, 1957
Ellen Goins December 21, 1966
William D. Goins January 30, 1875-March 6, 1953
William O. Goins June 17, 1920-January 11, 1943
Emory Goins April 1, 1905-November 17, 1932
Nannie McCoy Goins November 7, 1899-June 28, 1931
Horace E. Goins 1895-1965
Stella J. Goins 1899-
Nealie Goins May 4, 1871-December 5, 1910
Mary Goins March 31, 1837-Nov. 26, 1889
Dessie Whitmire Goins 1896-1927
Goins infant January 16, 1924-Jan. 17, 1924
Jennie Goins November 8, 1897-Jan. 26, 1898
Thelma Ulyssis Goins December 6, 1902-Jan. 23, 1939
Green B. Goins October 15, 1873- Oct. 11, 1948
Alva R. Goins January 22, 1875-Jan. 5, 1959
==O==
Buried in Ft. Hill Cemetery were:

Albert R. Goins September 12, 1972
Arthur G. Goins 1886-1954
Forest Goins July 28, 1908-March 10, 1919
son of L. C. and Mary Goins
Loma Clarinda Goins April 29, 1895-April 29, 1945
Myrtle F. Goins November 10, 1891-June 29, 1963
Patricia C. Goins May 11, 1941-June 9, 1942
daughter of T. W. and Alvia Goins
Phil Goins May 10-1880-June 16, 1939
Bessie Lawson Goins December 16, 1889-Sept. 21, 1935
Pat Goins died October 9, 1918
Bell Goins died March 15, 1918
D. P. Goins, Jr. died December 23, 1918
Rozelle M. Goins August 29, 1918-Nov. 8, 1970

Buried in Lebanon Baptist Church Cemetery were:

Raymond Keith Goins 1967
Oscar E. Goins August 24, 1969, aged 81 years
Isaac O. Goins April 18, 1897
Nora J. Goins August 15, 1894-October 29, 1969
Marvin Goins December 2, 1889-June 10, 1966
Jewel H. Goins April 11, 1901
Jack Goins March 16, 1863-Feb. 22, 1940
Sarah Goins December 1, 1867
Ona Goins July 8, 1894-July 27, 1939
wife of Oscar Goins
Beney B. Goins 1854-1920
Ollie E. Goins December 28, 1890-Oct. 11, 1919
==O==
Bulah Viola Goins was born September 7, 1906 in Cleveland, Tennessee. She was married about 1926 to Oscar Freeman Howard who was born at Monterey, Tennessee in Putnam County September 3, 1904. He, a major in the U.S. Air Force died June 13, 1964 and was buried in the National Cemetery at Chattanooga, Tennessee, according to “Neals and Their De­scendants” by Clara Neal Hodge.
==O==
Buried in Chestuee Methodist Church Cemetery in Bradley County were:

George F. Goins March 10, 1876–May 1, 1948
Louenia Goins November 27, 1872–July 10, 1956
Nolia M. Goins January 22, 1879–September 17, 1948
Ernest E. Goins 1897-1956
Ollie E. Goins 1900-1967
==O==
Elizabeth Goins was born about 1822 in Tennessee. She died in childbirth in June 1850 in Bradley County, according to “Tennessee Mortality Schedules.”

Ham Goins was father of a an infant son who died in 1928 and an infant daughter who died in 1938 who were buried in Chil­cutt Cemetery, according to “Historical Cemetery Records of Bradley County.”
==O==
Hugh Goins was enumerated as the head of Household 247-311 in the 1850 census of Bradley County:

“Goins, Hugh 29, born in North Carolina
Nancy J. 3, born in Tennessee
James Y. 2, born in Tennessee”
==O==
Buried in Hillcrest Cemetery in Bradley County were:

Julius C. Goins June 26, 1888–August 12, 1957
Hattie P. Goins August 12, 1889–October 20, 1969
Elizabeth A. Goins 1912–1958
Floyd Jackson Goins April 23, 1917–July 14, 1954
Henry L. Goins December 14, 1935–June 10, 1970
Jason Derrick Goins Infant, died July 5, 1969
==O==
Maggie Goins who was born May 31, 1874 died in April 8, 1925 and was buried in Antioch Cemetery, according to “Historical Cemetery Records of Bradley County, Tennessee.”
==O==
Martha A. Goins, “wife of James Haven,” who was born June 1, 1854, died July 15, 1915. She was buried in Lee Cemetery, according to “Historical Cemetery Records of Bradley County, Tennessee” by Ernest Lafayette Ross.
==O==
Roena Goins, mulatto, was enumerated in the 1870 census of Bradley County, First Civil District June 6, 1870. She, a 25-year-old was listed in the household of Joseph Loway, negro, household No. 140-147, as a housekeeper. She was born in 1845 and lived near Cleveland, Tennessee.
==O==
The tombstone of Wendell Joe Goins, “Born January 3, 1968–Died March 26, 1968” was found in Ft. Hill Cemetery in Bradley County.
==O==
Buried in Prospect Cemetery in Bradley County were:

William C. Goins March 5, 1897–July 16, 1970
Cora Lee Renner Goins Sept. 5, 1897–Sept. 8, 1939
==O==
Henry Gowens was married December 25, 1854 to Elizabeth Loudermilk, according to “Anderson County, Tennessee Masrriages, 1830-1850.” Children born to Henry Gowens and Elizabeth Loudermilk Gowens are unknown.
==O==
July Ann Gowens was married to Thomas Kimbrough July 18, 1866, according to “Bradley County, Tennessee Masrriages, 1864-1887.”
==O==
Martin E. Gowens was married to Elizabeth J. Johnson July 21, 1870, according to “Bradley County, Tennessee Masrriages, 1864-1887.” Of Martin E. Gowens and Elizabeth J. Johnston Gowens nothing more is known.
==O==
Nancy Jane Gowens was married June 14, 1868 to John Dixon, according to “Bradley County, Tennessee Masrriages, 1864-1887.”
==O==
Daniel Gowins was enumerated as the head of Household 726-381 in the 1850 census of Bradley County:

“Gowins, Daniel 31, born in Tennessee
Jane 30, born in North Carolina
John W. 8
Mary 5
Sarah L. 3
James 1”
==O==
James Y. Gowins was married December 15, 1868 to Mary L. Norton, according to “Bradley County, Tennessee Masrriages, 1864-1887.” Of James Y. Gowins and Mary L. Norton Gowins nothing more is known.

BLOUNT COUNTY, TENNESSEE

Isabela Going died in 1910 in Blount County according to “Tennessee Deaths,” record number 2704.
==O==
Charles Floyd Goings’ obituary was published October 6, 1999 in “The Knoxville News-Sentinel” and reads as such:

“Charles Floyd Goins, age 75 of Maryvilled passed away Sunday October 3, 1999 at his home. He was born June 19, 1924 in Louisvilles, Tennessee to the late John Alfred Goins and Flora Green Goins. He was a faithful member of the Maryville Chuch of God where he served faithfully until his health prevented him from attending. He was a decorated hero in WWII And the Korean War in the U.S. Navy, and was wounded in WWII resulting in long-term injury.

He was preceded in death by parents, brothers, Clarence, James, Alfred, Leonard, Roy Lee and Kenneth Goings; sister Johnny Alice Scruggs, and Hazel T. Goins and nephew, Clarence Lee Goins. He leaves to cherish his memories: brother, Clifford Goins of Maryville, sisters-in-law, Virginia Goins of Maryville, Lillian (Clarence) Goins of Alcoa, Carlee (Roy) Goins of Knoxville, Gwendolyn Goins of Ramson, R.I.; devoted niece, Louise Moore of Conway, S.C., Bernice Goins Crawford of Knoxville; seven nieces; fourteen nephews; twenty-two great nephews; nine great nieces; four grea great nephews; four great great nieces and many other relatives and friends.

Funeral services will be held Friday October 8, 1999 at 4 p.m. at Foothils Funeral Home Chapel with Elder Ralph Lee, officiating. Interment follows at Hilltop Cemetery, Louisville with military honors by East Tennessee Honor Guard. The family will receive friends one hour prior to the service. The remains may be viewed after 12 noon Thursday at Foothills Funeral Home, Maryville.”

CAMPBELL COUNTY, TENNESSEE

Revolutionary War Veterans Compiled

By Dallas Bogan

The following list of Revolutionary War soldiers are those men who received pensions from the federal government for their services while residing in Campbell County.

In 1818 an Act was passed by Congress granting pensions to soldiers of the Revolution. This Act was very strict which in turn allowed very few persons to qualify for benefits. The document was still not inclusive enough to assist many of the soldiers who provided themselves in the winning effort against British rule.

By 1832, public interest had so united toward compensation for the veterans that Congress then passed a Pension Act which included even militiamen who had provided as little as three months’ service in the war for independence.

Immediately afterward, within a year or two, veterans who had survived qualified before their country courts to obtain the pensions they so deserved. In 1835, a total list of veterans was published by an Act of Congress.

Included were:

Isaac Armstrong, Pension Number: S16312, born: July 1762 in Maryland, military: Virginia Line, applied: Oct. 9, 1832, Anderson County;

Charles Bratcher, Pension Number: S1501, born: 1762, Bedford County, Virginia, died: August 11, 1833, military: Virginia Line, applied: June 12, 1833, Campbell County;

James Cabbage, pension number not found;

John Cabbage, Pension Number: S3134, born: February 24, 1758, Chester County, PA; military: Virginia Militia; applied: March 11, 1834, Campbell County;

Robert Chapman, DAR Number: 1779193, Military: 7th Virginia Regulars; Residence: Campbell County 1830-1840;

James Chitwood, Pension Number: S1751; born: June 21, 1751, Cumberland County, VA; military: South Carolina Line; applied: Dec. 11, 1832, Campbell County;

Richard Crabtree, Widow’s Pension Number: W8642, born: January 29, 1758, Louden County, VA, died: June 29, 1849, wife: Sarah Richardson, married: Aug. 10, 1792, Russell County, VA, military, North Carolina Line, applied, Aug. 2, 1834, Morgan County, TN (Soldier’s Pension), applied Feb. 1, 1851, Scott County, TN;

John Day, Pension Number: S2532, military: Maryland Line, applied: Dec. 30, 1833, Campbell County;

Manoah Dyer, Pension Number: S2532, born: Sept. 25, 1755, Caroline County, VA, military: North Carolina and Virginia Line, applied: Nov. 12, 1832, Monroe County, TN;

Daniel Going [Goins], Pension Number: S38744; In 1820: Age 65; wife age 67; military: Virginia Continental Line, applied: June 3, 1818;

James Grant, Pension Number: S38759, died: January 21, 1824, applied: June 2, 1818, Campbell County;

Joseph Hatfield, Pension Number: W5, died: August 26, 1832, wife: Rachel, married: Oct. 28, 1779, military: Virginia Line, applied: Oct. 21, 1843, Campbell County;

Drewry Hembree, Pension Number; Not Found, born: Dec. 12, 1755, Spartanburg District, SC, applied: Oct. 10, 1834, Campbell County;

Churchwell Jackson, Sr., Pension Number: S4432, born: Feb. 15, 1758, Orange County, VA, military: North Carolina Line;

Rollings James, Pension Number: S2018, born: 1762 in MD, Military: North Carolina State Troops, applied: Sept. 10, 1832, Campbell County;

David Lawson, Pension Number: R6200, died March 1, 1852, wife, Elizabeth, married Oct. 18, 1794, military, North Carolina Line, applied: Oct. 28, 1843, Campbell County;

Dickeson Lumpkin(s), Pension Number: R6521, died: September 8, 1851, wife: Susan Luker, married, May 22, 1820, military: Pennsylvania and Virginia Line, applied: Sept. 11, 1832, [age 73] Campbell County; applied: April 2, 1855, Campbell County; [Widow’s Pension];

James McDonald, Pension Number: W7424, born: Aug. 21, 1758, Cumberland County, NC, died: Jan. 12, 1848, Campbell County; wife: Sarah Cox; married: July 20, 1797, Randolph County, NC, military: North Carolina Line, applied: May 31, 1834, Morgan County, TN, applied: Feb. 15, 1851, Scott County;

Richard Muse, Pension Number: unknown; born: 1752, military: unknown, applied: 1840, Pulaski County, KY;

Frederick Nester, Pension Number: S1572, born: April 24, 1739, Germany, military: North Carolina Militia, applied: Sept. 10, 1833, Campbell County;

John Ousley/Oysley/Hously, Pension Number: R16894, born: Nov. 6, 1757, died: Dec. 19, 1845, wife: Tabitha Barton, married, Aug. 16, 1778, military: Virginia Line, applied: March 19, 1833, Claiborne County, applied: April, 1846, Claiborne County, [Widow’s Pension];

John Reed/Read, Pension Number: W193, died, Dec. 9, 1838, Morgan County, TN; wife: Nancy Morris, married, September, 1783, Greenville District, SC, military: South Carolina Line, applied: Sept. 10, Campbell County; applied, June, 1839, Morgan County, TN [Widow’s Pension];

Henry Ridenour, Pension Number: not found;

John Ridenour, Pension Number: not found;

Benjamin Rogers/Rodgers, Pension Number: W867, Born: Jan. 29, 1754/55/56, Culpepper County, VA; wife, Martha Brawley; married: March 24, 1788; military: Virginia Line; applied: Dec. 11, 1832, Campbell County, applied: March 12, 1840, Campbell County;

William H. Rose, rank: Sergeant, military: First Battalion, 4th Reg. N. C. Continental Line, enlisted: April 23, 1776 to August 1783;

Robert Ross, Pension Number: W1496, died: Jan. 23, 1825, wife: Lucy Arnold, married, Nov. 22, 1792, military, Pennsylvania Continental Line, applied: April 29, 1818, Campbell County; applied: Nov. 3, 1838, Anderson County, [Widow’s Pension];

John Sanders/Saunders, Pension Number: W3873, died: April 6, 1833, Claiborne County, TN; wife, Mary Ann “Molly” Stotts/Statts; married, Aug. 17, 1780, Surry County, NC; military, North Carolina Line, applied: Jan. 4, 1833, Claiborne County, applied: Aug. 5, 1843, Campbell County [Widow’s Pension];

Timothy Smith, Pension: W196, died, June 18, 1832, wife, Esther, married, Aug. 18, 1780, York District, SC, military: New Jersey Cont’l Line, applied: Oct. 26, 1818, Campbell County, applied, June, 1838, Morgan County, TN [Widow’s Pension];

Thomas Slape, Pension: S39075, Died, Dec., 1820, military: Virginia Continental Line;

Ali (Eli) Smith, Pension: R9751, died: April 19, 1836, wife, Jane Denny Smith, married, April 8, 1783, military, Virginia Military, applied, Nov. 6, 1843 [Widow’s Pension];

Ransom Smith, Pension: S3925, born: April 11, 1761, Hanover County, VA; died, Aug. 12, 1855, military: North Carolina Line, applied: Oct. 12, 1832, Marion County, TN;

Robert Smith, Pension: R9697, died: Dec. 9, 1786, wife: Blessing, married: Fall of 1778, Botetourt County, VA, military: Virginia Continental Line, applied: Oct. 25, 1843, Campbell County, [Widow’s Pension];

Jacob Stooskbury/Stukesbury, Pension: S39094, in 1818: age about 63, in 1821: Wife, age 55, in 1838: age 85; military: Virginia Continental Line, applied: Sept. 8, 1818, Anderson County, military, Wagoner in Virginia Continental Line;

Dennis Trammel, pension: R10672, born: 1759, Amelia County, VA, died: March 29, 1849; wife, Martha Cooper [sec-ond wife]; married: April 27, 1841, Russell County, KY, mili-tary: Georgia and South Carolina Lines, received pension from Special Act of Congress, applied; 1853, Taylor County, KY.
==O==
Dusta Goin was married March 10, 1841 to Miss D. A. King, according to “Campbell County, Tennessee Masrriages, 1830-1850.” Children born to Dusta Goin and D. A. King Goin are unknown.
==O==
Elizabeth Goin was married January 1, 1842 to Amos Bratcher, according to “Campbell County, Tennessee Marriages, 1830-1850.”
==O==
Elizabeth Goins died December 17, 1894 and was buried in Glade Springs Cemetery in Campbell County.
==O==
Mac Goin appeared as the head of Household 622-644 in the 1850 census of Campbell County:

“Goin, Mac 20, born in South Carolina
Cooly 20, born in Tennessee”
==O==
State Rep. Mark Goin of LaFollette, Tennessee in Campbell County stated to a newspaper reporter that his mother luckily escaped injury in a fireworks explosion that occurred there June 5, 1997 at the plant of Pyro Shows, Inc. His mother who works in the plant warehouse was absent on the day of the explosion which killed four of her associates. Rep. Goin stated, “I live 13 miles from the point of the explosion, and it sounded like thunder. Shoppers at nearby Woodson’s Mall fled the stores, thinking that a bomb had gone off.”
==O==
Mary Goin was married to Absolum Lumpkins October 18, 1846, according to “Campbell County, Tennessee Marriages, 1830-1850.”
==O==
Preston Goin was enumerated in the 1850 census of Campbell County as the head of Household 434-615:

“Goin, Preston 45, born in VA
Delpha A. 34, born in SC
Susan 13
Nancy 11
Milton 9
Isim 8
John 3
Andrew 8/12”
==O==
Rachel Goin was married to Andrew Dibbley December 10, 1840, according to “Campbell County, Tennessee Marriages, 1830-1850.”
==O==
William Goin was married to Catharine Carroll March 3, 1845, according to “Campbell County, Tennessee Marriages, 1830-1850.” William Goin, who was born in Tennessee, was recorded as the head of Household 435-615 in the 1850 census of Campbell County:

“Goin, William 37, born in Tennessee
Catharine 30, born in North Carolina
Mary 5
Nancy 4
Sarah 3”

Mary Jane Goin, daughter of William Goin and Catherine Carroll Goin, was born March 12, 1845, probably in Campbell County. She was married about 1865 to Lorenzo Dow Towe II, son of Lorenzo Dow Towe, Sr. She died September 14, 1928 in adjoining Whitley County, Kentucky, according to Cindy Sopko, a descendant of Ohio..

Children born to Loranzo Towe and Mary Jane Goin Towe include:

McClellan Towe born September 11, 1866
Dan Towe born in March 1872
George W. Towe born March 12, 1878
Jim Towe born about 1884

McClellan Towe, son of Loranzo Towe and Mary Jane Goin Towe, was born September 11, 1866 in Tennessee. He was married about 1889 to Ollie M. Davis who was born December 19, 1863 in LaFolette, Tennessee. They were enumerated in the 1900 census of Whitley County. She died March 20, 1935 in Savoy, Kentucky in Whitley County. He died September 16, 1955 and was buried in Emlin Cemetery, Emlin, Kentucky.

Dan Towe, son of Loranzo Towe and Mary Jane Goin Towe, was born in March 1872 in Tennessee. He was married about 1896 to Eva Lane who was born in November 1871 in Tennessee.

George W. Towe, son of Loranzo Towe and Mary Jane Goin Towe, was born March 12, 1878 in Tennessee. He was married August 5, 1895 to Sarah E. Carr who was born May 3, 1880 in Whitley County. She died January 7, 1949, and he died May 12, 1961 in Whitley County.

Jim Towe, son of Loranzo Towe and Mary Jane Goin Towe, was born about 1884. He died November 11, 1938 in Whitley County.
==O==
William Goin who was born in Tennessee was recorded as the head of Household 435-615 in the 1850 census of Campbell County:

“Goin, William 37, born in TN
Catharine 30, born in NC
Mary 5
Nancy 4
Sarah 3”
==O==
Ella Goines died in 1911 in Campbell County according to “Tennessee Deaths,” No. 3995.
==O==
Daniel Going was born about 1755 in Virginia. He enlisted in the Fifth Virginia Regiment of the Continental Line in February 1777 and served at Valley Forge, according to his Revolutionary pension application. In 1820, at age 65 he was living in Campbell County, Tennessee. He received Penson No. S-38744.
==O==
Alex Goins, born October 9, 1880, died October 12, 1979, was buried in Bethlehem Baptist Church Cemetery.

“Clara Goans, wife of Alex Goans, born December 12, 1885, died December 23, 1918” [probably in the influenza epidemic] was buried in Bethlehem Baptist Church Cemetery.

William F. Goins, “son of Alex Goins,” was born September 27, 1915. He died December 21, 1918 [probably in the in­fluenza epidemic] and was buried in Bethlehem Baptist Church Cemetery.

Mary Smith Goins, born December 3, 1891, died August 7, 1973, was buried in Bethlehem Baptist Church Cemetery. She may have been the second wife of Alex Goins.
==O==
Alvis Goins was recorded as the head of a household in the 1900 census of Campbell County, Enumeration District 35, page 2, 6th Civil District:

“Goins, Alvis 48, born in Dec. 1851 in TN”
Nancy Y. 39, born in April 1861 in TN
James T. 20, born in February 1880 in TN
Thomas M. 17, born in March 1882 in TN
Franklin 15, born in Sept. 1884 in TN
Harrison C. 8, born in Nov. 1890 in TN
Elizabeth 6, born in February 1894 in TN
Samuel M. 3, born in July 1896 in TN”
==O==
Mrs. Berry Lou Goins died February 23, 2003, according to her obituary in the “Lafollette Press” of March 6, 2003:

“Berry Lou Goins, 67, Ohio, died February 23 in Ohio. She was preceded in death by her husband, Von T. Goins and parents, Bill and Betsy Marlow Mazingo. Mrs. Goins is survived by her sons, Chrisropher Richard Goins, LaFollette, Steven Von Goins, OH; two grand-children; sister, Neva Powers, OH.

Funeral services were February 28 in the chapel of Martin Wilson Funeral Home with Reverend Hobert McCreary officiating. Interment was in Woodlawn Cemetery.”
==O==
“James Alvin Goins” was born about 1875, place and parents unknown. He was married October 12, 1902 in adjoining Union County, Tennessee to Phoeby Dossett. “Alvis James Goins” died in La Follette about 1963, according to Wally Goins, a grandson. His wife, Phoby Dossett Goins died about the same time.
==O==
Byron L. Goins was included among Campbell County’s war dead of World War II.
==O==
The obituary of David Goins, age 36, was carried in the April 5 edition of “LaFollette Press:”

“David Goins, 36, of 512 N. 19th St, LaFollette died Thursday, March 29, at his home. He was preceded in death by mother Linda Goins. He is survived by wife Brenda Gail Goins; daughters Sarah Lynn Goins and Katie Elizabeth Goins all of LaFollette; brother James “Jim Bo” Walden of Georgia; sister Shelia Walden of Jacksboro. Funeral services were held on Sunday, April 1, in the Chapel of Martin Wilson Funeral Home with Rev. Bobby Hatfield officiating. Interment was held in the Woodlawn Cemetery.”
==O==
The obituary of Charles Glen “Sam” Goins who was born about 1925 appeared in the April 11, 2001 edition of the LaFollette Press:”

“Charles Glen “Sam” Goins, 76, of LaFollette, died on Sunday, April 7, at St. Mary’s of Campbell County. He was a member of Midway Baptist Church and a Navy Veteran of World War II. He was preceded in death by parents, Rev. Earnest and Margaret Goins, brother, Earnest Goins Jr., and sister Nona Goins.

He is survived by wife Christine Goins; son, Charles Timothy Goins; daughter, Linda Kay Goins Orick; sister, Wilene Goins Dabney and Anna Lou Goins Vandergriff; and brother, Henry A Goins.

Funeral services were held Tuesday, April 9, at Midway Baptist Church with Rev. Leonard Dabney and Rev. Johnny Dabney officiating. Interment was in the Campbell County Gardens with Military Honors by Campbell County Honor Guard. Cross Funeral Home was in charge of arrangements.”
==O==
Ella Goins died in 1910 in Campbell County according to “Tennessee Deaths,” number 4565.
==O==
Eunice Goins was married December 28, 1919 to Andrew Dossett by James Willoughby, minister of the gospel, according to Campbell County marriage records.
==O==
Eunice A. Goins was born May 11, 1919. She died February 28, 1937 and was buried in Bethlehem Baptist Church Cemetery.
==O==
The obituary of Eva Goins Ellison appeared in the February 27, 1003 edition of the “LaFollette Press:”

“Eva Goins Ellison, 76, LaFollette died February 18, 2003 at the St. Mary’s Health and Rehabilitation Center of Campbell County. She was preceded in death by her husband, Esau Ellison; parents, Milton and Lettie Goins; sister, Mackie Rogers; brothers, Clifton Goins, Elwin Goins and Everette Goins. Mrs. Ellison is survived by her daughters, Molly Hatfield, LaFollette, Judy Seaton, Greenville; sons, David Ellison and Denny Ellison both of LaFollette; six grandchildren; three great grandchildren; sister, Blanche Goings Smith, LaFollette. Funeral services were Feb. 22 at the Walters Chapel with Reverends Jack Goins and Ronnie Poston officiating. Interment was in Woodlawn Cemetery.”
==O==
Evelyn Goins was married about 1942 to Henderson Luther Miller who was born in 1915. She was widowed after 58 years of marriage November 1, 2000.

Henderson Luther Miller was 85 and lived at LaFollette, Tennessee, according to his obituary in the “Knoxville News-Sentinel” of November 3, 2000.

He was a veteran of WWII and served in the Sixth Cavalry in Europe. He was a member and past master of LaFollette Masonic Lodge #623, F&AM, member of Eastern Star Chapter 137, 32nd Degree Mason with the Scottish Rite and a Shriner with the Kerbella Temple in Knoxville.

He was retired from Lockheed Martin [formerly Union Carbide] in Oak Ridge where he was a fireman and ambulance driver.

Survivors include his wife of 58 years, Evelyn Goins Miller, of LaFollette; son and daughter in law, Marvin and Susan Robinson Miller of Ooltewah, Tenn.; daughters and sons in law, Maxine and Ray Goins, Vickie and Bill Braden all of LaFollette. He was buried in Campbell Memorial Gardens.
==O==
Frank Goins, born October 15, 1850, died April 5, 1939, was buried in Bethlehem Baptist Church Cemetery. Sallie Smith Goins, believed to have been his wife, born February 25, 1851, died January 7, 1937, was buried beside him. Adjoining was the grave of Mary Jones Goins, born August 20, 1877, died June 19, 1960. Adjoining was the grave of Ronnie Lee Goins, born March 21, 1959, died October 3, 1959.
==O==
Geneva Goins was born July 3, 1936, according to her tombstone in Glade Springs Cemetery.

Mrs. Gertie Mae Pratt Goins of Clinton, Tennessee, 91, widow of Roscoe Goins died October 16, 2002, according to her obituary in the October 24 edition of the “LaFollette Press:”

“Gertie Mae Pratt Goins, 91, of Clinton died October 16th, 2002 at Methodist Medical Center. She was preceded in death by her parents Joseph and Hannah Reynolds; husband, Roscoe Goins; daughter, Velma Goins Albertini and granddaughter, Angela Albertini.

Mrs. Goins is survived by her sons, Joseph Goins and Buford Goins both of Lake City; daughter, Jean Goins Bullock, Clinton; son-in-law, Charles Albertini, Lake City; 17 grandchildren, 24 great grandchildren, six great great grandchildren.

A private graveside service was held at the New Home Cemetery October 16th with interment following. Cox-Martin Funeral Home was in charge of arrangements.”
==O==
The obituary of Mrs. Gladys Willoughby Goins was carried in the May 6, 2002 edition of the “LaFollette Press:”

“Gladys Willoughby Goins, age 84, of LaFollette, passed away Sunday, May 5, 2002, at St. Mary’s Medical Center of Campbell County. She was a member of First Baptist Church, Coolidge, and a retired school teacher with forty years teaching experience. She was preceded in death by husband Albert Goins; brother, Ernest Willoughby, and sisters, Pernie Miller and Bonnie Kate Wright. Survivors include her brother, Ed Willoughby of LaFollette; sister, Elsa Aiken of Gallatin, Tennessee and 10 nieces and nephews. Funeral services were held Wednesday, May 8, at Cross Funeral Home, Rev. Casper, ‘Tip’ Moore officiating. Interment was May 9, at Fincastle Cemetery.”
==O==
Mrs. Grace R. Goins died October 29, 2002 and her obituary appeared in the “Lafollette Press” of November 7, 2002:

“Grace R. Goins, 90, of LaFollette died October 29th, 2002 at the St. Mary’s Health and Rehabilitation Center of Campbell County. She was preceded in death by her husband, Elmer W. Goins; daughter, Jewell Goins Kesterson and grandson, Jimmy Kesterson.

Mrs. Goins is survived by her daughter Jean Goins Childs, LaFollettte; sons, Ronnie Goins, Lafollette, Benny Goins, Georgia and 19 grandchildren.

Funeral services were October 31st at the Midway Baptist church with the Reverends H. Lee Ray, Leonard Dabney and Johnny Dabney officiating. Interment was in Woodlawn Cemetery. Walters Funeral Home was in charge of arrangements.”
==O==
Harold Goins was born February 18, 1946. He died February 22, 1968 and was buried in Bethlehem Baptist Church Cemetery.
==O==
Howard Goins died April 1, 2000 in LaFollette, Tennessee. He was buried in Beeler Cemetery in Speedwell, Tennessee and is survived by his wife, Sandra Goins, according to the “LaFollette Press.” He was a member of Pleasant Grove Baptist Church. Preceded in death by son, Bill Howard Goins; grandson, Gregory Williams; and brother, Benny Goins. Other survivors include: sons, Clarence and James Goins, both of La Follette; daughters, Shirley Goins of Oak Ridge and Emma Ruth Goins of La Follette; 4 grandchildren; sisters, Lucille Dossett and Thelma Young, both of La Follette. Funeral Service was held at 1 p.m. Wednesday at Cross Chapel. Rev. Ovid Bolton officiated.
==O==
James L. Goins was born July 5, 1824 and died June 7, 1894, according to his tombstone in Glade Springs Cemetery.
==O==
James Milton[?] Goins was born about 1872, according to the 1910 Campbell County census which showed him at age 38. He had been married previously for a short time, according to Darryl Chapman, family researcher of LaFollette, Tennessee.

He was remarried in 1891 to Mary Ann Parrott who was born about 1868, according to their enumeration which showed that they had been married for 19 years.

Eight children were born to James Milton Goins and Mary Ann Parrott Goins:

Erikes Goins born about 1892
Hattie Goins born about 1895
Nannie Goins born about 1896
Charlie Goins born about 1899
Verline Goins born about 1899
Sallie Goins born about 1903
Hubert Goins born about 1905
Edward Goins born October 15, 1908.

Erikes Goins, son of James Milton Goins and Mary Ann Parrott Goins, was born in Tennessee about 1892.

Hattie Goins, daughter of James Milton Goins and Mary Ann Parrott Goins, was born in Tennessee about 1895.

Nannie Goins, daughter of James Milton Goins and Mary Ann Parrott Goins, was born in Tennessee about 1896.

Verline Goins, son of James Milton Goins and Mary Ann Parrott Goins, was born in Tennessee about 1899.

Sallie Goins, daughter of James Milton Goins and Mary Ann Parrott Goins, was born in Tennessee about 1903.

Hubert Goins, son of James Milton Goins and Mary Ann Parrott Goins, was born in Tennessee about 1905. He was married about 1928 to Maggie Rutherford, sister to Ida Mae Rutherford who was married to Edward Goins, his brother.

Children born to Hubert Goins and Maggie Rutherford Goins include:

Imogene Goins born December 31, 1941

Imogene Goins, daughter of Hubert Goins and Maggie Goins, was born December 13, 1941. She died January 24, 1942 and was buried in Bethlehem Baptist Church Cemetery.

Edward Goins, son of James Milton Goins and Mary Ann Parrott Goins, was born in Tennessee October 15, 1908. He was married about 1931 to Ida Mae Rutherford who was born September 25, 1909 to Thomas Rutherford and his second wife, Florence Parrott Rutherford.

Children born to Edward Goins and Ida Mae Rutherford Goins include:

Troy Goins born about 1931
Bonnie Goins born about 1932
Ray Goins born about 1933
Harold Goins born about 1935
Mary Goins born about 1937
Edison Junior Goins, born about 1939
Floyd Goins born about 1940
Pansy Goins born about 1942
Paul Goins born about 1945
Tilman Goins born about 1948

Bonnie Goins, daughter of Edward Goins and Ida Mae Rutherford Goins, was born about 1932 in Campbell County. She was married about 1950 to Luther Wilson. She was later remarried to Verlin Burnette.

Mrs. Bonnie Goins Burnette, age 69 of 2800 Carl Stiner Highway, LaFollette passed away Thursday, September 27, 2001 at the St. Mary’s Medical Center of Campbell County, according to her obituary in the “LaFollette Press:”

“She was a member of the Indian Mound Baptist Church. She was a retired LPN from the LaFollette Hospital. She was preceded in death by; her first husband, Luther Wilson; son, Roger Wilson; daughter Judy Russell; parents, Ed Goins and Ida Rutherford Goins; brothers, Troy Goins, Ray Goins, and Harold Goins.

Bonnie is survived by husband Verlin Burnette of LaFollette; son and daughter-in-law, Bill and Debbie Wilson of Jacksboro; daughter, Tammy Treadway of LaFollette; daughters and sons-in-law, Barbara and John Acuff of Halls, Debbie and Gary Byrd of Jacksboro, Linda and Stanley Nelson of LaFollette; brothers, Floyd Goins, Junior Goins and Paul Goins, Leon Goins and Tilman Goins all of LaFollette; sisters, Mary Goins Kimberlin and Pansy Goins Hensley both of LaFollette.

Interment was in Cumberland View Cemetery. Martin Wilson Funeral Home of LaFollette was in charge of the arrangements.”

Edison Junior Goins, son of Edward Goins and Ida Mae Rutherford Goins, was born about 1939. He died March 7, 2002.

The obituary of Edison Junior Goins was carried in the March 8, 2002 edition of the “LaFollette Press:”

Edison Junior Goins, 63, of Speedwell, died on Thursday, March 7, at St. Mary’s Medical Center of Campbell County. He was a member of the Bethlehem Baptist Church.

He was preceded in death by parents Ed Goins and Ida Goins; brothers Troy Goins, Ray Goins and Harold Goins, and sister Bonnie Goins Burnette.

He is survived by daughter Helen Goins of Jacksboro; sisters Pansy Goins Hensley and Mary Goins Kimberland, both of LaFollette; brothers Tilman Goins, Floyd Goins, Paul Goins and Leon Goins, all of LaFollette.

Funeral services were Sunday at Walters Chapel with Rev. Howard Goins officiating. Interment was in the Goins Family Cemetery in Bethlehem.”
==O==
Eva Goins, daughter of Milton Goins and Lettie Goins, was born about 1927. She was married about 1946 to Esau Ellison. She died February 18, 2003 in Campbell County, according to her obituary in “The Knoxville News-Sentinel” February 19, 2003:

“Mrs. Eva G. Ellison, age 76, of LaFollette, passed away Tuesday, February 18, 2003, at St. Mary’s Health and Rehabilitation Center of Campbell County. She was preceded in death by her husband, Esau Ellison; parents, Milton Goins and Lettie Goins; sister, Mackie Goins Rogers and brothers, Clifton “Kink” Goins, Elwin Goins and Everette “Cotton” Goins.

She was a member of the Forks Grove Baptist Church and a cook in the Campbell County School System for over 25 years at Valley View School. Survivors: daughters, Molly Hatfield and husband, Pete Hatfield of LaFollette, Judy Seaton and husband, Dennis Seaton of Greenville, Tennessee; sons, David Ellison and wife, Anita, and Denny Ellison and wife, Tammy, all of LaFollette.

Funeral services set for Thursday, 2 p.m. at Walters Chapel with Rev. Charles Jack Goins and Rev. Ronnie Poston officiating. Interment set in Woodlawn Cemetery.”
==O==
Jennie Ivey Goins was born October 12, 1896 and died December 24, 1976, according to her tombstone in Glade Springs Cemetery.
==O==
John Goins, age 81 of LaFollette died June 6, 2002, according to his obituary in the “Knoxville News Sentinel” of June 8, 2002:

“John Goins, age 81 of LaFollette, Bethlehem Community, went home to be with the Lord, Thursday night, June 6 at St. Mary’s Hospital of Knoxville. He was a faithful member of the Bethlehem Baptist Church. He served as Deacon, Adult Choir leader and Adult Sunday school teacher for many years.

He retired from the State of Tennessee, having worked at Cove Lake State Park for many years.

Preceded in death by his parents, Emmitt Goins and Nora Smith Goins; two sons, Ronnie Goins and Stevie Wayne Goins, and brothers, Lloyd “Buck” Goins, Don Goins and Homer Goins. He is survived by wife, Lois Goins of LaFollette; sons, Jimmy Goins and wife, Marquita Goins of LaFollette, Ricky Goins and wife, Allison Goins of Jacksboro, and Jerry Goins of Knoxville; daughter, Sandy Goins Freeman and husband, Rev. Ronnie Freeman; three sisters, Ann Goins, Dean Goins Jones and Naomi Goins Jones; two brothers, Clayton Goins and Clifford Goins all of LaFollette; several grandchildren, nieces and nephews.

Funeral services are set for 2 p.m. Sunday, June 9, at Bethlehem Baptist Church, Rev. Bill Braden and Rev. Ronnie Freeman officiating. Burial will follow in the church cemetery. The family will receive friends Saturday night from 6-8:30 p.m. at Cross Funeral Home.”
==O==
John Jay Goins, 59 was born June 2, 1940 in La Follette, TN, according to “Sarasota Herald – Tribune”. He was a truck driver for Vinice Land Clearing. He was a Protestant. Survivors include Kathy of Vinice; Thomas of Port Charlotte FL; Daniel of Kissimee, FL; Deborah Dudley of Venice, FL; Faye Baird of Somerset, KY; Lucy Tudor of Newtonsville, OH; and Thomas Richard of Port Charlotte, FL.

Visitation was held from 5-6 p.m. Wednesday with services following at Ewing Funeral Home. Memorial donations may be made to American Cancer Society, South Sarasota County Unit, 2100 S. Tamiami Trail, Suite A, Venice, FL 34293.
==O==
The obituary of Mrs. Maggie Goins appeared in the May 6, 2000 edition of the “Knoxville News-Sentinel:”

“Goins, Maggie “Grannie,” age 97, of LaFollette, passed away Friday, May 5, 2000 at the LaFollette Medical Center. She was a member of Midway Baptist Church. She was preceded in death by husband, Rev. Ernest W. Goins and son, Ernest W. Goins, Jr. Survivors include: sons, Sam Goins of LaFollette, Henry Goins of Speedwell; daughters, Willene Goins Dabney of LaFollette, Anna Lou Goins Vandergriff of Oak Ridge; 14 grandchildren; 16 great grandchildren; 7 great great grand-children; a host of other relatives and friends. Funeral services 2 p.m. Sunday, May 7, at Midway Baptist Church, Rev. Howard Murray, Rev. Leonard Dabney, and Rev. Johnny Dabney officiating. Interment Campbell Memorial Gardens.
==O==
Mary Jane Jones was born March 12, 1849 in Campbell County to parents unknown. She died September 14, 1928 in Whitley County, Kentucky.
==O==
The obituary of Mrs. Nancy Elsie Paul Goins appeared in the September 6, 2001 edition of the “Lafollette Press:”

“Nancy Elsie Goins, 81, of Jacksboro, Tennessee died on Sunday, September 2, 2001 at University of Tennessee Medical Center of Knoxville. She was a member of the Glade Springs Baptist Church and was retired from Imperial Reading Corporation.

She was preceded in death by husband, Onie Goins; daughter Jennie Goins Vinsant; sons Rev. Gene Goins and James Goins. She was the daughter of William R. Paul and Cora J. Wilson Paul.

She was survived by daughters, Lucille Goins McNeely of LaFollette, Tennessee, Ruth Goins Scalf of Galveston, Indiana and Dianna Goins Wilson of Jacksboro and son Lewis O. Goins of LaFollette. Interment was in Glade Springs Cemetery.
==O==
Pauline Starrett Goins, 77, of LaFollette, died on Sunday, September 23, 2001 at the St. Mary’s Medical Center of Campbell County, according to her obituary in the “LaFollette Press:”

“She was a member of the Glade Springs Baptist Church. She was preceded in death by husband William Goins; son Jeffery Goins; parents Andrew and Neoma Edmond Starrett; brother Leon Starrett; and sisters Floetta Starrett, Bobbie Mattie.

She is survived by son David Goins; son Steve Goins of LaFollette; daughter Debbie Goins of Jellico and four grandchildren and three great-grandchildren. Interment was at Woodlawn Cemetery.”
==O==
Thomas Goins, born 1892, died 1923 was buried in the Phillips section of Cumberland Cemetery located three miles south of Jackson, Tennessee.
==O==
Preston Goins and his wife, Annie Smith Goins were residents of Campbell County in 1889 when their son, John Peter Goins was born. John Peter Goins, at a very young age, fell under the spell of a West Texas land agent and his life was changed forever, according to an article in the March 12, 1961 edition of “The Crosbyton Review” of Crosbyton, Texas:

“J. P. “Johnny” Goins was a Tennessee schoolboy when he overheard a West Texas land developer, B. W. Ellison, expounding on the merits of Crosbyton‑area land owned by the C. B. Livestock Co.

Ellison told J. C. Ausmus about the future of this new land and unfolded a map showing 90,000 acres being offered for sale. Ausmus was convinced, and so was young Goins on this September day in 1908.
The youth who was born March 21, 1889 in Campbell County, excitedly raced home to inform his parents of his plans to migrate west. His father was less than enthusiastic. ‘I don’t guess you will,’ he firmly told his son.

But the determined Johnny Goins won out. He left his parents’ home on November 4, 1908, ‘the day William Howard Taft was elected president of the United States.’

Although he failed to realize fully the impact this decision would have on the remainder of his life, Johnny Goins became a pioneer in a developing country.

The Tennessee farm boy informed his parents, ‘I’ll be home in one year.’ He didn’t make it! In fact, it was 16 years before he returned to Tennessee for a visit.

Goins and the Ausmus family bought railroad tickets to Texas. They changed cars in Kentucky, and stayed overnight in Kansas City where they turned south. The group ‘landed in Seymour, Texas on November 4′ and stayed at the B. W. Ellison place three days.

On the 11th, they hired John Bradford to drive them to Crosbyton in a horse‑drawn wagon. Ausmus paid Bradford $25 to deliver his family and possessions, and Goins’ fee was $10.

Camping overnight at Benjamin, Texas, the Tennesseeans-turned-Texans met Henry Leatherwood and his hired hand. ‘Mr. Leatherwood was the first Crosby County man I met’ the slightly-built Goins remembers. He also got acquainted rapidly with the rawness of West Texas, observing Leatherwood handling wild mules. Stock back home in Tennessee was ‘raised right in the pen and was always tame.’

Goins recalls that Mrs. Ausmus cried the night they were camped at Benjamin, expressing a desire to ‘go back home to Tennessee.’ The Ausmus family ‘didn’t stay long; they went to Illinois.’

Despite the adversities of this pioneer land, J. P. Goins stayed!

The 19-year-old lad had ‘$15 in cash when I got to Crosbyton. I bought a little food, and we stayed that night in a half dugout on B. W. Ellison’s place west of town. Along about midnight, Harley Coffey. Ewing Lawson and Luther Collier reached the dugout to overnight.’

Early the next morning, ‘Harley Coffey made breakfast. He cooked the first biscuits I ate in Crosby County. Ausmus killed an antelope, and we had fresh meat.’

Saturday afternoon, Goins came to Crosbyton where he met Julian M. Bassett, general manager of the C. B. Livestock Co, R. D. Wicks and others. Loyd A. Wicks was the livestock company’s attorney.

When he returned to town Monday morning to ‘mail a letter to my parents. Mr. Boggs took me to the supply store.’ Here, young Goins was offered a job by Mr. Craddock for ‘$25 a month and board.’ The employment lasted until Craddock ‘tried to cut my wages $5.

Again, the newcomer was job­hunting. He met ranch foreman Jay Walling, ‘one of the finest men I ever knew’ and became a cowboy. Ironically ‘when Mr. Walling hired me, he sent me to Crawfish Ranch to feed cattle. That ranch was the same section in Fairview Community where Goins six years later purchased land, which has since been his home for 63 years.

While working for Walling on the ranch Goins helped ‘lay off the route from Crosbyton to Petersburg.’ A sled pulled by four mules was utilized for developing the road.

We went across many farms; most land owners were agreeable. All molding out civilization in a rugged. new land was hard; there also were fond memories.

Johnny Goins remembers driving a chuck wagon with the crew which was building the road. Other crew members were Walling, A. R. Dees, the cook and several cowboys on horses.

Goins jumped from the chuck wagon to open a gate. He was unprepared to see the horses running off. The mounted cowboys soon had the runaway team under control.

Goins’ roots sink deep into this agriculture country which he literally helped build. In 1909 and 1910 the C. B. Livestock Co. was erecting Crosbyton’s second school. Goins hired on and worked making concrete blocks. The late Lige Ellison was one of the men hauling sand from the canyon for the construction job. This sand was screened to make blocks.

Goins explains that ‘kerosene was poured on the cylinder before each block’ was produced. The blocks then were wet down each day until they were cured.

An early-day Presbyterian preacher of whom Goins became fond was another employee. The blocks were produced in a pit which was covered with a tarp. After the C. B. Livestock Co. had completed the school building, the school board voted bonds for its purchase.

This became the basis for one of the area’s first major lawsuits. The structure was condemned in 1914, and the school board filed suit against the livestock company for reimbursement. C. B. Livestock Co. won, but the school board appealed, and the case went before Judge Dix in New Orleans. The federal judge reversed the earlier decision and ruled in favor of the school board. Goins remembers that Bassett said this was one of only two cases he ever lost.”

Crosby County and neighboring counties were beginning to change somewhat from grassland to farmland by 1910. ‘Mr. Hayden was the first ag man’ employed by C. B. Livestock Co. Goins was employed on the C. B. farm when ‘the second manager was hired. It didn’t work out because he hired men on an hourly basis–they quit before dark.” C. P. Sanders was the “third ag man” employed by C. B.

Another landmark came for Goins on Jan. 1, 1909 when ‘a bunch of us poured the foundation on the first bank’ [now the site of the present Citizens National Bank]. The men were mixing concrete by hand ‘on the foggiest day you’ve ever seen.’

Another first was seeing Frank White distribute the first issue of the ‘Crosbyton Review’ in January 1909. In fact, he had spent part of Christmas Day in White’s office watching him set type for that initial publication by hand. A copy of the first issue of ‘Crosbyton Review’ was sent ‘to my father in Tennessee.’ Johnny Goins, who has been taking the Crosbyton papers most of the time since then, must surely be the Review’s longest subscriber.

The former Tennessee farmboy worked as a freighter in 1909. He hauled freight on a wagon, going to Plainview on a route. The job had its good points. ‘You could get good meals for 25 cents at a boarding house run by a family in Plainview. It also had its bad features. ‘I had a full load of Irish potatoes when it came up a freeze, and they all spoiled.’ The ‘bad’ finally won out!

‘I burned out on that job because of the weather. One night, me and my team nearly froze.’

Despite the advice of ‘Uncle Joe McCarty. a fine fellow’ who was staying with the Ellisons, Johnny Goins had an even worse job experience. Uncle Joe warned the youngster that ‘I was making a mistake working for a man who couldn’t pay me.’ The advice rang true. ‘After several weeks work, I gave the man my watch to help him out, and I never got paid.’

Soon after, Uncle Joe McCarty, another of Johnny Goins’ favorites, ‘got a splinter under his fingernail, took blood poisoning and died.’

Although Johnny Goins admits ‘I never had a chance to go to school much,’ he was rapidly learning the ways of foundling West Texas.

In 1910, he had an opportunity to vote ‘for the first time.’ The decision was whether to move the county seat from Old Emma to Crosbyton. Did he vote for the change? ‘l sure did,’ Goins replied without hesitation.

After seven years in Crosby County, Goins, now a full-fledged Texan, became a landowner. He made a deal with Bassett of C. B. Livestock Co. for 160 acres of land in the Fairview community. Actually it was an agriculture lease for five years. The agreement called for $1 per acre lease the first year, $1.25 the second year, $1.50 the third year, $1.75 the fourth year, and $2.00 the fifth and final year. ‘The lease money was to be deducted from the $5 an acre.”

The transaction was finalized in August 1916, and Goins took possession of the land December 31, 1916. The diligent little man moved to the site January 17, 1917 and ‘broke out the sod with a walking plow.’ Actually, Goins moved to Fairview community in 1912 and was self-employed until 1959.

‘Exceptionally dry years’ prevailed across West Texas in 1917 and 1918. And World War I was declared in 1917. These were troubled years.

Goins ‘registered at Cone’ for military service on June 7, 1917. He was reclassified three times and never did have to go into the army. The war ended November 11, 1918. The situation was improving.

‘The drought broke, and we had a good crop in 1919.’ He planted and harvested ‘wheat, oats, and high-gear’ [heigera, a form of maize].

Goins ‘bought my first car’ October 11, 1921. His first registration papers were issued by the late B. W. Mitchell, then sheriff and tax collector.

Goins, who has a penchant for recalling events from the early years in Crosby County, also has a tendency to keep items from yester-year. He has in his possession ‘my first poll tax receipt from 1910 and the last one I ever paid.’ He also, kept his first auto registration papers and auto tags, his registration cards from the first world war and World War ll.

‘About all the early settlers are gone,’ he remarks sadly. Uncle Ben Ellison ‘has three daughters living,’ he states. They are Tina Harvey and Moda Reed, both of Crosbyton, and Viola Gray of Hereford.

The spry pioneer points out that he vividly recalls events from his childhood in Tennessee — recalling the Bible verse from his final Sunday school lesson there– and ‘things when I first came out here are fresh, but I don’t remember other things’ more recent.

Addressing the changing times, Goins says ‘people started gathering at Fairview before sundown to get a seat for plays’ presented at school. Community life was strong in those days. A Presbyterian church was founded at Fairview, followed by a Baptist church ‘after the other church folded.’ With no church in his home community, Goins now is a member of the Cone Baptist Church.

He served 12 years on the Fairview school board ‘before it was consolidated with Ralls in 1948.’ Admitting that he ‘strongly opposed’ the consolidation move, Goins is emphatic that ‘when we lost our school, we lost our community life.’

After braving those rugged early days — ‘I took 90 hides to Plainview one time, hides of cattle which had froze or starved’– Goins has some other firm opinions. Rugged physically and mentally, he was the only one of five friends to survive typhoid fever. Goins comes down hard on ‘farmers who talk about hard times.’

‘Lord o’ mercy, in the early days, many people lost their land and did well to just live. We didn’t have disaster payments, or Social Security, or anything.’ He recalls that during the depression, Pres. Roosevelt ordered cattle killed. ‘They dug a big pit and buried the stock. I remember seeing this government man kill calves’ with a .22-calibre rifle.

Continuing on the changing times, Goins remembers ‘I helped break out lots of sod land. I had three horses to a plow and walked behind. ‘The first cotton I raised hauled to Floydada in 1921 and sold for six cents a pound.’

This pioneer man who will celebrate his 92nd birthday on March 2 ‘if the Lord let’s me live,’ sees ‘many people being pushed off the land–the little man is being squeezed out–everything’s so high.’

He says ‘when farmers lived on a quarter or a half section, they had milk cows, chickens, and meat hogs. They had their living at home. They took milk and eggs to town on Saturday and sold them. This kept the little man on the farm.’

Goins ‘put in my last crop in 1959.” His land was leased to Louis Garcia and sons. who ‘bought my equipment and pump and had a three-year lease.’ A second irrigation well was added the following year. Garcia and his sons farmed the land 20 years before it was sold last October to Jesse Reese of Ralls.

Goins and his wife, the former Alice Holmes ‘who I met by accident November 14, 1964 and married June 18, 1966’ will be allowed to maintain their residence on the Fairview farm for the remainder of their lives.

‘I hated to sell the land, because I knew we’d never own another home,’ the pioneer admits. But, remembering Sept. 5, 1929 ‘when the stock market broke,’ he appreciates the financial security.

One thing he will never relinquish is his independence. Only eight years shy of his 100th birthday, Goins is proud and independent.

For example, he has few thoughts of not being able to drive his pickup when and where he desires. ‘I’d rather drive a pickup–you have better vision in a pickup than in a car,’ he declares.

But why shouldn’t J. P. Goins be proud? After all, he helped build this pioneer land and has moved through its various stages of development–for 73 years! He is not physically large, but in many ways Johnny Goins is a giant of a man!”
==O==
John Peter Goins, son of Preston Goins and Annie Smith Goins, was born in Campbell County March 21, 1889. He arrived in Crosby County, Texas in 1908. He was married about 1910, wife’s name, Nora L.

“John Goen” was the father of an infant born in Crosby County November 30, 1911, according to BVS File 19418.

John Peter Goins appeared in the deed records of Crosby County August 30, 1916. John Peter Goins deeded land to S. M. Walker May 21, 1921, according to Crosby County Deed Book 27, page 569. He also deeded land to C. K. Wilmeth Jan­uary 5, 1933 according to Crosby County Deed Book 48, page 312.

John Peter Goins and Nora L. Goins deeded 1.41 acres of land to the State of Texas for highway right-of-way March 7, 1935, according to Crosby County Deed Book 51, page 560. John Peter Goins declared his residence his homestead January 27, 1936, according to Crosby County Deed Book 52, page 257. Nora L. Goins appeared in real estate transactions in 1937, 1939 and 1940. She gave a warranty deed to D. R. Couch De­cember 14, 1939, according to Crosby County Deed Book 60, page 62.

Nora L. Goins received a warranty deed to Medina Irrigated Farms July 20, 1938 in Bexar County, Texas, according to Bexar County Deed Book 1637, page 577.

John Peter Goins, plaintiff, and Nora L. Goins, defendant, were parties to a divorce trial in Crosby County’s Seventy-second District Court November 2, 1940. In the divorce set­tlement John Peter Goins received 160 acres of land in Crosby County described as the northwest quarter of Section 31. Custody of their child, Samuel Preston Goins, age 25 and “mentally deficient” was given to Nora L. Goins.

John Peter Goins was married to Miss Ruth Pratt February 15, 1942, according to Crosby County Marriage Book 3, page 451.

John Peter Goins entered into an oil lease with Barnsdall Oil Company May 5, 1945, according to Crosby County Deed Book 71, page 522. He entered into an oil and gas lease with Gulf Oil Company July 29, 1969, according to Crosby County Deed Book 27, page 420. Of Ruth Pratt Goins nothing more is known.

Children born to John Peter Goins and Nora L. Goins include:

Samuel Preston Goins born in 1915

Samuel Preston Goins, son of John Peter Goins and Nora L. Goins was born in 1915. He was named in his parent’s di­vorce action as a 25-year-old mentally deficient. He was listed in Bexar County Probate Court File 35886 as “feeble minded.” He died February 22, 1944 in Travis County, Texas according to Travis County Death Certificate No. 10758.
==O==
James Goins and Elisabeth Goins are regarded as early residents of Campbell County. They were the parents of:

Enos H. Goins born February 5, 1858

Enos H. Goins, son of James Goins and Elisabeth Goins, was born in Campbell County February 5, 1858. He was married October 22, 1882 to Elizabeth “Betty” Ballard who was born August 1, 1856, according to Pam Shown, a descendant. They lived in Fincastle, Tennessee. Elizabeth “Betty” Ballard Goins died July 17, 1936 and was buried in Victory Cemetery. He died September 10, 1939 and was buried beside his wife.

Children born to Enos H. Goins and Elizabeth “Betty” Ballard Goins include:

Horace Maynard Goins born about 1882
James Edward Goins born in May 1884
Birdie Goins born August 10, 1886
William Whit Goins born December 16, 1888
Rosa Goins born November 28, 1891
Kelly Goins born April 21, 1894
Hattie Goins born in February 1898

Horace Maynard Goins, son of Enos H. Goins and Elizabeth “Betty” Ballard Goins, was born about 1882. He was married at age 16 to Annie Goins December 24, 1898. Following her death about 1908, he was remarried June 13, 1909 to Cora Lee McNeely, according to Pamela Shown, a granddaughter. Cora Lee McNeely was a daughter of Godfrey D. McNeely and Nancy Ellen Riggs McNeely. Horace Maynard Goins died April 15, 1956.

I descend through William 1& Mary>William 2 & Sarah>John Joseph and Martha Mattie Goins>Godfrey D. and Nancy Ellen Riggs>Cora Lee McNeely and Horace Maynard Goins

Four children were born to Horace Maynard Goins and Annie Goins Goins:

Eller Goins born about 1901
Adie Mae Goins born August 14, 1903
Clyde Goins born October 6, 1905
Emmitt Goins born in 1908

Twelve children were born to Horace Maynard Goins and Cora McNeely Goins:

Maudie Goins born about 1910
Albert Goins born about 1912
Hobart Conley Goins born September 6, 1913
[daughter] born about 1916
Paris Goins born about 1917
Virgie Goins born February 7, 1919
Erastus Goins born about 1922
[daughter] born September 18, 1923
Myrtle Goins born about 1924
Charles Goins born about 1926
Myria Goins born about 1927
[daughter] born about 1929

Eller Goins, daughter of Horace Maynard Goins and Annie Goins Goins, was born about 1901 and died at an early age, according to Pamela Shown.

Adie Mae Goins, daughter of Horace Maynard Goins and Annie Goins Goins, was born August 14, 1903. She died November 28, 1939 and was buried in Victory Cemetery.

Clyde Goins, son of Horace Maynard Goins and Annie Goins Goins, was born October 5, 1905. He died in a mining accident September 2, 1942 and was buried at Victory Cemetery.

Emmitt Goins, son of Horace Maynard Goins and Annie Goins Goins, was born about 1908.

Maudie Goins, daughter of Horace Maynard Goins and Cora McNeely Goins, was born about 1910. She died at an early age.

Albert Goins, son of Horace Maynard Goins and Cora McNeely Goins, was born about 1912. He died at an early age.

Hobart Conley Goins, son of Horace Maynard Goins and Cora McNeely Goins, was born September 6, 1913. He died October 27, 1979 and was buried in Victory Cemetery.

A daughter was born to Horace Maynard Goins and Cora McNeely Goins about 1916.

Paris Goins, son of Horace Maynard Goins and Cora McNeely Goins, was born about 1917. He died in 1971 and was buried in Victory Cemetery.

Virgie Goins, daughter of Horace Maynard Goins and Cora McNeely Goins, was born February 7, 1919. She died July 5, 1993 and was buried in Lot Cemetery in Jellico.

Erastus Goins, son of Horace Maynard Goins and Cora McNeely Goins, was born about 1922. When he died he was buried in Victory Cemetery.

A daughter was born to Horace Maynard Goins and Cora McNeely Goins September 18, 1923.

Myrtle Goins, daughter of Horace Maynard Goins and Cora McNeely Goins, was born about 1924. She died October 10, 1962 and was buried in Victory Cemetery.

Charles Goins, son of Horace Maynard Goins and Cora McNeely Goins, was born about 1926. He died September 12, 1987 and was buried in Victory Cemetery.

Myria Goins, daughter of Horace Maynard Goins and Cora McNeely Goins, was born about 1927. She died December 14, 1987 and was buried in Woodlawn Cemetery.

A daughter was born to Horace Maynard Goins and Cora McNeely Goins about 1929.

James Edward Goins, son of Enos H. Goins and Elizabeth “Betty” Ballard Goins, was born in May 1884 in Campbell County. He was enumerated in the 1920 census of Knox County, Tennessee, according to Ethel Louise Goins Dunn. He died in 1961 in Knox County, Tennessee.

Birdie Goins, daughter of Enos H. Goins and Elizabeth “Betty” Ballard Goins, was born August 10, 1886. She was married about 1906 to James Nelson. She died September 29, 1972 and was buried in Victory Cemetery.

William Whit Goins, son of Enos H. Goins and Elizabeth “Betty” Ballard Goins, was born December 16, 1888. He was married about 1911 to Mary Ann Miller. He died February 21, 1956 and was buried in Victory Cemetery. Children born to William Whit Goins and Mary Ann Miller Goins are unknown.

Rosa Goins, daughter of Enos H. Goins and Elizabeth “Betty” Ballard Goins, was born November 28, 1891. She was married about 1910 to Millard Chapman. She died July 2, 1991, at the age of 99, and was buried in Victory Cemetery.

Kelly Goins, son of Enos H. Goins and Elizabeth “Betty” Ballard Goins, was born April 21, 1894. He was married about 1918, wife’s name Mary Pearl. He died February 26, 1980. Children born to Kelly Goins and Mary Pearl Goins are unknown.

Hattie Goins, daughter of Enos H. Goins and Elizabeth “Betty” Ballard Goins, was born in February 1898. She was married about 1918 to Thomas E. McNeely. She died in 1978 and was buried in Campbell Memorial Gardens.

==O==
Wheeler George Goins, was born June 1, 1906 at Jellico, Tennessee, according to the research of Donna Lee Goins. Wheeler George Goins stated that he was raised by his “Chapman grandparents.”

Horace Maynard Goins, Jr, son of John Goins and Ollie Myers Goins, was born about 1908. He was married about 1928 to Stella Mae Prater.

Children born to Horace Maynard Goins, Jr. and Stella Mae Prater Goins include:

Beverly Goins born about 1930

Beverly Goins, daughter of Horace Maynard Goins, Jr. and Stella Mae Prater Goins, was born about 1930. She was married about 1950 to R. C. Dalton who was born February 16, 1927.

Children born to them include:

Ricky Dalton born October 8, 1952
Gary Wayne Dalton born about 1955
==O==
Walter D. Goins was born January 17, 1896 and died March 19, 1958, according to his tombstone in Glade Springs Cemetery.
==O==
William F. Goins was born May 3, 1849 and died January 2, 1892, according to his tombstone in Glade Springs Cemetery.

CANNON COUNTY, TENNESSEE

Hardy Gowan Davenport was born in Cannon County December 28, 1856. He died there October 3, 1928.
==O==
Thomas Gaun was enumerated as the head of a household in the 1900 census of Cannon County, Enumeration District 27, page 7, 8th Civil District:

“Gaun, Thomas 27, born in TN, July 1872
Della 22, born in TN, in 1878
Lillie 3, born in TN, July 1896
Martha Ann 1, born in TN, September 1898”
==O==
On July 18, 1855 Laborn Goen was married to Artine Clark in Cannon County. Of Laborn Goen and Artine Clark Goen nothing more is known.
==O==
T. B. Goens was married to Emeline Cooper on February 13, 1860, according to the Cannon County marriage records. Of T. B. Goens and Emeline Cooper Goens nothing more is known.
==O==
John William Goins was born in 1910, parents and place unknown. He was married about 1933 to Estelle Lee Finley who was born to Benjamin Franklin Finley in 1909. John William Goins died in 1983 and was buried in Riverside Garden Cemetery in Cannon County. Estelle Lee Finley Goins died in 1995 and was buried beside here husband, according to Luther Kelly.
==O==
Antily Gowen, “white female,” lived with the family of Isaac Turner, 42 and his wife, Sarah B. Turner, 33 in Civil District 6, Cannon County in the census of 1870. Enumerated on July 1, 1870 with post office at Woodbury, Tennessee was:

“Gowen, Antily 30, born in TN
James 1, born in TN”
==O==
Elizabeth Gowen was enumerated as the head of a household in the 1860 census of Cannon County:

“Gowens, Elizabeth 42, born in TN
John 29, born in TN
Nancy 20, born in TN
Carter 18, born in TN
Sarah 16, born in TN
Columbus 6, born in TN”

Carter Gowen, white male, appeared in the 1870 census of Cannon County living in Civil District 10. His household, No. 6-6, post office at Woodbury, Tennessee, was enumerated Au­gust 3, 1870 as:

“Gowen, Carter 28, born in TN, illiterate, farm
laborer
Catherine 26, born in TN, illiterate
Columbus 9, born in TN
James 7, born in TN
Allie 1, born in TN”

The family of Carter Gowen appeared on June 21, 1880 in the federal census of Wilson County, Tennessee, adjoining Cannon County on the north, in Enumeration District 257, page 27, Civil District 14, Household 265-283 as:

“Gowen, Carter 31, farm laborer, born in TN, father
born in TN, mother born in NC,
illiterate
Catherine 43, born in TN, father born in TN,
mother born in TN, wife
Alice 12, daughter, born in TN, father
born in TN, mother born in TN
Thomas, 10, born in TN, father born in TN,
mother born in TN, son
William 7, born in TN, father born in TN,
mother born in TN
Colonel 4, son, born in TN, father born in
TN, mother born in TN
Hugh 2, son, born in TN, father born in
TN, mother born in TN

It is suggested that Carter Gowen had married a widow 12 years his senior and the Columbus Gowen and James Gowen were her sons by a previous marriage. The 1870 census taker had made a gallant allowance for her age when he recorded her as “26” because she was more likely 32 at that time. Columbus Gowen and James Gowen apparently had left the household before the 1880 census taker arrived.
==O==
Charity Gowen was married March 29, 1855 to Nathan Gowin, according to “Cannon County, Tennessee Marriages, 1838-1873” by Byron Sistler. Children born to Nathan Gowin and Charity Gowen Gowin are unknown.
==O==
Francis Gowen was enumerated as the head of a household in the 1880 census of Cannon County, Enumeration District 22, page 30, Fourth Civil District, listed as:

“Gowen, Francis 39, born in TN, father born in TN,
laborer
Sarah 37, born in TN, father born in TN,
mother born in TN, wife
William 10, born in TN, father born in TN,
mother born in TN
Samuel 8, born in TN, father born in TN,
mother born in TN
Charley 6, born in TN, father born in TN,
mother born in TN
Andrew 4, born in TN, father born in TN,
mother born in TN
Lavada 7/12, born in TN, father born in TN,
mother born in TN”

Jamie Armitage of Indianapolis, Indiana advised April 17, 1996 that “Andrew Goins of Woodbury, Tennessee” was married in Tennessee to Ella Moore about 1910. She stated that he abandoned his family in 1921 after the death of his wife, Ella Moore Goins.

Children born to Andrew Goins and Ella Moore Goins include:

Minnie Goins born about 1912
Jim Goins born about 1914
Deland Goins born about 1916
Cecil Goins born about 1919
==O==
H. N. Gowen was married January 7, 1873 to A. E. Brown, ac­cording to “Cannon County, Tennessee Marriages, 1838-1873.” Children born to H. N. Gowen and A. E. Brown Gowen are unknown.
==O==
Hueston Gowen, was enumerated as the head of a household in the 1880 census of Cannon County, Enumeration District 23, page 9, Fifth Civil District as the head of a household composed of:

“Gowen, Hueston 31, born in TN, father born in TN,
mother born in TN, farmer
Mary A. 29, born in TN, father born in TN,
mother born in TN, wife
William I. 6, born in TN, father born in TN,
mother born in TN
Stephen A. 1, born in TN, father born in TN,
mother born in TN”
==O==
J. M. Gowen was enumerated as the head of a household in the 1850 census of Cannon County, Household 58-702:

“Gowen, J. M. 26, born in TN
E. T. 19, born in TN
W. D. 2, born in TN”

On March 29, 1855 a double wedding was recorded in the marriage records of the county when John Gowen was married to Rhoda Gowen and Nathan Gowen was married to Charity Gowen. The weddings, apparently of cousins, were performed by Abram Hathaway. “Roda Goins” was married to John Crawford on September 12, 1866, according to Cannon County marriage records.
==O==
Julia Y. Gowen was married to Nicholas C. Tilford, according to “Campbell County, Tennessee Marriages, 1830-1850.”
==O==
Nancy J. Gowen was shown in the 1870 census of Cannon County as a servant in the household of Jesse H. Gilley, according to the research of Thomas Mason Gowen of Winchester, Tennessee.
==O==
Parlee Gowens, white female, age 10, a domestic servant, illiterate, born in Tennessee was living in Household 154-165, Civil District 10, Cannon County on August 11, 1870 in the Household of Gabriel Keaton, age 34 and his wife Mary A. Keaton, age 38, according to the 1870 census.
==O==
Sarah Gowens was married October 15, 1864 to Richard Bowlin, according to Cannon County marriage records.
==O==
Thomas Goings appeared in Cannon County in its early days. The Commissioners Court Minutes refers to a road “built to the land of Thomas Goings now supposed to belong to the heirs of “Thomas Hopkins.”
==O==
A negro family headed by William Goowin was listed in the 1870 census of Cannon County, Civil District 4, postoffice Woodbury, Tennessee July 26, 1870. They were listed as:

“Goowin, William 28, born in TN, farmer, $300 per­
sonal property, illiterate
Clarat 32, born in TN, illiterate
Cynthia 12, born in TN, illiterate, idiot
Malinda 10, born in TN
Texas A. 6, female, born in TN
Tireland 2, male, born in TN
Angeline 1, born in TN”
==O==
Lillie Gowan, “age 13, born in July 1886 in TN, was enumer­ated in the 1900 census of Cannon County, Enumeration District 23, page 13 as the “servant of” Joseph E. Bailey.
==O==
A license was issued March 29, 1855 for the marriage of John Gowin to Miss Rhoda Gowin. No return was made of the li­cense.
==O==
Espey Ray McGowan, white male, was born November 20, 1897 in Cannon County to Oulis McGowan and Ada Moore McGowan, according to Cannon County Delayed Birth records.

CARROLL COUNTY, TENNESSEE

Ava Allen Gowan died in 1910 in Carroll County according to “Tennessee Deaths,” Death Record No. 6263.
==O==
Miss M. A. Gowan was married to George F. Wood January 6, 1874 in Carroll County. He was born about 1854 to George Wood and Mary Rollins Wood.
==O==
Miss M. J. Gowan was married to J. T. Turner February 18, 1873 in Carroll County.
==O==
William A. Gowan, “age 19, born in May 1881 in Tennessee,” was enumerated in the 1900 census of Carroll County, Enumeration District 122, page 13, as a “servant of Enoch G. Poe.”
==O==
William G. Gowan was married January 14, 1839 to Evaline Wood, according to “Carroll County, Tennessee Marriages, 1831-1880.”
==O==
David C. Gowen was married October 26, 1854 to Priscilla H. Fuller, according to “Carroll County, Tennessee Marriages, 1831-1880.” Children born to David C. Gowen and Priscilla H. Fuller Gowen are unknown.
==O==
Lillie Gowen, “age 24, born in December 1875 in South Car­olina” and “Margurite Gowen, “age 6, born in March 1894 in Indiana” were recorded as lodgers with Susan Ellen Fryer in the 1900 census of Carroll County, Enumeration District 138, page 8.
==O==
Mary F. Gowen was married to J. C. C. Thompson February 14, 1865, marriage license given on February 12, 1865, in Carroll County, according to “Early West Tennessee Marriages” by Byron and Barbara Sistler.
==O==
A negro, William Gowin, age 18, a servant born in Tennessee, whose parents were born in Tennessee, was living in the household of Mary A. Johnson in the 1880 census of Car­roll County, Enumeration District 18, page 5.

CARTER COUNTY, TENNESSEE

William G. Goowin, “age 16, born in October 1883 in Ten­nessee” and Martha A. Goowin, “age 13, born in February 1888 in Tennessee,” were enumerated in the 1900 census of Carter County, Enumeration District 126, page 8, living in the home of their grandmother, Emily Corden.
==O==
Rhoda Gowen, “mulatto” [possibly Melungeon] was listed as the head of a household in the 1880 census of Carter County, Enumeration District 257, page 25, Civil District 14, House­hold 241-257 enumerated as:

“Gowen, Rhoda 45, born in TN, father born in TN,
mother born in TN, mulatto,
illiterate, washerwoman
Nathan 20, born in TN, father born in TN,
mother born in TN, illiterate, son
Mary 18, born in TN, father born in TN,
mother born in TN, daughter,
illiterate
Lois 16, born in TN, father born in TN,
mother born in TN, son, illiterate
Stanford 5, born in TN, father born in TN,
mother born in TN, son
Emily J. 3, born in TN, father born in TN,
mother born in TN, daughter”

CHEATHAM COUNTY, TENNESSEE

Maude Geneva Goins, 86, formerly of Pleasant View, Tennessee passed away Saturday, April 13, 2002 at the Baptist Convalescent Center, Newport, Tennessee. She was the widow of William Goins. Interment was in the Pleasant View Cemetery by Cox & Son Funeral Home.

110 Davidson Co, TN

DAVIDSON COUNTY, TENNESSEE

Apparently William Gowen became attracted to the new settlement in Tennessee along the Cumberland River. Glowing reports were coming back about the fertility of the land and the opportunities the new area offered. It is believed that he was influenced there primarily by his son-in-law, Capt. John Rains who had been there at the invitation of Capt. James Robertson, founder of Nashville. Cleve Weathers, a descendant of Nashville, wrote that Capt. John Rains was pointed toward Harrodsburg, Kentucky until his meeting with James Robertson.

Since the area at that time was part of the state of North Carolina and since William Gowen may have served in the militia of that state, he felt assured of receiving a land grant there. Frank Maxwell Gowen, family researcher of Phoenix, wrote that he was accompanied in the move to Tennessee by his sons, William Gowen, John Gowen and James H. Gowen

Settlers living along the Watauga River in December 1787, af­ter the star-crossed Free State of Franklin adventure in 1784, signed a petition addressed to the General Assembly of North Carolina requesting a separate state for Tennessee. Signors included “William Goings,” Samuel Cox and Robert McCall.

It is believed that William Gowen arrived in Davidson County in the winter of 1779 under the guidance of Capt. John Rains. Since the Buchanan-Mulherrin party also arrived in Nashville in the winter of 1779, it is possible that the two parties traveled together. The estate of John Buchanan was inventoried October 4, 1787 by James Mulherrin and John Buchanan, administrators.

In 1788 counterfeit money began to appear in Nashville, and the county court appointed inspectors to begin to search for the source of the bogus money.

The Gowen men entered Davidson County at a time when it was constantly beset with Indian attacks from the Chickasaw, the Creek and the Chickamauga tribes.

On May 13, 1780 William Gowen was one of the signors of the Cumberland Compact Articles of Government. The document was signed by 255 men who lived in the five stations along the Cumberland River at that time. “John Cowan” also signed the document.

Fierce Indian fighting raged around the new settlements on the Cumberland, and David Gowen, regarded as an associate of William Gowen, was killed in 1780 in an attack on Mansker’s Station. There are two possible locations for Mansker’s Station. Mansker’s Station is now a historical spot near Goodletsville, Tennessee. Patrick Quigley was killed along with David Gowen.

Casper Mansker, a German long hunter from Pennsylvania, had built the fort called Mansker’s Station in 1779. He was the son of Ludwig Maintzger, an emigrant from Baden-Wurt-temburg, and was born on a ship crossing the Atlantic in 1749, according to the Mansker Website on the Internet. Ludwig Maintzger, a Revolutionary soldier was killed November 24, 1776 near Coryell’s Ferry, Pennsylvania.

Kasper Mansker first arrived in Middle Tennessee in 1769 with a hunting party, according to Walter T. Durham in “Kasper Mansker: Cumberland Frontiersman.” He was mentioned in Work Progress Administration’s “Writer’s Guide to Tennessee” published in 1931:

“Mansker became known for his Indian-fighting ability and later was made a major in the State Militia. That Mansker was an effective fighter is shown in a letter Andrew Jackson wrote to the Chickasaw [Indians] in 1812 when he was seeking their aid. ‘Do you remember, Jackson asked, ‘when the whole Creek Nation came to destroy your towns that a few hundred Chickasaws aided by a few whites chased them back to their nation, killing the best of their warriors and covering the rest with shame.’ The ‘few whites’ Jackson referred to were led by Mansker.

It was to Masker’s small, stoutly built house here that Col. John Donelson brought his family after his epic water trip on the adventure from the Watauga Settlement to Nashville. Mansker took the whole family in.”

When Sumner County was created in 1786 by partitioning Davidson County, Mansker’s Creek was chosen as the boundary line. Mansker’s Fort on the east bank was then located in Sumner County. At age 60, Kasper Mansker took part in the Nickajack Campaign. In 1795, he led the white troops which joined the Chickasaws to route the Creek attackers. Mansker borrowed a small swivel cannon which had been used by the defenders of Buchanan’s Station in 1792 to repulse the Indians. When it was fired, the Creek went home to stay, according to Durham. He wrote:

“Kasper Mansker and his great nephew Lewis Mansker enlisted in Capt. William Martin’s company of Col. Thomas Williamson’s Second Regiment of Tennessee Volunteer Mounted Gunmen. They joined Gen. John Coffee’s Brigade near New Orleans and participated in the Battle of New Orleans.”

Kasper Mansker died in 1820 and was regarded as a great soldier and a great patriot by his Middle Tennessee comrades. He was one of the first to sign the Cumberland Compact.

The Compact read:

“ARTICLES OF AGREEMENT

or Compact of Government entered into by settlers on the Cumberland river, 1st May, 1780.

[The first page is lost, and the second and third are torn and defaced.]

…..priority of right shall be determined as soon [as]……… veniently may be, in the following manner……………………. Say; The free men of this Country over the age………………..one Years shall immediately or as soon as may……………….proceed to elect and choose twelve Conscientious and de……….persons, from or out of the different Stations. That is………say, from Nashborough three, from Gaspers two, ………………. Bledsoes one, Ashers one, stones River one, …………………. Freelands one, Eatons two, Fort Union one…………………… Which said persons or a majority of them, after being bound by the solemnity of an Oath to do equal and impartial Justice between all contending parties, according to the ……….. of their skill and Judgment, having due……………. to the Regulations of the Lan………………………………. shall be competent Judge …………………………………. hearing the Allegations ………………………………….. Wittnesses as to the facts …………………………………. as to the truth of the fa…………………………………… decide the controversie, an………………………………… entitled to an entry for such………………………………. said determination or decision …………………………….. and conclusive, against the futu……………………………. partie, against whom such Judg…………………………….. and the Entry Taker shall make a………………………….. his Book accordingly and the Entry ……… ing partie so cast shall be, …………if it had never been made, and the Land in dispute………. to the person in whose favour such Judgment shall in case of the death removal, or absence of any of the Judges so to be chosen, or their refusing to act, the Station to which such person or persons belong or was chosen from, shall proceed to Elect another or others in his or their stead, which person or persons so chosen after being sworn as aforesaid to do equal and impartial Justice, shall have full power and, authority to proceed to business and act in all disputes respecting the premises as if they had been originally Ch………… at the first Election.

That the entry Book shall be kept fair and open by …………. be appointed by the said Richard Hender…………….try for Land numbered and dated ………………….ving any blank leaves or spaces ………………….on of the said twelve Judges ………………….

Times ………………. y persons have come to this Cou ………………….Husbandry, and from other ……………return without making a Crop, …………….this fall or early next spring ……………………… that all such should have the …………………of such places as they may have …………….. for the purpose of residence, therefore it is …………….be taken for all such, for as much as they are entitled to, from their Head rights, which said Lands shall be reserved for the particular person in whose in whose name they shall be entered, or their Heirs, provided such persons shall remove to this Coun­try and take possession of the respective place or piece of Land so chosen or entered, or shall send a labourer or labourers and a white person in his or her stead to perform the same on or before the first day of May in the Year one thousand seven hundred and eighty one and also provided such Land so chosen and entered for, is not entered and claimed by some person who is an Inhabitant and shall raise a Crop of Corn the present Year at some Station or place convenient to the General settlement in this Country.

But it is fully to be understood, that those who are actually at this Time Inhabitants of this Country shall not be debar’d of their choice or claim on account of the right of any such absent or returning person or persons.

It is further proposed and agreed, that no claim or title to any Lands whatsoever shall be set up by any person in consequence of any Mark, or former improvement, unless the same be entered with the Entry Taker within Twenty Days from the date of this association and agreement; and that when any person hereafter shall mark or improve Land or Lands for himself such mark or improvement not shall avail him, or be deemed an evidence of prior right unless the same be entered with the Entry Taker in thirty days from the time of such mark or improvement, but no other person shall be entitled to such Land so as aforesaid to be reserved in consequence of any purchase, Gift or otherwise.

That if the Entry Taker to be appointed shall neglect or refuse to perform his duty or be found by the said Judges or a majority of them to have acted fraudulently to the prejudice of any person whatsoever, such Entry Taker shall be immediately removed from his office, and the Book taken out of his possession by the said Judges, untill another shall be appointed to act in his room.

That as often as the people in General are dissatisfied with the doings of the Judges or Triers, so to be chosen, they may call a new election at any of the said Stations and Elect others to act in their stead, having due respect to the number now agreed to be elected at each Station, which persons so to be chosen shall have the same power with those in whose room or place they are or may be chosen to act.

That as no consideration money for the Lands on Cumberland River within the claim of the said Richard Henderson and Company and which is the subject of this association, is demanded or expected by the said Company untill a satisfactory and indisputable Title can be made, so we think it reasonable and Just that the twenty six pounds thirteen shillings and four pence current money per hundred Acres, the price proposed by the said Richard Henderson shall be paid according to the value of money on the first Day of January last, being the time when the price was made public, and Settlement encouraged thereon by said Henderson, and the said Richard Henderson on his part does hereby agree that in case of the rise or appreciation of money from that an abatement shall be made in the sum according to its raised or appreciated value.

That when any person shall remove to this Country with intent to become an Inhabitant and depart this life, either by violence or in the natural way before he shall have performed the requisites necessary to obtain Lands, the Child or Children of such deceased person shall be entitled in his or her room to such quantity of Land as such person would have been entitled to in case he or she had have lived to obtain a grant in their own name. And if such death be occasioned by the Indians, the said Henderson doth promise and agree that the Child or Children shall have as much as amounts to their head rights gratis, Surveyors and other incidental Fees excepted.

And whereas from our remote situation and want of proper officers for the administration of Justice no regular procedure at Law can be had for the punishment of offences and attainment of right. It is therefore agreed that untill we can be relieved by Government from the many Evils and inconveniences arising therefrom, the Judges or triers to be appointed as before directed when qualified shall be and are hereby declared a proper Court or Jurisdiction for the recovery of any debt or damages or where the cause of action or complaint has arisen or hereafter shall commence, for any thing done or to be done among ourselves within this our settlement on Cumberland aforesaid or in our passage hither, where the Law of our Country could not be exercised or damages repaired any other way, That is to say, in all cases where the Damages or demand does or shall not exceed one hundred Dollars, any three of the said Judges or Triers shall be competent to make a Court and finally decide the matter in comtroversie, but if for a larger sum and either partie shall be dissatisfied with the Judgment or decision of such Court, they may have an appeal to the whole twelve Judges or triers in which case nine members shall be deemed a full Court, whose decision if seven agree in one opinion upon the matter in dispute shall be final and their Judgment carried into execution in such manner and by such person or persons as they may appoint, and the said Courts respectively shall have full power to Tax such Costs as they may think Just and reasonable to be levied or collected with the debt or damages so to be awarded.

And it is further agreed that a majority of the said Judges, Triers or General Arbitrators shall have power to punish in their discretion, having respect to the Laws of our Country, all offences against the peace misdemeanours and those Criminal or of a Capital nature, provided such Court does not proceed with execution so far as to effect Life or Member; and in case any should be brought before them, whose crime is or shall be dangerous to the State or for which the benefit of Clergy is taken away by Law and sufficient evidence or proof of the fact or facts can probably be made such Court or a majority of the Members shall and may Order and direct him, her or them to be safely bound and sent under a strong guard to the place where the offence was or shall be committed or where Legal trial of such offence can be had which shall accordingly be done, and the reasonable expense attending the discharge of this duty ascertained by the Court and paid by the Inhabitants in such proportion as shall be hereafter agreed on for that purpose.

That as this settlement is in its infancy, unknown to Government and not included within any County in North Carolina, the State to which it belongs so as to derive the advantages of those wholesome and salutary Laws for the protection and benefit of its Citizens, we find ourselves constrained from necessity to adopt this temporary method of restraining the licentious and supplying by unanimous consent the Blessings flowing from a Just and equitable Government, declaring and promising that no Action or Complaint shall be hereafter instituted or lodged in any Court of Record within this State or elsewhere for any thing done, or to be done in consequence of the proceedings of the said Judges or general arbitrators so to be chosen and established by this our Association.

That as the well being of this Country entirely depends under Divine providence on unanimity of sentiment and concurrence in measures, and as clashing and various Interests, passions, and opinions without being under some restraint will most certainly produce confusion, discord and allmost certain ruin, so we think it our duty to associate and hereby form ourselves into one society for the benefit of present and future settlers, and untill the full and proper exercise of the Laws of our Country can be in use and the powers of Government exerted among us, ùWe do most solemnly and sacredly declare and promise each other that we will faithfully and punctually adhere to, perform, and abide by this our Association and will at all times if need be, compel by our united force a due obedience to these our Rules and Regulations.

In Testimony whereof we have hereunto subscribed our names in token of our entire approbation of the measures adopted.

The following or additional resolutions and farther association was also entered into at Nashborough this thirteenth Day of May 1780 To wit:

That all Young Men over the age of sixteen Years and able to perform militia duty shall be considered as having a full right to enter for and obtain Lands in their own name as if they were of full age, and in that case not be reckoned in the Family of his Father Mother or Master so as to avail them of any Land on their account.

That where any person shall mark or improve Land or Lands with intent to set up a claim thereto, such person shall write or mark in Legible characters the Initial Letters of his name at least, together with the Day of the Month and Year on which he marked or improved the same at the spring or most notorious part of the Land on some convenient Tree, or other durable substance, in order to notifie his intentions to all such as may enquire or examine, and in case of dispute with respect to priority of right, proof of such transaction shall be made by the oath of some indifferent Witness or no advantage or benefit shall be derived from such mark or improvement, and in all cases where priority of mark or occupancy cannot be ascertained according to the regulations and prescriptions herein proposed and agreed to, the oldest or first Entry in the office to be opened in consequence of this Association shall have the preference and the lands granted accordingly.

lt is further proposed and agreed that the Entry office shall be opened at Nashborough on Friday the 19th of May [instant] and kept from thenceforward at the same place unless other-wise directed by any future Convention of the people in general or their representatives.

That the Entry Taker shall and may demand and receive twelve Dollars for each entry to be made in his Book in manner before directed, and shall give a certificate thereof if required, and also may take the same Fees for every Caveat or counter claim to any Lands before entered, and in all cases where a caveat is to be tried in manner before directed, the Entry Book shall be laid before the said Committee of Judges, Triers or General arbitrators for their inspection and information and their Judgment upon the matter in dispute fairly entered as before directed, which said Court or Committee is also to keep a fair and distinct Journal or minutes of all their proceedings as well as with respect to Lands as other matters which may come before them in consequence of these our resolutions.

[A caveat is a legal notice suspending a legal proceeding until a hearing is held.]

It is also firmly agreed and resolved that no Person shall be admitted to make an Entry for any Lands with the said Entry Taker or permitted to hold the same unless such person shall subscribe his name and conform to this our Association, confederacy and general agreement unless it be for persons who have returned home and are permitted to have lands reserved for their use untill the first day of May next, in which case entries may be made for such absent Persons according to the True meaning of this writing without their personal presence, but shall become utterly void, if the particular person or persons for whom such entry shall be made should refuse or neglect to perform the same as soon as conveniently may be after their return, and before the said first day of May in the Year 1781.

Whereas the frequent and dangerous incursions of the Indians and allmost daily massacre of some of our Inhabitants renders it absolutely necessary for our safety and defence that due obedience be paid to our respective officers elected and to be elected at the several Stations or settlements to take command of the Men or Militia at such Fort or Station. It is further agreed and resolved that when it shall be adjudged necessary and expedient by such Commanding Officer, to draw out the Militia of any fort or Station to pursue or repulse the Enemy the said Officer shall have power to call out such and so many of his Men as he may Judge necessary, and in case of disobedience may inflict such fine as he in his discretion shall think Just and reasonable, and also may impress the Horse or Horses of any person or persons whomsoever, which if lost or damaged in such service shall be paid for by the Inhabitants of such Fort or Station in such manner and such proportion as the Committee hereby appointed or a majority of them shall direct and order; but if any person shall be agrieved or think himself unjustly used and injured by the fine or fines so imposed by his official Officers, such Person may appeal to the said Judges or Committee of General Arbitrators who, or a majority of them shall have power to examine the matter fully and make such order thereon as they may think Just and reasonable, which decisions shall be conclusive on the partie complaining as well as the Officer or Officers inflicting such fine, and the money arising from such fines shall be carefully applied for the benefit of such Fort or Station in such manner as the said Arbitrators shall hereafter direct.

It is lastly agreed and firmly resolved, that a dutiful and humble address or Petition be presented by some Person or Persons to be chosen by the Inhabitants to the General Assembly, giving the fullest assurance of the fidelity and attachment to the Interest of our Country and obedience to the Laws and constitution thereof: setting forth that we are confident that our settlement is not within the bounds of any Nation or Tribe of Indians, as some of us know and all believe, that they have fairly sold and received satisfaction for the lands or Territories whereon we reside and therefore hope we may not be considered as acting against the laws of our Country or the mandates of Government. That we do not desire to be exempt from the ratable share of the public expense of the present war or other contingent charges of Government.

That we are from our remote situation utterly destitute of the benefit of the Laws of our Country, and exposed to the depredations of the Indians without any Justifiable or effectual means of embodying our Militia or defending ourselves against the hostile attempts of our enemy, praying and imploring the immediate aid and protection of Government by erecting a County to include our settlements, appointing proper Officers for the discharge of public duty, Taking into consideration our distressed situation with respect to the Indians, and granting such relief and assistance as in wisdom, Justice and humanity may be thought reasonable.

Nashborough 13th May 1780

The signatures were entered in the sequence in which the signatories appeared.

Richd. Henderson
Nathl. Hart
Wm. H. Moore
Samuel Phariss
Jno Donelson. C.
Kasper Mansker
John Caffery
Jno Blackemore Senr.
Jno. Blakemore Junr.
James Shaw
Sanyel Deson
Samuel Marten
James Buchanan
Solomon Turpin
Isaac Rentfro
Robert Cartwright
Hugh Rogan
Joseph Morton
William Woods
David Mitchell
David Shelton
Spill Coleman
Saml. McMurray
P. Henderson
Edward Bradley
Edwd Bradley
Jas. Bradley
Michael Stoner
Joseph Mosely
Henry Guthrie
Francis Armstrong
Robert Lucas
James Robertson
George Freland
James Freland
John Tucker
Peter Catron
Phillip Catron
Francis Catron
John Dunham
Isaac Johnson
Adon Kelar
Thos. Burgess
Wm. Burgess
William Green
Moses Webb
Abselom Thomson
John McVay
James Thomson
Charles Thomson
Robert Thomson
Martain Hardin
Elijah Thomson
Andrew Thomson
Wm. Leaton
Edward Thomelu
Isaac Drake
Jonathan Jening
Zachariah Green
Andrew Lucas
James [X] Patrick
Richd. Gross
John Drake
Daniel Turner
Timothy Terel
Isaac Lefever
Thomas Fletcher
Samuel Barton
James Ray
Thomas Denton
Thomas Hendricks
John Holloday
Frederick Stump
William Hood
John Boyd
Jacob Stump
Henry Hardin
Richard Stanton
Sampson Sawyers
John Hobson
Ralph Wilson
James Givens
Robert Givens
Jas. Harrod
James Buchanan Sr.
William Geioch
Saml. Shelton
John Gibson
Robert Espey
George Espey
William Gowen
John Wilson
James Espey
Michael Kimberlin
John Cowan [John Gowen?]
Francis Hodge
William Fleming
James Leeper
George Leeper
Daniel Mungle
Patrick McCutchan
Saml. McCutchan
Wm. Price
Henry Kerbey
Joseph jackson
Daniel Ragsdil
Michael Shaver
Samuel Willson
John Reid
Joseph Daugherty
George Daugherty
Chas. Cameron
W. Russell Junr.
Hugh Simpson
Samuel Moore
Joseph Denton
Arthur McAdoo
James McAdoo
Nathl. Henderson
John Evans
Wm. Bailey Smith
Peter Luney
Jon Luney
James Cain
Danl. Johnston
Danl. Jarrot
Jesse Maxey
Noah Hawthorn
Charles McCartney
John Anderson
Matthew Anderson
Wm. McWhorter
Bartnet Hainey
Richd. Sims
Titus Murray
James Hamilton
Henry Daugerty
Zach White
Burgess White
William Calley
James Ray
William Ray
Perley Grimes
Samuel White
Daniel Hogan
Thos. Hines
Robert Goodloe
Thos. W. Alston
Wm. Barret
Thomas Shannon
James Moore
Edward Moore
Richd Moore
Saml. Moore
Elijah Moore
John Moore
Demsey Moore
Andrew Ewin
Ebenezer Titus
Mark Roberson
John Montgomery
Charles Campbill
William Overall
John Turner
Nathaniel Overall
Patrick Quigley
Josias Gamble
Saml. Newell
Joseph Reid
David Maxwell
Thos. Jefriss
Joseph Dunnagin
John Phelps
Andrew Bushongs
Daniel Ragsdell
Jno. McMyrty
D. D. Williams
John McAdams
Samson Williams
Thomas Thompson
Martin King
Wm. Logan
John Allstead
Nicholas Counrod
Evin Evins
Jonathan Evins
Thomas Thomas
Joshua Thomas
David Rounsavall
Isaac Rounsavall
James Crocket
Andrew Crocket
Russell Gower
John Shannon
David Shannon
Jonathan Drake
Benjamin Drake
John Drake
Mereday Rains
Richd. Dodg
James Green
James Cooke
Daniel Johnston
Geo. Mines
George Green
WilIiam More
Jacob Cimberlin
Robert Dockerty
John Crow
William Summers
[Name undecipherable]
Ambs. Mauldin
Morton Mauldin
John Dukham
Archelaus Allaway
Samuel Hayes
Nathl. Hayes
Isaac Johnson
Thomas Edmeston
Ezekl. Norris
William Purnell
Wm. McMurrey
John Condry
Nicolas Tramal
Haydon Wells
Daniel Ratletf
John Callaway
John Pleak
Willis Pope
Silas Harlan
Hugh Leeper
Harmon Consellea
Humphrey Hogan
James Foster
Wm. Morris
Nathaniel Bidkew
A. Tatom
William Hinson
Edmund Newton
Jonathan Green
John Phillips
George Flynn
Daniel Jarrott
John Owens
James Freland
Thos. Molloy
Isaac Lindsey
Isaac Bledsoe
Jacob Castleman
George Power
James Lynn
Thomas Cox
Edward Lucas
Philip Alston
James Russell”

Brenda Gains Gulick wrote that the Indian warfare began in adjoining Sumner County in 1780. She wrote:

“In the month of June, two settlers by the names of Goin and Kennedy were clearing land between Mansker’s Station and Eaton’s Station. A party of Indians stole up behind some brush heaps the men were making, and when the later came near, they were fired upon and killed. The savages then rushed out, tore off the scalps of their victims and escaped unharmed into the surrounding forest.”

Sometimes they attacked alone, sometimes in concert. Davidson County was created May 17, 1783 out of the Cumberland District of North Carolina. Sumner County was created out of the eastern part of Davidson County January 6, 1787.

William Gowen was appointed to the Davidson County grand jury January 4, 1784.

The pre-emption of William Gowen was “located and entered” January 15, 1784 and surveyed by John Buchanan on March 16, 1785 in consequence of Warrant No. 116, according to Cleve Weathers. William paid the State of North Carolina £10 per 100 acres for the land which was recorded March 11, 1788 in Davidson County Deed Book A, page 161.

On January 2, 1786 “William Gowan” appeared on a Davidson County jury which tried Robert Espey “for profane swearing and Sabbath breaking,” according to Davidson County court minutes. Espey was acquitted.

“Ambrose Goins,” regarded as a kinsman of William Gowen appeared briefly in Davidson County in 1786. He must have been a resident there because he was summoned to serve on a jury panel in April 1786. The fierce Indian attacks on the Cumberland settlement may have prompted him to return east.

Col. James Robertson, leader of the Cumberland settlements, sought to put an end to the Indian attacks and planned an expedition against them in 1787. Learning from two friendly Chickasaws, one of whom was known as Toka, Col. Robertson determined to take the offensive in the war, according to Pollyanna Creekmore, eminent Tennessee history researcher.

“Taking two friendly Chickasaws as guides, he made a rapid march with 130 men and attacked the Indian stronghold at Coldwater [now Tuscumbia, Alabama].

The Indians were routed almost without resistance. The town was destroyed, and a large store of goods were captured. Other campaigns against the Indians were undertaken. One, led by Capt. David Hays, was successful, although some of his soldiers were killed. On another occasion Capt. John Rains raised a force of 60 men and successfully attacked the Chickasaws.”

Irene M. Griffey writing in “The Preemptors: Middle Ten­nessee’s First Settlers,” Volume 1 included a list of 272 men who fought the Indians during this period. The list included James Maxwell, Beal Bosley, Elijah Robertson, Fuller Cox, John Cox, Enos Cox, Capt. John Rains, Jacob Donelson, Capt. David Hay, Moses Shelby and Frederick Stump.

The payroll records of the men in these expeditions were mixed with indexes of Revolutionary Army Accounts in Raleigh, North Carolina, causing many researchers to conclude that these men had Revolutionary service. Irene M. Griffey pointed out that the Tennessee militiamen were issued certificates documenting their service against the Indians.

“Certificates Nos. 1 through 469 were “for Mil. serv. p’formed in Davidson;” 470-559 were “for Service Perform’d in Sumner Co.” Beginning with No. 570 [Joseph Martin] through 1422 [John McLellin] are payments for “Service p’formed agst. Chicamoga Indians.”

It is possible that the wives remained in Kentucky with the mi­nor children during the homesteading period of the Gowens in Middle Tennessee. The Indian menace was very real, and many settlers there elected to pull back. Conditions were very primitive in Davidson County, North Carolina when William Gowen arrived. There were no courts and no law enforcement officers. James Shaw was selected as the first justice of the peace in 1781, according to the minutes of Davidson County Court records:

“On October 13, 1792, personally came Julius Sanders & Samuel Frelen and declared on oath that about 1781, people then resident in Nashborough made choice of James Shaw to supply the place of Justice of Peace in marrying people, there being neither Gospel Minister nor Justice of the Peace legally commissioned amongst us, courts of justice not being then established here.”

The name of Ft. Nashborough was changed to Nashville July 7, 1784 by Davidson County Court. The county court established some price controls they felt were equitable in the new frontier settlement. Ferry keepers fees were regulated as:

“Man & horse 6 pence
Man or horse 3 pence
Black cattle 2d per head
Sheep & hogs 1d per head”

Tavern keepers were also regulated by the court:

“Breakfast 1 shilling
Dinner 2 shillings
Supper 1 shilling
Whiskey ½ pint 6 shillings
Good bed, 1 night` 2 d”

John Boyd was £10.2 by the court January 9, 1789 “for plastering the inside of the courthouse, with extra services.”

William Gowen is believed to be first among the Gowen family members to settle in the area of Ft. Nashborough [originally called French Lick]. He received Preemption Claim No. 27 to “two acres on a small branch of Mill Creek,” according to “North Carolina Land Grants in Tennessee,” by Lilliam Johnson Gardiner and Betty Goff Cook Cartwright. A preemption claim indicated actual residence.

“William Gowan” received North Carolina Land Grant No. 20 on Warrant No. 116 to “640 acres on a small branch of Mill Creek” in Davidson County April 17, 1786, according to Tennessee State Land Book C7, page 8 in Tennessee State Archives. His deed was recorded March 11, 1788 in Davidson County Deed Book A, page 161. The property was described in the deed as:

“640 acres on the east side of Mill Creek . . . beginning at a hickory on Ebenezer Titus’ east boundary line and running east 320 poles to an oak, south 320 poles to a white oak, west crossing a branch of Mill Creek at 160 poles and another at 266 poles, cornered at 320 poles, north to the beginning . . . ”

The land, “320 poles [1 mile] square” lay on both sides of a tributary of Mill Creek and was located about six miles south­east of present-day downtown Nashville. The Murphreesboro Pike later crossed the northern portion of his property. The Central Tennessee State Hospital for the Insane was built on his property before the Civil War and the Metropolitan Nashville Airport was later installed on the preemption.

“David Goin, Patrick Quigley, Betsy Kennedy, John Shockley, James Lumsley and William Neely” were killed at Mansker’s Station, according to “Early Times in Middle Tennessee” published in 1857 by John Carr.

On March 4, 1783, “William Goings entered into bond in Davidson County with James Shaw, security, in the amount of £200 specie” and was granted the administration of “the estate of David Goings, deceased” by the Nashville Committee. William Gowen signed the return of the estate of David Gowen presented to the court. Shortly afterwards “William Gowens” as administrator of the estate of “David Gowens, deceased” sued John Gibson in a “plea of detinue*.”

Worth S. Ray, writing in “Tennessee Cousins” stated, “The court of the Cumberland District met again of June 3, 1783, and the Estate of David Gowen came up against John Gibson.” The estate was awarded £2 “for a heifer he disposed of,” according to early Nashville court records.

William Gowen was listed as a grand juror October 7, 1783 on the first grand jury panel in Davidson County and again in January 1784, according to “First Records of Davidson County, Tennessee.” Davidson County, at the time, embraced all of the present counties of Davidson, Cheatham, Williamson, Rutherford, Maury, Marshall and Bedford Counties.

William Overall was granted letters of administration on the estate of Patrick Quigley July 6, 1784, according to “David-son County, Tennessee County Court Minutes, 1783-1792.” by Carol Wells. Overall filed suit against “the heirs of Patrick Quigley” in County Court April 5, 1785. On July 5, 1785 when the “heirs made default,” Overall was awarded by the court “£14:10:8” and the sheriff was ordered to sell the Quigley land “to satisfy debt.”

William Gowen sold to Frederick Stump “one negro fellow named Guy” according to a bill of sale dated December 19, 1785 recorded in Davidson County Will Book 1, page 161.

Frederick Stump was a persona non grata in Pennsylvania where Gov. John Penn had issued a proclamation September 23, 1766 in Philadelphia that “Frederick Stump, a German was not authorized to settle upon land near Ft. Augusta. In January 1768 Frederick Stump and John Ironcutter were jailed in Cum­berland County, Pennsylvania “for killing 10 Indians.” In con­trast, Frederick Stump was welcomed on the Tennessee frontier where his Indian-slaying abilities were greatly appreciated. He and his son, Frederick Stump, Jr. were prominent in the community and frequently served as jurors and public office holders.

William Gowen was selected as a juror January 2, 1786 and again October 3, 1787, according to early Nashville Court records. On the latter date, the Court minutes reflected the seriousness of the Indian threat by bringing in regular troops, “For the better furnishing of the troops now coming to this county under command of Maj. Evans, Resolved that one-fourth of the County tax be paid in corn, two-fourths in beef, pork, bear and venison, one-eighth in salt and one-eighth in money to defray expenses of removing provisions from place of collection to troops.” Ten collection points, “including Maj. Buchanan’s” were established.

The Davidson County Court Minute Book records that “William Gowens” sued the heirs of “David Gowens” in the January, 1788 session of court. The defendants, unnamed, did not appear in court, and the court awarded to the plaintiff “£7:14:3 in damages.” A writ of attachment [legal means of seizure] was granted by the court to William Gowen October 9, 1788, and the sheriff was ordered to sell the land. It is likely that there were no “defendants” to appear, and the suit was merely a formality to satisfy the requirements of the law.

On March 11, 1788, William Gowen received his title from the State of North Carolina to his 640-acre land grant, according to Davidson County Deed Book A, page 161. “William Gowens” appeared as a juror for the last time October 7, 1788. Shortly afterward, a new lawyer, Andrew Jackson, Esquire “produced his license to practice law in the several county courts of the state and took oath” January 5, 1789.

On the following day, “Gowen, appellant” vs. “Boyd, ap­peallee” was heard, and “the jury finds for the appeallee, £7:4:4 with cost, judgment accordingly.” On the same date, the “jury finds for the plaintiff in Murdock [plaintiff] vs. Gowens.”

Sometime before 1790 William Gowen witnessed a bill of sale of a negro girl, age 12, price £150 pounds, according to Davidson County Will Book 1, page 90. As late as 1789, the county was still referred to as Davidson County, North Carolina. It is believed that a slave named Guy accompanied William Gowen in his move to Tennessee. Steve Rogers of the Tennessee Historical Commission found evidence that Guy lived in a small slave cabin adjacent to the home of William Gowen.

It is possible that the household of William Gowen may have been included in the enumeration of the 1790 census of North Carolina, but to date, it has not been documented. The first census did not have the value to genealogists that later enumerations had.

Patricia Law Hatcher, CG, FASG, had an accurate appraisal of the 1790 census:

“The 1790 census [which was not completed until 1791 in some areas] provides less information than any other. We have only the name of the head of household and counts for free white males 16 and over; free white males under 16; free white females; other free persons; and slaves. The canvassing, which covered residents in 17 present-day states, found 3,929,214 persons–almost 18 percent of them enslaved–in approximately 540,000 households [about seven persons per household].

Because the enumerator was paid $1 for every 150 persons enumerated [half that rate in cities], and because the enumeration established each state’s representation in Congress, there was incentive on both sides for a complete enumeration.

The schedules for Delaware, Georgia, Kentucky, New Jersey, Tennessee, and Virginia were casualties of the British burning of the Capitol during the War of 1812. These schedules contained about 30 percent of the total enumerations.. Substitutes have been constructed, primarily from tax lists, but they lack the household figures.”

William Gowen died in Davidson County sometime before July 1790 at about age 70. Harriette Simpson Arnow, writing in “Flowering of the Cumberland,” states that William Gowen was “killed,” suggesting that he, too, was a victim of the Indians.

Cleve Weathers wrote, “The uncertainties of life in the Mero District are partially reflected in an account by Harriette Simpson Arnow, in a section of her book dealing with Indian war-fare and the role of women. From “Flowering of the Cumberland,” published by The Macmillan Company, 1963, page 31:

‘Around two-thirds of the wives of the original settlers were widowed before the ending of the Indian Wars in Middle Tennessee in 1795. Numerous others, settling later–Mesdames Anthony and Isaac Bledsoe, Edwin Hickman, Jacob Castleman, John Donelson, Sr., Henry Rutherford, William Ramsey, to name only a few, were also widowed.’”

On July 13, 1790, apparently after the death of William Gowen, Andrew Ewing acknowledged before the County Court that William Gowen had indeed executed a bill of sale [probably] for “one Negro fellow named Guy” to Frederick Stump, according to the Court minutes.

On January 10, 1791 David Hay, justice of the Davidson County Court headed his court minutes with “Territory of the United States South of the River Ohio.”

It is believed that the property of William Gowen adjoined that of James Buchanan. Buchanan’s Station was built by James Buchanan to protect against the Indians and especially to defend the grist mill that had been constructed on Mill Creek. The Buchanan Cemetery is now located near the intersection of Elm Hill Pike and Briley Parkway within the city of Nashville. The Buchanan home, built about 1800, was still standing in 1978. Frank Maxwell Gowen visited the site in that year and wrote, “The cemetery is rather small, probably not over 75 graves, and it is located directly behind the old brick mansion which is quite large.”

On July 12, 1790 the County Court granted a court order to “Sarah Gowens” authorizing her to sell the estate of her hus­band. In Davidson County Will Book 1, page 168 Sarah Gowen, administrator of the estate of her husband, returned an inventory of the estate of “William Gowen deceased of David­son County, North Carolina” listing “one mare & colt, saddles, farm and carpenter’s tools, shoemaker tools, razor, guns, household goods, cotton cards, six pounds of powder, eight pounds of lead, eight dry cows, eight steers, ducks, hens, some money and bonds.”

In Davidson County Will Book 1, page 175, dated October 1790, Sarah Simpson Gowen returned into a court a total of the proceeds of the estate sale of William Gowen, “£597:11 for articles sold”–livestock, household goods and farm equipment. Until 1792, American currency was still based on the English system of pounds, shillings and pence.

Frank Maxwell Gowen made a copy of the estate sale of William Gowen in June 1976 while researching the family history in the Davidson County courthouse. The accounting was recorded as:

“An Inventory of the Sale of the Estate of William Gowens, Decd. as delivered into court October Term, 1790 by Sarah Gowens, Admx. of the estate of sd. Gowens Decd. Amounting on the sale to £597:11 shillings [two words illegible]:
Purchaser Item Price–Pounds:Shillings
======== ======== =====
John Hague One cow & calf 6:00
John Hague Two cows, one calf 16:15
Sarah Gowens One black & white steer 5:01
Sarah Gowens One small red steer 3:11
Sarah Gowens One red yearling heifer & calf 6:
Sarah Gowens One barren white faced cow 8:11
Sarah Gowens One small red bull 3:11
Sarah Gowens One two-year-old heifer 5:01
Samuel Deason One 3-year-old heifer & 2 bulls 8:15
Timothy Demumbre One-year bay colt 39:
Sarah Gowens One roan mare 16:
Sarah Gowens One gray horse 26:
Sarah Gowens One great plow 2:06
Sarah Gowens One shear & cotton 2:12
Sarah Gowens One pair of iron wedges 1:16
Sarah Gowens One axe 1:
Sarah Gowens One pair of doubletrees 1:
Sarah Gowens One auger 1:
Sarah Gowens One 3/4″ auger 1:14
Sarah Gowens One drawing knife 1:03
Robert Weakly One foot adze 1:14
Dan Hill One handsaw 18:
Nimrod Williams One cow & calf 6:15
Sarah Gowens One cow & calf 6:
Sarah Gowens One cow & calf 8:
Sarah Gowens One cow & calf [Illegible]
Sarah Gowens One cow & calf 6:
Sarah Gowens One steer 7:
Sarah Gowens One cow & calf 8:15
Sarah Gowens One cow & calf 8:08
Sarah Gowens One cow & calf 8:05
Sarah Gowens One cow & calf 8:11
Sarah Gowens One cow & calf 9:05
Sarah Gowens One steer 5:07
Sarah Gowens One steer 5:05
Sarah Gowens One steer 5:16
Sarah Gowens One barren cow 6:01
Francis Armstrong One cow & calf 6:10
George A. Sugg One red heifer 5:
Lardner Clark One cow & calf 6:08
Benjamin Barnes One cow & calf 7:10
George A. Sugg One yearling steer 3:10
George A. Sugg One cow & calf 6:06
George A. Sugg One steer 4:10
George A. Sugg One steer 5:12
George A. Sugg One cow & calf 6:
John Hague One cow & calf 10:06
James Bosley One cow & calf 6:10
James Bosley One barren cow 9:
Francis Armstrong One dark bull 4:06
William Anderson One cow & calf 8:
Sarah Gowens One woman’s saddle 1:
Sarah Gowens One man’s saddle 6:05
Sarah Gowens One pot 1:01
Sarah Gowens One pot & hooks 3:05
Sarah Gowens One Dutch oven 4:05
Sarah Gowens One pot rack 1:
Sarah Gowens One pair of steelyards [scales] 4:02
Sarah Gowens One grindstone 1:02
Sarah Gowens One smooth iron 0:08
Sarah Gowens Two snaffle bridles 1:09
Sarah Gowens One shotgun 2:01
Sarah Gowens One riffle gun 6:10
Bradley Gambrel One pair of spectacles 0:07
Timothy Demumbre One razor 0:24
George Augustus Sugg One pair of saddle bags 1:01
Lardner Clark One sow & pigs 3:06
Sarah Gowens Three chisels 1:01
Sarah Gowens One ax 1:03
Sarah Gowens One razor 1:10
Sarah Gowens One hoe 1:05
Sarah Gowens Two clevises 2:05
Sarah Gowens Two hoes 1:04
Sarah Gowens One cart 9:
Sarah Gowens One feather bed & furniture 20:
Sarah Gowens Two bedsteads 3:
Sarah Gowens One lot of spools 0:10
Benjamin Barnes One brod ax 2:01
Bobo Stovall One hatchet 0:18
Jonas Manifee One ax 1:03
Bradley Gambrel Two axes 2:02
Sarah Gowens Tanned leather 2:08
Sarah Gowens More tanned leather 1:01
Sarah Gowens Two tin kettles 1:06
Sarah Gowens Six pewter basins, 2 dishes,
6 plates 15:08
Sarah Gowens Seven tin cups & six spoons 0:19
Sarah Gowens One slate 0:20
Sarah Gowens Six lbs. powder & 8 lbs. of lead 6:
Sarah Gowens Seven 1/2 pt. bottles 0:09
Sarah Gowens Four water pails, 2 coolers,
2 churns, 5 chairs 2:02
Timothy Demumbre Tanned leather 1:12
John Hague Tanned leather 0:14
Jonas Manifee One tin strainer and 1 chair 0:05
Sarah Gowens One big wheel 0:10
Sarah Gowens One little wheel 0:07
Sarah Gowens One hogshead 0:08
Sarah Gowens Two bells 1:12
Sarah Gowens One sifter 0:08
Sarah Gowens One pr. cotton cards 1:
Sarah Gowens Two pair snuffers 0:04
Sarah Gowens Eighteen ducks 1:04
Sarah Gowens Two gimblets
[small augers] 0:03
Sarah Gowens Six curls 0:06
Sarah Gowens One pair nippers
& file 0:03
Sarah Gowens Ten barrows 30:11
Sarah Gowens Six sows & 14 shoats 16:01
Sarah Gowens One sow & 2 pigs [Illegible]
Jonas Manifee One hogshead 0:07
George A. Sugg Thirty hens 1:11
Hanson Williams One gimblett 0:01
Lardner Clark One barrow 3:05
John Hague Two sows & 15 pigs 5:12
John Hague Two sows & pigs 3:
George A. Sugg One sow 1:04
George A. Sugg One pied steer 5:09
Sarah Gowens One cow & calf 2:01
Sarah Gowens One cow & calf 6:
Sarah Gowens One cow & calf 5:
Sarah Gowens One cow & calf 3:
Sarah Gowens One yearling steer 0:20
Sarah Gowens One steer 3:
Sarah Gowens One steer 1:01
Sarah Gowens One grubbing hoe 0:20
Sarah Gowens One heading hoe 0:08
Sarah Gowens Six knives & 4 forks 0:06
Sarah Gowens Five lbs. cotton 0:20
Sarah Gowens Forty wt. flax 3:
Sampson Williams Hone & razor 1:15

The commissioners made return of a judgment obtained of Twenty-nine dollars due.”

On January 10, 1791 Davidson County was no longer part of North Carolina, and David Hay, Justice began to head the County Court minutes with “Davidson County, Territory of the United States, South of the River Ohio.”

The “widow Gower” and Alexander Gowan were listed in the inventory of the estate of Edwin Hickman, deceased among individuals indebted to the estate for “ferriages.”

Sarah Gowen appeared again in the Nashville Court Record, Entry No. 270 in connection with a sheriff’s sale May 6, 1793 in Nashville “by virtue of a writ of fiere facias” in the suit of Sarah Gowen against George A. Sugg and John Hague. The fiere facias was a writ of execution ordering a levy on goods to satisfy a judgment. Apparently the two had not made payment on goods purchased at the estate auction of William Gowen. By court order the sheriff, Sampson Williams, sold at auction a negro slave woman named “China” for £80:2 shillings to John & George M. Deadrick, Nashville merchants, and the debt was settled out of the proceeds.

The Indian attacks continued on the Nashville area until 1795 when James Robertson led a large group of militiamen to the present-day location of Chattanooga. Robertson’s forces destroyed the Indian town of Nickajack in reprisal, and the Indian threat to Nashville ceased. With the Indian threat removed, the population of Davidson County almost tripled during the next five years, according to “Nashville, 1780-1860” by Prof. Anita Shafer Goodstein. In the town of Nashville in 1800, there were still only 345 people, 191 white people and 154 non-whites.

Steve Rogers of the Tennessee Historical Commission wrote September 7, 1990 that an examination of Davidson County deed records showed that the land of William Gowen was sold off in three parts:

“A 240-acre portion of this land was sold in 1807 by James H. Gowen, a son, to Daniel Vaulx, Davidson County Deed Book G, page 199. A second tract of 200 acres was sold by William Gowen [William Gowen, Jr?] to John Gowen [John Jones Gowen?] in 1818, Davidson County Deed Book M, page 338. A third tract, an area that might be affected by plans to expand the Nashville airport, consisting of 200 acres that remained in the hands of the Gowen family until 1842. At that time Wilford Burleson Gowen sold it to Jesse Collins, Davidson County Deed Book 5, page 153. In this deed, Wilford Burleson Gowen reserved “an area of 5 square poles [1 pole = 16.5′] that . . . includes the family grave yard, the right of which is reserved in me and my representatives forever.’”

Graves of other individuals were also buried there after the State of Tennessee acquired the property in 1857 to be used as a mental hospital.”

The sale of land from Wilford Burleson Gowen to Jesse Collins ended the Gowens’ 56-year association with the land. Collins, born in England in 1794, continued a farming operation on the land. The 1850 agricultural census showed a well managed farming operation with 150 of his 200 acres under cultivation, producing 1,500 bushels of corn, 200 bushels of oats and 30 tons of hay. Collins employed nine slaves at that time. Additionally, the census showed Jesse Booth, a 26-year-old blacksmith, also from England and William McGregory, a laborer from Scotland living with Collins.

On January 1, 1852 Collins sold “the farm on which I now live” to Thomas B. Johnson for $10,300, according to Davidson County Deed Book 15, page 567. Johnson conveyed the 200 acres June 4, 1856 to his son, James P. Johnson. This deed repeated the reservation of the Gowen Cemetery of “25 poles square,” according to Davidson County Deed Book 26, page 234. Eight months after his father gave him the farm, James P. Johnson sold the 200-acre tract to the State of Tennessee and the Trustees of the Hospital for the Insane for $20,000, almost double the price paid for the land five years prior.

The present day Central State Hospital tract is situated on the western edge of William Gowen’s original preemption.

An unknown number of Gowen individuals were buried in the Gowen Cemetery. The possibility exists that this cemetery was later used by the state hospital to bury black inmates. Information from the Central State Hospital records, 1891-1934, indicate that a substantial number of blacks died and were buried on the hospital property. Information on the burials is contained in “Central State Hospital Records, Weekly Reports of Removals, Discharges and Deaths, 1916-1932” located in Box 9, Tennessee State Library and Archives. Further archival and archaeological investigation will be necessary to confirm this information.

The Tennessee Division of Archaeology prepared a research design for Metropolitan Nashville Airport Authority May 21, 1991. The report read:

“The Metropolitan Nashville Airport Authority [MNAA] is required to conduct Phase III data recovery excavations at 40DV401 [Area D], a National Register-eligible historic site that will be impacted by the extension and realignment of Runway 2C/20C at the Nashville International Airport. Site 40DV401 [Area D], also referred to as the Gowen Farmstead primarily contains the remains of an early to mid-19th century farmstead as well as a prehistoric Archaic period occupation.

Site 40DV401 was recorded as a result of a survey by the Tennessee Division of Archaeology of an approximate 300-acre tract to be acquired by the MNAA from the State of Tennessee [Smith 1991]. This tract, part of the Middle Tennessee Mental Health Institute, will be conveyed to MNAA for the extension and realignment of Nashville International Airport Runway 2C/20C across Murfreesboro Road.

The boundaries of site 40DV401 coincide with the original land grant of 640 acres made by the State of North Carolina to William Gowen on April 17, 1786. Most of the site encompasses highly dissected uplands with some gently sloping ridge tops. Mill Creek is the closest primary drainage, flowing approximately 0.5 km south of the southwest site boundary. Several large springs occur within the site area.

The 300 acres designated for acquisition by MNAA represent approximately the western half of the 40DV401 site boundary. The 300-acre tract was divided into six arbitrary “areas, A through F, by the Division of Archaeology during the survey. Two areas, A and D, were found to have intact cultural deposits dating to the 19th [and possibly 18th] century. Area D contains the remains of at least two early-to-mid-19th-century structures. Test units in this area revealed sections of intact limestone foundations, chimney falls and a probable interior root cellar. Documentary and artifactual evidence suggests Area D was a farmstead primarily occupied from about 1810 to 1860.

Area A contains a small cemetery near, and probably originally associated with the farmstead. The cemetery area includes a low stone block wall which surrounds three graves. Test investigations outside the stone wall identified at least eight additional burials. Unexcavated areas within the proposed cemetery boundaries are believed to contain 15 to 20 more graves, bringing the potential grave total to between 25 to 30. It is probable that the graves outside the stone block wall represent other family members, slaves associated with the farmstead and/or patients from nearby Mental Health Facility. Oral traditions at the institution report that the cemetery was used for African-American patients. There is a separate cemetery located on the current hospital grounds that was used for other patients.

Area D, the farmstead, is the only portion of site 40DV401 that is covered by this data recovery plan. Since the potential construction impact upon the cemetery area, Area A, has not been determined, possible grave removal and relocation will be handled as a separate archaeological project.

All historic cultural features, such as houses, outbuildings, privies, cellars, trash pits, etc, present in site 40DV401 Area D should be located and identified during data recovery.

A small amount of late 1700s-early 1800s artifactual material [ceramics] was recovered by the testing operations by the Division of Archaeology. Recovery of several Civil War period artifacts suggests a minor military component at the site. In December 1864, two blockhouses within several miles of the site were involved in significant battles.

Due to possible media and public interest in the data recovery excavations, occasional tours of the site may be planned. Since the excavation area is adjacent to an active construction zone, media and public requests to see the site should be coordinated with the construction project manager.

Upon completion and submission of the revised final report, the archaeological contractor [Garrow & Associates] will convey to the Tennessee Division of Archaeology all artifacts recovered during the data recovery investigations. The contractor will also furnish the Division of Archaeology all field notes, records and photographs associated with the project.

Any human burials, historic or prehistoric, encountered during the course of the investigation shall not be moved or disturbed without a court order. If human remains are encountered, all work in the immediate area should cease, the exposed remains covered and protected and MNAA and the Division of Archaeology notified at once.”

An article describing graves found during the construction was printed in the September 25, 1992 edition of the “Nashville Banner” on page 1.

“Burial Grounds Found at Airport

By Steve Majchrzak
Banner Staff Writer

Workers at the airport’s new runway construction project off Murfreesboro Road have stumbled across what state archaeologists believe may be the unmarked burial ground for up to 500 black former state mental patients.

State archaeologists say they believe the site was used as an unmarked cemetery for black patients who died while institutionalized at Middle Tennessee Mental Health Institute between 1859 and 1932.

The runway extension project crosses Murfreesboro Road onto the grounds of the hospital.

“We think this is where they buried patients who died when their families did not want to claim their bodies,” State Archaeologist Nick Fielder says.

“Based on the size of the area identified and compactness of the grave sites, we roughly estimate there are between 400 and 500 [graves].”

Fielder said the state has no record of the burial site. “We had defined a family plot in the area,” Fielder says. “But we had not known the patient part extended out as far as it did.”

The graves appear to be unmarked. If they had been, Fielder says, those markings have long since been “obliterated.”

The grave sites sit in the shadow of the 140-year-old Middle Tennessee Mental Health Institute–previously named the “Tennessee Insane Asylum” and later “Central State Psychiatric Hospital”–where acres of nearby land have been cleared to build a replacement general aviation runway over Murfreesboro Road.

A second cemetery, believed to be for white patients, was discovered near the facility across what is now Donelson Pike, several years ago and had some markings, Fielder says.

Fielder says hospital records indicate that between 1916 and 1932 some 137 black patients were buried on hospital grounds, but the documents do not indicate where. Earlier records were apparently destroyed when a tornado destroyed part of the facility at the turn of the century.

Hospital lore told of a mass burial ground for patients, but stories varied on the location of the site, Fielder says.

The land where the airport expansion is taking place was originally owned by William Gowen, one of Nashville’s original pioneers. The tract of land changed ownership several times until being bought by the state around 1850 for the hospital.

Gowen [heirs] maintained a clause in the deed that a small tract of the land would be maintained as a family cemetery forever.

Airport contractors were working near the previously identified family cemetery two weeks ago when they came upon several new burial sites while laying in a 24-inch storm water drainage pipe.

Work in the area ceased immediately after the discovery of 6 or 7 new grave sites. Airport Spokeswoman Beth Fortune says.

Airport officials went to Davidson County Chancery Court to get permission to remove the remains and rebury them else­where on the property, Fortune says.

In the meantime, however, state archaeologists had identified 50 additional gravesites and estimated there may be between 400 and 500 more graves in the immediate area.

Airport officials decided to abandon plans to remove the remains and redesigned their construction plans so as not to disturb the burial grounds, Fortune says.

The storm water drain will be rerouted and several navigational aids planned for the area will be repositioned, she adds. The path of the runway itself will not be altered.

Airport officials say they will erect a marker identifying the burial area when construction is complete. “What we plan to do when we get this all done is to have the area clearly marked and preserve the area in a more dignified way,” Fortune says.

A curious notation appeared in the minutes of the Davidson County Court April 13, 1795:

“Order sheriff to expose to sale 25 acres, being part of 110 acres lying on Mill Creek and now occupied by a Mrs. Cowan, to satisfy a judgment obtained by Sampson Williams against Isaac Wilcox for the sum of Six Dollars and costs.”

It is believed that Sarah Gowen died about 1806. Shortly afterward her son, James H. Gowen offered for sale his por-tion of the Gowen preemption.

William Gowen and Sarah [Simpson?] Gowen are regarded as the parents of:

John Gowen born about 1745
Christianna Gowen born about 1751
James H. Gowen born about 1752

John Gowen, son of William Gowen and Sarah Gowen was born about 1745. It is believed that he was married about 1770, wife’s name possibly “Jones.”

“John Going” who resided “between the Broad and Catawba Rivers,” was named as a petit juror in Camden District, South Carolina in 1778-1779, according to “Jury List of South Carolina, 1778-1779,” by GeLee Corley Hendrick and Morn McKoy Lindsey. John Gowen drew pay for militia duty May 23, 1785 in Camden District, Fairfield County, according to “Stub Entries to Indents,” Book 2, page 199. These volumes were compiled by A. S. Salley, former state historian of South Carolina.

“John Goin” was enumerated as the head of a household in the 1786 census of Fairfield County, page 20, according to “Heads of Families, South Carolina, 1790:”

“Goin, John white male, over 16
white female
white female
white male, under 16
white female

It is believed that he removed to Davidson County, Tennessee about 1790. “John McGown” was appointed to a road committee “to oversee the road from Nichols Ferry to where it joins the main road, Mansker’s Station to Heaton’s Station” January 12, 1792, according to Davidson County Court minutes.

“John Goyen, trusty and well-beloved friend of Daverson County, North Carolina [later Tennessee], gentleman” received the power of attorney of “Levi Goyen” of Fairfield County, South Carolina to sell 640 acres of land on Mill Creek in Davidson County September 17, 1792. He is regarded as a kinsman of Levi Gowen and his brother David Gowen whose land was inherited by Levi Gowen when David Gowen was killed by the Creek Indians in 1780.

According to Davidson County Land Book G-7, “640 acres on the east side of Mill Creek” were surveyed June 26, 1793 for John Gowen. William Gowen, his son, was a “chain carrier” on the surveying party which marked out the land.

John Gowen received on May 19, 1794 640 acres from the State of North Carolina on Warrant No. 350. The land lay on Mill Creek about one-half mile west of his father’s pre-emption site, between land grants of Ebenzer Titus. Cleve Weathers, a descendant of Nashville, identifies the section as the one which was issued to David Gowen who was killed in 1780 “in the settlement and defense of Nashville.”

The land was described in Davidson County Deed Book C, page 281:

“State of North Carolina to John Gowen . . . 640 acres on the East side of Mill Creek . . . beginning at a white walnut on the bank of Mill Creek, being the Northwest corner of James Meness’s guard right on the East boundary line of said Meness’ preemption, thence East 390 poles to a dogwood on Ebenezer Titus’s West boundary line, then north 340 poles to a hickory, thence West 164 poles to a sycamore on the bank of said creek, thence up said creek with its meanders 333 poles to a poplar on said Meness’s East boundary line, then South with said line to the beginning 120 poles.”

According to Steve Rogers, examination of the deed transactions of John Gowen suggest that he did not live on his land grant, but sold off various portions of it from 1798 to 1802, according to Deed Book D, page 378 and 416 and Deed Book E, page 173 and 357. It is assumed that John Gowen lived somewhere on his father’s preemption.

On September 19, 1795 “John Gowen of Davidson County” bought 1,920 acres of land “on the east side of Stone’s River on Spring Creek” at a sheriff’s sale.

John Gowen bought 81 acres on Stone’s River at a sheriff’s sale December 30, 1795, according to Davidson County Deed Book D, page 40. On August 5, 1803 he sold this plot for $40, according to Davidson County Deed Book F, page 462. Later in that year the land lay in the newly created Rutherford County.

John Gowen received a deed to 201 acres on Mill Creek De­cember 30, 1797 from Jonathan Phillips, according to Davidson County Deed Book D, page 388.

On May 12, 1798 John Gowen witnessed a bill of sale of “a negro wench named Judy” from Simon McClendon to John Blackman, according to Davidson County Will Book 1, page 148.

On Tuesday, July 15, 1806 “John Goine,” administrator of the estate of James Gay deceased. returned to the Williamson County Court an inventory of the estate, according to “Williamson County, Tennessee Court Minutes, 1808-1812,” page 4. On page 5 another entry reads, “Jno. Gayne, administrator returns inventory, chattels and credits of James Gay, dcsd.”

On Tuesday, October 14, 1806 a return was made to the court of the sale of the estate of Jay Gay, deceased. On October 17 additional items in the inventory of the estate of James Gay was returned to the court.

On December 18, 1806 “John Gowan of Davidson County” purchased from Elisha Prewitt 372 acres on Cripple Creek, land that originally granted to Samuel Pearson, according to Rutherford County Deed Book E, page 425. This land adjoined that of Joseph Gowen.

In December 1806 John Gowen bought from Elisha Prewitt 372 acres of land “beginning at Joseph Gowen’s northeast corner,” according to Rutherford County deed records. “Joseph Gowen, James F. Gowen and R. Howell” witnessed the transaction. On December 18, 1806 “John Gowan of Davidson County” completed the transaction, paying Elisha Prewitt $150 for the 372 acres of land located on “Cripple Creek of Stone’s River” which was a part of a tract of land originally granted to Samuel Pearson by the state of North Carolina, probably for military services. This transaction was recorded in Rutherford County Deed Book E, page 425. “Reed Howell, Joseph Gowen and James Gowen” again were witnesses. Joseph Gowen and his son, James F. Gowen are regarded as cousins to John Gowen.

It is believed that John Gowen assisted his brother, James H. Gowen who had apparently settled north of the Cumberland River, in selling his inheritance from their father. An advertisement offering to sell the northern 240 acres of the original pre-emption was inserted in a Nashville newspaper in its edition of December 13, 1806. The land was described as “containing 240 acres and lying on the main road from Nashville to Jefferson [early name of Murphreesboro] sold by James H. Gowen June 2, 1807 to Daniel Vaulx, a neighbor. Daniel Vaulx was a member of Capt. Belk’s militia in its muster of 1812. Other members of this militia company at that time were Lt. William Gowen, his brother, John Gowen and Charles Crutchfield.

Daniel Vaulx and his wife, Catherine Vaulx had sons by the names of Joseph Vaulx and James Vaulx. James Vaulx in 1809 held an important position in the region as the locator of lands in the Western District. The locator system installed by North Carolina to distribute the land as Tennessee was opened for settlement was later found to be corrupt. Many of its officials were charged with bribery and land fraud.

After the death of Daniel Vaulx in 1812, his widow, Catherine Vaulx continued to live in the area with her property adjoining that of Charles Hays. Charles Hays, the father-in-law of John Jones Gowen, was the founder of Antioch Baptist Church of Antioch, Tennessee, a Nashville suburb. John Jones Gowen was buried in the Hays family Cemetery located at the rear of the home of Charles Hays.

Steve Rogers of the Tennessee Historical Commission who researched the deed record of the property wrote, “This 240-acre tract is located on the northern third of the property north of present-day Murphreesboro Road and is not a part of the Central States Hospital tract. The route of the Murfreesboro Turnpike, established in 1824, followed approximately the southern boundary, according to ‘Acts of Tennessee, 1824,’ page 148.”

John Gowen was shown as a taxpayer in Rutherford County in 1809, paying $1.10¼ on 590 acres of land. He was the only Gowen taxpayer to be assessed in the county in that year. In 1811 he paid taxes on 560 acres of land–$1.39. In 1813 he paid $1.50 tax on 560 acres of land.

It is believed that John Gowen died about 1815. Children born to John Gowen are believed to include:

William Gowen born about 1769
John Gowen born February 3, 1775

William Gowen and John Gowen, assumed to be brothers were early residents of Davidson County. Both had descen­dants whose names included “Jones.” John Jones Gowen was a son of John Gowen, and another John Jones Gowen was a grandson of William Gowen. “Jones B. Gowin,” born in 1873, later appeared in Crawford County, Arkansas.

William Gowen, son of John Gowen and grandson of William Gowen who received the preemption grant in Davidson County, was born about 1769, probably in South Carolina. He was brought to Ft. Nashborough, Tennessee in 1779 by his father, accompanying his grandfather and his uncle, Capt. John Rains. It is believed that William Gowen was married, wife’s name unknown, about 1792. After the birth of two sons, it is believed that his wife died.

William Gowen and his father [or brother] John Gowen participated in the defense of Buchanan’s Station in an Indian attack in 1792. An account of the battle was written in 1998 by Cleve Weathers, a descendant of Nashville, Tennessee.

“A William Goin/Gowen and a John Goin/Gowens, who were old enough to fight, were at the siege on Buchanan’s Station in Davidson County, Tennessee in September 1792. This was a famous battle at Maj. John Buchanan’s Station or Buchanan’s Fort occurring around midnight on September 30, 1792.

Word had gotten to the settlers of a large body of Indians coming from East Tennessee with apparent plans to attack them. About 15 families congregated in Buchanan’s Station for security. Most of the defenders can be identified as living to the east of Buchanan’s Station, such as the Shanes who lived about 5 miles to the east on Stones River. Widow Sarah Gowen’s house was about 1.5 miles southeast of Buchanan’s Station. Buchanan’s Station was one of the more substantial stations and was strategically located nearer to Ft. Nashboro, i.e. a place of comparative safety. Maj. John Buchanan was born at Harrisburg, Pennsylvania January 12, 1759.

This John and William Goin were, without reasonable doubt, John and William Gowen, either sons or grandsons of William and Sarah Gowen. My 3rd great-grandfather, John Gowen, born in 1775, could have been the “John” referred to, or it could have been his father, John Gowen, born about 1745, as Arlee suggests. [Arlee and I are trying to come to a concensus whether the John, born in 1775, was a son or a grandson of William and Sarah Gowen.]

The eight-page narrative written by John Buchanan Todd, who was in the fort at the time of the attack and was about 10 years old, is a little known first-hand account of the battle. John Buchanan Todd was a nephew of the owner of the fort, Maj. John Buchanan, and the son of James Todd. “The Lyman Draper Papers,” Tennessee State Library & Archives, Manuscript Accession No. 29, series XX, Vol. 6, frame 68, state in part:

“The names of the defenders of the station were Maj. John Buchanan, commander, John McCrary, James Mulherrin, James Bryant, Wm Turbull [sic], Wetherell Lattimore, Robt. Castbolt, Thomas Kennedy, Abram Kennedy, Morris O’Shane, John Tony [?sp], Geo. Davidson, Thomas Wilcox, Jos. Crabtree, John Goin [sic], Wm Goin [sic] & James Todd.”

See another account of attack in J. G. M. Ramsey’s “Annals of Tennessee,” copyrighted 1853, pub. 1860, pp. 566-67.

“An Account of the 1792 Attack on Buchanan’s Station

Knoxville Gazette

Knoxville, Wednesday, October 10

“On the 30th of September, about midnight, John Buchanan’s station, four miles south of Nashville [at which sundry families had collected, and fifteen gun­men] were attacked by a party of Creeks and Lower Cherokees, supposed to consist of three or four hun­dred.

Their approach was suspected by the running of cattle that had taken fright at them, and upon examination, they were found rapidly advancing within ten yards of the gate, and from this place and distance they received the first fire from the man who discovered them [John M’Rory]. They immediately returned the fire, and con­tinued a very heavy and constant firing upon the station [block-houses surrounded with a stockade] for an hour, and were repulsed with considerable loss, without in­juring man, woman or child in the station.

During the whole time of the attack, the Indians were never more distant than ten yards from the Block House, and often in large numbers close round the lower walls, attempting to put fire to it. One ascended the roof with a torch, where he was shot, and falling to the ground, renewed his attempts to fire the bottom logs, and was killed. The Indians fired 30 balls through a port hole or the overjuting, which lodged in the roof in the circumstances of a hat, and those sticking in the walls on the outside are innumerable.

“Upon viewing the ground next morning, it appeared, that the fellow who was shot from the roof, was a Cherokee halfbreed, of the Running Water, known by the whites by the name of Tom Turnbridge’s step son, the son of a French woman by an Indian; and there was much blood, and sign that many dead had been dragged off, and litters having been made to carry the wounded to their horses which they had left a mile from the sta­tion.

Near the block house were found, several swords, hatchets, pipes, kettles, and budgets of different Indian articles; one of the swords was a fine Spanish blade, and richly mounted in the Spanish fashion. In the morning previous to the attack, Jonathan Gee and Savard[?] Clayton were sent out as spies; and on the ground, among other articles left by the Indians, were found a handkerchief and a moccasin, known one to belong to Gee and the other to Clayton, hence it sup­posed they are killed.

Undoubted advices have been received that as early as the 18th of September, as many as five hundred Creeks passed the Tennessee, at the lower Cherokee towns, and below, on their way as they declared, to make war on Cumberland, and that they were joined by about one hundred Cherokees of those towns. This may have been the party that attacked Buchanan’s Station. Dreadful havoc was expected, but it is now hoped that the check they have received, will induce them to return without making further attempts upon that settlement.”

Walter T. Durham, writing in “Kasper Mansker: Cumberland Frontiersman,” stated that the defenders at Buchanan’s Station employed a small swivel cannon to terrorize the Indians. Thus the 15 defenders were able to withstand the hundreds of Indians. Kasper Mansker borrowed the cannon in 1795 when he joined the Chickasaw Indians in their battle against the Creeks. The little cannon was very decisive in defeating the Creeks.

On February 17, 1794 the Davidson County Court minutes record that “William Gowen was appointed to a road venire to review whether the road from Heaton’s old station could not come nearer to the mouth of Lick Branch than where the bridge formerly was built.”

On December 30, 1795 William Gowen received a deed to 150 acres on Stone’s River which he bought at a sheriff’s sale, according to Davidson County Deed Book D, page 38. His brother John Gowen bought 81 acres on Stone’s River at the same sale on December 30, 1795, according to Davidson County Deed Book D, page 40. John Gowen received a deed on the same day to 50 acres on Stone’s River, according to Davidson County Deed Book D, page 40. Apparently the land, which was sold for delinquent taxes, lay in adjoining plots. They received their deeds July 11, 1796 from Sheriff Nicholas Perkins Hardeman, according to Davidson County Court minutes.

The Davidson County Court set ferry rates for crossing the Cumberland River April 5, 1796, “Wagon & team–$1, Two-wheel carriage & horses–50¢, Man & horse–6¼¢, Black cattle, per head–5¢ and Hogs, per head–3¢. Price was set for “Good proof whiskey–1 shilling.”

William Gowen was mentioned as a purchaser at the estate sale of Robert McCrory, deceased, in the Davidson County Court term of April 1796, according to Davidson County Will Book 1, page 44. He served as a petit juror July 15, October 10-14, in 1796.

On February 15, 1797 William Gowen purchased 90 acres on Mill Creek from William Terrill, according to Davidson County Deed Book D, page 380. Francis B. Sappington appeared in court April 10, 1798 to prove the deed. On the same date William Gowen proved in court a deed from John Johnston to Charles Hays.

On September 1, 1797 William Gowen was commissioned a lieutenant in the Davidson County militia company commanded by Capt. John Rains, his uncle. Later that year William Gowen was married to his cousin, Martha “Patsy” Rains, daughter of Capt. John Rains and Christiana Gowen Rains, on December 3, 1797, according to Davidson County Marriage Book 1, page 28.

Martha “Patsy” Rains was born about 1773, probably in Montgomery County, Virginia or in the State of Franklin [East Tennessee]. She was brought to Davidson County by her parents about 1779. Her father took her mother and the children back to safety in Kentucky when Indian attacks threatened to kill all the settlers on the Cumberland. When hostilities subsided, Capt. Rains brought his family back to Ft. Nashborough.

She had a narrow escape from the Indians about 1790 when she and her friend, Betsy Williams, were fired upon by Indians while out riding. Martha “Patsy” Rains, riding a fast horse, escaped, but her friend Betsy Williams was killed and scalped. A. W. Putnam writing in “History of Middle Tennessee,” stated “Indians shot and killed Betsy Williams who was riding on the same horse behind Martha “Patsy” Rains.”

John Rains, Jr. gave some additional details about the incident:

“On one occasion my sister [Martha “Patsy” Rains] wished to go up to Armstrong’s Station, about seven miles from Nashville. She could not get company as pleased her, so she went alone. She got there safely. On her return a young woman [Betsy Williams] at some point desired to come along with her, and they both started on the same horse. A young man named Patton went along as a guard. A small dog became alarmed, and she desired Patton to go ahead. He did so, and the Indians fired at the party. My sister turned her horse and tried to make him leap the fence, but he failed the first trial. The young woman being behind was hit by the Indians and fell off. The horse then leaping the fence, my sister escaped. As she looked behind her, she saw the Indians in the act of seizing her companion, whom they killed. My sister kept on to Armstrong’s Station, and the people being alarmed, went back and found the poor girl’s body. Patton ran off in another direction and escaped in safety.”

It is believed that Martha “Patsy” Rains Gowen died about 1799, perhaps in childbirth.

North Carolina Land Grants in Tennessee

Davidson County Tennessee 1782:

1. Frederick Stump
2. Daniel Stump
3. Jacob Williams
4. John Montgomery
5. John Rains

Davidson County Tennessee 1783:

6. Daniel Hogan
7. Amos Heaton
8. Benjamin Drake Jr.
9. David Rounsivale
10. Henry Ramsey
11. Robert Espy
12. The Heirs of William Cooper
13. John Manifee
14. Benjamin Logan
15. Daniel Dunkham
16. James Espy
17-18. Isaac Johnston
19-20. Hadin Wells
21. William Loggins
22. Jacob Jones
23. Heirs of Nicholas Gentrey
24. John Brown
25. David Love
26. Dennis Condry
27. William Gowen
28. Isaac Lindsay
29. James Mayfield
30. Andrew Hill
31. Humphrey Hogan
32. Richard Dodge
33. Ebenezar Titus
34. Ephraim McLain
35. James Bradley
36. William Green
37. John Barrow
38. Henry Turney
39. John Bohannan Jr
40. Isaac Drake
41. Zachariah White
42. Samuel Barton
43. Samuel Wilson
44. John Hamilton
45. Francis Hodge
46. William Johnston
47. John Evans
48. John Milner
49. Roland Maddison
50. Michael Shaver
51. John Thomas
52. Joseph Hendricks
53. Thomas Edmundson
54.David Gwin
55. William Campbell
56. Hugh McGary
57. James Ray
58. Samuel Walker
59. George Purtle
60. Moses Rentfro
61. Robert Dishe
62. William Johnston
63. Samuel Scott
64. Daniel Johnston
65. William Overall
66. Benjamin Drake
67. Jonathan Drake
68. William Gillaspie
69. William Bradshaw
70. Hugh McGray
71. George Daugherty
72. Daniel Chambers
73. William Griggin
74. Roger Topp
75. Chandler McCarthney
76. John Henderson
77. George Espy
78. James McAdon
79. Arthur McAdon
80. Philip Pushow
81. Hugh Henry Jr.
82. David Henry
83. John Crew
84. John Dunham
85. Bartaloff Searsey
86. Cornelius Riddle
87. Peter Rentfro
88. Samuel McCutchin
89. Samuel Ewing
90. Peter McCutchin
91. Lewis Deweese
92. John Boyd
93. Joseph Daugherty
94. John Holliday
95. William Leighton
96. John Caffrey
97. Isaac Rentfro
98. Thomas Davis
99. William Rentfro
100. John Evand
101. John Cowen
102. James Crutchfield
103. Charles Campbell
104. John McVey
105. William Stern
106. James Robertson
107. John Robertson
108. William Russell
109. William Rentfro
110. Joseph Hays
111. Samuel Moore
112. missing
113. John Cordry
114. Solomon White
115. John Drake Sr.
116. Charles Metcalf
117. Samuel Hays
118. Archibald McNeal
119. John Searsey
120. Ralph Trammell
121. Martin Holden
122. William Neally
123. John Donoson
124. Samuel Deeson
125. Samuel McMurry
126. William Purnell
127. Robert Daugherty
128. Richard Sims
129. Richard Gross
130. John Phack
131. Edward Hogan
132. Isaac Lucas
133. Joseph Reed
134. Julius Sanders
135. Samuel Morrow
136. Abel Gower
137. Samuel Price
138. Moses Winters
139. James Farris
140. Hugh Hays
141. Nathaniel Hays
142. John Caywood
143. William Grimes
144. James Foster
145. Elijah Gower
146. James Harwood
147. Meredith Rains
148. John Hamilton
149. Thomas Jones Gwin
150. John Donolson Sr.
151. William McMurry
152. Phillip Mason
153. Nicholas Trammell
154. James Freeland
155. Thomas Hamilton
156. Zachariah Green
157. James Franklin
158. Samuel Shelton
159. Jesse Maxfield
160. Evan Evans
161. David Maxfield
162. John Turner
163. Peter Looney
164. Patrick Quigby
165. David Looney
166. Robert Cartwright
167. George Neally
168. Jacob Kimberlin
169. Thomas Gillespie
170. David Mitchell Jr.
171. Michael Kimberlin
172. Jacob Steel
173. John Galloway
174. Dennis Clark
175. Ephraim Drake, Daniel Durham
176. Hugh Simpson
177. Samuel Sanders
178. Martin King
179. David Turner
180. William Overall
181. Henry Houdishall
182. Daniel Garrett
183. William Moor
184. James McKean
185. Joseph Milligan
186. James Green
187. Andrew Thomas
188. Alexander Thompson
189. William Collinsworth
190. Abraham Jones
191. John Withers
192. Benjamin Porter
193. John Blackamoor
194. Nathan Turpin
195. Daniel Chambers
196. James Crockett
197. Archilus Holloway
198. Thomas Pharris
199. William Summers
200. George Newell
201. James Clendenning
202. Willliam Hood
203. William Henry
204. William Taylor
205. Philip Catron
206. Peter Catron
207. Jonathan & John Drake
208. Andrew Rule
209. Edward Larymone
210. Jonathan Green
211. David Shannon
212. Henry Watkins
213. John Higginson
214. Berry Caywood
215. William Elliss
216. John Cockrell
217. John Kissinger
218. Mark Robinson
219. Nathan Faris
220. Joshua Pennick
221. Isaac Pennick
222. Roger Topp
223. William Snody
224. Edward Tomlinson
225. Michael Stone
226. William Morris
227. William Galloway
228. James Cunningham
229. Henry Highland
230. Thomas Jones
231. James Rentfro
232. John Donolson
233. Robert Neeley
234. William Fletcher
235. John Hollis
236. Benjamin Drake
237. Robert Russell
238. Andrew Steel
239. Thomas Thompson
240. Absolem Chessom
241. Magness McDonald
242. Lawrence Stevens
243. Jacob Stevens
244. William Simpson
245. Jonathan Jennings
246. William Cocke
247. Michael Larrick
248. John Wilson
249. Thomas Kilgore
250. Alexander Bohannan
251. John Fulkinson
252. Rowland Middison
253. Robert Gwans
254. Edward Carvin
255. Samuel Habberd
256. Hugh Henry
257. George Mancher
258. William Donehoe
259. Andrew Ewing
260. David Gowen
261. John Mulherrin
262. Jesse Boitstone
263. James Robinson
264. William Price
265. Maurice Shane
266. John Sawyer
267. John Kennedy
268. Solomon Turpin
269. Christopher Funkhouser
270. George Carlyle
271. James Harris
272. Joseph Rentfro
273. John Hobson
274. James Hollice
275. John Wilson
276. John Cockrell
277. John King
278. George Leeper
279. Andrew Kincannon
280. William McCormack
281. Robert Lucas
282. Isaac Shelby
283. Lewis Crane
284. William Stewart
285. Peter Looney
286. Absolom Thompson
287. Jesse Benton
288. John Hughes
289. David Looney
290. John Deeson
291. Thomas Woodard
292. Simon Woodard
293. Edward Swanson
294. John Phillips
295. Frederick Edwards
296. William Frame
297. Christopher Beeley
298. Nicholas Conrad
299. Philip Conrad
300. Jennitt John -? Reverse
301. Ezekiel Douglass
302. William McMurry
303. Edward Bradley
304. Abraham Simaster
305. Ephraim Pratt
306. Morgan Osborne
307. Henry Hieory
308. William Goosney
309. William Purnell
310. Charles Thompson
311. John Miller
312. Timothy Terrill
313. James Robinson
314. John Barnard
315. Evan Baker
316. John Gibson
317. Joseph Hannah
318. Joel Hobbles
319. James Cook
320. Elijah Tarress
321. Nathaniel Henderson
322. John Sevill
323. Pleasant Henderson
324. Titus Murry
325. George Kannady
326. Jonathan Anthony
327. Hugh Leeper
328. Michael Castills
329. Bamah Byrant
330. James Anthony
331. Isaac Henry
332. John Estis
333. Daniel Frazier
334. Edmund Jennings
335. John Lamsden
336. Moses Webb
337. Moses Pharris
338. John White
339. John Cotton
340. Casper Mansher
341. David Fain
342. John Anderson
343. Jesse Maxey
344. John Gilkey
345. Solomon Phillips
346. Francis Armstrong
347. William Hinson
348. Isaac Kitterell
349. Isaac Lefeveor
350. John James
351. Thomas Sharpe
352. Daniel Smith
354-354. James Shaw
355. Henry Lovell
356. Elmore Douglass
357. John Poe
358. James Freeland
359. James Leeper
360. Mark Robinson
361. James Freeland
362. Isham Clayton
363. Elias Mires
364. Thomas Hainey
365. Henry O’Hara
366. George Green
367. Ephraim Payton
368. Burgess White
369. Daniel Mungle
370. Stephen Rhea
371. Sampson Wilson
372. Jarrott Manifee
373. John Morgan
374. John Dunkam
375. John Craig
376. William Craig
377. Henry Rule
378. Henry Blackmore
379. William Ashert
380. William McGouch
381. Charles Robinson
382. James Todd
383. John Todd
384. Roger Topp
385. Evan Baker
386. Nathaniel Hart
387. Charles Brantley
388. Alexander Allison
389. Charles Bowen
390. William Bailey
391. William Bowen
392. William Stewart
393. Matthew Pain
394. Benjamin Pettit
395. George Paine
396. Roger Topp
397. Sampson Sawyer
398. William Parker
399. John Blackmore
400. Elmore Douglass
401. Martin Hardin
402. David Craig
403. Musther McAboy
404. William Neely
405. William White
406. John Henrdricks
407. James Turpin
408. James McGavock
409. William Burgess
410. Thomas Burgess
411. Elijah Robinson
412. Andrew Crockett
413. Jamess Tolar
414. Archibald Bohanan
415. Henry Hardin
416. Abraham Price
417. Abraham Mulherrin
418. James Denton
419. Spilly Coleman
420. David Shelton
421. Nicholas Baker
422. Richard Cox
423. Matthew Anderson
424. James Malding
425. William Newing
426. Robert Roseberry
427. William McWhirter
428. William Montgomery
429. John McMurtry
430. James Gwins
431. Charles Peyton
432. Henry Daugherty
433. William Mitchell
434. William Moore
435. James Thompson
436. Joseph Jackson
437. James Brown
438. Ebenezar Titus
439. John Holt
440. James Crockett
441. James Hays
442. James Lawless
443. Thomas Kilgore
444. Thomas Miggerson
445. Hugh Logan
446. James Shanklin
447. William Moore
448. John Shockley
449. Elijah Robinson
450. Edward Cox
451. Joseph Blackford
452. Joseph Bean
453-454. Isaac Bledsoe
455. Perry Graves
456. Ebenezar Mann
457. James Smith
458. James Ray
459. Lewis Reeland (Freeland?)
460. Ralph Wilson
461. William Ray
462. William Collier
463. James Robinson
464. Richard Henderson
465. Robert Looney
466. Thomas Spencer
467. Charles Deneth
468. William Lucas
469. John Phillips
470. Thomas Maxwell
471. John Crockett
472. Richard Logan
473. John Owens
474. Samuel Newell
475. Anthony Bledsoe
476. Horatio Rolls
477. John Fletcher
478. Jordon Gibson
479. George Freeland
480. John Calloway
481. Anthony Bledsoe
482. Archibald Taylor
483. Robert Montgomery
484. Joseph Moseley
==O==
Davidson County, Tennessee at its founding in 1783 was known as Miro District, North Carolina. In 1787 it was re­ferred to as the District of Tennessee. In 1794 when it was ceded to the United States, it was referred to as “Territory of the United States, south of the River Ohio.” In 1796 it was known as the State of Tennessee.
==O==
Will Goens, negro was married December 7, 1916 to Addie Mae Davis, according to Davidson County marriage records. Children born to Will Goens and Addie Mae Davis Goens are unknown.
==O==
Harry Goin, age 25, was married June 3, 1921 to Mary Wilkinson, according to Davidson County marriage records. Of Harry Goin and Mary Wilkinson Goin nothing more is known.
==O==
Daniel T. Goines requested a license to marry Ellen E. Hooberry December 20, 1864. No return was made of the li­cense.
==O==
Charles Going was married to Harriett Winford August 28, 1888, according to Davidson County marriage records. Chil­dren born to Charles Going and Harriett Winford Going are unknown.
==O==
David W. Going, who was born in Ireland in 1826, appeared in the 1850 census of Davidson County, Civil District 13, Household No. 200-200. His age was given as 24.
==O==
John Going was enumerated as the head of a household recorded in the 1850 census of Davidson County, Civil District 22, city of Nashville, Household No. 100-231. The family was recorded as:

“Going, John 35, born in TN, farmer
Jane 38, born in TN
Mary E. 8, born in Illinois
Sarah J. 7, born in TN
Rosa A. 5, born in TN
William 3, born in TN
John 2, born in TN”

Adjoining the household of John Going was that of William Going recorded in the 1850 census of Davidson County, Civil District 22, city of Nashville, Household No. 100-102. The fam­ily was recorded as:

“Going, William 37, born in TN, farmer
Rachel 34, born in TN
Elizabeth A. 12, born in TN
Stephen A. 10, born in TN
Hugh 5, born in TN
Tabitha A. 1, born in TN”

Apparently the household appeared a second time in the 1850 census in McMinn County, Tennessee, Household 1518-662:

“Goins, William 29, born in North Carolina
Rachel 28, born in TN
Elizabeth 7
Stephen 5
Hugh 1
Vice 11”

[See William Goins, Rutherford County, Tennessee for an in­teresting parallel.]

Adjoining the household of William Going was that of Alfred Going recorded in the 1850 census of Davidson County, Civil District 22, city of Nashville, Household No. 99-101. The family was recorded as:

“Going, Alfred 22, farmer, born in TN
Rhoda 21, born in TN
Isaac 3, born in TN”

Alfred Going had brothers by the names of Albert Goings, Joseph Going and S. Going, according to Sherrill Bourn.

Alfred Going had obtained a license October 16, 1847 to marry Rhoda Darows, according to Davidson County marriage records. No return was made of the license.

Alfred Going removed to Kentucky about 1858. They were enumerated in the 1860 census of Graves County in the southeast corner of Kentucky on the Tennessee state line:

“Going, Alfred 32, born in TN
Rhoda 31, born in TN
Isaac 13, born in TN
Eliza 8, born in TN
Elizabeth 6, born in TN
Margaret 5, born in TN
Sarah 4, born in TN
Polly Ann 1, born in KY”

Children born to Alfred Going and Rhoda Darows Going in­clude:

Isaac Going born about 1847
Eliza Going born about 1851
Elizabeth Going born about 1853
Margaret Going born about 1855
Sarah Going born about 1857
Polly Ann Going born about 1859

A Polly Ann Going who was born in Graves County May 12, 1861 was married in Caledonia, Illinois to Nicholas Henry Dover as his second wife, according to Sherrill Bourn.
==O==
Alexander Goings, was enumerated as the head of a household in the 1850 census of Davidson County:

“Goings, Alexander 28, born in TN, farmer
Sarah E. 28, born in TN
Nancy J. 9, born in Illinois
Daniel T. 7, born in Illinois
Goings, Elizabeth 60, born in NC, mother
James 10, born in TN
Andrew 20, born in TN, laborer
Thomas 18, born in TN, laborer”

“Alexander Gown” was enumerated as the head of Household 694-668 in the 1860 census of Davidson County, 21st Civil District, near Goodlettsville, Tennessee:

“Gown, Alexander 45, born in NC, farmer
Sarah 35, born in TN
Nancy 18, born in TN
Daniel 16, born in TN
James 14, born in TN
Hugh 11, born in TN
Rosanna 9, born in TN”
==O==
Fannie Ethel Goings, age 36, was married May 7, 1928 to George Gilbert Noel, according to Davidson County marriage records.
==O==
Will T. Goings, age 35, 5506 New York Avenue, Nashville was married July 16, 1927 to Matilla Barcliff, according to Davidson County marriage records. Children born to Will T. Goings and Matilla Barcliff Goings are unknown.
==O==
Ambrose Goins was named as a juror April 5, 1786, according to Davidson County Court minutes
==O==
Charles C. Goins was married September 21, 1886 to Alice Burnett, according to Davidson County marriage records. Children born to Charles C. Goins and Alice Burnett Goins are unknown.
==O==
Charles C. Goins died in 1910 in Davidson County according to “Tennessee Deaths,” record number 16980.
==O==
Drusilla Goins was enumerated in the 1880 census of Davidson County living in a boarding house. She was recorded as “Drusilla Goins, 41, born in TN, father born in MO.”
==O==
John Goins, age 18, 1040 29th Avenue North, Nashville, was married December 24, 1919 to Dollie Evans, age 20, Nashville, according to Davidson County marriage records. Of John Goins and Dollie Evans Goins nothing more is known.

A license was issued October 4, 1919 for the marriage of Miss Ollie Goins, age 18, 1040 29th Avenue North, Nashville to Earnest J. Marsh, age 27, Pegram Street, Nashville, according to Davidson County marriage records.

Ollie Goins, age 19, was married May 5, 1920 to Anest Veli­otis, age 22, 212 4th Avenue North, Nashville, according to Davidson County marriage records.

Tommie Goins, age 21, 1040 29th Avenue North, Nashville was married October 28, 1919 to Irma Buckinhaur, age 19, according to Davidson county marriage records. Children born to Tommie Goins and Irma Buckinhaur Goins are unknown.
==O==
May Tillie Goins, age 20, was married October 9, 1928 to William Buford, age 21, according to Davidson County mar­riage records.
==O==
“Andrew R. Gooan, Esq. died in Marshall County, Mississippi on Saturday, 28th ultimate, according to the July 12, 1841 edi­tion of “The Nashville Whig.”
==O==
William Gowa[n?] was enumerated as the head of a household in the 1850 census of Davidson County, Household 940-668:

“Gowa[n?] William 38, born in TN
Lucy 37, born in TN
Mary 19
Nancy 17
William 13
Fountain 11
Susan 7
Eliza 5
Josephine 2″
==O==
Elizabeth Gowan was enumerated as the head of Household 369-365, 10th Civil District in the 1860 census of Davidson County:

Gowan, Elizabeth 55, born in Ireland, $1,000 real estate
Helen 35, born in NC
James 23, born in GA
Lucina 18, born in GA
Francis 17, born in GA, male”
==O==
Ernest Gowan was married May 18, 1910 to Delia Watson, ac­cording to Davidson County marriage records. Jesse O’Neal was bondsman for Ernest Gowan and Delia Watson Gowan.
==O==
Mrs. Fannie Goodner Gowan, negro, daughter of George Goodner and Vinnie Smith Goodner, was born in 1855 in Ten­nessee. In 1915 she lived at 177 Filmore in Nashville. She died there December 20, 1915, age about 60, of “parapelegra and valvular heart trouble,” according to Tennessee BVS Death Certificate 522 signed by L. P. Johnson, M.D. She was buried in Greenwood Cemetery, according to Mack Gowan, informant of 81 Green Street, rear, Nashville.
==O==
Fannie D. Gowan was married to T. C. Payne January 27, 1865, according to Davidson County marriage records.
==O==
George A. Gowan was born about 1860 of parents unknown. He was married about 1890 to Edith Meadows, daughter of John Meadows and Sarah Davis Meadows, who was born February 27, 1868 in Tennessee. He died about 1914.

In 1932 Edith Meadows Gowan lived at 1201 Woodland Street in Nashville with her younger son, “G. G. Gowan.” She died there December 13, 1932, at age 64 of pneumonia and in­fluenza, according to Tennessee DVS Death Certificate No. 25172 signed by R. N. Hubert, M.D. She was buried in Mt Olive Cemetery under the direction of Wiles Funeral Home, ac­cording to “G. G. Gowan, informant of 1201 Woodland.”

The will of Edith Meadows Gowan was probated in Davidson County January 16, 1933. In her will she named two sons, “Cody Clemens Gowan and G. G. Gowan.”

Children born to George A. Gowan and Edith Meadows Gowan include:

Cody Clemens Gowan born about 1887
George Grady Gowan born about 1890

Cody Clemens Gowan, son of George A. Gowan and Editth Meadows Gowan, was born about 1887, probably in Davidson County. He died in Jefferson County, Kentucky September 6, 1934. His will, probated March 17, 1936, named his widow, Ida Mary Gowan.

George Grady Gowan, son of George A. Gowan and Edith Meadows Gowan, was born about 1890, probably in Davidson County. He was mentioned in the “Nashville Banner” in its edition of January 16, 1918:

“In an article used in Sunday’s Banner in connection with a photograph of the Hawaiian Quartette, it was stated that three of these young men have displayed real patriotism by enlisting with Uncle Sam’s fighting forces. It might have been said that all four of the members of this popular musical aggregation have displayed the real spirit, since Grady Gowan, the only one who is not yet in service, made every effort to gain admission. Being with only one hand, he was rejected upon his application recently.

No reflection upon Mr. Gowan was meant, and the Banner sincerely regrets the unfortunate phrasing of the news matter accompanying the picture. Mr. Gowan is well known in this city and is an efficient travelling salesman for Armour & Company.”

George Grady Gowan, age 27, 1201 Woodland, Nashville, was married May 29, 1918 to Frances Macon Hunter, age 21, according to Davidson County marriage records. Children born to George Grady Gowan and Frances Macon Hunter Gowan are unknown.
==O==
Grace Gowan was married May 6, 1943 to Andrew Peal, 506 Hogan Street, Nashville, according to Davidson County mar­riage records.
==O==
Henry Gowan, negro, son of Clay Gowan, was born in Ten­nessee in October 1882. In 1924 he was an unmarried laborer living in Nashville at 140 Lewis Street. He died April 7, 1924 of an organic heart condition, according to Tennessee BVS Death Certificate No. 290 signed by G. H. Martin, M.D. He was buried in Greenwood Cemetery, according to Mrs. Jennie Hodge of 140 Lewis Street, informant.
==O==
Howard R. Gowan, 178 Kenner Avenue, Nashville, Ten­nessee was a student at Southern Methodist University living at 4222 Mt. Royal Street, Dallas, Texas in 1948.

On May 16, 1956 a Howard R. Gowan and his wife, Evelyn R. Gowan received a warranty deed from Better-Bilt Homes, Inc., to a lot in Elroy Heights, Arlington, Texas, according to Tarrant County Deed Book 2990, page 595.

On February 4, 1965 Howard R. Gowan and Evelyn R. Gowan received a tax release from the United States of America on a balance of $578.79 according to Tarrant County Deed Book 4027, page 641. They lived at 1914 Menefee Drive, Grand Prairie, Texas. They continued at the same address in 1972 and 1973, according to the 1973 city directory of Arlington. In 1973 Howard R. Gowan was listed as a department head at LTV Corporation.
==O==
James Gowan, age 42, was enumerated in the 1870 census of Davidson County, page 371.
==O==
James M. Gowan was enumerated as the head of Household 1011-986 in the 1860 census of Davidson County, 13th Civil District:

“Gowan, James M. 25, born in Scotland, painter
Harriett 22, born in England
Jane 2, born in Canada
Agnes 1, born in Canada”
==O==
Joseph Miel Gowan, Jr, age 20, was married May 12, 1949 to Ada Willene Bone, age 20, according to Davidson County mar­riage records. Children born to Joseph Miel Gowan, Jr, and Ada Willene Bone Gowan are unknown.
==O==
Mark Gowan lived at 2866 Sugar Tree Road, according to the 1971 Nashville telephone directory.
==O==
Minerve Gowan was married June 20, 1825 to Blackman Hays, according to “Davidson County, Tennessee Marriages, 1788-1850.”

Naomi M. Gowan lived at Madison Academy Apartments, ac­cording to the 1971 Nashville telephone directory.
==O==
Robert L. Gowan was born in May 1870. He was enumerated as the head of a house­hold in the 1900 census of Nashville, Tennessee, living on Prospect Av­enue. He was recorded in Enumeration District 107, page 11 as:

“Gowan, Robert L. 30, born in May 1870 in TN
Laura L. 31, born in December 1868 in TN
Vada G. 10, born in Nov. 1889 in TN
James R. 6, born in December 1893 in TN
Martha J. 3, born in March 1896 in TN”
==O==
William Gowan, negro, was enumerated as the head of a household in the 1900 census of Davidson County, Enumer­ation Dis­trict 106, page 26, living at 629 Wood Street:

“Gowan, William 40, born March 1860, TN, negro
Maggie 24, born August 1875, TN, wife
Samuel S. 5/12, born January 1900, son
George 16, born March 1884, son
Harrison 10, born October 1889, son
Ernest 13, born April 1887, son
Carrie 7, born Nov. 1892, daughter
Mary 3, born April 1897, daughter”
==O==
John W. Gowans was born in 1875, probably at Nashville. He was married May 30, 1900 to Clara F. Bell, age 23, according to Davidson County Marriage License No. 22906. Clara F. Bell Gowans, who was born in 1877, died in 1918. Her will was probated November 5, 1918. It named her husband, John W. Gowans, as executor.

He was married second to Lula Mae Vaughn, January 29, 1921, according to Davidson County Marriage License 24865. The groom, who was 46, lived at 309 South 17th Street. The bride was 37.

John W. Gowans died in Nashville in 1930, at age 55, and his will, written December 10, 1929, was probated November 13, 1930. His will named his second wife, Lula May Vaughn Gowans and two sons, James M. Gowans and Ronald H. Gowans.

John W. Gowans and Clara F. Bell Gowans were buried in Spring Hill Cemetery, Harding Lot, beside the grave of W. O. Gowan, according to “Tombstone Inscriptions & Manuscripts” by Jeanette Tillotson Acklen.

James M. Gowans, son of John W. Gowans and Clara F. Bell Gowans, was born in 1904, probably in Nashville. He was living with his parents at 309 South 17th Street, Nashville, when he was married to Janie Mai Allen, age 24, January 26, 1925, according to Davidson County Marriage License No. 34959. Of James M. Gowans and Janie Mai Allen Gowans nothing more is known.

Ronald H. Gowans, son of John W. Gowans, was mentioned in the will of his father who died in 1930.
==O==
Lillian Erin Gowans, age 37, was married September 25, 1959 to Robert Lee Warrick, age 41, according to Davidson County marriage records. Both lived on Route 2, Smyrna, Tennessee.
==O==
R. H. Gowans lived at 216 Linda Line, Madison, Tennessee, according to the 1971 telephone directory of Nashville.

==O==
Mrs. Willene Gowans, Miss Connie Gowans and J. M. Gowans, Jr. lived at 2608 Traughbor Drive, Nashville, ac­cording to the 1959 telephone directory.
==O==
Alexander C. Gowen was married August 23, 1838 to Caroline C. Smith, according to Davidson County marriage records. Children born to Alexander C. Gowen and Caroline C. Smith Gowen are unknown.
==O==
Alfred Gowen was married October 16, 1847 to Rhoda Darows, according to “Davidson County, Tennessee Marriages, 1788-1850.” Children born to Alfred Gowen and Rhoda Darows are unknown.
==O==
Amanda M. Gowen was married December 129, 1824 to Albert G. Dunn by Rev. William Hume, V.D.M, according to “Davidson County, Tennessee Marriages, 1788-1850.”
==O==
Andrew Gowen, “works at 185 South Market Street, home on Gay near Clay,” appeared in the 1877 edition of the Nashville city directory.
==O==
Annie Elizabeth Gowen, age 19, was married to Clifton Par­rish, age 20, March 30, 1918, according to Davidson County marriage records.
==O==
Benjamin A. Gowen and his wife, Bettie Gowen appeared in the 1922 and 1924 editions of the Nashville city directory. He was listed as a “rural carrier, Franksley Avenue, 4E Nolensville Road.”
==O==
Billy R. Gowen lived at 3911 Murphy Road, according to the 1959 telephone directory of Nashville.
==O==
Billy S. Gowen lived at 206 Bonnarding Drive, according to the 1971 telephone directory of Nashville.
==O==
C. Henry Gowen, “a clerk, 109 Union Avenue, boards at 20 North High, according to the 1885 edition of the Nashville city directory. In 1888 he reappeared as “C. Henry Gowen, sales­man, 508 Church Street, boards at 153 North Summer.” The 1891 and 1892 editions carried “Henry Gowen, clerk, 403 Church Street, boards at 208 North Vine. In 1895 the inser­tion read, “C. Henry Gowen, salesman, 403 Church Street. In 1896 “Henry C. Gowen, clerk 403 Church Street, boards at 143 North Vine” appeared. In 1897 the listing was carried “Henry Gowen, Jr, clerk, 403 Church Street, boards at 204 North High. In the 1910 directory he appeared as “Henry Gowen, Jr, home, Caldwell Lane.”
==O==
Caroline Gowen was married about 1850 to William Hamlett, according to “Davidson County, Tennessee Marriages, 1838-1863.”
==O==
Charles Gowen, “switchman, North Carolina and St. Louis Railroad,” was listed in the 1892 city directory of Nashville.
==O==
Clinton Gowen was recorded as the head of Household 1035-1008 in the 1860 census of Davidson County, 13th Civil Dis­trict:

“Gowen, Clinton 25, born in TN, carpenter
Martha 22, born in TN
William 4, born in TN
John 1, born in TN”
==O==
David Gowen, a negro farmer, was enumerated in the 1850 census of Davidson County. The household was number 228. David Gowen was 60. He was a farmer, born in Tennessee, living in the household of Venus Burnett, negro.
==O==
E. R. Gowen, “works at corner of Clinton & Clay,” appeared in the 1885 city directory of Nashville. In the 1886 edition, Joseph Gowen, “works at the corner of Clinton & Clay,” was listed.
==O==
Ed Gowen, negro, was enumerated as the head of a house­hold in the 1880 census of Davidson County, Enumeration District 67, page 7, Civil District 7. The household was recorded as:

“Gowen, Ed 25, born in TN, black
Masida 23, born in TN
Moses 6, born in TN
Sam 4, born in TN
William 2, born in TN”

Moses Gowen, negro, son of Ed Gowen and Masida Gowen was born in 1874 in Davidson County. He appeared in his fa­ther’s household in the 1880 census as a six-year-old.

Sam Gowen, negro, son of Ed Gowen and Masida Gowen was born in 1876 in Davidson County. He appeared in his father’s household in the 1880 census of Davidson County as a four-year-old. Sam Gowen was married to Mary Blackman December 24, 1898, according to Davidson County marriage records. Sam Gowen and Mary Blackman Gowen appeared on the 1900 census of Davidson County, Enumeration District 124, page 7, Ninth Civil District:

“Gowen, Sam 23, born in TN in February 1877
Mary 22, born in TN in April 1879

William Gowen, negro, son of Ed Gowen and Masida Gowen was born in 1878 in Davidson County. He appeared in his fa­ther’s household in the 1880 census of Davidson County as a two-year-old. William Gowen was married to Maggie Hughes August 2, 1897, according to Davidson County Marriage records. Of William Gowen and Maggie Hughes Gowen nothing more is known.
==O==
Edward Gowen, negro, was married to Jane Buchanan May 11, 1866, according to Davidson County marriage records. Of Edward Gowen and Jane Buchanan Gowen nothing more is known.
==O==
Edmund Gowen, negro, was married June 18, 1873 to Matilda Maxwell, according to Davidson County marriage records. Children born to Edmund Gowen and Matilda Maxwell Gowen are unknown.
==O==
Elisha Gowen, negro, was married April 13, 1866 to Maria Hamilton, according to Davidson County marriage records. Children born to Elisha Gowen and Maria Hamilton Gowen are unknown.
==O==
Elizabeth K. “Betsy” Gowen was “born August 29, 1811–died 1861,” according to a bible owned by Mrs. E. E. Patterson of Nashville.
==O==
Elizabeth S. Gowen, “widow of John D. Gowen, home at 157 North Spruce,” appeared in the 1872 city directory of Nashville. She reappeared in the 1874, 1877 and 1878 edi­tions of the directory living at the same address.

Her son, John W. Gowen, “printer at 48 Union Avenue” boarded with his mother at 157 North Spruce, according to the 1872 edition of the directory. He reappeared at the same ad­dress in the 1874 edition as “John W. H. Gowen, pressman, works at 48 Union Avenue. In the 1877 and 1878 editions he appeared at the same address.

Edwin J. Gowen, believed to be another son of Elizabeth S. Gowen was listed in the 1877 edition of the directory as a clerk at “32 North College, boards at 157 North Spruce.” He did not appear in later editions.
==O==
Ethel Gowen was married October 27, 1908 to Jesse Fulton according to Davidson County Marriage Book 25.
==O==
Evard Gowen, “works at Nash Cotton Mills,” appeared in the 1887 edition of the city directory.
==O==
F. R. Gowen received a deed to a lot at High and Broad streets in Nashville from Benjamin H. Sheppard in April 1850, according to Davidson County Deed Book 14, page 79.
==O==
Fanny Gowen, a mulatto domestic servant was living in the household of Sarah M. Corbett in 1880, according to the Davidson County census in District 18:

Corbett, Sarah M. 51, house keeper, born in KY,
father born in VA, mother
born in SC
Eugene 30, son, wholesale hardware,
born in TN, father born in TN,
mother born in KY
Jo-Ella 21, daughter-in-law, born in TN,
father born in TN, mother
born in TN
William B. 27, son, born in TN, father born
in TN, mother born in KY
Macey 23, son, clerk in iron store, born
in TN, father born in TN,
mother born in KY
Frank 17, son, born in TN, father born
in TN, father born in TN,
mother born in TN
Robert 16, son, born in TN, father born
In TN, mother born in TN
Gowen, Fanny 22, mulatto, domestic servant,
born in TN, father born in TN,
mother born in TN”
==O==
G. Haskell Gowen was married November 14, 1911 to May Lee Gower “of 324 6th Avenue North, Nashville,” according to Davidson County marriage records.

Haskell Gowen, age 56, 1831 Primrose Avenue, Nashville, was married December 23, 1949 to Mittie Creola Scudder, age 38, 105 Duling Avenue, Nashville, according to Davidson County marriage records. Children born to G. Haskell Gowen, May Lee Gower Gowen and Mittie Creola Scudder Gowen are unknown.
==O==
Henry Gowen, Jr. was married to Sara D. McEwen September 8, 1904, according to Davidson County marriage records. Children born to Henry Gowen, Jr. and Sara D. McEwen Gowen are unknown.
==O==
I. M. Gowen received a deed from C. V. Heath to property January 8, 1925, according to Davidson County deed records.
==O==
J. J. Gowen, “clerk and master” of a lodge received a deed to a lot on Lebanon Pike in Nashville January 29, 1877, according to Davidson County deed records.
==O==
J. M. Gowen was married July 22, 1888 to Lula Burton, according to Davidson County marriage records. Of J. M. Gowen and Lula Burton Gowen nothing more is known.
==O==
James G. Gowen was married in 1887 to Blanche M. Burnum, according to Davidson County marriage records. Children born to James G. Gowen and Blanche M. Burnum Gowen are unknown.
==O==
Nellie Louise Gowen, age 36, 1018 Acklen Avenue, Nashville was married October 17, 1932 to William J. Colson, age 39, according to Davidson County marriage records.
==O==
John Gowen was married to Lydia Shute October 30, 1801, according to “Davidson County, Tennessee Marriages, 1788-1850.”
==O==
John Gowen was enumerated in the 1850 [1860?] census of Davidson County, city of Nashville, in the household of William R. Hennesbro, No. 370-347, Civil District 22:

“Gowen, John 22, born in TN, merchant”
==O==
John Gowen was married October 11, 1860 to Julia Ann T. Williams, according to Davidson County marriage records. Of John Gowen and Julia Ann T. Williams Gowen nothing more is known.
==O==
John Gowen, laborer, age 21, was living in the household of Harriett Powell, according to the 1860 census of Davidson County, page 419.
==O==
John Gowen appeared in the 1887 city directory of Nashville, and his business was described as “wood and coal, Jefferson, north of Clay.”
==O==
John H. Gowen was married January 13, 1852 to Minerva J. Mences, according to “Davidson County Marriages, “1838-1863.”. Children born to John Gowen and Minerva J. Mences Gowen are unknown.
==O==
John J. Gowen was married May 5, 1823 to Tabitha Hays, according to “Davidson County, Tennessee Marriages, 1788-1850.” Children born to John J. Gowen and Tabitha Hays Gowen are unknown.
==O==
Jordan M. Gowen, a dancing master, was enumerated as the head of Household 862-842, 13th Civil District in the 1860 census of Davidson County:

“Gowen, Jordan M. 53, born in TN, dancing
master, $1,500 real estate,
$600 personal property
Mary 50, born in Alabama
Thompson 12, born in Alabama”
==O==
Joseph Gowen received a deed December 23, 1797 to 126 acres on Mill Creek from John Buchanan, according to Davidson County Deed Book D, page 311. He received an­other deed to 100 acres on Mill Creek from William Thomas September 5, 1801, according to Davidson County Deed Book E, page 337.
==O==
Joseph Gowen was listed in the 1887 edition of the Nashville city directory as a “fireman, North Carolina & St. Louis Rail­road.”
==O==
Josephine Gowen, age 18, Smyrna, Tennessee was married October 25, 1948 to Walter Lee Brewer, age 19, LaVergne, Tennessee, according to Davidson County marriage records.
==O==
Lorenzo D. Gowen was married December 6, 1893 to Danie A. Byers, according to Davidson County marriage records. Children born to Lorenzo D. Gowen and Danie A. Byers Gowen are unknown.
==O==
Louise Gowen, negro, was enumerated as the head of a house­hold in the 1880 census of Davidson County, Enumeration District 77, page 5, Civil District 18. The household was rendered as:

“Gowen, Louise 60, born in TN
Wesley 28, born in TN, son
Alice 30, born in TN, daughter-in-law
Bettie 9, born in TN, granddaughter
Marie 6, born in TN, granddaughter
Lewis A. 4, born in TN, grandson
John Ella 3, born in TN, granddaughter
Harvey 3/12, born in TN, grandson”
==O==
Lucille Gowen, age 19, Tullahoma, Tennessee was married December 26, 1947 to Cleveland Shearin, Shelbyville, Ten­nessee, according to Davidson County marriage records.
==O==
Lucy Ann Gowen was married March 14, 1839 to George W. Shuester, according to Davidson County marriage records.
==O==
Miss M. Gowen [possibly M. Pocahontas Gowen] appeared in the 1872 edition of the Nashville city directory.
==O==
Mack Gowen, negro was married September 25, 1901 to Fannie M. Williams, according to Davidson County marriage records. Children born to Mack Gowen and Fannie M. Williams Gowen are unknown.
==O==
A license was purchased September 29, 1947 for Marianne Gowen, age 18, to marry John Marion Thrash, Jr, age 20, 2819 Sharondale Drive, Nashville, according to Davidson County marriage records.
==O==
Marianne Gowen, age 26, 239 Mereclar Street, Nashville was married December 21, 1955 to Bailey N. Abernathy, age 27, 809 Brookside Drive, Nashville, according to Davidson County marriage records.
==O==
Martin Gowen was enumerated in the 1860 census of David­son County, page 457, as “Gowen, Martin, 28, laborer, born in Tennessee”
==O==
Mary E. Gowen was married January 8, 1849 to Henry P. Robertson, according to “Davidson County, Tennessee Marriages, 1838-1863.”
==O==
Mrs. Mary J. Gowen was born in Virginia in 1812. She was a resident of Tennessee in 1829.

She was enumerated as the head of a household in the 1850 census of Davidson County, Household No. 223-199. The family was listed as:

“Gowen, Mary J. 38, born in VA
Mary J, Jr. 21, born in TN
B. C. 18, born in TN
Margaret C. J. 17, born in TN
C. M. W. 11, born in TN
Lewis G. R. R. 3, born in TN”

A Mrs. M. J. Gowen was married to Rev. E. D. Stephenson June 1, 1864 in Nashville, according to Davidson County mar­riage records.
==O==
Minerva J. Gowen received a deed to 20 acres on Mill Creek February 5, 1852 from Joseph W. Dabbs, according to David­son County Deed Book 15, page 471.
==O==
Nellie Gowen, age 26, was married April 9, 1923 to Brown Boaz, age 26, of Pulaski, Tennessee, according to Davidson County marriage records. S. A. Chambers was surety.
==O==
Nelwyn Jeanene Gowen, age 24, LaVergne, Tennessee was married November 14, 1958 to William Alfred Calvin, age 32, 2628 Flamingo Drive, Nashville, according to Davidson County marriage records.
==O==
Owen M. Gowen, an Irish emigrant, was enumerated as the head of Household 1002-977 in the 1860 census of Davidson County, 13th Civil District:

“Gowen, Owen M. 35, born in Ireland, laborer
Ann 23, born in Ireland, wife
May 2, born in TN
Phillip W. 1/12, born in TN”
==O==
Robert Harrison Gowen, age 22, 4606 Leland Lane was mar­ried January 30, 1950 to Margaret Adele Adams, age 22, ac­cording to Davidson County marriage records. Of Robert Harrison Gowen and Margaret Adele Adams Gowen nothing more is known.

==O==
Samuel G. Gowen was married to Malinda A. Long August 7, 1870 by T. A. Mason, minister of the gospel, according to Davidson County marriage records. Malinda A. Long Gowen, “widow of Samuel Gowen, boardinghouse, 213 Broad” appeared in the 1887 edition of the city directory of Nashville. In 1888 she appeared at her home at 515 South Cherry. In the 1891 edition she was listed as a “dressmaker, 507 South High.” In 1892 she was making her home at 313 South Spruce. She did not reappear in the 1893 edition.

Malinda A. Long Gowen, “widow of Samuel Gowen”, was listed in the Ft. Worth, Texas city directory from 1889 to 1908 residing at 412 East 4th Street. She was enumerated in the 1900 census of Tarrant County, Texas, Enumeration District 87, page 2 in the household of her-brother-in-law, James E. Turntrell as:

“Gowen, Malinda A. 67, born in TN in December 1832.”
==O==
Sarah C. Gowen was married April 27, 1853 to Thomas C. [Crafts?] Casey, a possible son of Dempsey Casey of Currituck County, North Carolina, according to “Davidson County, Tennessee Marriages, 1838-1863.”

In the same year Thomas C. Casey was enumerated in Davidson County living with James and Phoebe Smith:

“Smith, James 59,
Phoebe 59,
Kitty 18,
“Casey, Thomas C. 60, pedler, married within the
year”

Thomas C. Casey reappeared in the 1860 census of adjoining Cheatham County, Tennessee. Cheatham County had been created from Davidson County in 1856. According to Alicia Jones, he was enumerated in the First Civil District, page 40:

“Casey, Thomas 68, farmer, born in NC, $1,511
in real estate
S. S. 34, born in TN, [Sarah Catherine Gowen?]
J. D. 4, son, born in TN
Jno 3, son, born in TN
A. C. 1, daughter, born in TN
William H. 24, son, born in TN”

Children born to Thomas C. Casey and Sarah C. [S?] Gowen Casey include:

James D. Casey born about 1856
John Casey born about 1857
Anna Catherine Casey born about 1859
==O==
Susan L. Gowen, age 26, was enumerated in the 1870 census of Davidson County, page 443.
==O==
Thomas Gowen was enumerated as the head of a household in the 1850 census of Davidson County, Household 175, page 710.

“Gowen, Thomas 30, born in TN, woodcutter
Elizabeth 27, born in TN
George 13, born in TN
James 8, born in TN
Josiah 6, born in TN
Still, George 23, born in TN, laborer
Hilton, Jerome 19, born in TN, woodcutter”
==O==
Thomas Gowen, negro was married January 29, 1877 to Journie Baugh, according to Davidson County marriage records. Children born to Thomas Gowen and Journie Baugh Gowen are unknown.
==O==
Vivian Karen Gowen, age 23, 1807 19th Avenue South was married September 1, 1965 to Thomas Wayne Newman, 2006 Dabbs Avenue, Nashville, according to Davidson County mar­riage records.
==O==
Wesley Gowen, negro was married January 18, 1877 to Alice Porter, according to Davidson County marriage records. Of Wesley Gowen and Alice Porter Gowen nothing more is known.
==O==
William Gowen “of Davidson County, Tennessee” purchased from Jenkins Whitesides, also of Davidson County 100 acres on Richland Creek of Elk River in Lincoln County, Ten­nessee for $1,500 September 11, 1820, according to Lincoln County Deed Book B-1, page 108. The land was part of 5,000 acres originally granted to Martin Armstrong in Grant No. 1107, probably for Revolutionary service.
==O==
William Gowen [or Gavin or Goven] was enumerated as the head of a household in the 1860 [?] census of Davidson County, City of Nashville, Household 115-115. The family was recorded as:

“Gowen, William 26, born in TN, no profession
Jane 27, born in TN
A. M. 8/12, born in TN
Gowen, Joanna 46, born in TN
John 23, born in TN
Henry 21, born in TN
Anne 17, born in TN”
==O==
William F. Gowen was married January 26, 1886 to Nannie A. Chadones, according to Davidson County marriage records. Children born to William F. Gowen and Nancy Chadones Gowen are unknown.
==O==
Willie Gowen, age 14 in 1860, was living in the home of A. J. Folsom, according to the 1860 census of Davidson County, page 148.
==O==
Miss Winifred Gowen, age 20, was married January 6, 1928 to Milburn L. Hogue, age 26, 228 Bascobel, Nashville, according to Davidson County marriage records.
==O==
Alvin Buell Gowens was born in 1928. He was married June 25, 1965 to Barbara Gayle Walpool, age 22, according to Davidson County Marriage records. Of Alvin Buell Gowens and Barbara Gayle Walpool Gowens nothing more is known.
==O==
Ed Gowens, negro was married August 21, 1897 to Henrietta Cunningham August 21, 1897, according to Davidson County marriage records. Children born to Ed Gowens and Henri­etta Cunningham Gowens are unknown.
==O==
James W. Gowens requested a license to marry Martha Hooberry December 6, 1864, according to Davidson County marriage records. No return was made of the license.
==O==
Jarrett Gowens, negro, was married to Frances Mullins March 15, 1877, according to Davidson County marriage records. “Jarrett Gowen,” negro, was remarried to Lou Harris January 10, 1880. “Garrett Going,” negro, was remarried to Lou Harris January 29, 1889, according to Davidson County marriage records. “Jarrett Gowen,” negro, was married to Janie Rucker August 26, 1898. “Jarrett Going,” negro was married to Onie Irvin August 14, 1909. Moses Going was bondsman. Jarrett Gowens was married to Daisy Cunningham July 21, 1914, according to Davidson County marriage records.
==O==
Lane Gowens lived at 4701 Outer Drive, according to the 1959 telephone directory of Nashville.
==O==
Ray Gowens, age 36, 208 Bernie Dillon Building, Nashville was married May 27, 1930 to Mrs. Mabel Nowhie Ramsey, age 28, according to Davidson County marriage records. Ray Gowens lived at 1209 Ashwood Avenue, according to the 1959 telephone directory of Nashville.
==O==
Syntha Gower was fined “for not attending when summoned to testify in behalf of Thomas Hampton against John Boyd and James Foster” October 7, 1789, according to Davidson County Court minutes.
==O==
William Gower was appointed a grand juror in the April term of 1784, and he recorded his brand there in July 1784, accord­ing to Davidson County Court minutes.
==O==
Michael Gowin was married November 9, 1860 to Margaret Gannon, according to Davidson County marriage records. Children born to Michael Gowin and Margaret Gannon Gowin are unknown.
==O==
Rev. Henry E. Gowins lived at 1407 9th Avenue North, according to the 1971 telephone directory of Nashville.
==O==
Mrs. Mary Gowing was married to James Arthur February 11, 1865, according to Davidson County Marriage records.
==O==
Gordon Gowne appeared as the head of a household in the 1860 census of Davidson County. The family was rendered as:

“Gowne, Gordon 48, born in Virginia, shoemaker
Jamina 36, born in TN
Samuel 14, born in TN
Johna 12, born in TN
Susan 10, born in TN
Charles 8, born in TN
Daniel 6, born in TN
Margaret 4, born in TN
Sarah 2, born in TN
Elby 1/12, born in TN”
==O==
Samuel McGowen appeared on Davidson County jury panels July 8, 1779, April 4, 1786, and in October 1786, according to Davidson County Court minutes.
==O==
John McGown was named on a road committee “to oversee the road from Mansker’s Station to Heaton’s Station” January 12, 1792, according to Davidson County Court minutes.
==O==
Miss Willie Gowen Tompkins, daughter of John Thomas Tompkins and Nannie Ellen Webb Tompkins, was born June 7, 1884 in Davidson County. She was married about 1901 to John Judah.

DECATUR COUNTY, TENNESSEE

J. Gowan was enumerated as the head of Household 841-841 in the 1860 census of Decatur County, 11th Civil District:

“Gowan, J. 28, born in TN, day laborer
C. 28, born in TN, wife
J. W. 8, born in TN, male
R. 6, born in TN, male
R. 4, born in TN, male”
==O==
Living in the household of J. M. Jones, No. 854-854, 11th Civil District in the 1860 census of Decatur County were four Gowen individuals:

“Jones, J. M. 30, born in TN, day laborer”
Gowen M. 26, born in TN, female
Gowen J. M. 8, born in TN, male
J. J. 6, born in TN, male
C. M. 5, born in TN, male
A. J. 2, born in TN, male”
==O==
S. O. Gowens was enumerated as the head of Household 778-779, 12th Civil District, Decatur County:

“Gowens, S. O. 27, born in TN, farmer, $250 real
estate, $240 personal property,
illiterate
J. M. 27, born in TN
E. 5, born in TN, female
E. E. 3, born in TN, female”

DEKALB COUNTY, TENNESSEE

Sarah Goens was married to Joe Kimbrow April 25, 1879 in Dekalb County according to Tenessee Marriage records [1851-1900].
==O==
Jackson Goin was married to M. A. Goin November 5, 1876 in Dekalb County according to Tennessee marriage records.
==O==
John Goines married Pollie A. Goines on February 13, 1887, according to DeKalb County marriage records.
==O==
Samuel Goines married Sarah Brown on December 25, 1884, according to DeKalb County marriage records.
==O==
Isebel Goins was married to Scott Columbus [also appears as Scott Columus] Novemer 28, 1883 in Dekalb County.
==O==
Clay Gowan, a mulatto [or Melungeon] was listed as the head of a household enumerated in the 1880 census of DeKalb County, Enumeration District 25, page 23, Civil District 1, as:

“Gowan, Clay 45, born in TN, mulatto
Fannie 31, born in TN, white
Jim 13, born in TN, mulatto
Nora 10, born in TN, mulatto
Lulu 9, born in TN, mulatto
Mack 4, born in TN, mulatto
Willie 6, born in TN, mulatto, daughter
Ewing 3, born in TN, mulatto
Clay 8/12, born in TN, mulatto”
==O==
Polley Gowans married Lucien Preston on February 19, 1869 in DeKalb County, according to Tennesse marriage records [1851-1900].
==O==
Mollie Gowen was married to John Rollins March 22, 1879 in Dekalb County according to Tennessee Marriage records (1851-1900).
==O==
Nannie Gowen was married to Liv Tubb December 17, 1876 in Dekalb County according to Tennessee Marriage records [1851-1900].
==O==
Susan M. Gowen was married to E. K. Atwell May 13, 1877 in Dekalb County according to Tennessee Marriage records (1851-1900).
==O==
W. D. Gowen was married to Mattie E. Wood September 25, 1873 in Dekalb County according to Tennessee Marriage records (1851-1900). Nothing more is known of W. D. Gowen and Mattie E. Wood Gowen.
==O==
Joshua Gowens was married February 27, 1881 to Jane King, according to Dekalb County marriage records. Children born to Joshua Gowens and Jane King Gowens are unknown.
==O==
Spencer Gowens was married February 11, 1859 to Edith Morrison, according to Dekalb County marriage records. Children born to Spencer Gowens and Edith Morrison Gowens are unknown.

DICKSON COUNTY, TENNESSEE

James Goan, a farmer was listed in the 1820 census of Dick­son County as the head of household No. 559. Enumerated in the household were:

“James Goan white male 26-45
white female 16-26
white male 0-10
white male 0-10
white female 0-10
white female 0-10”
==O==
G. W. L. Gowen was born in Tennessee in 1827. He was mar­ried about 1850. He, a blacksmith, appeared September 27, 1860 as the head of a Household 1063-1063, near Danielsville, Tennessee in the 1860 census of Dickson County, Middle Division, page 276-A, enumerated as:

“Gowen, G. W. L. 33, born in TN, blacksmith, $500 real
estate, $130 personal property
M. 32, born in TN, wife
W. C. 9, born in TN, son
J. W. 7, born in TN, son
M. A. 6, born in TN, daughter
S. E. 4, born in TN, daughter
G. W. 3, born in TN, son
L. 1, born in TN, daughter
J. 1/12, born in TN, son”

DYER COUNTY, TENNESSEE

Allen Goings was recorded as the head of a household in the 1900 census of Dyer County, Enumeration District 15, page 5, living in Dyersburg, Tennessee:

“Goings, Allen, 24, born in January 1876 in TN
Mary 26, born in March 1874 in TN
Mattie 5, born in March 1895 in TN
Irene 2, born in January 1898 in TN
Lillie 5/12, born in December 1899 in TN
==O==
Andy Goins, negro, was enumerated as the head of a household in the 1900 census of Dyer County, Enumeration District 16, page 4, living in Dyersburg, Tennessee:

“Goins, Andy 34, born in TN, July 1865, negro
Mat 30, born in TN, January 1870, wife
Percy 17, born in TN, September 1882
Earnest 15, born in TN, December 1884
Earry 13, born in TN, October 1886
Willie 9, born in TN, October 1890
Earmer 6, born in TN, September 1893
Ada M . 5, born in TN, August 1894
Mary 3, born in TN, February 1884”
==O==
D. C. Gowen was born in Tennessee in 1827 of parents who were both born in Virginia. He was married before 1860, wife’s name Tennessee. The household of D. C. Gowen was enumerated in the 1880 census of Dyer County, Enumeration District 5, page 18, Second Civil District as:

“Gowen, D. C. 53, born in TN, father born in
VA, mother born in VA
Tennessee 46, born in AL, father born in NC
mother born in GA
Hamilton 18, born in TN,, father born in
TN, mother born in Alabama
Mary 17, born in TN, father born in
TN, mother born in AL
John 16, born in TN, father born in
TN, mother born in AL
James 14, born in TN, father born in
TN, mother born in AL
Pleasant 12, born in TN, father born in
TN, mother born in AL
Martha 11, born in TN, father born in
TN, mother born in AL
Julia Ann 10, born in TN, father born in
TN, mother born in AL
Susan 9, born in TN, father born in
TN, mother born in Al
Thomas 8, born in TN, father born in
TN, mother born in AL
Alles 4, born in TN, father born in
TN, mother born in AL,
daughter
William 20, born in TN, father born in
TN, mother born in AL, son”
==O==
Mark Gowen, negro, was enumerated as the head of a house­hold in the 1900 census of Dyersburg, Tennessee, Enumeration District 16, page 4:

“Gowen, Mark 38, born in TN in December 1861
Martin 32, born in TN in March 1868, wife
Osie 5, born in TN in April 1895, son
Howard 3, born in TN in May 1897, son
George 1, born in TN in January 1899, son”

FAYETTE COUNTY, TENNESSEE

No individuals by the name of Gowen [or spelling variations] appeared in the 1836 tax list of Fayette County.
==O==
L. S. Goen was enumerated as the head of a household in the 1880 census of Fayette County, Enumeration District 24, page 18, Civil District 8:

“Goen, L. S. 52, born in TN
A. E. 53, born in TN
Glosip, S. J. 30, born in TN, niece
J. E. 5, born in TN,
great niece, daughter of S. J. Glosip”
==O==
C. A. Goins was married March 17, 1843 to Sarah F. B. Elder, according to “Fayetten County, Tennessee Masrriages, 1848-1850.” Children born to C. A. Goins and Sarah F. B. Elder Goins are unknown.
==O==
William Gowan, negro, son of Pugh Gowan and Classie Gowan, was born in September 1872 in Tennessee. In 1916 he was a farmer in Fayette County. He died there November 2, 1916 “of gastroenteritis,” according to Tennessee BVS Death Certificate No. 414. Pearley Mitchell of Moscow, Tennessee was the informant.
==O==
Sarah Jane Gowen was married to E. F. Atkin, January 30, 1848, according to “Fayette County, Tennessee Masrriages, 1838-1850.”

FRANKLIN COUNTY, TENNESSEE

Nathen Goin was enumerated as the head of a household in the 1900 census of Franklin County, Enumeration District 27, page 10:

Goin, Nathen 72, born in TN, September 1827
Vandorey 30, born in TN, October 1869
Marah 28, born in TN, February 1872
John 23, born in TN, January 1877
Harvey 21, born in TN, November 1878
Nathaniel 5, born in TN, October 1894″
==O==
Samuel Goin was reported as the head of a household in the 1900 census of Franklin County, Enumeration District 27, page 13:

“Goin, Samuel 28, born in TN, March 1871
Marah 21, born in TN, September 1878
Harie 1, born in TN, July 1898, son”
==O==
Thomas Goin was shown as head of a household in the 1900 census of Franklin County, Enumeration District 28, page 9:

“Goin, Thomas 30, born in TN, May 1870
Nancy M. 39, born in TN, April 1861
Joseph C. 5, born in TN, June 1895
Carnel C. 3, born in TN, April 1897
Adams, John H. 14, born in TN, July 1886,
stepson”
==O==
William Goin was enumerated as the head of a household in the 1900 census of Franklin County, Enumeration District 27, page 13:

“Goin, William 26, born in TN, September 1873
Learie 24, born in TN, February 1876
Frank 2, born in TN, June 1895”
==O==
Antney Gouing, “step-son of Obe Brown” was enumerated in the 1900 census of Franklin County, Enumeration District 27, page 11 as “age 33, born in Tennessee in November 1866.”
==O==
John M. Gowan, “of the County of Franklin” deeded 10 acres of land to Roswell Hall of Rhea County, Tennessee February 24, 1821, according to Franklin County Deed Book A, page 23. The land lay “between the town of Jasper and the creek formerly known as Hudson Creek.” This area was later included in Marion County, Tennessee.

“John Gowen” appeared in the 1840 census of Bedford County, Tennessee, page 30, as the head of a household. The family was recorded as:

“Gowen, John white male 50-60
white female 40-50
white male 20-30
white male 20-30
white female 15-20
white female 5-10”

The family did not reappear in the 1850 census of Bedford County.
==O==
Thomas O. Gowan appeared as the head of a household in the 1850 census of Franklin County. The family was rendered as:

“Gowin, Thomas O. 38, born in TN
Mary H. 28, born in TN
Benjamin H. 12, born in MS
Thomas I. 10, born in TN
James H. 3, born in TN
Sarah 1, born in TN”
==O==
The 1890 polltax list of Franklin County included Bill Gowins, Noah Gowins, Joshua Gowins, Jack Gowins and Granville Gowins.
==O==
Levi Gown was appointed to a road committee June 4, 1832, and in May 1838, according to Franklin County Court Minute Book, page 38.
==O==
“Gown & Gown” paid an advalorem tax on 110 acres, ac­cording to the 1890 tax list of Franklin County. Mrs. Mattie Gown paid an advalorem tax on a three-acre town lot in 1890.

GIBSON COUNTY, TENNESSEE

Drury Gowan was married to Fanny Hall January 17, 1853, according to “Gibson County, Tennessee Marriages, 1824-1860.” Children born to Drury Gowan and Fanny Hall Gowan are unknown.
==O==
Lucinda Gowan appeared as the head of a household in the 1880 census of Gibson County, Enumeration District 32, page 16:

“Gowan, Lucinda 43, born in TN
Johnson, James 18, born in TN
Nettie 14, born in TN, daughter
Gowan, Fannie 4, born in TN, daughter”

Apparently Lucinda Gowan had been widowed twice. “Lou Gowan, age 60, born in Tennessee in February 1839” was enu­merated in the 1900 census of Gibson County, Enumeration District 31, page 2, living alone.
==O==
R. M. Gowan was married to Mary Jane McFarlen November 24, 1854, according to “Gibson County, Tennessee Marriages, 1824-1860.” Children born to R. M. Gowan and Mary Jane McFarlen Gowan are unknown.
==O==
Sophronia E. Gowan was married January 17, 1853 to George M. Taylor, according to “Gibson County, Tennessee Marriages, 1824-1860.”
==O==
Will Gowan, “age 15, born in May 1885, servant of William Wood,” was enumerated in Wood’s household in the 1900 cen­sus of Gibson County, Enumeration District 47, page 12.
==O==
William J. Gowan was married Augut 21, 1851 to Dicey McFarland, according to “Gibson County, Tennessee Marriages, 1824-1860.” Children born to William J. Gowan and Dicey McFarland Gowan are unknown.
==O==
Mattie Gowen was enumerated in the 1900 census of Gibson County, Enumeration District 48, page 9 living in the house­hold of Benjamin H. Williams in Milan, Tennessee where she was employed as his housekeeper.

GILES COUNTY, TENNESSEE

Giles County was organized in 1809 with land from adjoining Maury County, Tennessee. A great many settlers came into the area, only to learn that they were “Intruders” on land that the Chickasaw Indians claimed by treaty.

U. S. Army soldiers from Ft. Hampton were ordered to remove the settlers. Between the years 1809 and 1811 federal soldiers made numerous forays onto the Chickasaw reservation in order to remove illegal settlers and destroy their improvements, including crops and homes.

The settlers appealed to Pres. James Madison. In 1810 they addressed a petition to Washington:

“The 1810 Elk River Intruders Petition

Although commonly referred to as the “Simms’ Settlement Petition, many of the 450 men and women [Intruders] who signed the following document were residing elsewhere within the untreated Chickasaw lands, including Giles County, although Simms Settlement [on the Elk River in present-day Limestone County, Alabama, just south of Giles] does appear to have been where the settlers’ returned to regroup following the 1809 Intruder Removals.

Many of these names and those on the 1809 Elk River Intruder List are also on the 1812 Giles county tax list, and a sampling has been indicated by the use of the symbol after the name.

Excerpted from The Territorial Papers of the United States, The Territory of Mississippi, 1809-1817, Volume VI, com-piled and edited by Clarence Edwin Carter, published by the United States Government Printing Office,
Washington, 1928, pp. 106-113:

Page 106–108] Mississippi Territory

PETITION TO THE PRESIDENT AND CONGRESS BY
BY INTRUDERS ON CHICKASAW LANDS

Mississippi Territory, Elk River, Sims’es Settlement

September 5th 1810–

To his Excellency James Maddison President of the United States of America and the honourable Congress assembled:

We your petitioners humbly sheweth that a great many of your fellow citizens have unfortunately settled on what is now called Chickasaw land- which has led us into difficultys that tongue cannot express if the orders from the ware department are executed in removeing us off of said land.

However in a government like ours founded on the will of the people, we have reason to hope and expect that we shall be treated with as much lennity as the duty you owe to Justice will permit.

We therefore wish, Without the shade or colour of falshood, to leve to your consideration the main object of our setling of this country. In the first Place, we understood that all the land on the north side of Tennessee river was purchased of the Indians which was certainly the Case, and further we understood that this was congress land as we call it and by paying of two Dollars per acre we should obtain An undoubted title to our lands and avoide the endless law suits that arise in our neighboring states in the landed property under these and many other impressions of minde that appeared inviteing to us to setle here a great many of us solde our possessions and Came and settled here in the winter and spring of 1807 without any knoledg or intention of violating the laws of government or Infringing on the right of another nation and we remained in this peacefull situation untill the fall of 1807 when General Robertson Came on runing the Chickasaw boundary line and he informed us that, though the Cherokees had sold this land, yet the Chickasaws held a clame to it as their right.

And now as booth nations |had| set up a clame to this land and Government having extingushed the Cherokee clame; and we who are well acquainted with the boundarys of this country do think in Justice that the Cherokees had undoubtedly the best right to this land we could state our reasons for thinking so, in many cases, but we shall only refurr you to one particular, that is when Zacheriah Cocks (1) made a purchase of parte of this country and came in order to settle it, he landed on an island in the Mussell Shoals, and was making preparations to ingarrison himself, but when the Cherokees Understood his intentions, they got themselves together and sent in messingers to him telling him if he did not desist and remove his men out of their country they would certainly imbody themselves and cut him off. And Cocks took the alarme And left the Island in the night. And if the cherokees had not defended this country at that time it may be persumed that it would have been taken from the Chickasaws without asking of them anything about their right to it. For the Cherokees do say that they have held an antiant clame to it which they never lost by sword or treaty untill extinguished by government.

And should this be the case and appeare to your satisfaction that the cherokees had at least as good a right as the Chickasaw and you haveing that right invested in you-and you are allso willing to pay the Chickasaw for their clame and they refuse to sell it, where then can there remain a single doubt In the publick Minde of doing the Chickasaws any kind of unjustice in makeing use of the Cherokee clame and saying: if they will not take a reasonable price for their clame we will not remove our fellow citizens off which will bring many women and children to a state of starvation mearly to gratify a heathan nation Who have no better right to this land than we have ourselves.

And they have by estemation nearly 100000 acres of land to each man Of their nation and of no more use to government or society than to saunter about upon like so many wolves or bares whilst they who would be a supporte to government and Improve the country must be forsed even to rent poore stony ridges to make a support to rase their famelies on whist there is fine fertile countrys lying uncultivated and we must be debared even from inJoying a small Corner of this land, but we look to your boddy of government as a friendly father to us and believe it Compleatley within your power Whilst you are administering Justice between us and the Chickasaws to say with the greatest propriety that we have once purchased this land and we will not remove our fellow citizens off but let them remain as tennants at will untill the Chickasaws may feell a disposition to sell us their clame.

Therefore we your humble petitioners wish you to take our standing duely into consideration and not say they are a set of dishoneste people who have fled from the lawes of their country and it is no matter what is done With them.

For we can support our carractors to be other ways and it is our wish and desire to protect and supporte our own native Government we must informe you that in the settling of this country men was obliged to expose themselves very much and the Climate not helthy a number of respectable men have deceased and left their widows with families Of alphan [orphan] children to rase in the best way they can.

And you might allmost as well send the sword amongst us as the fammin the time being short that our orders permits us to stay on. We wish you to send us an answer to our petition as soon as posable and, for heavens Sake, Pause to think what is to become of these poore alphan families who have more need of the help of some friendly parish than to have the strictest orders executed on them who has not a friend in this unfeeling world that is able to asist them Either in geting off of said land or supporting when they are off. We are certain in our own minds that if you could have A true representation of our carractor the industry we have made and the purity of our intentions in settling here together with the justice of our cause you would say in the name of God let them stay on and eat their well earned bread.

Perhaps our number may be fare more than you are apprised of from the best calculation that we can make, there is Exclusive of Doublehead’s reserv (2) 2250 souls on what is called Chickasaw land and all of us could live tollerabie comfortable if we Could remain on our improvements, but the distance is so great if we are removed off that we cannot take our produce with Us and a great many not in a circumstance to purchase more will in consequence of this be brought to a deplorable situation.

We shall therefore conclude in hopes that on a due consideration we shall find favour in the sight of your most honourable Body which will in duty binde your petitioners to ever Pray &c.

Wm. Sims (3)
James Sims
Michael Odaniell
Thomas Skagg
Wiliam Payne
Berry Matlock
George Brown
James Reynolds
Larkin Webb

Isaac Crowson
Benjimen osbourn
Robert Cravens
Andrew Arnett
Jonathan Cochron
Hoseph Bradley
James Wooley
Henry Lysby
Isaac Gibson

Samuel Easely
David Simon
John Hoddge
John Coward
Charles Skaggs Sen
Charles Skaggs Jur
Charles Williams
William Adams
Wm Bowling Sen
Wm Bowling Jr
Wm Cooper
Wm Conway
Charles Easely
John Scaggs
John Eppler
Jonathan Eppler
James Neill
Isham Brown
James Brown
Abraham Brown
Edward Davis
Rawleigh Dodson
Aaron Luisley
Simon Foy
Benj. Murrell
Calvin Wittey
Caleb Juett
Isaac Murrell
George Arbuthnot
Francis Daugherty
Bejman Carrel
Asa Magge
Sammell Preed Jun
Sammul Preed
James Preed
Christopher Baylor
Marckel Stockdon
Thomas Redus
Abraham Sims
Richard Murrell
John Daugherty
James Hodge
James Hood
William Mayer
William Hodge
William Hoodser
Edmond Fears
William Hood Jr
Ely Robertson
Samuel Robertson
Michel Robertson
John Allon
James Ball
[MS illegible]
John McCutchen
David McCutchen
John Calwell
John Bidell
John Rosson
Simon Rosson
Richard Linville
Wm. Nelson
John Nelson
James Ford
James Caldwell
Wm. Kile
Samuel Bradley
William Adams
Roland McKenny
James McKenny
John McKenny
Ruben McKenny
Robert McKenny
William McKenny
John Lynn
Elijah Price
John Hogges
John Sessoms
Amos Moor
William Ellis
John Thomas
Joshua Perkins
Issac Fraey
Lovill Coffman
Cornelius Gatliff
James Redey
John Panton
Jesse Panton
William Hooker
Thomas Pool
Philmer Green Senr
Jere. McKellins
Reuben Riggs
William Candon
James Riggs
Robert Tayler
Enoch Tayler
John Tayler
Jas Wilder
Fracis Ascaugh
Joab Arbagh
Jas. Wherrey
John Bell
Benjamin Russell
Edward Frost
Jas. Anderson
Joseph Evans
Henry Evans
John Scallern
Jacob Scallern
John Wainwright
John Myers
James Green
John Mowery
Alexander Dutton
George Fergel
John Sauls
Reel Matcok
John Bartell
John Kim
Andr Jackson
Henry Miller
Abraham Miller
Robert Foury
Joseph Calvert
James Mossy
James McMahhan
Jessy Cooper
David Miller
Levi Cummins
Mark Mitchell
Allen Cotton
John Cotton
William Cox
Thomas Hardy
George Loften
John Tayler
John Reed
Elkin Tayler
Lennard Lofton
Joseph Foster
Abraham Kirkelot
John Kirkendall
Jos. Jones
Levi Cooper
John Cooper
John Paine
Fuller Cox
Sami Cox
Joseph Looker
William Riggs
Bridges Freeman
Charles Hulsey
Beverly Philips
Shaderick Cross
Benjamin Ishmal
Benjn. Cross
Henry Cross
Jonathan Adams
Thos. Adams
Robt. Wallis
James Isaac
Hardin Hulsey
William Hill
Jas Miller
John Hamlin
Samuel Smith
Ellexander Smith
Felps Smith
Wm. Smith
Bryan Smith
Jonathon Greenhow
Wm. Greenhow
Greenbery Greenhow
John Croslin
Benjamin French
Henry Croslin
Jessey Richardson
Joseph England
David Dudden
John Crage
Michal Trimble
Elisha Rainbolt
Jas Craig
John Mitchell Snr
Elisha Garritt
John Mitchell Jnr
George Mitchell
Wm. Smith
Jno. Sanders
Reuben Sanders
Joseph Carnes
Wm Carnes
Redden Crisp
Wm. Black
Levi Black
Jos. Keen
John Allman
Walter Tremble
Elye Hornback
Wm. McGowen
Robt. Hodges Jnr.
Robert Stenson
John Smith
John Runnels
Francis Bird
Thos. Henderson
Shadrach Morres
Lewis Tacket
William Kellett
Joseph Kellett
James Kellett
James Humphrs [Humphreys?]
William Humphrs
Charles Smith
William Stephens
Samuel Nelson
George Honbre
Joel James
Henry McGuin
Wm Mullin
Thomas Mullin
John Toliver
Matt Smith
James Mullens
Jaret Brandon
James Smith
John Miller
Elijah Major
James Major
John Trimble
Joshua Brunson
David Parker
John Ray
John Carnham
Jacob Pyeatt
James Pyeatt
Aron Gibson
Cabot Turner
Isack Shipman
John Hakins
George S. Wilson
Josha Bruntson
James Slaughter
Jesop Luster
John Luster
James Luster
Robert McGowen
DanI McIntyre
Alexr Masky (or Marky)
John Chambers
Thos Price
Joel Philips
Wm. Stinson
George Hauge
Ezek. Smith
Wm Smith
Andrew Smith
Jame McConel (or McCarrel)
Sami McConell
Jams M. McConell William Chambers
Jno. Webb
George Bankhead
Jno Bankhead
Michael Shaly
George Shaly
Fredrich Shaly
Moses Crosen [Crowson?]
Moses Chot
John Vans
Duncan McAntire
William Voss
Alex Miller
William Cochran
John Welch
William Welch Senr
Beverly Luster
David Luster
Jas Bevers
Jonathan Burleson
John Burleson
Mathew Brunston
William Slaughter
Jonathan Blair
John Billinsly
Johnathan Greenhow
Clouds Greenhow
Alexander Moor
Robert Moor
John Umphres [Humphreys?]
Archable Tremble
James Garner
John Bell
James Burlston
Robert Thresher
David Thompson
John Roguey(?)
David Capshaw
Malachi Reeves
Robert Gresham
Amos French
William W. Capshaw
George Ogel
George McCown
David Allerd
William Magers(?)
Harda Allerd
Georg Cooper
David Water
John Wager
Harmon Horn
Banra Devon
John Gebbens
Robt Gebbins
Saml Gibbons
James Gibbons
Jos. Gibbons
Clemen Arman(?)
Mathew Brewer
James Norman
Aaron Shote
John Shote
John Wynn
M. Armstrong
Thos. Dodd
Isaac Perrett
Jeremiah Rowlen
Mitchell O’Neel
Jessy Dillion
Tiery O’Neel
Hirram O’Neel
Joseph Brunson
John Parmerly
Richard Robertson
George Taylour
Ellken Taylor
John Taylour Junr.
Robert Taylour
Hanum Taylour
John Taylour Sen.
Thomas Read
John Read
Wm. Taylour
Nathanniel Hannet [Hamet?]
James Dunahoo
James Long
John Cooper
Leire Cooper
James Dunham
Alexr Dunham
Thomas Brighton
Names of the Widows
Damarias Bowling
Amerida Hatton
Betsey Williams
Mahaley Robertson
Gilly Crowson
Milly Hogwood
Drankey(?) Medders
Patsey Carter
Caty Lawrence
Joan Black
Ann Johnstons
Susan Wigges
Betsey Cooper
Ann Grin(?)
Elizebeth Sims
Grizell Sims
Polly Prigman
Sally Williams
Any Taylour
Christiana McRavey
Men’s Names
Abner Camnon (or Camron)
Jessey Beavers
John Hoaton
Robert Hoaton
Nicholess Boren
James Boren
Abner Boren
Henry Davis
Benjamin Land
Andrew Blithe
Jacob Blithe
Wm. Lilly
Obediah Martin
Wm. Martin
Henson Day
Andrew Pickins
Joseph L. Jones
Hugh Bradon
Adam Burney
James Burney
Wm. Ferrell
Owen Shannon
William Cooper
Jas. Braden
James Steward
John Cooper
Levi Cooper
Chale Dever
John Black Junr
Prier Kile
Reuben Smith
Isac Lann (or Lanse)
Eli Tidwell
Millin Tidwell
Eli Tidwell
Daniel Kinny
Owin Shannon Se.
James Renn
H. T. Hendry
Jos L. Hendry
William Cramer
William Murrell
William Smith
John Smith
John Black Senr
Gabriel Tayour [Taylour?]
Natheniell Harbin(?)
Jessee Harbin
James Harbin
Robert Wood Millenton Tidwell
James Leath
Edward Shoat
Vantenten [Valentin?] Shoat
John Taylour
Benjamin Tutt
Thomas Kile
James Pickins

[Endorsed] Petition (addressed to James Madison, Pres: U.S. by 450 of the Intruders upon the Chickasaw Territory:

Reced Octo. 1st 1810.

Simon Foy and Thomas Dodd are not on the 1812 Giles tax list, but are mentioned by McCallum as early Elk River settlers. Both are also on the 1809 Intruders List (1) According to McCallum’s History of Giles…, “The treaties of 1805 and 1806 extinguished the Indian title to a considerable portion of what is now Madison County, in Alabama, a scope of country in the shape of a “V,” some thirty miles wide on the South boundary of the Tennessee with a point on the Tennessee River at Ditto’s landing, with about eight miles front on the river.

Soon after the treaty, Zachariah Cox and his associates, the “Tennessee Yazoo Company”, claimed this scope of country as against the US Government. Under their purchase from the State of Georgia in 1795, they commenced settling it and having it settled up. They were resisted by the Government and those claiming under said purchase were driven off.”

(2) Fort Hampton at the Doublehead Reserve became home to the soldiers’ whose duty it was to rid the reservation lands of “intruders.” A list dated (3) The original transcription included numbers which were commonly referred to as “Sims Numbers.” Those were not included in this edition.
==O==
William Goins was married to Frances Bunch July 6, 1865 in Giles County according to Tennessee Marriage records (1851-1900). Nothing more is known of William Goins and Frances Bunch Goins.
==O==
The family of Ernest B. Gowan was involved in an automobile accident June 20, 1983 six miles west of Columbia on SH99, according to the “Columbia State.” The newspaper identified the dead as Ernest B. Gowan, Pulaski; his wife, Brenda Gowan, 35, their daughter Lisa 11; Rayburn S. Cooper, 57 of Etheridge, Tennessee and his wife, Mildred Cooper, 53. Another Gowan daughter, seven-year-old Tina Gowan was hospitalized with a cut across her face.
==O==
Margaret C. Gowen who was born in South Carolina in 1840, was listed as the head of a household in the 1880 census of Giles County. The household, enumerated in Enumera­tion District 101, page 15, Civil District 3 in the Manuel Roberts household included:

“Gowen, Margaret C. 40, born in South Carolina
John W. 18, born in Alabama
Thomas 10, born in TN”
==O==
John William Gowan was born in West Tennessee February 3, 1852 of parents unknown. He was married about 1870, wife’s name Malinda. “J. W. Gown” was enumerated as the head of a household in the 1880 census of Giles County, Enumeration District 114, page 2, Civil District 16:

“Gown, J. W. 28, born in TN
Malinda 26, born in TN
L. A. 9, born in TN, daughter
D. H. 4, born in TN, son”

It is believed that Malinda Gowan died about 1878. John William Gowan was remarried February 3, 1881 to Martha Miles, according to a great-granddaughter, Tjuana Mc-Callister. She was born in January 1857 to Henry Miles.

“John Gowen” was enumerated as the head of a household in the 1900 census of Giles County, Enumeration District 3, page 5:

“Gowen, John 44, born in TN in February 1856
Martha M. 43, born in TN in January 1857
Laticia 21, born in TN May 1879,
daughter
Joe 19, born in TN in Jan. 1881, son
Mary E. 16, born in TN Oct. 1883,
daughter
Willis 14, born in TN in July 1885, son
Sallie 13, born in TN in Feb. 1887,
daughter
Mattie 11, born in TN in March 1889,
daughter
Stanly 6, born in TN in June 1894, son
Fayette 4, born in TN in Aug. 1895, son
John M. 9/12, born in TN in Jan. 1900, son”

In 1915 John William Gowan was a farmer in Giles County.

“Mrs. Martha Miles Gowan, daughter of Henry Miles,” was was living in Giles County in Civil District 11 in 1917. She died there April 24, 1917, “age about 82, [actually age 60] of valvular heart lesion and senility,” according to Tennessee DVS Death Certificate No. 11208. She was buried in Providence Cemetery, according to her son, Joseph Milton Gowan, informant of Providence, Tennessee.

John William Gowan died there December 25, 1932, at age 67 in Giles County of “pneumonia following pulmonary T.B,” according to Tennessee BVS Death Certificate No. 28269. He was buried in Providence Cemetery, according to his son Joseph Milton Gowan, informant, of Pulaski, Tennessee.

Children born to John William Gowan and Malinda Gowan include:

Laticia A. Gowan born in May 1871
D. H. Gowan born about 1876

Children born to John William Gowan and Martha Miles Gowan include:

Joseph Milton Gowan born in January 1881
Mary E. Gowan born in October 1883
Willis Dee Gowan born in July 1885
Sallie Lee Gowan born in February 1887
Stanley Vestal Gowan born in June 1894
Fayette Gowan born in August 1895
John M. Gowan born in January 1900

Laticia A. Gowan, daughter of John William Gowan and Malinda Gowan, was born in May 1871, according to her enumeration in the 1880 census. Her age was reported as “21” [actually 29] in the 1900 census when she was living in her father’s household.

D. H. Gowan, son of John William Gowan and Malinda Gowan was born about 1876 in Tennessee. He appeared as a four-year-old in the 1880 census of his father’s household.

Joseph Milton Gowan, son of John William Gowan and Martha Miles Gowan, was born in January 1881 in Tennessee. He was enumerated as “Joe Gowen” in the 1900 census of his father’s household in Giles County.

He was married about 1901 to Virgie Pearl Warden who was born March 3, 1878 to Moses Warden and Sara Jane Dickson Warden of Moore County, Tennessee.

Joseph Milton Gowan and Virgie Pearl Warden Gowan were residents of Goodsprings, Tennessee in Civil District 6, about 1916. Their family consisted of three sons and four daughters.

He was the informant on the death certificate of his mother who died in 1917 when he lived at Providence and on the death certificate of his father who died in 1932 when he lived at Pulaski, Tennessee.

Virgie Pearl Warden Gowan died there May 12, 1945 of paralysis, according to Tennessee Death Certificate 42806. Her husband, the informant, was age 68 at the time. She was buried in Providence Cemetery, near Pulaski, Tennessee.

Children born to them include four daughters and:

Ernest Gowan born about 1916
Wallace Hill Gowan born about 1918
Carl Gowan born about 1920

Ernest Gowan, son of Joe M. Gowan and Virgie Pearl Warden Gowan, was born about 1916. In 1983 he lived in Pulaski.

Wallace Hill Gowan, son of Joe M. Gowan and Virgie Pearl Warden Gowan, was born about 1918. He was married about 1941 to Mattie Richardson. He became a dairy farmer at Pulaski. He died April 10, 1983 in Giles County Hospital and was buried in Giles Memory Gardens. His obituary mentioned that he was survived by three daughters: Mrs. Don Gilbert of Memphis, Mrs. Alvin Kimbrough of Chattanooga and Mrs. Robert Jacoby of Columbia and four sisters: Mrs. Oscar Surles, Mrs. Aymett Hamlett, Mrs. Virgil Pierce and Mrs. Grady Boone, all of Pulaski.

Children born to Wallace Hill Gowan and Mattie Richardson Gowan include:

Joe F. Gowan born about 1943
Thomas Perry Gowan born about 1946

Joe F. Gowan, son of Wallace Hill Gowan and Mattie Richardson Gowan, was born about 1943. In 1983 he lived in Knoxville.

Thomas Perry Gowan, son of Wallace Hill Gowan and Mattie Richardson Gowan, was born about 1946. In 1983 he lived in Pulaski.

Mary E. Gowan, daughter of John William Gowan and Martha Miles Gowan, was born in October, 1883.

Willis Dee Gowan, son of John William Gowan and Martha Miles Gowan, was born in Giles County in February 1887.

Sallie Lee Gowan, daughter of John William Gowan and Martha Miles Gowan, was born in February 1887.

Stanley Vestal Gowan, son of John William Gowan and Martha Miles Gowan, was born in June 1894 in Giles County.

Fayette Gowan, son of John William Gowan and Martha Miles Gowan, was born in August 1895.

“Fate Gowan” died in Pulaski in 1953.

Children born to him include:

Fred Gowan born about 1920
William Gowan born about 1922
Charles Gowan born about 1925

Fred Gowan, son of Fayette Gowan, was born about 1920.

William Gowan, son of Fayette Gowan, was born about 1922.

Charles Gowan, son of Fayette Gowan, was born about 1925. He was married about 1948, wife’s name Doris. In 1972 Charles Gowan and Doris Gowan lived at 1018 School Street, Columbia, Tennessee.

John M. Gowan, son of John William Gowan and Martha Miles Gowan, was born in January 1900.

111 Grainger Co, TN

GRAINGER COUNTY, TENNESSEE

Grainger County was organized April 22, 1796 with land from Hawkins and Knox counties. It was named for Mary Grainger, maiden name of the wife of William Blount, according to Pollyanna Creekmore, pre-eminent historian of Tennessee. Land was taken from Grainger when Anderson and Claiborne were created in 1801. Additional territory was given up when Union County was created in 1850. A final slice was removed when Hamblen County was created in 1870.

Virginia Easley DeMarse, Foundation researcher, compiled a list of the early taxpayers of Grainger County of interest to Gowen chroniclers. Her account read:

“By the provisions of the Act of 1797, the justices were authorized to take lists of taxable property and polls in various captains’ companies of the militia. White polls were “all free males and male servants, between the age of twenty-one and fiftyyears;” slaves, “all slaves male and female, between the age oftwelve and fifty years.” On Monday, November 3, 1809, the Grainger County Court ordered ten justices to take the list of taxable property and make their returns at the next court session. The returns were made February 19, 20, 21, 1810. The amount of tax was omitted on the copy I abstracted from.

The headers for the following list are:
1) on each 100 acres, 12.5 cents
2) each town lot, 25 cents
3) each free poll, 12.5 cents
4) each black poll, 25 cents 5)
5) each retail store, $5.00.
The acreage is listed after item 1.

Polls and Taxable property in Captain William Mayses Company of Militia returned by Moses Hodge included:

John Goan, 90 acres North Holston, Young’s Creek, no polls.

Claiborne Goan, 100 acres North Holston, Young’s Creek , 1 free poll.

James Goan, 1 free poll.

List of polls and taxable property in the bounds of Captain Elisha Williamson’s Company returned by Henry Boatman included:

William Goan, 1 free poll.
Shaderick Goan, 1 free poll.

List of polls and taxable property in the bounds of Captain John Bull’s Company, returned by John Moffet included:

Caleb Gowin, 1 free poll.

List of Polls and Taxable Property returned by William Clay in the bounds of Captain Richard Cotses’ Company included:

Samuel Bunch, 180 acres at Richland, 1 free poll.
Samuel Bunch for John Spencer, 2.
John Bunch, Senr. 187 acres R. C, 2 polls (black?).
John Bunch, Senr. 200 acres R. Knobbs, 6 (black?) polls, 4 other polls.

Captain Samuel Richardson’s Company returned by David Tate, included:

William Guynn, 200 acres, 1 free poll.

Captain Thomas Sharp’s Company returned by Mathew Campbell included:

Daniel Goan, 338 acres R. Creek, 1 free poll.
Robert Gains, 150 acres R. L. McNabbs, 1 free poll.

Captain George Gifford’s Company returned by Charles McAnally included:

Griffee Collins, 1 free poll.
Thomas Collins, 1 free poll.
Thomas Collins, 1 free poll.
Joseph Collins, 1 free poll.
Dowell Collins, 1 free poll.
Conley Collins, 1 free poll.”

A portion of the 1810 census of Grainger, long believed to have been lost, surfaced during the 1980s in the McClung Historical Collection.

The total population of the county in 1810 stood at 6,397. The breakdown was as follows:

Free White Males
45 & over 315
26-45 438
16-26 548
10-16 478
0-10 1,115

Free White Females
45 & over 270
26-45 462
16-26 542
10-16 481
0-10 270

All other free persons,
except Indians not Taxed 182
Slaves 637

Total 6,397

Several heads of households were listed in the 1830 census of Grainger County that were of interest to Melungeon researchers and Gowen chroniclers:

Edmund Bolen (fc) Ezekel, Bolen (fc)
Shadrach Bolen (fc) Clabourn Bolen (fc)
Edmund Bolen ( fc ) Moses Collins ( fc)
David Goan (fc) Gondly Collins (fc)
Thomas Goan (fc) Dowell Collins (fc )

Nancy Goan (fc) Lewis Collins (fc)
Preston Goan (fc) Encey Collins (fc
Fanny Goan (fc) Hardin Collins(fc)
Joseph Collins (fc) Andrew Collins (fc)
Griffin Collins (fc) Allen Collins (fc)
Levi Collins (fc) Lavinia Lafes(fc)

“fc” indicates “Free Colored”
==O==
Polly Goan [Goin?] was married May 20, 1812 to William Whitecotton, according to “Grainger County, Tennessee Marriages, 1796-1850.”
==O==
Pryor Goan [Goin] was married to Martha Moore March 2, 1831, according to “Grainger County, Tennessee Mar­riages, 1796-1850.” Children born to Pryor Goan and Martha Moore Goan are unknown.
==O==
Ann Goin was married December 19, 1850, according to “Grainger County, Tennessee Marriages, 1796-1850.”
==O==
Caleb Goin was married June 10, 1820 to Polly Dunkin, according to “Grainger County, Tennessee Marriages, 1796-1850.” Of Caleb Goin and Polly Dunkin Goin nothing more is known.
==O==
David Goin was married March 8, 1820 to Nancy Dunkin, according to “Grainger County, Tennessee Marriages, 1796-1850.” Children born to David Goin and Nancy Dunkin Goin are unknown.
==O==
Dicy Goin was married November 19, 1848 to Walker Jackson, according to “Grainger County, Tennessee Marriages, 1796-1850.”
==O==
Drury Goin [Goans?] was married August 23, 1817 to Mary Goin [Goans], according to “Grainger County, Tennessee Marriages, 1796-1850.” Of David Goin and Mary Goin Going nothiug more is known.

Elizabeth Goin was married August 18, 1829 to John Davis, according to “Grainger County, Tennessee Marriages, 1796-1850.”
==O==
Isabella Goin was married January 6, 1813 to Thomas Harriss, according to “Grainger County, Tennessee Marriages, 1796-1850.”
==O==
James R. Goin was married to Mariah Jarnagin August 19, 1849, according to “Grainger County, Tennessee Mar­riages, 1796-1850.” Children born to James R. Goin and Mariah Jarnagin Goin are unknown.
==O==
Jane Goin was married to Abram Bell December 3, 1841, according to “Grainger County, Tennessee Marriages, 1796-1850.”
==O==
Jeremiah Goin was married February 28, 1829 to Levenia Renfro, according to “Grainger County, Tennessee Marriages, 1796-1850.” Children born to Jeremiah R. Goin and Levenia Renfro Goin are unknown.
==O==
John Goin was married January 10, 1845 to Martha Jane Goin, according to “Grainger County, Tennessee Marriages, 1796-1850.” of John Goin and Martha Jane Goin Goin nothing more is known.
==O==
Levi Goin was married to Nancy Dickson December 8, 1825, according to “Grainger County, Tennessee Marriages, 1796-1850.” Children born to Levi Goin and Nancy Dickson Goin are unknown.
==O==
Mahala Goin was married October 22, 1846 to James H. Perrin, according to “Grainger County, Tennessee Marriages, 1796-1850.”
==O==
Martha Goin was married January 31, 1825 to Henry Wysnor, according to “Grainger County, Tennessee Marriages, 1796-1850.”
==O==
Nancy Goin was married November 22, 1802 to James Ran­dolph, according to “Grainger County, Tennessee Mar­riages, 1796-1850.”
==O==
Nancy Goin was married December 2, 1824 to Ezekiel Bowling, according to “Grainger County, Tennessee Marriages, 1796-1850.”
==O==
Peter Goin was married December 4, 1837 to Katherine Petty, according to “Grainger County, Tennessee Marriages, 1796-1850.” Children born to Peter Goin and Katherine Petty Goin are unknown.
==O==
Preston Goin was married December 9, 1829 to Betsy Goin, according to “Grainger County, Tennessee Marriages, 1796-1850.” Children born to Preston Goin and Betsy Goin Goin are unknown.

Rebecca Goin was married December 22, 1812 to Philip Den­ham [Derehorn?] according to “Grainger County, Ten­nessee Marriages, 1796-1850.”
==O==
Sally Goin was married to Edmund Boling January 3, 1824, according to “Grainger County, Tennessee Marriages, 1796-1850.”
==O==
Elizabeth Goins was married August 19, 1829 to John Davis, according to “Grainger County, Tennessee Marriages, 1796-1850.” Justice of the Peace Henry Alsup performed the ceremony.
==O==
Ethel Louise Goins Dunn of Crandall, Georgia wrote in the July 1997 Foundation Newsletter, “Granville Goins, my g-g-grandfather, was born about 1810 in Grainger County, Tennessee of parents unknown, according to the affidavit of Matilda Goins of Dayton, Tennessee in the Court of Claims June 24, 1908.”

He joined the exodus of some of the Melungeon Goins families who removed to Hamilton County, Tennessee. Prominent in this group was David Smith Goins, Revolutionary soldier who moved about 1832 and his younger brother, Laban Goins who had preceded him in the move about 1829. They were sons of Shadrach Goins of Hanover, Halifax and Patrick Counties, Virginia.

E. Raymond Evans, an anthropologist, made a study of the mysterious Melungeons and wrote a report of his findings in “Tennessee Anthropologist,” Spring 1979. He wrote:

“Located approximately 30 miles north of Chattanooga, the community of Graysville, Tennessee contains one of the most stable Melungeon settlements in the state.

No people in Tennessee have been subjected to more romantic speculation than have the so‑called ‘Melungeons.’ These dark‑skinned people, living in a white world, have attempted to explain their color by saying they were of Portuguese descent, according to Swan Burnett in 1889 in ‘The American Anthropologist.’ Popular writers, including Thurston L. Willis in ‘The Chesapiean’ in 1941 and Leo Zuber in ‘The Melungeons’ in 1941, have elaborated on this theme They have been claimed to be descendants of the ‘lost’ tribes of Israel as reported by Jean Patterson Bible writing in 1975 in ‘Melungeons Yesterday and Today.’ and ‘old world Gypsies,’ ‘Welsh Indians,’ and Arabs by others.

Others have attempted to link their origin with established historical events. Raleigh’s ‘Lost Colony’ and the De Soto expedition are two examples suggested by Mozon Peters writing in 1970 in the ‘Chattanooga Times.’

The most common surname among the Graysville Melungeons is Goins, being so prevalent that the whites in the surrounding area call all the Graysville Melungeons ‘Goinses,’ rather than Melungeons. In fact, the term ‘Melungeon’ is rarely used anywhere in lower East Tennessee. The Goins families are so well known in Rhea County that any dark skinned person, not regarded as a black, is said to ‘look like a Goins.”

In the 1830 census, Hamilton County reported less than 400 families. Four of them were headed by “Laban Gowan, Roland Gowin, Sandford Gowin and Dodson Gowin.” Each of these families listed colored members [total of 13] and three of them listed white members [total of 6]. All were listed on Page 75 and were located just south of Graysville, Tennessee. Since Granville Goins did not appear as a householder in 1830, he may have been a son of Laban Goins.
==O==
“David Goins, age 76” was listed as Revolutionary War Pensioner S3406 in Hamilton County in 1834, according to “Twenty Four Hundred Tennessee Pensioners” by Zella Armstrong. David Smith Goins died in 1840 in Hamilton County, “his pension then being paid to his children” [unnamed], according to pension records. He did not appear in the 1840 census of Hamilton County.
==O==
Granville Goins was married about 1831, wife’s name Mary “Polly,” probably in Graysville, located just across the county line in Rhea County.

Twelve households of the family were enumerated in the 1840 census of Hamilton County: Sanford Gowin, page 150; Thomas Gowin, page 150; George Gowin, page 150; William Gowin, page 150; John Gowin, page 150; Martin Gowin, page 150; G.[ranville] Gowin, page 150; P. Gowin, page 150; John Gowan page 175; Pryor Gowen, page 175, Carter Gowin, page 177 and Preston Gowen, page 178. All except the last four were recorded as “free colored.”

Granville Goins was enumerated as the head of a household No. 1339 in the 1850 census of Hamilton County. The family was recorded October 21, 1850 as:

“Goins, Granvill 40, farmer, born in Tennessee
Mary 33, born in Tennessee
Mahaley 18, born in Tennessee
Rachel 14, born in Tennessee
Noah 12, born in Tennessee
Roland 10, born in Tennessee
Dopson 8, born in Tennessee
James 6, born in Tennessee
Nancy 4, born in Tennessee
William 8/12, born in Tennessee”

Adjoining the household of Granville Goins was that of Nancy Goins. The household, No. 1340, was recorded on Page 925 as: “Goins, Nancy, 45, born in Tennessee; Elizabeth, 29, born in Tennessee and Fanney, 10, born in Tennessee.”

“Granville and Polly Goins” were mentioned in an affidavit signed in 1908 by J. P. Talley of Chattanooga, according to “Cherokee by Blood: Records of Eastern Cherokee Ancestry in the U.S. Court of Claims, 1906-1910” by Jerry Wright Jordon. In the hope of compensation, several Melungeon families claimed Cherokee ancestry. Talley stated:

“I [affirm] that I am 80 years of age and lived in James County, Tennessee [later absorbed]. I knew Polly and Granville Goins. They lived in Hamilton County, but I think they were born in upper Tennessee, probably Grainger County. Polly and Granville were a little older than myself. They have been dead 12 or 15 years. They were never on any Indian rolls that I know of.”

J. P. Talley
June 18, 1908 Chattanooga, Tenn.”

At the same time, W. T. Irvin of Chattanooga, grandson-in-law of Granville Goins, and former husband of Mary Jane Goins Irvin who died in 1897, made an affidavit about the family:

“I affirm that I live in Marion County, Tennessee [adjoining Hamilton County]. I am 49 years of age. I make claim for my children. My first wife has been dead 11 years. She was about 30 or 32 when she died. Her parents were Alfred Goins and Halie [Mahala?]Goins. She claims Indian descent on her father’s side and her mother’s side. Her grandparents on her mother’s side were Granville and Polly Goins. On her father’s side they were Thomas and Betsy Goins. They come by the same name because they were probably related. She was always recognized as an Indian in the community in which she lived. Her parents and grandparents lived in what is now James County. Her grandparents originated in Grainger County. She claimed to be a full-blood Cherokee. Her grandparents lived in Hamilton County in 1835.
W. T. Irvin
June 18, 1908 Chattanooga, Tenn”

Granville Goins and Mary “Polly” Goins died about 1914. Children born to them are believed to include:

Mahala “Halie” Goins born about 1832
Betsy Jane Goins born about 1834
Rachel Goins born about 1836
Mary Goins born about 1837
Noah Goins born about 1838
Roland Goins born about 1840
Dodson Goins born about 1842
Martha Goins born about 1843
James L. Goins born about 1844
Nancy Goins born about 1846
John Goins born about 1847
William Goins born about 1849
Francis Marion Goins born about 1853

Dodson Goins, above, was the subject of an article in the Newsletter, January 1997.

Mahala “Halie” Goins, daughter of Granville Goins and Mary “Polly” Goins, was born in Hamilton County about 1832. She appeared as an 18-year-old in the 1850 census of her parents household. She was married about 1850 to Alfred Goins, a cousin. He was a son of Thomas Goins and Betsy Goins.

Children born to Alfred Goins and Mahala “Halie” Going Goins include a daughter, Mary Jane Goins, born about 1865. The daughter was married about 1882 to W. T. Irvin of Chatanooga. She died in 1897 at about age 31, according to an affidavit furnished by Irvin, according to “Cherokee by Blood.”

Betsy Jane Goins, daughter of Granville Goins and Mary “Polly” Goins, was born in Hamilton County about 1834, according to the research of Ethel Louise Goins Dunn of Crandall, Georgia. She did not appear in the 1850 census of her parents’ household.

Rachel Goins, daughter of Granville Goins and Mary “Polly” Goins, was born in Hamilton County about 1836. She appeared as a 14-year-old in the 1850 census of the household of her parents.

Mary Goins, daughter of Granville Goins and Mary “Polly” Goins, was born in Hamilton County about 1837, according to Ethel Louise Goins Dunn. She did not appear in the 1850 census.

Noah Goins, son of Granville Goins and Mary “Polly” Goins, was born in Hamilton County about 1838. He appeared in the 1850 census of his father’s household at age 12.
==O==
Rev. Leonard Goins had the distinction of conducting the funeral service Gertrude Janeway, the last surviving widow of a Union soldier from the Civil War:

“Last Recognized Civil War Widow Dies
Sunday, January 19, 2003
By Duncan Mansfield
Associated Press Writer

Blaine, Tennessee – Gertrude Janeway, the last widow of a Union veteran from the Civil War, has died in the three-room log cabin where she lived most of her life. She was 93.

Bedridden for years, she died Friday, more than six decades after the passing of the man she called the love of her life, John Janeway, who married her when he was 81 and she was barely 18.

“She was a special person,” said the Rev. Leonard Goins, who officiated at her funeral Sunday.

“Gertie, as she was called, had a vision beyond that [cabin] that kept her going. She never had any wavering or doubt in her salvation. She was strong in that,” he said.

She was to be buried Monday near her husband’s slender military tombstone at tiny New Corinth Church cemetery.

An honorary member of the Daughters of Union Veterans of the Civil War, Mrs. Janeway was the last recognized Union widow. She received a $70 check each month from the Veterans Administration.

Still alive is Confederate widow Alberta Martin, 95, of Elba, Ala. Mrs. Janeway, who lived her whole life in Blaine, about 30 miles north of Knoxville, was born 44 years after the Civil War ended.

In a 1998 interview, she said her husband rarely spoke about the war. “He says the nighest he ever got to gettin’ killed was when they shot a hole through his hat brim,” she said, but he never told her where that happened.

Her husband was a 19-year-old Grainger County farm boy who ran away to enlist in 1864 after being encouraged by a group of Union horse soldiers that he met on his way to a Blount County grist mill.

He sent his horse home and signed up under the surname January because “he was afraid his people would come and claim him,” Mrs. Janeway said.

Two months later, he was captured by Confederates near Athens, Georgia. He was later released and rejoined his unit, the 14th Illinois Cavalry Regiment. After the war, he spent many years in California before returning home to Tennessee and meeting then 16-year-old Gertrude.

Mrs. Janeway said her mother refused to sign papers to let her marry him before she turned 18. “So my man says, ‘Well, I will wait for her until you won’t have to,’” she recalled. “We sparked for three years.”

She remembered getting married in the middle of a dirt road in 1927 with family and friends gathered around. He bought her the cabin in 1932, and it was there that he died in 1937, at 91, from pneumonia.

“After he died, why it just seemed like a part of me went down under the ground with him,” she said in the 1998 interview. “He is the only one I ever had. There wasn’t anybody else.”
==O==
An article describing the life of the last surviving Confederate widow was written by Matthew Linton Chancey, an Alabama free lance writer:

Mrs. Alberta Martin, The Last Known Living Widow of a Confederate Veteran

Mrs. Alberta Martin, The Old Man’s Darling

By Matthew Linton Chancey

Crouching in a muddy Virginia trench, Pvt. William Jasper Martin, hot, wet and far from home, shivered with fever and contemplated his prospects. The backwoods 18 year-old boy represented the shattered remnants of an army that had captivated the world. The Army of Northern Virginia had started with a few local militias in fancy uniforms and smoothbore muskets, and within two years had earned an everlasting legacy of valor which would fill thousands of books and millions of hearts the world over.

They came from all over the South: from the well-bred, tidewater Virginia Cavilier to the ruddy Scottish Presbyterian of the Southern Highlands. These men represented the South united and the hope of the young confederation of American States which had banded together—as their fathers and grandfathers had—to form a government of their own. Now in the summer of 1864, the South’s greatest army was slowly sinking into the mire around Petersburg and into history.

Today, the American Civil War is considered by most to be ancient history. Aside from your core group of history buffs, many Americans have trouble placing the War Between the States within the right century, let alone understanding the significance of why it was fought.

However, The War Between the States did not take place that long ago. It is true that the technological wonders of the 20th century have created a seemingly insurmountable wall between the Old South and the New. But the Old South is not that old. There are people still living today whose grandfathers fought in America’s greatest and most devastating war. There are even those living who had fathers marching under Robert E. Lee and “Stonewall” Jackson. But there is one individual connected to the Old South in a way in which none other can boast. Pvt. William Jasper Martin’s wife still lives. Mrs. Alberta Martin, age 92 is the last known living widow of a Confederate veteran.

If you want to visit “Miz” Alberta, you will not find her living on a plantation estate in Natchez, Mississippi, or Savannah, Georgia, but in a small assisted living facility in Elba, Alabama. Miz Alberta has been called “the last link to Dixie” because to meet her is to meet history face-to-face. Although she never lived in the 19th century, her connection to Pvt. W. J. Martin and the Confederacy is special and unique. Since 1996, Miz Alberta has received the “Alabama State Pension for the Widows of Confederate Soldiers, Sailors, and Marines.”

Her story is one of two centuries, two worlds, two societies, two political philosophies and two nations all intersecting.
==O==
“Goins Family Intermarried With Indian Neighbors”

This is one of the families included in the book “Early Hamilton Settlers” by John Wilson.

In the days when the Cherokee Indians occupied the Chattanooga region, members of the Goins family were their neighbors and intermarried with them. Some of the Goins clan were of the mysterious dark-skinned Melungeon race.

The Goins pioneers made their way from Virginia to Grainger and Claiborne counties and on to Hamilton in the 1820s. Sanford Goins, Roland Goins, Laban Goins, Dodson Goins and John Goins were here at the time of the 1830 census. Roland Goins paid George Irwin $50 for 160 acres in 1845. Dodson Goins was among those going out from Ross’s Landing in the Second Seminole War in 1837.

The Goins family was allied with the Dodsons in Grainger County, Tennessee. Laban Goins was born in Hanover County, Virginia in 1764, and he had an older brother, David Smith Goins, who was born in 1757. David Smith Goins volunteered for the Revolution in Halifax County, Virginia under Col. William Terry. He had several terms of service, including a march to join Gen. George Washington’s army at Portsmouth, Virginia about two months before the surrender of Lord Cornwallis.

David Smith Goins lived in Grayson County, Virginia, then in Wythe County, Virginia before moving to Grainger County, Tennessee. He arrived in Hamilton County on the last day of February 1833 and drew a Revolutionary pension of $32 per year. Laban Goins resided on property at Sale Creek that is now the David Gray Sanctuary of the Audubon Society. Laban Goins’ son, Carter Goins, was born in Virginia, and his children included Harbance Goins, Charles Goins and Carter Goins, Jr. Carter Goins, Jr. was married to Cynthia A. McGill.

Children of Harbance Goins included Laban Goins, William Goins, Duncan Goins and Jane Goins. Carter Goins, Jr. and Cynthia A. McGill Goins had William Goins, Francis Marion Goins, James Goins, Elizabeth Goins who was married to Pleasant Bowling, Jefferson Goins who was married to Sarah Mooneyham, Vandola Goins and Minerva goins who was married to James Goins and Francis Marion Goins, who was born in the removal year.

Francis Marion Goins was married to Sarah Neely and then to Margaret J. Murphy. He and Jefferson Goins were in the Union’s First Light Artillery, and Francis Marion Goins was injured in the Battle of Cumberland Gap.

His children included James M. Goins, William J. Goins, Samuel Ulysses S. Grant Goins, Charles Goins, Andrew Goins and Lavada Goins. By his second wife he had James Robert Goins, Ida Jane Goins and Maria Elizabeth Goins. Francis Marion Goins died at Burt, Tennessee in Cannon County in 1895.

Samuel Ulysses. S. Grant Goins returned to the Graysville area after marrying Mrs. Amanda Mooneyham Barrett in Cannon County. Her first husband was Albert Barrett of Cannon County. Samuel Ulysses S.Grant Goins died in 1947, and Amanda Mooneyham Barrett Goins died in 1944. Their children were John Wiley Goins who was married to Dovie Mae Bedwell, Levada Goins, Emiline Goins who was married to Charles Albert Leffew, Andrew Jackson Goins, Amie Marshall Goins who was married to Floyd Martin Larmon, and Charles W. Goins who was married to Beatrice Goins. Andrew Jackson Goins, who was unmarried, for many years had an ice cream cart in Chattanooga, Tennessee..

Another early settler was Pryor L. Goins who acquired 82 acres from William Reed for $80 in 1841. Price Goins and Martha Goins also were here along with Tillman Goins and Dinah Goins.

Price Goins had Andrew Jackson Goins who was married to Mary Selvidge, Rachael Goins, Joseph Goins, Preston Goins, Priscilla Goins, Thomas Goins and Mary Goins.

Tillman Goins died in the late 1850s. His children included Julia Ann Goins, Spencer Goins, James Goins, Pleasant Goins, Eliza Goins, William Goins, Carter Goins, Jackson Goins and Isabella Goins.

Preston Goins, who was born about 1804, was here [Hamilton County] prior to the war with his wife, Mary Goins. Their son was Jarrett Goins, who married Rebecca and had William Goins, James Goins and Sarah Goins.

The John Goins family was allied with the Fields family, which had a Cherokee background. John’s children included Sandell Goins, Polly Goins, John Goins, Jr, Sanford Goins, Martin Goins, Thomas Goins and Nathan Goins. Sandell Goins was first married to George Fields, a Cherokee who went to Arkansas on the Trail of Tears, but returned to Hamilton County a few years later and died about 1841. Sandell Goins Fields then married George Still. Nathan Goins was married to Mary Fields. Another member of the family, Nancy Goins, was married to John Fields.

Granville Goins and his wife, Polly Goins, also lived among the Cherokees in Hamilton County. It was said that Granville Goins knew the Cherokee language and had an Indian name. Granville Goins, who was a carpenter, started on the Trail of Tears, but was among those turning back to Tennessee.

Children of Granville Goins included Mahala Goins, Rachael Goins, Noah Goins, Roland Goins, Dodson Goins, Barnes Goins, Nancy Goins and William Goins.

One of the best known of the family was Oscar Claiborne Goins who was born in Grainger County February 24, 1830. His parents moved to Hamilton County when he was three. His father died when he was 11 and the mother, Nancy Biby Goins, was married in 1846 to a kinsman, Levi Goins. The other children were Pleasant Goins, William Goins, George W. Goins and Sarah Jane Goins who was married to James K. Cornell, a carpenter.

Oscar Claiborne Goins and his family “settled on a farm among the Cherokee Indians.” He took over the farm’s management after his father’s death, then he began clerking in a store at Chattanooga when he was 16. He married Nancy Florence Potter, daughter of Moses Potter and Ellen Potter, in 1853. They separated after they had a son, William Preston Goins.

John C. Potter, who was married to Tennessee Iles, may be another son of Nancy Potter Goins. William Preston Goins lived with his Potter grandparents during the Civil War.

William Preston Goins moved to Greene County, Arkansas. He was married to Lydia Elizabeth Lafferty, a descendant of the wealthy Rockefeller family.

In 1858, Oscar Claiborne Goins was married to Esther Reynolds, daughter of Anderson Reynolds and and Maria Reynolds.

Oscar Claiborne Goins was operating a grocery and supply house at Chattanooga when the Civil War broke out. He enlisted on the Confederate side in the 19th Tennessee Infantry. He first saw action at Fishing Creek, then was in the fighting at Shiloh. He was detailed to bring wounded soldiers to Chattanooga, then he helped raise the Lookout Mountain Battery. He was with this unit at Mobile, then was at Vicksburg before he finally had to leave the service because of poor health. He was a traveling salesman after the war, and he moved his family near Spring Place, Georgia in 1873, when he acquired the three-story Joe Vann mansion. The Goins family lived on this fine plantation the next 22 years. Oscar C. Goins was in Bradley County when he died in 1903.

William A. Goins also enlisted from Hamilton County with the Confederacy. He was captured at Grand Gulf, Mississippi May 18, 1863, and taken to a prison at Alton, Illinois. William Goins was sent for exchange on June 12, 1863, but he objected to the terms of the oath of allegiance and was returned to the Alton prison. He died there July 2, 1864.

A Goins family at Graysville near the Rhea County line had a Melungeon background. Asa “Acy” Goins was married to Sara Bolden and they had a large family in the Brown Rock section. Acy Goins was one of the sons of Jackson Goins and Jennie Goins, who moved to Hamilton County from Georgia about 1843. Others were Richard Goins, William Goins, Henry Goins, Nathaniel Goins, Bradford Goins, George Goins and Robert Goins. Daughters were Sarah J. Goins, Nancy Goins, Caroline Goins, Viola Goins, Lydia Goins and Jane Goins.

Also living near the Jackson Goins family were Alfred Goins and Mahala Goins and Francis M. Goins and Sarah Goins. Acy’s Goins youngest child was Alvin Goins, who was born in 1903. He was kicked in the head by a mule when he was five, and he never learned to read and write. But he could “perform a Goins remarkable feat of computation in his head that would baffle a math professor. Given the day, month and year of someone’s birth, in a few seconds Alvin could estimate the exact number of days that elapsed since then.” Tested on this by an author doing a book on Melungeons, “his figures were found to be correct down to the last digit.” It was said when he worked at a sawmill, he could accurately compute a load of logs and tell how many slabs to cut off. Some contractors building a brick building asked his advice on how many bricks to order. He made the computation in a few minutes. After the project, three bricks were left over.

John C. Goins was born near Apison in 1896. His grandfathers fought on different sides in the war. His father was Daniel Alexander Goins and the grandfather was John Goins, who married Amanda Jane Hughes in 1852 and lived in Bradley County. John Goins, who was a native of Blount County, fought for the Confederacy with Co. D of Thomas’ Legion. There were 12 children, including Daniel Alexander Goins who was born in Bradley County in 1869. He married Mary Alta Johnson. Daniel A. Goins was killed near his home at Apison in 1939 when he was hit by a bus. John C. and his younger brother, Charles Daniel Goins, were Chattanooga lawyers, and John C. Goins became a judge in Hamilton County Circuit Court. John C. Goins was also president of the Chattanooga Bar Association in 1934 and the Tennessee Bar Association in 1941-42. He was also a member of the American Bar Association House of Delegates in 1953-56. He married Wilda Swick, but she died a few hours after their son, John C. Goins Jr., was born. His second wife was Martha Raulston of Marion County, and their son, Landon Haynes Goins, is a lawyer here. His first name came from his father’s longtime law partner, Landon Gammon. John C. Goins Jr. is a biologist in Missouri.

Caroline Goins, daughter of John C. Goins, married attorney Keith Harber. Bess Goins, sister of John C. Goins, was a teacher at Tyner High School and she married the school’s principal, Paul Morris.

John C. Goins also had brothers Thomas M. Goins and James Goins. Thomas M. Goins was an attorney in Pennsylvania.
==O==
Humble Beginnings

Miz Alberta was born Alberta Stewart on December 4, 1906, down in a little hollow by a sawmill at a place called Dannely’s Crossroads in Coffee County, Alabama. Today, although the sawmill is long gone, Dannely’s Crossroads looks much like it did in 1906—a simple intersection surrounded by cotton and peanut fields. An old filling station sits on the corner, representing the only commercial establishment in the community; and scattered here and there are a few house trailers and the remains of old barns and sharecropper homes.

Miz Alberta’s parents, like many folks in the rural South at that time, were sharecroppers who spent their lives moving from field to field, planting and picking under the steamy southern sky. “Back then times was hard,” comments Miz Alberta, “Back in the olden times, we lived poor. Everything was cheap, but you had no money. It don’t seem like nothin’s like it use to be. Seems like ever’thing has got modern.”

Folks alive today who grew up as sharecroppers will tell you that the arrangement usually resulted in farmer and field hand getting the essentials of life, but not much more. The better the soil in a particular field, the better the crop yield—which translated into greater profits for the sharecropper. Consequently, the Stewarts moved nearly every year, sometimes just across the street to work in an adjacent field.

Although modern family portraits usually picture family members neatly groomed and in comfortable living quarters, the only known picture of the Stewart family shows everyone in a cotton field—little cotton sacks hanging around the tiny bodies of the children. “Before we were old enough to pick, they would put us in a cotton basket and take us out to the field with ‘em. They would hang 24-pound flour sacks around our necks. I started pickin’ cotton just as soon as I could wear that sack. When we’d get that little ol’ cotton sack full, we emptied it into our mama or daddy’s sack. We shook peanuts, stacked peanuts, hoed peanuts, hoed cotton and picked up roots where they’d clear a patch for plantin’ next year. It was hard work.”

Even though the Stewarts and most of their neighbors were dirt poor, Miz Alberta still remembers some of the good times they had down on the farm. Every 4th of July, ol’ Doc Donaldson, who owned many of the fields in the area, would have a big Independence Day dinner where all his hands and anybody else who wanted to come could spend the day eating and playing games. Mr. Stewart loved to dance, and, according to Miz Alberta, “He could play the fiddle right smart.” He decided to throw a party one day for all the neighbors. So they cleared the furniture and beds out of one room and had a big dance. Miz Alberta remembers that the guests spit tobacco juice all over the floor, and her daddy promised never to host another indoor dance again. Such was life on the red dirt roads in Curtis, Alabama.

With the good times came some bad as well. When Alberta was 11 years old, her mother died after a long, painful battle with cancer. In 1918, Alberta’s brother, A. J. went off to war in France for Uncle Sam. Shortly after A. J. shipped out, so did the rest of the Stewarts. Mr. Stewart decided to move his family to a place that might have been as distant as Europe as far as the children were concerned—Tallassee, Alabama [around 100 miles from Curtis].

It was in Tallassee that Alberta married her first husband, Howard Farrow, in a little church on a street corner. Mr. Farrow made his living driving a taxi cab. While she was pregnant with their first child, Miz Alberta worked 12 hours a day in a cotton mill until her clothes could no longer hide her condition. Shortly before their son, Harold, was born, Mr. Farrow abandoned his young, pregnant wife.

Matters only worsened. When Harold was only six months old, his father burned to death in a violent car accident. After Howard’s death, Alberta and her father moved back south, this time outside of Opp, Alabama, in Covington County. They moved in with Alberta’s half-brother and his family. Living conditions were cramped in the little house, and Miz Alberta would periodically take Harold out for some fresh air in the front yard. The house was surrounded by a picket fence, and it was at this fence line that Miz Alberta remembers seeing an old man frequently passing by on his way to town.

Unbeknownst to her, this particular old man had passed the house for reasons other than to meet some old war buddies at the corner store for a game of dominoes.

Mr. Martin Little is known of the early history of Pvt. W. J. Martin. He was born in Macon County, Georgia in December 1845, but spent most of his life in the Covington County area. W. J. Martin joined the Confederate army in May, 1864. He fell in with Company K of the 4th Alabama Infantry Regiment, which at the time was involved in the siege of Petersburg and action around Richmond. As for the rest of his War record, confusion abounds, since there were three or four “W. Martins” in the 4th Alabama Infantry, including two in company K. It appears that several records have also been commingled.

What happened after Pvt. Martin arrived in Petersburg is sketchy. He took part in the Howlett’s House skirmish near Richmond and was eventually hospitalized with Rubella. Some records list a William Martin as a deserter, but that William Martin was recorded as being born in Alabama. William Jasper Martin was born in Georgia. The William Martin who was listed as a deserter joined the Army when he was 16. William Jasper Martin joined when he was 18. To add to the confusion, when W. J. was in the hospital, some of his comrades reported him dead.

Despite the ambiguity of the official record, Pvt. Martin later convinced the State of Alabama that he was eligible for the Confederate veterans’ pension through the production of witnesses testifying to his military service. Additionally, the War Department could find no evidence in 1920 that William Jasper Martin was a deserter. Mr. Martin, like so many other Alabama Confederate veterans, applied for a pension late in life—as one’s net worth had to be $400.00 or less to be eligible.

We may never know for sure whether W. J. was a deserter or not, but we do know that veteran Pvt. Martin was a true Confederate at heart. Miz Alberta remembers that he made an effort to attend every annual reunion of the United Confederate Veterans in Montgomery. “Mr. Martin,” as Alberta called him, had changed considerably since his military days—at least physically. The sounds of battle long since faded, the old warrior was in his eighties now. But his elderly frame hid a youthful spirit.

Their courtship was brief—just a few conversations over the fence rail. He asked; she consented. Mr. Martin then had to ask Mr. Stewart for his daughter’s hand. Mr. Stewart gave his consent. Although it was an unusual match, he had little of which to complain. Mr. Martin was a sober man, and his generous pension of $50.00 a month would give Alberta and Harold a good life.

The wedding was scheduled for Saturday, December 10, 1927. W. J. was nearly 82; Miz Alberta had just turned 21. It may be safe to assume that never had the town of Opp heard such a story. This was to be a most abnormal marriage, and the gossip flowed freely. Mrs. Martin went to town and bought herself a blue dress with a floral design in front extending from the neckline down to the hem. Mr. Martin wore a dress shirt and sport coat. They were married at the courthouse in Andalusia, the Covington County seat. When asked if she loved him, Miz Alberta stated that her marriage to W. J. was not based on the type of love found between two young people, but on mutual respect and need. Both wanted companionship and support—a young widow with a baby to look after, and an old man who needed someone to take care of him.

The uneventful wedding concluded, Mr. Martin took his new bride home to meet the family. Mr. Martin lived with one of his sons [from an earlier marriage] and his family. Thus the peculiar wedding gave way to a very peculiar honeymoon when the new Mr. and Mrs. Martin spent their first night together in the same bedroom with four other family members. Needless to say, Miz Alberta remembers that ” after that first weekend, we got out of that place and found us our own home in town.”

No sooner had the gossip died down in Opp when it was announced that Mrs. Martin would be expecting her second child. Ten months after the marriage, Willie was born. Mr. Martin was very proud of his little boy. He would periodically take him into town, carrying the lad on his shoulders to show off his prize.

Remembering the War Mr. Martin never talked very much to his young wife about his service with the 4th Alabama. One of the few things she remembers is his complaining about how hungry he was and how on passing a field, he would dig frantically to find a potato or something left from the harvest. The grim memories of trench warfare also were related. Mr. Martin told Alberta about how he and his messmates would constantly throw firewood, blankets, and anything else on the floor of the trench in order to stay out of the mud. He also confided to Miz Alberta that Union men had tried to get him to enlist and serve Abe Lincoln’s army—a proposition he flatly refused.

Mr. and Mrs. Martin’s marriage was brief, lasting only 4 ½ years. During the 1920s and ‘30s, Pvt. Martin and his Confederate comrades began slipping into eternity at an ever-increasing rate. His funeral was very simple and without pageantry. Today, beneath a large cedar tree in the Cool Springs Primitive Baptist Church Cemetery in Opp, Alabama, a simple VA marker identifies his grave. Today, when asked why she married a man so much older than herself, Miz Alberta just smiles and says, “It’s better to be an old man’s darlin’ than a young man’s slave!”

Two months after Mr. Martin’s death, Alberta married again, this time to Mr. Charlie Martin. Charlie was the grandson of W. J. Martin from his first marriage, which had taken place over 50 years earlier. By this time, the folks in Opp had seen just about everything. At first, the local clergy were not sure how to handle the marriage, so Charlie and Alberta were temporarily estranged from their church. But upon further study of the Scripture, it was agreed that the Martins were not committing sin, and the couple was welcomed back into fellowship.

In 1936 the Martins moved to Elba, where they spent most of their life together. The two were married for over 50 years until Mr. Martin’s death in 1983. After Charlie died, Miz Alberta settled down for permanent widowhood. She led a quiet life, playing bingo at the local Senior Citizens Center and attending church with her friends. Every now and again someone would ask her about her Confederate husband, but for the most part Miz Alberta’s past remained largely unknown. That is until Daisy Wilson Cave, supposedly the “last known living Confederate widow” died around 1990.

The overlooked widow. In the Spring of 1996 when the Pvt. William Rufus Painter Camp # 1719 realized who they had in their back yard, Dr. Ken Chancey, a visiting SCV member from the Col. William C. Oates Camp #809, Dothan, Alabama, volunteered to visit Miz. Alberta and see if the SCV could offer any assistance to her.

After driving around Elba trying to find the right street, he finally received a police escort to her house. Miz Alberta was pleased as always to have visitors and listened intently as Dr. Chancey asked her questions about her needs. She made two requests to the doctor: One was that he help her receive the recognition to which she believed she was entitled for marrying into history. She modestly stated that she had never done anything all that important in her life, but she was the last Confederate widow. The second request was that the SCV look into her eligibility for a Confederate pension. After receiving assurance from Dr. Chancey that he would do his best, the two said their goodbyes.

On to Richmond!

In 1996, the SCV held its 100th anniversary convention in Richmond, Virginia, at the majestic Jefferson Hotel. Men from all over the country gathered for the opening session of the Convention. SCV members could be easily identified—their Sunday suits glittered with heritage metals and Bonnie Blue lapel pins. The convention promised to be the one of the most memorable in SCV history.

In the main ballroom the 5th Alabama Infantry Band played Southern music with passion, and the stage was draped with a huge Confederate Battle Flag. After the ceremonies began, the Commander-in-Chief of the SCV announced that they had a special guest among them.

“Men, can you believe it? We still have one with us!” He then introduced Alberta Martin as the last known living widow of a Confederate veteran, and the brand new recipient of the “Alabama State Pension for the Widows of Confederate Soldiers, Sailors, and Marines.” Mrs. Martin was slowly wheeled down the aisle by Dr. Chancey. As she passed, whispers could be heard, “That’s the widow…that’s her, boys.” The men burst into a rousing ovation while Miz Alberta, with both hands, began throwing kisses.

This provoked the men to more intense applause and some were observed weeping, as they no doubt realized the special connection this 89-year-old woman had to their own Confederate heritage.

With the applause and rebel yells continuing, Miz Alberta was asked if she would like to say anything. She told the men that she loved them and thanked them for all they had done for her. With that, the ovations and rebel yells started up again. This was the largest and warmest reception Mrs. Martin had ever received in her life.

Miz Alberta has since been to numerous reenactments, Confederate grave dedications, a funeral for an unknown Gettysburg casualty, a meeting with a Union veteran’s widow, dedication of the Jefferson Davis Presidential Library, several more SCV annual conventions, and the recent Confederate Flag rally in Columbia, S.C. Who would have thought that Fate would have it that a little old woman, who grew up dirt poor in southeast Alabama, would become the most unique direct link to an old civilization that has endeared the hearts of millions?

Alberta Martin’s life is a silent reminder to us not to get so caught up in “progress” that we forget the important lessons and experiences from the past.

The seeds of her unique legacy have apparently fallen on fertile ground, for in the last ten years, Confederate heritage groups have mushroomed in the North and South. Never since the end of Reconstruction has there been such a renewed interest in what it means to be Southern and a descendant of a Confederate soldier, sailor, or marine. With this movement is developing a common icon—not of a masculine reenactor in his dress grays, or a suave politician speaking on State’s Rights—but of a little old widow from Elba, Alabama, waving a Confederate Battle Flag and blowing kisses to descendents of men who fought along with her late husband for the cause of Southern independence.

Ol’ times there are not forgotten…

Matthew Linton Chancey is an Alabama-born freelance writer currently living in the Shenandoah Valley of Virginia.
==O==
Roland Goins, son of parents unknown, was born about 1810. He was married about 1833, wife’s name Elizabeth. He was reported at age 40 in the 1850 census of Hamilton County, Civil District 27, Household 662-830:

” Goins, Rolin 40, born in TN
Elizabeth 35,
John 15,
Dotson 13,
Harrison 10″

The family reappeared in the 1860 census of adjoining Roane County, Civil District 6, Household 927-1064:

“Goen, Rowlen 45, born in TN
Betsy 35
Wm. D. 23
Harrison 19”

“Betsy Goen” is regarded as the second wife of Rolin Goins. Children born to Roland Goins and Betsy Goins are unknown.

Children born to Roland Goins and Elizabeth Goins include:

John Goins born about 1835
William Dotson Gowins born about 1837
Jesse Harrison Goins born about 1840

John Goins, son of Roland Goins and Elizabeth Goins, was born about 1835, probably in Hamilton County. He appeared as a 15-year-old in the 1850 census in the household of his father.

William Dotson Gowins, son of Roland Goins and Elizabeth Goins, was born about 1836, probably in Hamilton County, Tennessee. He appeared at age 23 in his father’s household in the 1860 census of Roane County.

He was married to Sarah E. Morris in Roane County March 20, 1861, according to Roane County marriage records. They were members of the Prospect Baptist Church there [now Loudon County] along with several Morris families.

He enlisted in the Forty-third Tennessee Infantry Regiment, Company F, in 1861, along with his brother, Jesse Harrison Goins. He participated in the Battle of Vicksburg and died during the battle or shortly afterwards, according to Mary Ruth McKinney, a descendant of Dallas, Texas. His widow was remarried to Robert E. Redpath and removed to Illinois about 1868, according to research of Mary Ruth McKenney.
Wife #2 was Sarah [Morris] Gowen, gr grandmother of my husband, Kenneth Reeves. Robert and first wife were on the 1860 Allegheny Co PA census. I found that on an index, but have not seen the actual census. By 1870, Robert, age 50 b PA, was in Marion Co IL with 2nd wife, Sarah 27 b TN. The children listed were Wilbur, 19 PA, Alice 17 PA, Emma 13 PA, Robert 9 PA and Flora B. 1 IL. Flora was evidently from 2nd marriage to Sarah.
In 1880 Marion Co IL, Robert 60 PA, Sarah 40 TN, Emma K 24 PA, Robert E 19 PA, Charles N 12 IL, Frank W 9 IL, Schulyer E 6 IL and William 4 IL. In 1900, Sarah was living in Lawrence Co MO, age 57, born Apr 1843. Her youngest son, John Bert born Dec 1880, was also residing there.
All that was known by the family is the marriage of Sarah Gowen to a Mr Redpath, and that they had a son Bert (John Bert). None of the other
siblings were ever mentioned to the grandchildren of Jesse Gowen, older son of Sarah [Morris] Gowen Redpath.
Earlier today, I found the marriage record for Charles N Redpath to Arlie Schooley, Cook Co IL 20 May 1893. I believe this was Charles, s/o
Robert, but there is no proof of that.
John Bert Redpath married a lady named Rachel, born in KS. He died July 1973 in Tulsa, Tulsa Co OK.
I hope someone knows of these Redpaths. They have certainly remained a mystery as far as this branch of the family is concerned.
Joyce House-Reeves

Children born to William Dotson Gowin and Sarah E. Morris Gowin include:

Jesse Harrison Gowin born July 28, 1862

Jesse Harrison Gowin, son of William Dotson Gowin and Sarah E. Morris Gowin, was born July 28, 1862 in Loudon, Tennessee. He was married in 1887 to Sallie Ann Robertson in Seymore, Missouri. Children born to Jesse Harrison Gowin and Sallie Ann Robertson Gowin are unknown.

Jesse Harrison Goins, son of Roland Goins and Elizabeth Goins, was born about 1840. He appeared as a 10-year-old in the 1850 census of Hamilton County in his father’s household. He was enumerated at age 19 in the 1860 census of Hamilton County as “Harrison Goen.” He and his brother William Dotson Gowin enlisted in 1861 in Company F, 43rd Tennessee Infantry Regiment and participated in the Battle of Vicksburg.

Dodson Goins, son of Granville Goins and Mary “Polly” Goins, was born in Hamilton County about 1842. He was recorded as an eight-year-old in the 1850 census of Hamilton County. He was married about 1864 to Erelda Goins, daughter of Nathan Goins and Sarah Elizabeth McGill Goins, according to Dunn research.

“Dodson Goin” was listed as the head of a household in the 1880 census of Cannon County, Enumeration District 24, page 25, Civil District 9, enumerated as:

“Goin, Dodson 36, born in TN
Erilday 35, born in TN
Noah 15, born in TN
William 13, born in TN
Psalmist 9, born in TN, son
Mahala 7, born in TN
Lotta 6, born in TN
De A. 1, born in TN, son”

The full name of the third son of Dodson Goin and Erilday Goin is believed to be “Psalmist David Goin.” Later he would be known as “Sam D. Goin.” [Samuel David Goins] He was born in Tennessee in January 1870, according to the census.

Dodson Goin died in 1887, according to Dunn research, and his widow was remarried to Joshua Columbus Goins, unidentified. Erelda Goins Goins Goins was still living in 1905 in Cannon County.

Children born to Dodson Goins and Erelda Goins Goins in­clude:

Noah Goins born about 1865
William Granville Goins born about 1866
Psalmist David Goins born January 1870
Mahala Goins born about 1873
Lottie Bell Goins born about 1874
De Amold Goins born about 1878
Jacob Benjamin Goins born about 1883

Noah Goins, son of Dodson Goin and Erelda Goins Goins, was born about 1865 in Hamilton County. He appeared as a 15-year-old in the 1880 census of his father’s household. He was married about 1888, wife’s name Jane. Children born to Noah Goins and Jane Goins are unknown.

William Granville Goins, son of Dodson Goin and Erelda Goins Goins, was born about 1866 in James County, Tennessee. He appeared as a 13-year-old in the 1880 census of Cannon County. He was married about 1889, wife’s name unknown.

Children born to them include:

Ida Goins born January 4, 1891
Claud Goins born October 11, 1895
Irene Goins born December 9, 1901

Psalmist David Goins, son of Dodson Goin and Erelda Goins Goins, was born in January 1870. He was enumerated at age 9 in the 1880 census.

“Sam D. Goin” was married about 1897 to Mary Clark, de­scribed as a “caucasian.” He filed suit in 1905 in Franklin County, Tennessee seeking to have his son Henry E. [or Harry E.] Goins reinstated in school from which he had been expelled for “being a Negro.”

In a deposition taken December 22, 1905 in Winchester, Tennessee, Sam D. Goin advised that he would be “35 next month” and that he was the father of Harry E. Goin who was born July 19, 1898. He stated that “Harry E. Goin, his oldest living child” was enrolled in school in the Ninth Civil District of Franklin County in July 1904 at age six. He was dismissed by the teacher, J. B. Smith on the suspicion of being a Negro.

“Sam D. Goin” testified that he was “Cherokee and Irish” and had no Negro blood. He stated that he went to white schools in Cannon and Wilson Counties.

In the hearing Mary Clark Goin deposed that she was “born and raised in Franklin County and that she did not know if her husband had any Negro blood.”

“Mrs. Erilday Goin, mother of Sam D. Goin, age 73” [most likely 60], testified that her son was a “little darker than white people.” The deposition record gives no hint as to the final result of the hearing.

Children born to Psalmist David Goins and Mary Clark Goins include:

Harry E. Goins born July 19, 1898

Harry [Henry] E. Goins, son of Psalmist David Goins and Mary Clark Goins, was born July 19, 1898. He was the subject of a school controversy in 1905 in Franklin County, Tennessee.

Mahala Goins, daughter of Dodson Goin and Erelda Goins Goins, was born about 1873. She was recorded at age seven in the 1880 census of Cannon County. She died in 1884, ac­cording to Dunn research.

Lottie Belle Goins, daughter of Dodson Goin and Erelda Goins Goins, was born about 1874. She was enumerated at age six in the 1880 census. She died in 1893, according to Dunn research.

De Amold Goins, son of Dodson Goin and Erelda Goins Goins, was born about 1879. He was recorded as a one-year-old in the 1880 census of his father’s household. He died in 1884, according to Dunn research.

Jacob Benjamin Goins, son of Dodson Goin and Erelda Goins Goins, was born about 1883. He died in 1891, according to Dunn research.

Martha Goins, daughter of Granville Goins and Mary “Polly” Goins, was born in Hamilton County about 1843, according to Ethel Louise Goins Dunn. She did not appear in the 1850 census of her father’s household..

James L. Goins, son of Granville Goins and Mary “Polly Goins, was born in Hamilton County about 1844. He ap­peared as a six-year-old in the 1850 census. He was married about 1870 to a cousin, Melvina Goins, daughter of Martin Goins and Susan Goins. James L. Goins died August 20, 1897.

According to the research of Ethel Louise Goins Dunn, children born to James L. Goins and Melvina Goins Goins include:

Mary Goins born about 1871
Elijah Goins born June 7, 1873
Archibald Goins born September 8, 1874
Charles Goins born February 10, 1876
Albert Goins born about 1878
Mattie Goins born about 1879
Thomas Goins born about 1880
John Goins born about 1883

Mary Goins, daughter of James L. Goins and Melvina Goins Goins, was born about 1871. She was married about 1890, husband’s name Erwin, according to Dunn research.

Elijah Goins, son of James L. Goins and Melvina Goins Goins, was born June 7, 1873 in James County, Tennessee. He was married about 1896, wife’s name Dora. Children born to Elijah Goins and Dora Goins are unknown.

Archibald Goins, son of James L. Goins and Melvina Goins Goins, was born September 8, 1874 in James Gounty. He was married about 1897, wife’s name Florence.

Children born to Archibald Goins and Florence Goins include:

Eliza Goins born about 1900

Eliza Goins, daughter of Archibald Goins and Florence Goins, was born about 1900, according to John Harrison, a grandson.

Charles Goins, son of James L. Goins and Melvina Goins Goins, was born February 10, 1876. He was married about 1899, wife’s name Nancy. Of Charles Goins and Nancy Goins nothing more is known.

Albert Goins, son of James L. Goins and Melvina Goins Goins, was born about 1878.

Children born to Albert Goins include:

James Goins born about 1918

Mattie Goins, daughter of James L. Goins and Melvina Goins Goins, was born about 1879. She died in 1898, according to Dunn research.

Thomas Goins, son of James L. Goins and Melvina Goins Goins, was born about 1880. He died in 1906, according to Dunn research.

John Goins, son of James L. Goins and Melvina Goins Goins, was born about 1886. He died in 1906, according to Dunn research.

Nancy Goins, daughter of Granville Goins and Mary “Polly” Goins, was born in Hamilton County about 1846. She appeared as a four-year-old in the 1850 census.

John Goins, son of Granville Goins and Mary “Polly” Goins, was born in Hamilton County about 1847, according to Ethel Louise Goins Dunn. He did not appear in the 1850 census of his father’s household.

William Goins, son of Granville Goins and Mary “Polly” Goins, was born in Hamilton County about 1849. He was enumerated at “eight months” in the 1850 census of his par­ents’ household.

Francis Marion Goins, son of Granville Goins and Mary “Polly” Goins, was born in Hamilton County about 1853, according to Ethel Louise Goins Dunn..
==O==
Isabella Goins was married January 6, 1813 to Thomas Har­riss, according to “Grainger County, Tennessee Marriages, 1796-1850.”
==O==
Joseph Anderson Goins was born about 1820, possibly in Grainger County, according to a letter written by Doris Ann Goins Ketner of Clinton, Tennessee. He was married about 1843, and the bride is believed to be Martha Lipscomb.

Children born to Joseph Anderson Goins and Martha Lip­scomb Goins include:

Joseph Anderson Goins, Jr. born August 15, 1848

Joseph Anderson Goins, Jr, son of Joseph Anderson Goins and Martha Lipscomb Goins, was born August 15, 1848 probably in Greene County, Tennessee. He was married in 1868 to Su­san Perkey. They and their 12 children removed to Anderson­ville, Tennessee about 1886. Children born to Joseph Ander­son Goins and Susan Perkey Goins are unidentified.
==O==
Lloyd P. Goins, son of Charlie Goins and Nancy Goins, was born November 3, 1906 in Dayton, Tennessee, according to the research of Roberta E. Horton, Foundation Member of Concord, California. He was married about 1934 to Cora Mae Thrailkill who was born January 24, 1908 to Naomi Swafford Thrailkill. In 1946 they were living in Los Angeles, Califor­nia.

Lloyd P. Goins died in May 1991 in Chattanooga, and his wife died December 13, 1995 in San Diego, California.

Children born to Lloyd P. Goins and Cora Mae Thrailkill Goins include:

Betty June Goins born about 1936
Martha Imogene Goins born about 1938
Lloyd Dewayne Goins born about 1941
Barbara Yvonne Goins born about 1944
Treva Ladoyn Goins born October 18, 1946
==O==
Malinda Goins was enumerated in the 1870 census of Grainger County living in Household No. 37 headed by James Dotson in Thornhill District:

Dotson, James 32, farmer
Prior 38, farmer
Goins Malinda 27, domestic servant
Mary 6”
==O==
Nancy Bibee Goins and her husband, name unknown, removed from Grainger County in 1833 “and settled among the Cherokees” in Hamilton County, Tennessee, according to “Memoirs of Georgia” published in 1895 in Atlanta by Southern Historical Association.

Nancy Bibee Goins was remarried to Levi Goins after the death of her first husband in 1841, according to this volume. This statement has not been documented by Tennessee county records. If this statement is not correct, then Levi Goins, in­stead of being a kinsman of her first husband, was her first husband. Levi Goins appeared as the head of a household in the 1850 census of Hamilton County, Household 318, page 782:

“Goins, Levi 50, born in Tennessee
Nancy 40, born in Tennessee
Oscar 22, born in Tennessee
Jane 20, born in Tennessee
Pleasant 16, born in Tennessee
William 14, born in Tennessee
George 11, born in Tennessee”

“Levi Goins,” age 38, was convicted of larceny in Hamilton County and was sentenced to serve time in the state penitentiary at Nashville, Tennessee, according to “Convicts in the Tennessee State Penitentiary, 1831-1850.”

Children born to Nancy Bibee Goins and her first husband included:

Oscar Claiborne “Roscoe” Goins
born February 24, 1830
Sarah Jane Goins born about 1831
Pleasant Goins born about 1833
William A. Goins born about 1835
George Goins born about 1838

Oscar Claiborne “Roscoe” Goins, son of Nancy Goins, was born in Grainger County February 24, 1830, [1829?], according to “Memoirs of Georgia.”

“The father of Mr. Goins, a native of Wythe County, Virginia, was born during the early part of this century. He moved to Cocke County, Tennessee with his parents. Later he settled in Hamilton County where he was married Miss Nancy Biby of Cocke County. They had five children, four sons and one daughter, Oscar C, William W, Pleasant W, George W. and Sarah Jane. She was married to James K. Connell of Virginia and now resides in Birmingham, Alabama. The others are now deceased, Oscar C. being the survivor.”
In 1833 the family of Oscar Claiborne “Roscoe” Goins re­moved to Hamilton County where he had the opportunity of getting well acquainted with the Cherokee Indians. His father farmed there until he died in 1841. His mother was remarried in 1846 to Levi Goins, suggested as a kinsman to her first husband. Oscar Claiborne “Roscoe” Goins left home shortly afterward and went to Chattanooga when he found a job as a “clerk in a mercantile house.”

“He remained there for 13 years where he acquired an extensive and practical knowledge of mercantile affairs which has since proven to be of infinite value to him,” according to “Memoirs of Georgia.”

He was married about 1853 to Nancy Florence Potter who was born in Alabama in 1832. She appeared as a 22-year-old unmarried female living in her father’s household in the 1850 census of Hamilton enumerated October 3, 1850. A son, their only child was born to them May 11, 1855. It is assumed that they were divorced about 1856.

He was remarried there in 1858 to Esther C. Reynolds, daughter of Anderson Reynolds of Chattanooga. Immediately after his marriage he went into the grocery business which he operated until the beginning of the Civil War.

The family was enumerated in the 1860 census of Hamilton County as:

“Goins, O. C. 30, born in TN
Ester 21, born in TN
Reynolds, Mary 15, born in TN”

Anderson Reynolds wrote his will July 17, 1860 including the names of Sarah Crabtree and Ester Reynolds Goins among his heirs.

Nancy Florence Potter Goins was enumerated in the household of her parents in the 1860 census of Hamilton County:

“Potter, Moses 60, born in TN, farmer,
$240 real estate
Ellander 56, born in SC
Nancy 28, born in AL
Elizabeth 26, born in TN
McKelvey 13, born in TN
James H. 8, born in TN
*Wm. Preston 6, born in TN”

The household of Moses Potter reappeared in the 1870 census of Hamilton County, No. 93-93 in Civil District 12:

“Potter, Moses 70, born in TN, farm laborer
Ellen 66, born in SC
Nancy 40, born in AL
Elizabeth 38, born in TN
John 16, born in TN
*Preston 15, born in TN
George W. 6, born in TN

William Preston Goins was enumerated as William Preston Potter in 1860 and 1870. His grandfather Moses Potter lived to be 104, according to the research of Louise Goins Richardson.

William Preston Goins enlisted in Company B, Nineteenth Tennessee Infantry Regiment commanded by Col. J. C. Cummins. Shortly afterward he was commissioned a second lieutenant in command of his company. His first engagement was in the Battle of Fishing Creek, Kentucky. Afterward his regiment participated in the two-day Battle of Shiloh, Tennessee.

Following this battle, he was ordered to bring the wounded to Chattanooga by way of Mobile and Montgomery and Atlanta. Upon completing this assignment, he assisted in the raising of Lookout Mountain Battery under the command of Capt. R. L. Barry. Later Barry’s Light Artillery was transferred to Knoxville, then to West Point, Mississippi and finally to Pollard, Alabama near Alabama. The battery was stationed there for 12 months, serving to protect the railroad junction there.

When the battle for Vicksburg intensified, the battery was moved northward to Jackson, Mississippi. It participated in the Battle of Baker’s Creek and then moved to Yazoo City in an attempt to repel the Union gunboats on the Mississippi under the command of Gen. Joseph E. Johnston. After the fall of Vicksburg July 4, 1863, the battery was pulled back to Jackson.

According to “Tennessee Soldiers in the Civil War,” John Goins, Levi Goins and Rosco Goins served as privates in Company C, Thirty-seventh Infantry Regiment, C.S.A. Henry Goins served in Company G in the Thirty-seventh as a cook. Pvt. Oscar C[laiborne] Goins was shown as a member of Barry’s Light Artillery.

“Pvt. Rosco Goengs” and Pvt. John Goins were members of Co. C, Thirty-seventh Tennessee Infantry Regiment in 1862, according to “Confederate Veteran,” Volume 28, [1920]. The regiment was organized in Morristown, Tennessee in May 1861.

After the war, he returned to Chattanooga broken in spirit, broken in health and broken in finances. He, like many Confederate veterans, had to attempt to rebuild his life. For the next 13 years he became a traveling salesman, and gradually regained his finances.

Anderson Reynolds, former father-in-law of Oscar Claiborne “Roscoe” Goins, died about 1866, and Goins, joined by John Crabtree and Sarah Crabtree, appeared in court to contest the will. They were unsuccessful.

In 1873 they removed to Spring Place, Georgia in Murray County, just across the state line. There he bought a plantation with a large two-story mansion which had been originally built Chief Joe Vann of the Cherokees. From its earliest days, it was a historic landmark, and in recent years has been registered by the State of Georgia as a historic site.

Dr. Kemp Mabry of Statesboro, Georgia wrote an account of the history of the Vann House:

Among historic sites still open to the public is the magnificent Chief Vann House at Spring Place, between Dalton and Chatsworth. Built in 1804 by James Vann, a minor Cherokee chief, its equal was never seen in the Cherokee Nation.

“James Vann, son of a Scot trader, Clement Vann and Wawli, a Cherokee princess, owned property and businesses throughout Cherokee Indian Territory. He was responsible for construction of Jellico Road, now U. S. 76, which the mansion faces.

He had two wives, a fierce temper and a bad drinking problem. However, in 1801, he offered land to Moravian missionaries of New Salem, N. C., for a school. His family embraced Christianity, but he called it a fable.

The James Vann family moved into the three-story brick mansion on March 24, 1005. Envisioned by Vanns for several generations, James lived there only five years. He had killed several men‑‑white, Indian and Black slaves. After he killed his brother‑in‑law, that death was avenged in a tavern in what is now Forsyth County.

James’ son, Joseph, inherited the house, amassed great wealth and gained the nickname of “Rich Joe.” Pres. James Monroe visited in 1819. In 1834, “Rich Joe: hired a white overseer but was evicted by Georgia Home Guards. Gold had been discovered near Dahlonega, a land lottery held, and white Georgians were to take over Cherokee lands.

John Howard Payne, who wrote “Home, Sweet Home,” was incarcerated in a slave cabin on the Vann planta­tion because of had Cherokee sympathies. Joseph Vann and his family fled to Tennessee, but by 1838, most of the Cherokees were herded toward Oklahoma. More than 4,000 died along the infamous “Trail of Tears.”

“Rich Joe” Vann built a replica of the mansion at Web­bers Falls, Oklahoma. Northern troops destroyed it during the War Between the States. “Rich Joe” died in an explosion of a steamboat he was racing on the Ohio River October 23, 1844.

The Chief Vann House was built of native Murray County materials except for windows brought from Savannah. Interior decorations mimic colors of nature–blue [sky], green [trees], red [clay soil] and yellow [ripened grain].

The hall stairway is the oldest cantilevered construction in Georgia, with no semblance of support under the landing platform. Third floor coffin-shaped bedrooms had thousands of sightseers names written on their walls by 1930. There had been 15 different owners since “Rich Joe’s” eviction in 1834, and the mansion was sadly dilapidated.

In the 1950s, the Chief Vann House was renovated and fully restored to its original splendor, dedicated by Gov. Marvin Griffin in 1958. Will Rogers, humorist and movie star, was the most famous Vann descendant, 42 of whom attended the dedication.”

Oscar Claiborne “Roscoe” Goins was enumerated in the 1880 census of Murray County:

“Goins, O. C. 51, born in Tennessee
Ester C. 45, born in Tennessee”

About 1895, he returned to Chattanooga to live, perhaps shortly after the death of Esther C. Reynolds Goins who died in that year, according to Myra Peeples Steed, a niece. He sold the Chief Vann home in that year. The deed was prepared and notarized in Hamilton County. He was described as a widower in a deed dated October 5, 1897. He was remarried about 1898 to Mary E. Mitchell.

He died there December 5, 1903 and was buried in Flint Springs Cumberland Presbyterian Cemetery. He was buried about one mile from his farm, 244 acres located nine miles south of Cleveland, Tennessee. Lois Goins Richardson, a great-granddaughter wrote, ” I have been to his grave, cleaned his tombstone and made prints of it. The stone is very nice, made of white marble with black marble inlay in it.”

Mary E. Mitchell Goins was appointed administratrix of the estate by Bradley County Probate Court September 5, 1904. She returned to the court April 3, 1905 an inventory of the sale of the estate of Oscar Claiborne “Roscoe” Goins:

“Cultivator $ 8.00
Disk Harrow 5.00
Mowing Machine .50
Turning Plow .50
Turning Plow .30
One-half interest in Binder 26.50
Brace & Bits .75
Double foot plow .30
Box of tools .30
Set of Trace Chains .45
Hoe & Plow .35
Hoe .15
Cross-cut Saw .45
Watch 1.00
====.===
Total $ 45.20

No children born to Oscar Claiborne “Roscoe” Goins, Esther C. Reynolds Goins and Mary E. Mitchell Goins. Mary E. Mitchell Goins was survived by Ruth Mitchell Austin, a great niece, who in 1993 continued to own part of the Goins farm.

One son was born to Oscar Claiborne “Roscoe” Goins and Nancy Florence Potter Goins:

William Preston Goins born December 6, 1902

William Preston Goins, only child of Oscar Claiborne “Roscoe” Goins and Nancy Florence Potter Goins, was born May 11, 1855 in Hamilton County. It is believed that he lived with his Potter grandparents, Moses Potter and Ellander Potter when his father went away to serve the Confederacy. He had a cousin by the name of John Potter.

Just prior to the Battle of Chickamauga the Potters found themselves situated in the path of the Union Army of the Cumberland under the command of Gen. William Starkie Rosencrans. Before engaging the Confederate army, Gen. Rosencrans halted his army in the fertile valley near Chat­tanooga and sent out foraging parties. They stripped the surrounding farms of their cattle and hogs and plundered their barns for provender.

The book, “Battle of Chickamauga” describes how the Union soldiers covered the valleys like a swarm of locusts. Gen. Rosencrans even held his troops there in the summer of 1863 until the corn crop ripened and then had his soldiers harvest the entire crop for the use of his army. After the corn was gathered, they turned their horses in on the fields for any remaining grain and fodder. After the men and animals were well rested, they pushed forward to the next battle line, carrying all of the plunder with them.

Louise Richardson Goins wrote:

“Grandpa said nearly all of their food was devoured, crops destroyed, animals taken and their wells were pumped dry, leaving them destitute. Grandpa’s Grandpa had him hide the pigs in the woods so they would have something to eat at the Union troops had gone. But the Yankees found the pigs and butchered all of them except one poor old sow. Since there was nothing to feed the sow, the family butchered her as soon as the troops pulled out.

Since the Union soldiers took their salt supply, Grandpa and his grandmother tore the floor out of the smokehouse and shoveled up the dirt underneath. Some salt had collected there from the curing process. They sifted out the salt content and purified it by boiling the brine solution.

As a young boy, Grandpa had learned to play the fiddle and it was one his most prized possessions. The night before the Union troops pulled out, they asked him to play for them. He obliged them, and at the end of the evening hung up his fiddle and the bow.

The next morning when he got out of bed, he discovered that not only were the Yankees gone, but his beloved fiddle as well. Grandpa dashed after the troops, found the thief who took his fiddle and demanded it back. The soldier refused to give up his plunder, and Grandpa went to the company com­mander who ordered the fiddle returned to the boy. The fiddle is still a treasured possession in the family and is now owned by my brother, David Goins of Paragould.

About 1870 he removed to Martinsville, Illinois in Clark County. He was married there October 20, 1878 to Lydia Elizabeth Lafferty, daughter of Parmenas Lafferty and Mary Jane McClure Lafferty. She was born in Clark County August 13, 1852.

Louise Goins Richardson wrote:

“My grandpa was a good fiddle player and was hired by the Laffertys to play at Lydia’s party to announce her engagement to another young man there. However, when grandpa saw her, he fell in love with her and knew that he couldn’t let her marry the other man who was financially well off, and Grandpa was broke at the time. It was love at first sight for both of them. He started making plans to marry her. I recall how he used to say, ‘I wooed her, and I won her.’”

They lived in adjoining Coles County in 1880-81-82, and in 1883 were back in Clark County. In 1884 they removed to Beech Grove, Arkansas in Greene County. They travelled in three covered wagons, taking three weeks to make the trip. Upon arrival in Greene County, they purchased 40 acres of land in Section 3, Township 16, Range 3.

While living in Illinois, three of their children were born to the couple. Ross Coe, the oldest, was born in 1879. He was named for his grandfather whose nickname was ‘Roscoe.’ I have an old letter to Grandpa and Grandma from Great Grandpa in 1881 and postmarked Spring Place, Georgia. It was in reply to a letter that he had received from my grandparents about naming their first born, Ross Coe after him. He verified that ‘Roscoe’ was his nickname and that his real name was ‘Oscar Claiborne.’ Charles Albert was born in 1881 and Lewis Edward in 1883. There were eight other children born in Arkansas.”

In 1895, Paragould, Arkansas became a boomtown because of the coming of the railroad and the jobs it created. At the time Grandpa purchased a $10 butcher’s license and opened a shop on Pruett Street. Business was good, and he extended credit to the railroad men upon request. Credit was his undoing, according to the journal of the butcher shop, still retained by his granddaughter, Inez Clark, along with his butcher’s license. When his beef cattle were gone, so was his business.

In 1897 Grandpa and Grandma homesteaded 160 acres on the ‘Cache Bottoms,’ swampy land that was not very desirable for farming. They obtained this land under Arkansas’ Donation Act; the land was free if they lived on the land, improved it and paid taxes on it.

Grandpa set about to drain the water from the land by con­structing a series of ditches. He hired neighbors to bring their teams and equipment to dig the laterals, and he contracted with dredgeboat operators to open the main channels. In time the work converted a swamp into valuable farmland. This property remains in the Goins family today.

Grandpa had seen his grandparents suffer during the Civil War when the Yankees came through the country foraging for food. They took everything they wanted, without compensation, often leaving the civilians in destitute circumstances. Consequently Grandpa was always sympathetic with people in need and was very generous in helping them.

Once Grandpa noticed that corn was disappearing from his bins. Since he had lots of experience at trapping animals, he decided one night to set a trap for the thief. Later that night he heard the trap spring, however he decided to leave the “animal” in the trap until daylight. The next morning, sure enough, he had caught the thief, but instead of scolding or prosecuting him, he had the fellow come in and have breakfast with him. Grandpa never had trouble with corn missing again.

This story was told many times by members of our family, but nobody ever knew who the thief was. Neither Grandpa or Grandma would ever reveal his identity.

In addition to farming, our grandparents had a number of occupations and endeavors. Grandpa made the best knives to use in the kitchen and around the farm. He also made Grandma’s crochet hooks with bones.

He owned a large sawmill where they cut and sold lumber and timber. Neighbors frequently came to his woodworking shop to request a casket be made for a funeral. Grandpa would heat the wood so that it would bend to form the contour of the casket. Grandma, with the help of Aunt Roxie Schamb, would line the casket with satin for the adults and white flannelette for children. Grandpa or Uncle Dee Morrow would build a pine box for the casket.

Grandpa was an excellent woodcarver. Once he carved his own portrait on a beech tree in the woods with the aid of a mirror. My brother, David Goins was squirrel hunting recently and came up on the portrait. Grandpa had signed it when he finished–just like an artist. The tree and the portrait are still there, in a secluded spot in the woods and in good condition.

A number of men were always employed by Grandpa working at the sawmill, on the farm or opening ditches. In 1912 he purchased a thresher which he took all over the country threshing wheat for the farmers. It took a big crew of men to operate this business.

Additionally Grandpa had a blacksmith shop and was a good farrier. He was a good metal worker and taught his son how to shoe horses. He built farm implements and in 1892 received Patent No. 479,269 for corn-planting attachment which he invented. In 1915 he invented a locking device for a multiple mailbox system. His locking device must have attracted lots of attention. In his correspondence file we found offers on it from several firms, including: Scully Pattern & Model Works of Kansas City, Missouri; American Investment Company of Washington, D.C; New World Manufacturing Company of Cincinnati, Ohio and Gerding Manufacturing Company of Cincinnati.

He did carpentry work and also bought and sold cattle, horses and mules. Once he bought an expensive Red Polled bull from Kentucky. I still have the papers on this purchase.

Perhaps the most memorable enterprise that I remember during my early years living on a farm adjoining them was the large orchard which contained many kinds of fruit and pecan trees, strawberries and Concord grape vines. The orchard was also home to 150 honeybee stands. It was amazing to our how Grandpa could work around the bees, extracting honey and beeswax for sale in town, without getting stung by them.

In 1920, Grandpa and several neighbors bought carbide lighting systems from a traveling salesman who came through Greene County. There was a pipe to carry the carbide gas to each room in the house with a valve in each room to control the flame. Carbide was fairly inexpensive, and the neighbors were envious of those who could afford to install the system. After all the initial systems were installed, the supplier raised the price of carbide so high that hardly anyone could afford it.

Rural telephones came about the same time. For as long as I can remember, our family had a telephone. It ran off batteries, and we had connections to my grandmother’s house and to Aunt Pearl Morrow’s house.

When electricity came to the area, the carbide gas pipes were removed and replaced with electrical wiring. I recall that our home was one of the first in the area to receive electricity.

Gypsies came through our area and people were suspicious of them. We kept an eye on our chickenhouses when they were around. They always had a group of bad horses to trade to people who did not know horseflesh. On trading day, they would feed their poor horses lots of salt so they drink a lot of water and looked fat and sleek. Grandpa knew all of the tricks of the trade, however and he always looked at their teeth to determine their condition. He could tell exactly how old a horse was by checking his teeth.

My grandparents were baptized into the Church of Christ August 24, 1915 at Evening Shade, Arkansas. He was 62 at that time. Their daughter, Pearl Goins had been baptized two days earlier in the revival meeting. The family took a very active part in the church.

Grandma’s diary recorded that on October 15, 1915, Grandpa cut and hauled lumber to Commissary, Arkansas where he began to build a new church building. He served as the church treasurer after the congregation was organized. They remained faithful members of the church until their deaths, setting a good example for their descendants.

Following a stroke, my grandparents moved to Paragould along with their daughter Mary Goins who was a registered nurse at Dixon Memorial Hospital. Grandma died there April 10, 1947 and was buried in the Morrow Cemetery which was located on a him overlooking the farm where she and Grandpa had spent so many happy years.

After Grandma died, Grandpa want to return to live on the farm, and his children acceded to his wishes. In his older years, it was difficult for him to get around over the farm, but his son John Goins would take him in the car anytime he want to go for a ride. His favorite Saturday afternoon pastime was to sit in the car parked on the Paragould square where he could visit with his friends as they walked by.

On a cold, icy day, December 7, 1950 Grandpa died at the age of 97 years and six months. He was buried beside Grandma in the Morrow Cemetery

Mrs. Elizabeth Thorpe Rockefeller was my Grandma Goins’ grandmother. While my grandparents were visiting in Minnesota, some of the Rockefeller family came to Uncle Ross’ home to gather information for the family record. “The Transactions of the Rockefeller Family Association for 1915-1925″ was published in 1926. My grandparents met with the Rockefellers and gave them our family information which was published in their book. Grandmother and her two sisters Ginny Lafferty Knopp and Molly Lafferty Potter were invited many times to the Rockefeller family reunions, however it was very expensive to travel to the reunion site by train, and they chose not to go. We still have some of the invitations to the Rockefeller reunions today. After John D. Rockefeller died, these annual reunions ceased.”

William Preston Goins was mentioned in a newspaper article published May 2, 1930 in Greene County:

“Large Gathering of Aged People Guest of Bud Ryan

Bud Ryan popular owner of the Ryan Cafe, put the big pot in the little one so to speak in his royal, big entertainment of the aged people of Greene county at his well known place of business at noon today when he served his guests a sumptous chicken dinner. A total of 137 guests, who have attained or passed the age of 75 years, shared in his hospitality by sitting at his festal board. The large diningroom of the cafe was filled to overflowing when the guests filed in and were seated. Tables were extended from one end of the room to the other, symbolical of Bud’s smile which extended from ear to ear, as he gave to each of the guests the glad hand and expressions of a cordial welcome, he as happy as the happiest guest present – and all were happy.

Following the feast at the cafe, the aged guests were ushered to the Capitol Theater where John Collins, the manager of that poplar playhouse, entertained them in the presentation of “Paramount on Parade” a very interesting all-talking picture.

It was a great feast , and it was a great time, a big occasion that will stand out in the memory of the aged guests and their host of friends , through the years to come. Each of the aged guests registered his or her name with Miss Mary Ida Ryan , giving age, date of birth and place of residence. The reg-ister showed a total of 137 names, all of those who had either reached or passed the 75th anniversary of their birth.

Register of the Grand Event

Guest Date Born Age Etc.

J. H. Kitchens May 4, 1852 77 yrs. 11 mo. M.D.
J. M. Bowlin 75 . born in SC.
T . M. T. Brewer 1851 79 born in Benton Co, TN
Laurie Dennis 86
Walcott, Butler Blackwood 81
Walcott, Mrs. Sorina Rogers 78
John Jonas 77
T.M. Wesley 75
W. B. Todd 78
Adam Sheffield 86
W. A. Oden Nov. 17, 1852 81 born in Morgan Co. Ala
J. P. Odell 77 born in Greene Co.
J. D. Breckenridge 76
W. M. Langton Jan. 3, 1841 89 born in Canada
J. W. Walls May 31, 1853 79 born in Gibson
Co. West Tenn.
W. W. Berryhil Sept. 9, 1849 80 Macklenburg
Co., N. Carolina
J. Newberry June 14, 1851 79 Cherokee Co., Ala
E. Roark May 1, 1852 78 born in Old Clarksburg, Tenn.
R. A. Evans June 1, 1852 77 born in Perry Co., Tenn.
W. F.Brewer July 27, 1849 80 Carrol Co.,West Tenn.
G. H. Brewer Aug. 3, 1854 75 born in Carrol Co. Tenn
S.L. Meadows Apr.8,1850 80 born in Southern Ill.
E. M. Johkins Feb. 4, 1845 85 born in Weatly Co. , Tenn
D. B. Withrow Jan. 15, 1842 88 born in Indiana
Pressly Cothrew Feb. 11, 1850 80 born in Spartanburg District,South Carolina
A. B. Harvey Sep. 3, 1851 78 born in Carroll Co., Tenn
G. F. Miller Oct.13, 1853 76 born in Giles Co. Tenn
J. N. Meredith July 27, 1847 82 Greene Co.
C. L. Harvey Mar. 1, 1847 83 born in Tenn.
“Uncle” Jake Lambert Feb 22, 1847 77 born in Tenn
M. E. Winn Nov 10,1845 84 born in Craighead Co.
W. D. Hester Sept 12, 1849 80 born in N.Carolina
J.D. Norton July 18,1850 79 born in Georgia came here in 1865
K.W. Nesmith Feb 6, 1847 83 born in Lawrence Co. Ala
J.C. Toler Oct 10,1850 79 born in Ill
L.B. Rogers Mar 12,1847 83 born in Ky
Mrs. Evelyn Dunaway Oct 1853 born in Obion Co. Tenn
Z.T. Fletcher Oct 18, 1848 81 born in Gibson Co. Tenn been here since 1866
Lawrence Newberry June 18, 1853 76 born in Mississippi
J. H. Cole Nov 2, 1854 75 born in Tenn
S. J. Troxel July 6, 1844 85 born in Terre Haute , Indiana
John Good Sept 10, 1854 75 born in Hamilton Co. , Indiana
Mrs. Martha Carter Apr 29, 1853 76 born in Tenn
Mrs.Eliza Dacus Oct 18, 1854 75 born in Mississippi
J. T. Hester Apr 2, 1848 82 born in N. Carolina
John Garland Sept 12, 1850 79 born in Tenn
Mrs. Mary Elizabeth
Garland Feb 14, 1851 79

Theo. C. Schwamb Nov 5, 1851 78 born in Ripley co., Indiana
B.F. Smith Mar 14, 1855 75 born in Jasper Co. Ill
Mrs.M.A. Robinson Apr 26,1853 76 born in Benton Co.,Tenn
I. H. Trevtharn July 29, 1853 76 born in W. Tenn been here 75 yrs.
“Aunt” Annie Tyner Apr 15, 1851 79 born in Benton Co. Tenn
John Harrison Mar 4, 1854 75 born in Ohio
J.J. Underwood Feb 4, 1853 76 born in Indiana
W.B. Edwards June 2, 1848 81 born in Kentucky
Mrs. Elizabeth Hyde Dec 1, 1843 86 born in Tenn
Mrs. Mary Jane Hyde Dec 21, 1847 83 born in N.Carolina
Dan Meriwether Dec 31, 1850 79 born in Kirksville, Mo
H.D. Lacy Sept 28,1853 76 born in Christian Co. Kentucky
P.S. Black June 21, 1852 77 born in Indiana
G.T. Ware Oct 27, 1842 85 born in Wilson Co. Tenn
Mrs. Iola LaFont June 30, 1853 75 born in Metropolis, Ill
Mrs. Malinda Dollins Dec 17, 1839 90 born in Middle Tenn Lincoln co.
Mrs. N.S. Lawrence Apr 30, 1847 83 born in Ky
Mrs. Sarah Garner Mar 18, 1842 88 born in Tenn
Mrs. Mary Roe July 11, 1854 75 born in Walker Co. Ga.
W.A. Overall Sept 12,1854 75
A.M. Robinson Jan 30,1849 81 born in Ardell Co. N.C.
Mrs. Lucinda Stuart Oct 28, 1852 77 born in Craighead co.
J.W. Batten Apr 21, 1850 80 born in Tenn
Aaron Thompson Jan 24, 1845 85 born in W.Tenn Henry Co.
Mrs. Martha Holigan Apr 15, 1854 75 born in Ga.
Mrs. M. C. Murphy July 17, 1841 88 born in Ga.
W.B. Montgomery Jan 1, 1854 75 born in East Tenn Bedford Co.
J.W. Hart July 20, 1851 79 born in England crossed Atlantic ocean to America at age of 6 yrs old
T.R. Walker Dec 13,1850 79 born in Gibson Co. Tenn
G.W. Gibson Sept 23,1840 89 born in Henry Co. Tenn
Mrs. M. J. Dodson Mar 17,1854 75 born in Miss
J.M. Lytle Jan 5, 1847 84 born in N.C.
B.F. Justice Mar 26, 1855 75 born in St.Francis Co,Mo.
A.J. Bishop Dec 25,1839 90 born in Bibb Co. Ala
G.P. Panel Oct 6, 1851 80 born in Ala
Mrs. Emma Vanover Jan 18,1854 76 born in Ky
H.S. Trice Nov 9, 1851 76 born in Craighead Co. Ar
Mrs. Rosa Worthan Mar 75 born in Indiana
W.E. Bush Feb 2,1855 75 born in W. Tenn near Paris been here twenty yrs.
W.P. Goins May 11,1853 76 born in E.Tenn
R.W. Rogers Sept 5,1852 77 born in Graves Co. Ky. been here 40 yrs
Mrs. Susan Hunter Feb 14,1853 75 born in Middle Tenn , Gallerton
S.N. Felty May 4, 1854 76 born in White Co. Ill
Mrs. Fannie S.
Hammond Jan 27, 1852 78 born in Ill
A.A. McKinney Feb 22,1851 79 born in Ind.
“Granny” Harris July 23, 1850 79 born in Ky
H.L. Tripod Mar 29,1853 77 born in Higland, Ill
Henry Fesler Aug 4,1850 79 born in Ill
Mrs.Mildred Murdock Jan 22, 1853 75 born in Tenn
W.R. Bennett July 23, 1847 82 born in Fulton Co. Ky
Mrs. A. Turley Sept 9,1853 75 born in St.Francis Co. Mo
H.M. Williford Feb 28,1856 76 born in Tenn
W.B. Morgan Sept 2,1852 79 born in Miss
J.O. Nash Nov 23, 1840 89 born in Penn
“Uncle ” Bill McDonald Feb 19, 1850 80 born in Ga.
V.F. Norton Aug 30,1854 75 born in Tenn
M.R. Coffman Dec 4,1840 89
G.W. Lloyd Oct 9,1852 80 born in Ark
Mrs. G.W. Lloyd Mar 12,1853 77 born in Tenn
D.L. Ligon July 7,1847 82 born in Tenn
J.L. Raines July 26,1848 81 born in Henry Co. Tenn
Mrs. V.A. Wadley Jan 10,1854 76 born in Fayette Co. Miss
J.R. Elkins Aug.4,1852 77 born in Summer Co. Tenn
L.F. Kenney May 23,1849 80 born in Mo.
P.G. Ellington June 11,1854 76 born in W.Tenn
M.C. Stevenson July 26,1853 76 born in S.Carolina
Mrs. Virginia Thompson 1846 83 born in St.Francis Co.
J.Hotchkiss Apr 21,1849 81 born in Independence co. Ar
J.V. Landrum Aug 18,1853 76 born in Weekley co.Tenn
A.B. Hays Jan 22, 1842 89 born in Hickman Co. Ky
Mrs. W.J. McDonald Apr 1854 76 born in Tenn
Joe A. White Dec 7, 1854 81 born in W.
Miss G.H. Walker June 4, 1848 81 born in Ala
J.W. Stalcup Sept 15,1852 76 born in Weakley Co. Tenn
G.N. Wadley Dec 8,1854 75 born in middle Tenn
G.J. Pierce Feb 5,1853 77 born in Logansville Clinton Co. Pa
W.C. Swain Jan 14,1852 78 born in Russelville , Ky
S.E. Batey Aug 8,1852 77 born in North Ga.
W.H. May July 21,1850 79 born in Va.
Mrs. Katie Higgins Jan 3,1852 78 born in Miss
A.Martin Sept 5, 1854 75 born in Germany
George Zollner Dec 2, 1853 77 born in Germany
Mrs. Mary Jane Worsham June 10, 1853 76 born in Ala
Mrs. C.A. Dover Oct 29,1855 75 born in Benton Co. Tenn
F.M. Barnett Oct 12,1847 82 born in Ill

Eleven children were born to William Preston Goins and Lydia Elizabeth Lafferty Goins:

Ross Coe Goins born in 1879
Albert Goins born in 1881
Lewis Earsalee Goins born in 1883
Mary Irene Goins born in 1886
Jimmie Goins born in 1889
Edna Alice Goins born in 1890
George Chester Goins born in 1891
Jessie Attee Goins born in 1894
Alma Pearl Goins born in 1898
William Joe Goins born in 1900
John Leon Goins born December 6, 1902

Ross Coe Goins, son of William Preston Goins and Lydia Elizabeth Lafferty Goins, was born in 1879 in Clark County, Illinois. He did not live with his parents after they moved to the Donation Grant. He had contracted the “chills” [now called malaria] which was caused by mosquito bites. The doctor advised Uncle Ross that if he wanted to maintain his health, he would have to move away from the swamps, so he went to Martinsville, Illinois and lived with his Grandmother Mary Jane Lafferty. Later he removed to International Falls, Minnesota where he married Suave Reuter, raised a family and died.

Through the years, Uncle Ross kept in close touch with his parents, writing many letters to them. His mother kept every letter, and they were passed down to Aunt Pearl Morrow. At her death, the box of letters were found in her attic.

Albert Goins, son of William Preston Goins and Lydia Elizabeth Lafferty Goins, was born in 1881 in Clark County.

Lewis Earsalee Goins, son of William Preston Goins and Lydia Elizabeth Lafferty Goins, was born in Clark County in 1883.

Mary Irene Goins, daughter of William Preston Goins and Lydia Elizabeth Lafferty Goins, was born in Greene County, Arkansas in 1886.

Jimmie Goins, son of William Preston Goins and Lydia Elizabeth Lafferty Goins, was born in 1889 in Greene County.

Edna Alice Goins, daughter of William Preston Goins and Lydia Elizabeth Lafferty Goins, was born in Greene County in 1890.

George Chester Goins, son of William Preston Goins and Lydia Elizabeth Lafferty Goins, was born in Greene County in 1891. He attended school in Walcott, Arkansas, riding “Old Gray.” After graduation at Walcott, he enrolled in an electrical engineering correspondence course. He was married about 1914, wife’s name unknown. He died of a ruptured appendix December 8, 1916, leaving his widow and a small baby, name unknown.

Jessie Attee Goins, son of William Preston Goins and Lydia Elizabeth Lafferty Goins, was born in Greene County in 1894.

Alma Pearl Goins, daughter of William Preston Goins and Ly­dia Elizabeth Lafferty Goins, was born in 1898 in Greene County.

William Joe Goins, son of William Preston Goins and Lydia Elizabeth Lafferty Goins, was born in Greene County in 1900.

John Leon Goins, son of William Preston Goins and Lydia Elizabeth Lafferty Goins, was born in Greene County Decem­ber 2, 1902. He was married there about 1925 to Cora C. Smith, daughter of Logan H. Roots Smith and Mary Alice Burkeen Smith. Cora C. Smith Goins died November 18, 1994.

Children born to John Leon Goins and Cora C. Smith Goins include:

Louise Goins born January 11, 1935

Louise Goins, daughter of John Leon Goins and Cora C. Smith Goins, was born in Greene County January 11, 1935. She was married August 24, 1949 to William F. Richardson. Following a divorce, she lived in Paragould, Arkansas in 1993. She a member of Gowen Research Foundation’s Editorial Board, was active in the research of her family history and contributed much of the material for this section of the manuscript.

Sarah Jane Goins, daughter of Nancy Goins, was born in Grainger County about 1831. Her parents brought her to Hamilton County about 1833. She was enumerated as a 20-year-old in the 1850 census of Hamilton County.

She was married shortly afterward to James K. Connell. They and their two children were enumerated in the 1860 census of Hamilton County. In 1895 they lived in Birmingham, Al­abama, according to “Memoirs of Georgia.”

Pleasant Goins, son of Nancy Bibee Goins, was born about 1833 in Hamilton County. He appeared there in the 1850 cen­sus as a 16-year-old. He was deceased by 1895, according to “Memoirs of Georgia.”

William A[ttle?] Goins, son of Nancy Bibee Goins, was born about 1835 in Hamilton County. He was enumerated there as a 14-year-old in the 1850 census.

“William A. Goins” was taken prisoner May 3, 1863 near Grand Gulf, in the Vicksburg campaign, according his prisoner of war record. He was transported upriver to a prisoner-of-war camp at Alton, Illinois. Hospital records there show that he was hospitalized for pneumonia December 24 and was discharged December 30. He died of chronic diarrhea July 2, 1864. He was buried there.

It was noted in his record jacket that “Prisoner states that he was conscripted and objects to being exchanged; desires to take the Oath of Allegiance without reservation or evasion.” It was also noted, “Prisoner sent to City Point for exchange June 12, 1863.”

Oscar Claiborne “Roscoe” Goins appeared in Hamilton County Court June 3, 1867 and “suggested the death” of William A. Goins and was made administrator of his estate.

Anderson Goen, Charles Goen, Dotson Goen, John Goen and William A. Goins believed to be Hamilton County men all served in the Forty-Third Tennessee Infantry Regiment, ac­cording to “Tennessee Soldiers in the Civil War.” All served in C Company except Charles Goen who served in K Company.

Louise Goins Richardson wrote, “I went to the Confederate Cemetery in Alton, Illinois. There are no individual markers for the 1,346 Confederate soldiers who died in one year there. However, there is a huge monument with all of the names of the soldiers who died there embossed in bronze. William A. Goins, Company C, 43rd Tennessee Infantry Regiment ap­pears on it.”

George Goins, son of Nancy Bibee Goins, was born about 1838 in Hamilton County. He was recorded there as an 11-year-old in the 1850 census. He died prior to 1895, according to “Memoirs of Georgia.”
==O==
Caleb Goan headed a “free colored” household of six individu­als in the 1810 census of Grainger County. “Caleb Gowin” was recorded as “one poll” in Capt. John Bull’s Company in the 1810 tax list of Grainger County.
==O==
Claibourn Goan was enumerated in the 1810 census of Grainger County as the head of a household of eight free col­ored. “Claibourne Goan” was assessed taxes in 1810 one 100 acres at 12.5 cents and one poll at 12.5 cents.

“Claborn Goins” was enumerated as the head of a household in the 1850 census of Grainger County, Household 154-20:

“Goins, Claborn 76, born in Virginia
Dolly 35, born in Tennessee
Levi 16
Perry 13
Polly 13
John 9
Nancy 7
Roscoe D. 6
Susan 4”
==O==
A household headed by James Goan enumerated in the 1810 census of Grainger County was composed of three “free col­ored and one “white female 16-26.” James Goan paid 12.5 tax on one poll, according to the 1810 tax list.
==O==
John Goan headed a “free colored” household composed of nine individuals, according to the 1810 census of Grainger County. He was assessed taxes on 90 acres in the 1810 tax list.
==O==
“Shaderick Goan” was recorded in November 1809 for the 1810 tax list as “1 poll.” William Goan was recorded in a consecu­tive entry as “1 white poll.”

Shadrach Goan, “free colored” with five members in his house­hold was enumerated in the 1810 census of Grainger County in a cluster of “free colored” households headed by Martha Ivy, James Reynolds, Sarah Mournin, Elizabeth Den­son, Gooden Scott, Dennis Scott and Jesse Scott.
==O==
Caleb Goin was married June 10, 1820 to Polly Dunkin, ac­cording to Grainger County marriage records. Claiborne Goin was the bondsman. Children born to Caleb Goin and Polly Dunkin are unknown.
==O==
In 1810 Daniel Goin paid tax on 338 acres and “one white poll” in Capt. Thomas Sharp’s Company.

Daniel Goin was enumerated as the head of a household in the 1810 census of Grainger County:

“Goin, Daniel white male 26-45
white female 26-45
white female 10-16
white female 10-16
white male 0-10
white male 0-10
white male 0-10
white male 0-10
white female 0-10”

Daniel Goin owned one slave in 1810. “Daniel Goins” re­ceived a land grant No. 16468 in Grainger County July 13, 1830.
==O==
Levi Goin was born in 1795 in North Carolina. He was mar­ried about 1816, wife’s name unknown, probably in North Carolina. He was enumerated as the head of a household in the 1850 census of Grainger County:

“Goin, Levi 55, born in North Carolina
Esther A. 28, born in North Carolina
William J. M. 15
Falany P. 12
Levi M. 10
Manervy A. 7
Lunda M. 5”

Levi Goin, Jr, was born between 1800 and 1810, probably in Claiborne County. He was married between 1820 and 1825.

His household was enumerated in the 1830 census of Clai­borne County adjoining the household of “Levi Goin, Sr, page 131.” It is not believed that “Levi Goin, Jr.” was a son of Levi Goin, Sr.” because Levi Goin, Sr. would only be 15 years at that time. It is possible that the Jr. and Sr. were assigned by the census taker merely to distinguish between the two.

The household of Levi Goin, Jr. appeared in the 1830 census as:

“Levi Goin, Jr. white male 20-30
white female 20-30
white female 5-10
white male 0-5”

The household of Levi Goin, Jr. reappeared in the 1840 census of Claiborne County, page 216, still nearby to the residence of Levi Goin, Sr. as:

“Levi Goin, Jr. white male 20-30
white female 30-40
white female 10-15
white male 5-10
white female 5-10
white male 0-5
white male 0-5”
==O==
Uriah Goin appeared in the 1840 census of Claiborne County, still adjoining his brother, Levi Goin. He family appeared as:

“Goin, Uriah white male 40-50
white female 40-50
white female 15-20
white female 5-10”
==O==
Baylis E. Goines was born in Tennessee in 1810. He was married about 1830, wife’s name Rhoda. She was born in North Carolina in 1812.

The household of Baylis E. Goines was enumerated as House­hold 783-810, Civil District 8, Grainger County in the 1850 census:

“Goines, Baylis E. 40, born in Tennessee, farmer,
$800 real estate
Rhoda 38, born in North Carolina,
illiterate
Martha S. 19, born in Tennessee
Nancy 16, born in Tennessee
James M. 14, born in Tennessee
Mary E. 9, born in Tennessee
William 8, born in Tennessee
Rhoda 4, born in Tennessee
Samuel S. 2, born in Tennessee”
“Goines, Prior A. 22, born in Tennessee”
==O==
Anny Goins was named as head of a household in the 1900 Grainger County, Enumeration District 26, page 2:

“Goins, Anny 67, born in NC, February 1833
Thomas 28, born in TN, February 1872, son
John 11, born in TN, Apr. 1889, grandson”
==O==
David Goins was married March 8, 1820 to Nancy Dunkin, ac­cording to Grainger County marriage records. William McGill was their bondsman. Children born to David Goins and Nancy Dunkin Goins are unknown.
==O==
Davis Goins was enumerated as the head of Household 936-126 the 1850 census of Grainger County:

“Goins, Davis 70, born in Tennessee
Jane 43, born in Tennessee
Calvin 16,
Alsy E. 7,
David 6,
Juliat A.C. 5
Abner B. F. 2
Lucy A. 5/12
Dyer, Eliza 22”
==O==
Drury Goins was married August 23, 1817 to Mary Goin, ac­cording to “Grainger County, Tennessee Marriages, 1796-1850.” Edward Riggs was their bondsman. Drury Goins ap­peared as the head of a household in the 1830 and 1840 census returns of Grainger County. Children born to Drury Goins and Mary Goin Goins are unknown.
==O==
Gabriel Goins was born in Virginia in 1810. He was married about 1840, wife’s name, Betsy, she was born in Virginia in 1816. The household of Gabriel Goins, an illiterate laborer was enumerated as No. 186-190, Civil District 2, in the census of the 1850 of Grainger County:

“Goins, Gabriel 40, born in VA, laborer, illiterate
Betsy 34, born in Virginia
Mahaly E. 12, born in Tennessee
Andrew 10, born in Tennessee
William R. 8, born in Tennessee”
==O==
Granville Goins was born in Grainger County about 1810, ac­cording to the affidavit of Matilda Goins of Dayton, Tennessee in the Court of Claims June 24, 1908. He was married about 1833, wife’s name Mary “Polly.” By 1837 they were located in Hamilton County, Tennessee

Granville Goins was enumerated as the head of a household No. 1339 in the 1850 census of Hamilton County. The family was recorded October 21, 1850 as:

“Goins, Granvill 40, farmer, born in Tennessee
Mary 33, born in Tennessee
Mahaley 18, born in Tennessee
Rachel 14, born in Tennessee
Noah 12, born in Tennessee
Roland 10, born in Tennessee
Dopson 8, born in Tennessee
James 6, born in Tennessee
Nancy 4, born in Tennessee
William 8/12, born in Tennessee”

Adjoining the household of Granville Goins was that of Nancy Goins. The household, No. 1340, was recorded on Page 925 as:

“Goins, Nancy 45, born in Tennessee
Elizabeth 29, born in Tennessee
Fanney 10, born in Tennessee”

“Granville and Polly Goins” were mentioned in an affidavit signed in 1908 by J. P. Talley of Chattanooga, according to “Cherokee by Blood: Records of Eastern Cherokee Ances­try in the U. S. Court of Claims, 1906-1910” by Jerry Wright Jordon.

“[I affirm] that I am 80 years of age and lived in James County, Tennessee. I was just partially acquainted with Mary Jane Irwin and know W. V. Goins quite well. May Jane Irwin is the second cousin of W. V. Goins. I knew Polly and Granville Goins. They lived in Hamil­ton County, but I think they were born in upper East Tennessee, probably Grainger County. Alfred and Halie, I think, were born in Hamilton County. Alfred, I think, was most too young to live with the Indians. They lived around where there were Indians, in the same neighborhood and country, and whether they ever took a part in the tribal councils as recognized Indians, I don’t know. Polly and Granville Goins were a little older than myself. They have been dead about 12 or 15 years. They were never on any Indian rolls that I know of. They were always called Indians, Cherokees. I was ac­quainted with Nathan and Marila Goins. They lived in Hamilton County, but I think they were born some­where else. The parents and grandparents of W. V. Goins were recognized as having Cherokee Indian blood in them. Don’t know that they were on any rolls. It’s been 50-odd years ago since I first got acquainted with them, and ever since I knew them, they have lived in Hamilton County. I know of nothing further to give in aid of ei­ther of said claims.
J. P. Talley
Chattanooga, Tenn, June 18, 1908”

At the same time W. T. Irwin of Chattanooga, former husband of Mary Jane Goins Irwin who died in 1897, made an affidavit about the family:

“I affirm that I live in Marion County, Tennessee. I am 49 years of age. I make claim for my children. My first wife has been dead 11 years. She was about 30 or 32 when she died. Her parents names were Alfred and Halie Goins. She claims Indian descent on her father’s and mother’s side. Her grandparents on her mother’s side were Granville and Polly Goins. On her father’s side they were Thomas and Betsy Goins. They come by the same name because they were probably related. She was always recognized as an Indian in the commu­nity in which she lived. Her parents and grandparents lived in what is now James County [?]. Her grandpar­ents origi­nated from Grainger County. She claimed to be a full blood Cherokee. Her grandparents lived in Hamilton County in 1835. She had only two brothers, those men­tioned in the application. The children of Granville and Polly Goins are Halie, Jim, Dodson or Dotson and Nancy. I have heard that my wife’s parents and grand­parents were on some roll, but I don’t know what roll. I have nothing further to add to what I have already said.

W. T. Irwin
Chattanooga, Tenn, June 18, 1908”
==O==
Gutre Goins, a Virginian, was recorded as the head of a house­hold in the 1850 census of Grainger County, Household 197-26:

“Goins, Gutre 40, born in Virginia
Betsy 31, born in Virginia
Mahaly E. 12
Andrew 10
William K. 8”
==O==
James Goins was born in Tennessee in 1821. He was mar­ried in 1850, wife’s name Myra I. She was born in Tennessee in 1832. He was a tailor and illiterate. They had no children.
==O==
James Goins appeared as the head of a household in the census of 1840:

Goins, James white male 20-30
white female 20-30
==O==
John Goins was enumerated as the head of Household 152-20 in the 1850 census of Grainger County:

“Goins, John 30, born in Tennessee
Martha F. 22, born in Tennessee
George W. A. 4
Joseph 1”

Robert C. Goins, was born in Tennessee in 1812. He was mar­ried about 1835 wife’s name Sele. The household of Robert C. Goins, No. 727-758, was enumerated in the 1850 census of Grainger County, Civil District 10:

“Goins, Robert C. 38, born in Tennessee, farmer
Sele 26, born in Tennessee,
illiterate
Thomas E. 14, born in Tennessee
Rhode I. 13, born in Tennessee
Robert K. 10, born in Tennessee
Sarah E. 7, born in Tennessee
Richard H. 6, born in Tennessee
Susan 4, born in Tennessee”
==O==
Sally Goins was shown as the head of a household in the 1850 census of Grainger County, 10th Civil District, Household No. 1317-1374. She was born in North Carolina in 1816. The 95-year old Sally Goins was possibly her mother-in-law. The household was enumerated as:

“Goins, Sally 34, born in North Carolina
Henry 18, born in Tennessee
Jane 12, born in Tennessee
James 7, born in Tennessee
Goins, Sally 95, born in North Carolina,
illiterate”
==O==
Samuel C. Goins was enumerated as the head of Household 893-120 in the 1850 census of Grainger County:

“Goins, Samuel C. 42, born in Tennessee
Mahala 29, born in Tennessee
William P. 5
Mary E. 4
Joseph N. 2”
==O==
Sarah Goins was born in Tennessee in 1820. She appeared in the 1850 census of Grainger County, as the head of Household No. 1103-1151, Civil District 10:

“Goins, Sarah 30, born in TN, illiterate
Nelson [Wilson?] 10, born in TN”
Mansfield, John 40
Camper Martha 30″
==O==
Thomas Goins was born in North Carolina in 1796. He moved to Tennessee about 1840. He appeared as the head of household No. 1300-1357, Civil District 11, Grainger County, in the 1850 census as:

“Goins, Thomas 54, born in NC, farmer, $150
real estate
Catherine 55, born in NC, illiterate
Henry 13, born in NC
George W. 10, born in NC
John G. W. 9, born in TN”

Thomas Goins, received Land Grant No. 25208 in Grainger County September 20, 1844. “Thomas Goans” received from the State of Tennessee Land Grant No. 30327 in Grainger County December 20, 1859.

Children born to Thomas Goins and Catherine Goins include:

George W. Goins born in 1834
Henry Goins born about 1836
John G. W. Goins born about 1841

George W. Goins, suggested as a son of Thomas Goins and Catherine Goins was born in 1834 in North Carolina according to his Confederate pension application. He was brought to Grainger County about 1840. In 1907 he stated that he had lived in Tennessee for 67 years.

George W. Goins, “colored” of Idol, Tennessee in Grainger County, stated on his Confederate pension application dated January 14, 1907 that he was born in North Carolina in 1834.

In reply to a pension board questionnaire dated January 14, 1907, he stated, “I enlisted in Company D, Twenty-sixth Infantry Regiment, CSA under Capt. William McConnal and Col. Leland. I was not in any battle. I was left to guard the wagon train. I was at the Ft. Donelson fight, but did not engage in the fight; I was with the wagons.”

He stated that the nature of his wound was “head diseased.” No doctor treated him, but “Les Talines waited on me.

When asked to explain how he got out of the army, he ex­plained, “I was left at Cumberland City with the sick and while there, my command was captured. The sick was sent to Knoxville and Morristown, and I —– —– —– —– —– —– home and reenlisted under Capt. L. J. Jennings in Grainger County, Tennessee and he furloughed me to my house, and I have since lost my furlough.”

He stated that he had lived in Tennessee for 67 years, that he had a wife and two sons, ages 38 and 35 living with him. He did a “little farming” on 50 acres of land he owned which he valued at $100 to $200. He owned “about $20” worth of personal property. He claimed that he was no longer able to work and that his sons could not support him.

Grainger County marriage records show that G. W. Goins was married to Jane Goins March 6, 1863 by L. H. Lowe, minister of the gospel.

Dr. J. H. Campbell attached an affidavit stating that the appli­cant had “disabilities from disease of liver, kidneys and gastri­tis of the stomach and in a bad state of health, unable to per­form manual labor.”

Capt. L. J. Jennings of Greenville County, South Carolina sub­mitted an notarized affidavit September 10, 1906 stating, “I was captain of Company D, Twelfth Battalion, Tennessee Cav­alry in the Confederate Army and George Goins was a mem­ber of my company.”

In April George W. Goins wrote the following letter to the pen­sion board:

April 22, 1907
Mr. F. A. Moses
Nashville, Tennessee

Dear Sir: I am in receipt of your letter of inquiry. I was in Company C, 12th Tennessee Battalion and was fur­lough home in July 1862 on account of sickness to re­main until called for the army dispersed, and I was not called for which left me at home and remained there. I am an invalid and have never been well since.

G. W. Goins”

Six months after completing the questionnaire, George W. Goins wrote concerning his application:

July 20, 1907
Mr. Frank A. Moses, S. E.
Nashville, Tennessee

Dear Sir: As I have not heard anything concerning my pension for some time, I desire to know whether it was allowed or whether you want more proof. Now my po­sition in the army was to cook for 8 men which I did. If the board is satisfied with the proof and my service in the army demands or entitles me to a pension, I would like to know as I need help.
George W. Goins”

On June 25, 1910 Joseph H. Goins, suggested as a kinsman of George W. Goins wrote:

“Mr. Frank A. Moses, S.E.
Nashville, Tennessee

Dear Sir: G. W. Goins of Idol, Tenn. died the 6th of this month of a disease contracted during service in the army for which you have the proof at your option. He leaves a widow 68 years old who is in need of help. If you need any more proof concerning his pension on file, please notify me or her. Someone told me that if she out lived her husband that she would get a pension. So please write me concerning it.

Yours respectfully,
Jos. Goins
P. S. Her name is Jane Goins, col, Idol, Tenn. Please notify either soon for she is very feeble. Or you can write to R. L. Mc, Idol, Tenn. as he is a magistrat and does business of that kind.”

Joseph H. Goins was still trying to obtain the pension in the following year:

Tate, Tenn.
July 2, 1911
Mr. F. A. Moses, S. E.
Nashville, Tenn.

Dear Sir: I am deeply interested in the case of G. W. Goins, deceased, #8686 for I know that no one needs a pension any worse that his widow or is any more entitled to one than was her husband. He was a free-born man and allowed to enlist wherever he chose. He was with the army some time before he enlisted not know­ing any better, but finally enlisted some time before the army was disbanded. As I have not mo­lested you any for a year, I appeal to your conscience to present her claim before the board again. Please respond.
Yours truly,
J. H. Goins
P.S. His widow’s name and address is Jane Goins, Idol, Tenn.

On July 11, 1911, Liddie Jane Goins filed a formal applica­tion for a widow’s pension. She supplied answers to a printed questionnaire.

She stated that she was born in Grainger County in 1838 and was married to George W. Goins by Lannie Lowe. She men­tioned that they were the parents of seven children –all boys. The oldest was about 50 and the youngest about 30 For prop­erty she mentioned that she had a life interest in a little moun­tainland worth about $75 and one milkcow. She declared that a son, age 39 and a grandson, age 10 presently lived with her.

On June 30, 1912, Joseph H. Goins made another attempt:

Tate, Tenn.
June 30, 1912
Mr. Frank A. Moses, Spec. Exmr.
Nashville, Tenn.

Dear Sir: In regard to the case of G. W. Goins, Case #8686, Col. We as col. people of Tate Springs would like to know why the pension of G. W. Goins has not been allowed, knowing that all the proof you have asked for has been made and backed up by the best of­ficials of Grainger County. His widow, Jane Goins is 73 years old and needs assistance. I will ask you for the last time to consider her case. Now this is election year, and we want to know something. You will please present this to the board next Tuesday and write her at Idol or write me at Tate. We do not know whether he merited a pension or not, but his comrades say he did. I know that his widow needs a pension or some help. So please consider this letter and let us hear from you.
Yours sincerely,
J. H. Goins

On July 30, 1912, Frank A. Moses, special examiner for the Tennessee Board of Pension Examiners, wrote Capt. L. J. Jen­nings in Greenville:

“Dear Sir,

The widow of G. W. Goins is an applicant for pension. It is claimed that Goins was a member of your com­pany. Our information is that at one time he was a cook for your company, but it appears that he did not remain until the close of the war. In fact, in his own application, made in 1907 he said that Capt. Jennings furloughed him home and he remained there. I was a Confederate soldier myself [captain] and never heard of the enlistment of a negro until the last few months of the war, when Gen. Lee advised the enlistment of ne­groes with the promise of their freedom at the end of the war. I believe a very few enlisted within a short time before the war closed. Please write me what you can to assist me in the consideration of this case.

Frank A. Moses”

Lyddie Jane Goins wrote Capt. Moses a final letter:

“Idol, Tenn.
October 1, 1912
Mr. Frank A. Moses
Nashville, Tenn.

I have your letter of July 3, that was written to my son J. H. Goins at Tate, Tennessee in regard to my pension. You stated that you were writing Capt. Jennings for information. Hope you have heard from him by now, and if may husband was due a pension, I would be thankful for it, for I am 73 years old and very feeble, and if I could get it, it would be of great value to me.

Yours truly,
Liddie J. Goins

On October 7, 1912 Captain Moses wrote a final letter to Lyddie Jane Goins:

“I have your letter of October 1. I wrote Capt. Jen­nings in July and have his reply. He tells me that the statements made by your husband in his application are true, but the trouble in your case is that your husband was a servant and not an enlisted soldier.

The Confederate States enlisted very few colored man and none until long after your husband left Capt. Jennings’ command and went home. Even if he had been enlisted, the fact that he did not stay until the close of the war would prevent us from giving a pension in this case. I do not think that it is worth your while to expect anything in the way of a pension.”
==O==
Amy Gowen was married March 11, 1846 to Isaac Shoemaker, according to “Grainger County, Tennessee Marriages, 1796-1850.”
==O==
James Gowen appeared as the head of a household in the 1840 census of Grainger County. His household appeared on a farm as:

“Gowen, James white male 40-50
white female 40-50
white male 20-30
white female 20-30
white male 15-20
white male 15-20
white male 10-15
white male 5-10
white male 5-10
white male 0-5
white male 0-5
white female 60-70”
==O==
Nancy Gowen, Jr. was eight years old when she was “bound to Joshua Hicky until she attain the age of 18” February 18, 1822, according to Grainger County Court Minute Book 5, page 3.
==O==
Caleb Gowin was recorded as “one white poll” in Capt. John Bull’s Company in the 1810 tax list of Grainger County.
==O==
Albert Gowing appeared as the head of a household in the 1850 census of Grainger County, household 518-425, Civil District 5. The family was enumerated as:

“Gowing, Albert 23, born in TN, farmer, illiterate
Nancy 20, born in Tennessee, illiterate
Deliora E. 2, born in Tennessee”
==O==
Joseph Guin was enumerated as the head of a household in the 1810 census of Grainger County:

“Guin, Joseph white male 26-45
white female 16-26
white male 0-10
white female 0-10”

Researcher Descendants:

Louise Goins Richardson, 2207 E. Lake Street, Paragould, AR, 72450
L. R. Williams, Jr, 6400 Middle Ridge Lane, Chattanooga, Tennessee, 37343,
615/842-7285.
Kenny Ann Gibson Wood, 8718 S. 68th E. Avenue, Tulsa, OK, 918/481-1661

GREENE COUNTY, TENNESSEE

William Goings of Greene County applied for a soldier’s pension in 1835.
==O==
Thomas Gooin, a North Carolina Revolutionary soldier re­ceived North Carolina land Warrant No. 2015 to 300 acres of land in 1787 in Greene County, according to “North Carolina Land Grants in Tennessee, 1778-1791” by Lillian Johnson Gardiner and Betty Goff Cook Cartwright.
==O==
Rebecca Gowan was married in 1847 to Bueford Graves in Greene County. He was born in 1850 in Sullivan County, Indiana.
==O==
Joseph Gowins was enumerated as the head of a household in the 1830 census of Greene County.

GRUNDY COUNTY, TENNESSEE

John C. Goin was enumerated as the head of a household in the 1900 census of Grundy County, Enumeration District 35, page 35:

“Goin, John C. 45, born in TN, March 1855
Sheldy 50, born in TN, 1850
Jim 30, born in TN, 1870”
==O==
Florinda C. W. Gowan, widow of Andrew J. W. Gowan came into Grundy County Court and contested the will of her deceased husband as not being valid February 4, 1849, according to Grundy County Court Minute Book 1844-1855. The court met to close the estate December 1, 1851. Florinda C. W. Gowan had remarried in the interim, husband either Garrison Harrison or Miles H. Harrison. Other heirs of Andrew J. W. Gowan mentioned in the court records include Elizabeth L. Roberts, Margaret McGown, and L. D. McGown.

HAMBLEN COUNTY, TENNESSEE

William Goan was enumerated as the head of a household in the 1900 census of Hamblen County, Enumeration District 53, page 1:

“Goan, William 72, born in TN, May 1828
Mary M. 62, born in TN, December 1838
Robert 18, born in TN, January 1882”
==O==
Joseph Goin was born in Tennessee about 1850. He appeared as the head of a household in the 1880 census of Hamblen County, Enumeration District 70, page 21, Civil District 6:

“Goin, Joseph 30, born in TN
L. Jane 23, born in TN
Leonidas 3, born in TN
M. Rosella 1, born in TN”

The family reappeared in the 1900 census of Hamblen County, 10th Civil District, Enumeration District 61, page 3:

“Goin, Josiah 53, born in TN, May 1847
Jennie 47, born in TN, January 1853
Leonidas 22, born in TN, July 1877
Florence 14, born in TN, August 1885
Nora 19, born in TN, March 1881
Bertha 7, born in TN, April 1893
Frank 2, born in TN, June 1898, son
Audley 2, born in TN, June 1898, son
==O==
Comadore Goine died in 1910 in Hamblen County according to “Tennessee Deaths,” Record No. 32637.
==O==
Several members of the Goins family were buried in the Emma Jarnagin Cemetery located in Morristown, Tennessee. Interred there were:

Grace Goins 1901-1973
Laura Quillen Goins 1877-1954
Logan M. Goins 1904-1971
Cornie M. Goins 1899-December 17, 1987

End of Hamblen County, Tennessee

HAMILTON COUNTY, TENNESSEE

Hamilton County was created in 1819 with land taken from Rhea County. Rhea County was created in 1807 with land taken from Roane County. Roane County was created in 1801 with land taken from Knox and Blount Counties.
==O==
Free Colored Families enumerated in the 1840 census of Hamilton County included households headed by:

Caston Gowin 53011-10101
G. Gowin 0011-1211
George Gowin 4101-001
John Gowin 301-221
P. Gowin 0111-101
Sanford Gowin 011-101
Thomas Gowin 201-001
William Gowin 1101-0001
==O==
The obituary of Frank B. Goan, 67, a guard for Chattanooga Glass Company was published in February 1954 in the “Chattanooga Times.”
==O==
B. E. Goins was arrested for “driving while drunk,” according to the October 18, 1940 edition of “The Chattanooga Times.”
==O==
B. W. Goins and Leila Williams were arrested for “public profanity,” according to the October 18, 1940 edition of “The Chattanooga Times.”
==O==
Cassandra “Cassie” Goins was born in Hamilton County in August 1862 of parents unknown. She was married about 1895 to William Charles Austin who was born April 18, 1872 in Baxter County, Arkansas to Robert Austin and Nancy M. Hopper Austin. William Charles Austin died August 24, 1924 in Sequoyah County, Oklahoma. Cassandra “Cassie” Goins Austin died April 13, 1927 and was buried in Riley Cemetery in Sequoyah County.
==O==
John Goins “F.M.C,” Confederate soldier, unit unknown, was injured during the Battle of Murfreesboro, Tennessee and was shipped by train to Chattanooga for hospitalization, according to Margie Daniels. He died there, one of 887, during the period, January 1, 1863-May 31, 1863 who were hastily buried in a cemetery near the Tennessee River. Many of the wounded in the battle of Murfreesboro were sent to Chattanooga by train. Some of them died en route and others in the station immediately upon arrival. Homes and hospitals were filled with other soldiers who lingered, some a few days and some for months.

After the war was over, Col. R. L. Watkins supervised the removal of the bodies to the Confederate Cemetery in Chattanooga in 1867. He compiled a list of the interments.

Col. Watkins began his list with the number 142 and the date February 1, 1863. It is presumed that 141 men died in January and were buried in the very low ground where the water washed the graves and the wooden boards, and that the names were not decipherable when he made his list in 1867. The last number “887” is dated May 31, 1863.

The list bears this inscription:

“Presented to the Confederate Memorial Association March 18, 1876, by R. L. Watkins, who assisted in obtaining this record in 1867 and participated in removing the dead to the graves where they now lie. This was when the Confederate Memorial Association was first organized. Each grave was numbered and named on headboard as this list shows and was easily identified.
R. L. Watkins.”

ALABAMA

Alexander, George, Company E, 34th Regiment.
Alexander, J. W., Company C, 28th Regiment.
Allen, J., Company H, 34th Regiment.
Allison, E., Company E, 16th Regiment.
Anderson, Robert C., Company E, 19th Regiment.
Andrew, W. F., Company H, 35th Regiment.
Alsed, Isaac, Company M, 1st Cavalry.
Baker, S. B., Company K, 1st Cavalry.
Ballard, Samuel, Company A, 33rd Regiment.
Barlow, W. P., Company K, 25th Regiment.
Barnes, C. P., Company D, 19th Regiment.
Baros, C. C., Company K, 1st Regiment.
Bates, Francis M., Company B, 3rd Cavalry.
Bathwell, E., Company E, 6th Cavalry.
Bayley, E. C., Company ?, 28th Regiment.
Beedles, Benjamin, Cavalry
Bell, I. W., Company B, 5th Regiment.
Belvin, E. D., Company B, 45th Regiment.
Beles, Harrison, Company B, 19th Regiment.
Bishop, J., Company A, 33rd Regiment.
Black, C. J., Company G, 41St Regiment.
Blair, Wyley, Company G, 35th Regiment.
Blakely, William, Company I, 30th Regiment.
Blanton, J. W., Company K, 26th Regiment.
Bottenburg, Jas., Company B, 16th Regiment.
Bowsman, John, Company I, 1st Cavalry.
Bradley, A., Company B, 34th Regiment.
Brannon, J. B., Company F, 45th Regiment.
Brown, B. P., Maney’s Battery.
Brown, G. W., Company I, 1st Cavalry.
Brown, J. B., Company J, 34th Regiment.
Brown, J. W., 32nd Regiment.
Brown, S. B., Company I, 25th Regiment.
Bruner, John, Company F, 26th Regiment.
Bryant, B., Company H, 1st Regiment.
Burdett, L. S., Company G, 34th Regiment.
Burdick, W. G., Company E, 34th Regiment.
Busbin, Isaac, Company E, 19th Regiment.
Bynum, Riley, Company I, 1st Cavalry.
Bynum, Tom, Company B, 28th Regiment.
Camp, B., Company L, 1st Cavalry.
Camp, M. M., Company B, 51st Regiment.
Cannon, E., Company H, 45th Regiment.
Capps, W. H., Company E, 45th Regiment.
Cargile, Richard C., Company C, 19th Regiment.
Carlton, R. H., Company A, 34th Regiment.
Chapman, A. J., Company E, 24th Regiment.
Chapman, Amos, Company E, 24th Regiment.
Chapman, Lieut. M., Company E, 19th Regiment.
Cheatham, J. S., Company C, 33rd Regiment.
Cherry, John William, Company C, 35th Regiment.
Chesterfield, Ivie, Company A, 28th Regiment.
Clement, A. J., Company E, 16th Regiment.
Coffin, John, Company C, 2nd Cavalry.
Colburn, J. Company B, 41st Regiment.
Compton, M., Company L, 1st Regiment.
Corburn, Perry, Company C, 2nd Cavalry.
Cox, A., Company D, 32nd Regiment.
Craig, W. R., Company G, 22nd Regiment.
Crow, J. B., Company F, 24th Regiment.
Crum, Sergt. W., Company A, 11th Regiment.
Daniels, J. A., Company C, 30th Regiment.
Danormy (?) W. J., Company B, 39th Regiment.
Davis, E. J., Company I, 25th Regiment.
Davis, G., Company C, 32nd Regiment.
Dickam, M., Company C, 2nd Battalion.
Docrull, R. C., Company C, 33rd Regiment.
Doherty, J. L., Company G, 19th Regiment.
Dones, I. C., Company C, 35th Regiment.
Dossey, G. B., Company B, 33rd Regiment.
Duke, William G., Company I, 18th Regiment.
Dunham, Richard, Company B, 34th Regiment.
Durner, Daniel, Company J, 4th Cavalry.
Durrett, G. H., Company F, 26th Regiment.
Durro, W. G., Company E, 22nd Regiment.
Dutton, B., Company K, 1st Regiment.
Eason, E. D., Company H, 25th Regiment.
Ellis, E. T., Company E, 34th Regiment.
Emmon, Joseph, Company F, 31st Regiment.
Enbe, E. N., Company F, 25th Regiment.
Everett, Marshall, Company G, 22nd Regiment.
Ezell, Addison W., Company A, 38th Regiment.
Fields, W. N., Company M, 1st Cavalry.
Foster, Francis, Company G, 34th Regiment.
Fowlett, J. W., Company C, 4th Regiment.
Fusler, Alf. S., Company F, 45th Regiment.
Gabham, G. S., Company B, 35th Regiment.
Gaines, William F., Company K, 26th Regiment.
Galbreth, A. C., Company E, 5ist Regiment.
Gilbert, John, Company E, 24th Regiment.
Goba, John H., Company C, 19th Regiment.
Goodwin, Morris, Company B, 22nd Regiment.
Gordon, W., Company C, 16th Regiment.
Gorham, J. H., Company K, 4th Regiment.
Goubile, John, Company B, 24th Regiment.
Graham, Napoleon, Company I, 24th Regiment.
Grant, J. A., Company F, 1st Cavalry.
Green, E. C., Company B, 51st Regiment.
Green, J., Company E, 6oth Regiment.
Green, Jackson, Company K, 30th Regiment.
Griffin, G., Company B, 1st Cavalry.
Hackney, G. W., Company B, 34th Regiment.
Hale, W. L., Company C, 28th Regiment.
Hamil, Simon, Company C, 25th Regiment.
Hand, A. W., Company G, 34th Regiment.
Harris, 3. S., Company G, 34th Regiment.
Harrison, Napoleon B., Company E, 24th Regiment.
Hattaway, M. W., Company B, 51st Regiment.
Hawkins, John F., Company B, 38th Regiment.
Hendricks, J., Company C, Gibson’s Battery.
Hicks, J. W., Company A, 45th Regiment.
Hicks, Thomas E., Company A, 25th Regiment.
Hill, E. B., Company -, 1st Regiment.
Hinson, W. B., Company A, 25th Regiment.
Hitt, E. P., Company D, 28th Regiment.
Hods, James, Company G, 25th Regiment.
Holland, B. B, Company K, 26th Regiment.
Holliday, Reuben, Company K, 16th Regiment.
Homes, Lieut. J. W., Company, 1st Cavalry.
Holt, W. C., Company F, 24th Regiment.
Hooke, A. C., Company I, 34th Regiment.
Hooker, John, Company I, 32nd Regiment.
Hord, W. H., Company K, 31st Regiment.
Holt, C. W., Company K, 34th Regiment.
Housen, A., Company H, 25th Regiment.
Hutchin, D. L., Company -, 1st Regiment State.
Inadmatt, Robt. B., Company D. 19th, Regiment.
Israel, Leander W., Company E, 19th Regiment.
Janis, B., Company C, 26th Regiment.
Jarret, James, Company H, 19th Regiment.
Jenkins, J. D., Company E, 4th Regiment.
Jester, James A., Company F, 19th Regiment.
Jobson or Johnson, L., Company A, 26th Regiment.
Johnson, Oliver, Company I, 25th Regiment.
Johnson, Wm. H., Company I, 1st Cavalry.
Johnson, S. R., Company B, 25th Regiment.
Jones, S. M., Company ?, 16th Regiment.
Jones, W. K., Company B, 28th Regiment.
Jordan Mark, Company A, 41st Regiment.
Jurrell L, Company K, 24th Regiment.
Kelly John, Company A, 25th Regiment.
Kenneda, J. W., Company E, 25th Regiment
Kerby A, Company C, 19th Regiment.
Killen G W., Company B, 51st Regiment.
Kirkland, John, Company E, 1st Battalion.
Kyle, Robert E., Company D, Russel’s Cavalry.
LaMarcus, Elias, Company H, 38th Regiment.
Lambert S. S., Company F, 34th Regiment.
Latham, Moses, Company D, 19th Regiment.
Lee J P., Company B, 39th Regiment.
Lee Lewis, Company D, 33rd Regiment.
Leline Allen, Company K, 34th Regiment.
Lillard Wm., Company C, 26th Regiment.
Liston R. A., Company F, 51st Regiment.
Lixton James, Company G, 41St Regiment.
Loftus Samuel, Company K, 38th Regiment.
Long C M., Company F, 25th Regiment.
Longley C. W., Company B, 28th Regiment.
Lunchford, A. W., Company G, 51st Regiment.
McCaffity, D., Companys B and E, 26th Regiment.
McCarthy, Daniel, Company D, 4th Cavalry.
McCartney, John, Company H, 26th Regiment.
McCowin, T. D., Company E, 45th Regiment.
McCoy Alexander, Company I, 25th Regiment.
McCoy S. A., Company H, 33rd Regiment.
McDonnell, William E, Company A, 1st Alabama Cavalry.
McDowell, W. C., Company A, 1st Cavalry.
McElwain, W., Company G, 34th Regiment.
McGuire, Charles, Company C, 18th Regiment.
McHenry, Thomas, Company A, 19th Regiment.
McKee, S., Company G, 25th Regiment.
McKleduff, T. N., Company A, 1st Cavalry.
McLain, E. E., Company E, 45th Regiment.
McLandon, Company E, 24th Regiment.
McLandon, Thomas, Company C, 25th Regiment.
Manley, J. G., Company I, 25th Regiment.
Marshall, E. M., Company H, 38th Regiment.
Martin, Daniel, Company A, 16th Regiment.
Massey, Aaron, Company G, 51st Regiment.
May, G. W., Company B, 25th Regiment.
Mays, James, Company K, 5th Regiment.
Melton, M. W., Company H, 41st Regiment.
Michell, Andrew T., Company F, 33rd Regiment.
Micou, W. H., Company H, 34th Regiment.
Miller, W. D., Company K, 1st Regiment.
Milligan, J., Company F, 25th Regiment.
Michen, H. S., Company B, 25th Regiment.
Moes, J. T., Company I, 18th Regiment.
Moin, J. G., Company D, 32nd Regiment.
Mooney, John P., Company B, 33rd Regiment.
Moore, W. D., Company -, Eufaula Artillery.
Morey, Charles, Company G, 19th Regiment.
Mullen, Augustus, Company D, 33rd Regiment.
Murphee, D. L., Company I, 1st Cavalry.
Murphey, W. Y., Company K, 1st Regiment.
Murphey, B. S, Co., K, 1st Cavalry Regiment
Nelson, Andrew J., Company B, 25th Regiment.
Nelson, David, Company I, 51st Regiment.
Nichols, J. J., Company H, 44th Regiment.
Nix, J., Company E, 28th Regiment.
Noland, LeBron, Company C, 25th Regiment.
Norvell, G. B., Company F, 4th Regiment.
Osburn, , Company D, 4th Regiment.
Palmer, Milton, Company H, 33rd Regiment.
Patterson, W. J., Company G, 34th Regiment.
Payne, J. M., Company A, 21st Regiment.
Pede, C, Company F, 39th Regiment.
Phillips, John H., Company C, 33rd Regiment.
Phillips, J. W., Company E, 51st Regiment.
Pollard, J. M., Company D, 32nd Regiment.
Preese, J. D., Company F, 20th Regiment.
Pritchett, B. F., Company A, 25th Regiment.
Quick, J. J, Company G, 38th Regiment.
Ragsdale, W, Company C, 22nd Regiment.
Raider, W. F., Company G, 38th Regiment.
Rainey, J. J. , Maney’s Battery.
Ray, H. A., Company C, 22nd Regiment.
Rhodes, J. B., Company C, 34th Regiment.
Richardson, John A., Company C, 38th Regiment.
Rice, James, Company H, 1st Cavalry.
Roberts, A. J., Company I, 19th Regiment.
Rodgers, J. J. , Company E, 1st Cavalry.
Rogers, John L., Company I, 33rd Regiment.
Roper, William, Company G, 25th Regiment.
Rowe, Harry M., Company E, 34th Regiment.
Rowe, P. A., 34th Regiment.
Rulfard, James, Company F., 33rd Regiment.
Sackett, James, Company -, 2nd Regiment.
Saner, John, Company G, 41st Regiment.
Sanford, James, Company D, 24th Regiment.
Satterwhite, W. J., Company G, 22nd Regiment.
Scott, J. M., Company H, 41St Regiment.
Seff, Thomas E., Company F, 36th Regiment.
Shahan, Alonzo, Company H, 1st Cavalry.
Shelton, G., Company G, 45th Regiment.
Singleton, W. H., Company B, 38th Regiment.
Slattery, John, Company E, 33rd Regiment.
Smith, Jackson, Company D, 34th Regiment.
Smith, John W., Company F, 19th Regiment.
Smith, J. M., Company C, 34th Regiment.
Smith, W. W., Company M, 1st Cavalry.
Somers, S. C., Company B, 41st Regiment.
Soralls, John H., Company , 34th Regiment.
Spears, James R., Company E, 1st Battery.
Spence, William, Company I, 39th Regiment.
Steed, J., Company K, 4th Regiment.
Stevens, Timothy, Company H, 25th Regiment.
Tate, John, Company A, 2nd Cavalry.
Tavers, Willis A, Company B, 34th Regiment.
Taylor, E. B., Company B, 25th Regiment.
Teer, Joseph, Company B, 25th Regiment.
Terrel, Anthony, Company A, 16th Regiment.
Thomas, Uriah, Company E, 54th Regiment.
Thomas, W., Company G, 24th Regiment.
Thomas, W. G., Company C, 33rd Regiment.
Thompson, George, Company F, 41st Regiment.
Thompson, T. M., Company G, 26th Regiment.
Thompson, William, Company B, 51st Regiment.
Tiler, G. W., Company A, 25th Regiment.
Tinker, H., Company A, 3rd Alabama.
Todd, Thomas J., Company I, 4th Cavalry.
Toney, J. A., Company C, 26th Regiment.
Tramel, F., Company F, 19th Regiment.
Tusher, Aif S., Company F, 45th Regiment.
Tybs, William, Company I, 32nd Regiment.
Vaughn, John, Company K, 1st Cavalry.
Vestal, Davis A., Company C, 16th Regiment.
Vickers, Corp. T. J., Company F, 32nd Regiment.
Wade, Benj. B., Company D, 38th Regiment.
Wall, F. M., Company H, 26th Regiment.
Walters, D., Company G, 26th Regiment.
Walters, Joshua, Company E, 51st Regiment.
Wark, James, Company A, 41St Regiment.
Waskin, T. D., Company D, 28th Regiment.
Weiley, David, Company I, 36th Regiment.
Whaley, J., Company K, 1st Regiment.
Willingham, B. M., Company B, th Regiment.
Wills, J. B., Company A, 39th Regiment.
Wilson, B., Company B, 1st Cavalry.
Wilson, William, Company B, 1st Cavalry.
With (Witt?), William W., Company C, 28th Regiment.
Wood, Allen G., Company E, 34th Regiment.
Wood, John W., Company I, 36th Regiment.
Wright, John, Company C, 34th Regiment.
Wright, W. D., Company G, 45th Regiment.
York, Lieut. A. J., Company E, 32nd Regiment.
Unknown, Company F, 3rd Alabama Cavalry.

ARKANSAS

Bartlett, M., Company B, 31st Regiment.
Barstow, James, 7th Regiment.
Beavers, F. M., Company C, 31st Regiment.
Bennett, H., Company F, 3rd Regiment.
Bennett, R., Company D, 2nd Regiment.
Boker, J. L., Company H, 8th Regiment.
Brumby, James, Company K, 4th Regiment.
Cates, J. W., Company K, 31st Regiment.
Course, J. L., Company I, 30th Regiment.
Gatten, William T., 25th Regiment.
Gray, J. P., Company K, Adams’ Regiment.
Holmes, Lieut. J. W., 1st Cavalry.
James, D. T., Company D, 8th Regiment.
Kendall, George, Company D, 31st Regiment.
McKinney, P. L., Company A, 1st Regiment.
Martin (Morton), Joseph, Company H, 2nd Regiment.
Patterson, D. A., Company E, 1st Regiment.
Patterson, John, Company C, 4th Regiment.
Patton, J. A., Company B, 3rd Regiment.
Porter, Robert, Company B, 1st Regiment.
Rowland, W. H., Company E, 31st Regiment.
Smith, R., Company B, 1st Regiment.
Smith, William, Company K, 6th Regiment.
Stanley, R. A., Company I, 1st Regiment.
Stovall, W. F., Company I, 8th Regiment.
Thompson, J. M., Company F, 2nd Regiment.
Vend, J., 1st Regiment.
Virdel, T. L., Company I, 2nd Regiment.
White, J. J. , Company A, 7th Regiment.
Word, Thomas, Company H, 8th Regiment.

FLORIDA

Boals, J., 11th Regiment.
Coggins, J. H., Company D, 3rd Regiment.
Douglass, C., Company F, 4th Regiment.
Elliott, James B., Company D, 3rd Regiment.
Gary, M. J., Company F, 3rd Regiment.
Holland, D., Company H, 1st Regiment.
Lamb, C., Company G, 3rd Regiment.
Latt, William C., Company 1, 4th Regiment.
Lovell, W. A., Company G, 4th Regiment.
Martin, Jesse, Company E, 1st Regiment.
Nelson, J. T., Company I, 1st Regiment.
Reeves, S. S., Company H, 3rd Regiment.
Sapps, B. W., Company E, 4th Regiment.
White, Edward, Company G, 3rd Regiment.
Wingate, J. J. , Company A, 3rd Regiment.
Wynne, Charles, Company B, 1st Regiment.
Wynne, Isaiah, Company F, 4th Regiment.

GEORGIA

Allen, H. E., Company B, 9th Regiment.
Bailey, G., Company H, 3rd Cavalry.
Bailey, S. A., Company B, 5th Regiment.
Capps, H. J., Company E, 3rd Battery.
Cine, G. W., Company B, 9th Battery.
Clay, J. A., Company H, 5th Regiment.
Cootes, E. T., Company B, 2nd Battalion.
Covington, Thomas, Company H, 3rd Regiment.
Demeriss, A., Company K, 13th Regiment.
Hunt, M. S., Company D, 3rd Cavalry.
Hutchin, 1st Georgia State Troops.
Jansen (or Nelson), H. J., Georgia Cavalry.
Lerois, W. D., Company C, 3rd Battery.
Lyle, G. W., Company C, 3rd Battery.
Marhulon, T., Company C, 9th Georgia.
Nelson (or Janson), H. J., Cavalry.
Patters, M. J., Company C, 3rd Battery.
Peeples, C. C., Company B, 3rd Regiment.
Perry, Thomas J., Company B, 3rd Regiment.
Powers, J. E., Company K, 5th Regiment.
Pud, J., Company E, 9th Battalion.
Ramsey, Jordan, Company C, 9th Battalion.
Sarp, Thomas A., 3rd Cavalry.
Sorrels, A. W., Company E, 2nd Regiment.
Spence, T. J., Company C, 2nd Regiment.
Stephens, Newton, Company F, 5th Regiment.
Tucker, E. T., Company D, 2nd Battalion Cavalry.
Veaney, Barney, Company I, 5th Regiment.
Ward, N., Company D, 8th Battery.
Wilbanks, J. A., Company F, 3rd Regiment.

KENTUCKY

Belter, John, Company B, 1st Cavalry.
Berry, W., Company B, 2nd Regiment.
Boget, A., Company D, 1st Cavalry.
Burgs, J. G., Company D, 9th Regiment.
Jones, M. S., Company F, 1st Cavalry.
McCullen (McCullough), William, Company H, 6th Regiment.
Perkins, Thomas, Company A, 3rd Cavalry.
Simpson, D. M., Company G, 1st Cavalry.
Speaker, George, Morgan’s Cavalry.
Steel, James B., Cynthiana, Ky.
Switzer, James, Company F, 9th Regiment.
Tucker, James, Company D, 4th Cavalry.
Waiths, Lieut. F. M., Cavalry. S
Wr1sten, Joseph M., Company D, 4th Regiment.

LOUISIANA

Arthur, D., Company F, 16th Regiment.
Barnett, William I., Company I, 16th Regiment.
Brickley (or Buckley), A. G., Company E, 11th Regiment.
Conner, J., Company E, 16th Regiment.
Eagan, Michael, Company G, 10th Regiment.
Findlay, John, Company B, 25th Regiment.
Hallett, James, 1st Cavalry.
Heardy, J. H., Company H, 13th Regiment.
Honeycutt, G. M., Company F, 11th Regiment.
Kelly, D., Company A, uth Regiment.
Kenan, D. L., Company F, 2 th Regiment.
McCoy, A., Company E, 25th Regiment.
McWilliams, D. P., Company E, 1st Regiment.
Merchell, Lewis, 13th Regiment.
Moran, Henry, Company K, 13th Regiment.
Morrow, William, Company F, 16th Regiment.
Nolen (Noland), Michael, Company C, uth Regiment.
Nollett, Mitchell, Company G, 13th Regiment.
Ott, Thomas J., Company H, 16th Regiment.
Pullen, S. A., Company E, 25th Regiment.
Riley, George, Company K, 13th Regiment.
Robertson, Levi, Company E, 13th Regiment.
Spring, W. G., Company D, 25th Regiment.
Ross, William A., Company K, 1st Cavalry.
Strippling, A. A., Company E, 25th Regiment.
Thompson, D., Company A, 16th Regiment.
yarborough, Charles, Company F, 16th Regiment.
Zachary, J. E., Company H, 16th Regiment.

MISSISSIPPI

Alexander, W. M., Company E, 34th Regiment.
Allen, W. P., Company G, 27th Regiment.
Applewhite, Sergt. C., Company J, 10th Regiment.
Avara, A. J., Company C, 41st Regiment.
Baird, J. M., Company F. 27th Blythe’s.
Ballew, J. W., Company C, 29th Regiment.
Barnquarth, T. E., Company C, 41st Regiment.
Bell, Henry, Company D, 45th Regiment.
Bennett, George, Company E, 24th Regiment.
Berry, Company I, 24th Regiment.
Bishop, J., Company K, 27th Regiment.
Blackberry, John, Company E, 29th Regiment.
Bobbitt, W. H., Company I, 24th Regiment.
Boddis, A., Company H, 27th Regiment.
Bowland, J. W., Company F, 29th Regiment.
Brinkley, W. H., Company E, 27th Blythe’s.
Bunn, E. C., Company G, 41st Regiment.
Cate, Z. A., Company E, 27th Regiment.
Carltridge, James, Company C, 24th Regiment.
Closkey, G. W. W., Company F, 7th Regiment.
Cremer, A. L., Company A, 37th Regiment.
Davenport, G. W., Company A, 37th Regiment.
Davis, Fred L., Company B, ioth Regiment.
Dixon, W. H., Company G, 31st Regiment.
Doggett, R. D., Company I, 7th and 9th Regiments.
Douglass, Harrison, Company G, 29th Regiment.
Echner, L. E., Company G, 41st Regiment.
Edegar, G. W., Company H, 7th Regiment.
Eisley, Oliver, Company H, 10th Regiment.
Foust, L. D., Company A, 29th Regiment.
Fuller, B. W., Company B, 29th Regiment.
Gardner, G. W., Company B, 30th Regiment.
Garner, W. F., Company I, 29th Regiment.
Garuse, S., Company H, 37th Regiment.
Gentry, W., Company E, 32nd Regiment.
Gilmer, K. H., Company H, 10th Regiment.
Gil mer, Thomas, Company D, 37th Regiment.
Godwin, E. H., Company H, 37th Regiment.
Gork, E. H., Company D, 10th Regiment.
Griffin, Samuel, Company F, 24th Regiment.
Grisham, W. A. W., Company H, 33rd Regiment.
Harris, D. H., Company G, 29th Regiment.
Hassell, J. H., Company D, 37th Regiment.
Heddencok, I. B., 10th Regiment.
Hill, Thomas J., Company B, 34th Rement.
Hodges, J. B., Company K, 10th Regiment.
Hough, Frank, Company B, 27th Regiment.
Housley, G. W., Company G, 27th Regiment.
Johnston, C. A., Company D, 27th Regiment.
Kenneda, R. M., Company E, 27th Regiment.
Kens, W. A. E., Company D, 30th Regiment.
Knighton, W. C., Company I, 24th Regiment.
Latrip, J. B., Company K, 27th Regiment.
Law, S. W., Company D, 27th Regiment.
Lchnimpore (?),J. W., Company D, 41St Regiment.
Leavins, E. A., Company E, 29th Regiment.
Lenty, John, Company I, 29th Regiment.
Lester, George H., Company F, 29th Regiment.
Linchard, W., Company F, 30th Regiment.
Lipscomb, G. W., Company A, 30th Regiment.
McCrory, W. D. T, Company D, 37th Regiment.
McDonald, J., Company B, 37th Regiment.
McKnight, J. M., Company C, 10th Regiment.
Madew, B. C., Company E, 29th Regiment.
Maxwell, J. W., Company K, 27th Regiment
Miles, W. W., Company H., 27th Regiment.
Millsaps, W. M., Company F, Blythe’s Regiment.
Morris, H., Company L, 41st Regiment.
Mounger, H., Company F, 29th Regiment.
O’Neal, J. R., Company H, 7th Regiment.
Parker, S. W., Company F, 24th Regiment.
Philips, W. F., Company B, 32nd Regiment.
Pickles, E., Company I, 30th Regiment.
Pickols, J. M., Company L, 24th Regiment.
Reikles, E., Company I, 30th Regiment.
Robinson, Stephen, Company D, 27th Regiment.
Rushing, N. R., Company E, 27th Regiment.
Scalion, G. W., Companys B and D, 24th and 29th Regiments.
Scarborough, Sergt. M., Company C, 24th Regiment.
Scillon, L. J., Company C, 29th Regiment.
Scruggs, W. S., Company E, 29th Regiment.
Shelton, W. T., Company G, 9th Regiment.
Sherrod, G., Company I, 29th Regiment.
Shirkey, Lieut. Montgomery C., Company A, 30th Regiment.
Shurtbiff, 0. G., Company E, 7th Regiment.
Simpson, W. B., Company G, 5th Regiment.
Slade, E. A., Company E, 30th Regiment.
Slade, H. F., Company D, 7th Regiment.
Slaughter, J. M., Company B, 24th Regiment.
Smith, W. D., Company F, 45th Regiment.
Stacey, M., Company G, 24th Regiment.
Stephens, E. T., Company F, 29th Regiment.
Strong, Henry, Company F, 27th Regiment.
Tilly, Stephen S., Company F, 29th Regiment.
Ussery, G. H., Company C, 37th Regiment.
Walker, W., Company E, 24th Regiment.
Wall, C. V., Company C, 7th Regiment.
Wallis, R. A., Company B, 8th Regiment.
Warren, L., Company H, 7th Regiment.
Whiddon, J. A., Company F, 7th Regiment.
White (or Whits), J. G., Company D, 30th Regiment.
Whittey, J. F., Company K, 27th Regiment.
Williams, S. G., Company B, 24th Regiment.
Wray, W. P., Company C, Blythe’s Regiment.
Youngblood, N. A., 27th Regiment.
One unknown from Mississippi.

NORTH CAROLINA

Beard, Daniel F., Company K, 39th Regiment.
Brindle, J. F., Company E, 29th Regiment.
Ceaghel, William, Company H, 60th Regiment.
Crowder, I. W., Company D, 29th Regiment.
Evans, S. C., Company B, 60th Regiment.
Frisbee, A. J., Company C, 29th Regiment.
Jones, Isaac A., Company H. 60th Regiment.
Kelly, J., Company H, 60th Regiment.
Lexton (or Sexton), George, Company H, 6oth Regiment.
Ponder, G. W., Company F, 60th Regiment.
Reynhold, Sergt. T. W., Company F, 6oth Regiment.
Rhea, T. W., Company G, 39th Regiment.
Watson, W., Company G, 39th Regiment.
Wells, Lieut. F. W., Company C, 29th Regiment.

SOUTH CAROLINA

Brown, R., Company L, 10th Regiment.
Bound, Zac B., Company B, 8th Regiment.
Caldres, E. W., Company H, 10th Regiment.
Carter, William, Company H, 10th Regiment.
Coleman, J. W., Company D, 10th Regiment.
Gilmen, H. M., Company B, 8th Regiment.
Grey, Alfred, Company H, 10th Regiment.
Holland, J. B., Company E, 10th and 19th Regiments.
Mallox, Henry, Company I, 19th Regiment.
Mathews, Francis, Company H, 9th and 10th Regiments.
Podget, Wilbert, Company A, 19th Regiment.
Satcher, R. (might be Latcher or Hatcher)–Regiment.–, Company H, 19th
Smith, H., Company H, 10th Regiment.
Todd, J. M., Company G, 10th Regiment.

TENNESSEE

Anderson, James, Company B, 13th Regiment.
Anderson, James, Company C, 28th Regiment.
Armstrong, B. F., Company B, 20th Regiment.
Bailey, F., Company A, 18th Regiment.
Bailey, J., Company L, 30th Regiment.
Barksdale, N., Company B, 13th and 154th Regiments.
Briggell, S. J., Company C, 47th Regiment.
Bruce, W., Company I, 1st Regiment.
Bowlin, Thomas G., Company I, 32nd Regiment.
Caldwell, James, Company I, 19th Regiment.
Campbell, W. H., Company I, 47th Regiment.
Cate, Robert C., Company H, 3rd Cavalry.
Caywood, A. C., Company K, 29th Regiment.
Clark, J. D., Company K, 4th Regiment.
Clarke, W. B., Company I, 31st Regiment.
Clarke. W. D., Company K, 154th Regiment.
Coffey, Calvin, Company D, 26th Regiment.
Combs, Andrew, Company K, 26th Regiment.
Conn, S. G., Company B, 25th Regiment.
Cox, W. E., Company K, 26th Regiment.
Craighead, S. S. (?), Company F, 38th Regiment.
Crawford, Sergt. Thomas, Cheatham’s Escort.
Crawley, H., Company G, 17th Regiment.
Crow, M. R., Company K, 11th Regiment.
Dahamy, Thomas, Company E, 19th Regiment.
Davis, B., Company G, 51st Regiment.
Davis, Montgomery, Company D, 4th Confederate.
Davis, Robert, 1st Cavalry.
Davis, Rowell, Company B, 38th Regiment.
Davis, Simon, Company C, 25th Regiment.
Davis, Thomas C., Company B, 1st Middle Tenn. Cavalry.
Dawson, T., Company E, 84th Regiment.
Deaton, William, Company A, 26th Regiment.
Degraffenreid, Capt. H. E., Company B, 154th Regiment.

[This name is given on R. L. Watkins’ list as Deysaffenus as nearly as it can be translated. However, H. E. DeGraffenried was Captain of Company B of the 154th Tennessee. He was mortally wounded in the battle of Murfreesboro and was, no doubt, brought to the hospital in Chattanooga as were the others, and died there a few weeks later. “The Confederate Military Annals of Tennessee” shows Capt. Henry E. DeGraffenried as captain of Company B, 154th Tennessee.]

Dickens, Chesley, Company B, 19th Regiment.
Dickens, John, Company E, 24th Regiment.
Elder, George, Company F, 38th Regiment.
Elder, T. D., Company F, 28th Regiment.
Ellwood, H. C., Company I, 29th Regiment.
Elrod, G., Company E, 28th Regiment.
Epps, James L., Company D, 32nd Regiment.
Estel, Lieut. John, Company E, 15th Regiment.
Gathins, B. T., Company W, 51st Regiment.
Gilbride, Barney, Company K, 35th Tenn.
Gillespie, James, 19th Tenn.
Gilmer, J., Company I, 29th Regiment.
Goffey, J. G., Company E, 6th and 8th Regiments.
Gordon, Robert, Company H, 18th Regiment.
Greer, William C., Company C, 28th Regiment.
Halarson, Thomas, Company E, 44th Regiment.
Hall, Joseph, Company H, 5th Regiment.
Hallmark, Company K, 19th Regiment.
Hamlett,. D. R., Company I, 13th Regiment.
Hasberger, S. D., Company K, 19th Regiment.
Hawkins, W. H., Company F, 11th Regiment.
Hendrick, J. L., Company K, 4th Regiment.
Hendricks, Joseph S., Company H, 154th Regiment.
Hicks, R., Company K, 26th Regiment.
Hodges, William J., Company C, 45th Regiment.
Hogan, W., Company I, 29th Regiment.
Humphries, 0. H., Company B, 19th Regiment.
Jared, Joseph, Company A, 28th Regiment.
Johnson, Thomas, Company B, 5th Regiment.
Jolly, J. H., Company D, 8th Regiment.
Jones, G. W., Company H, 32nd Regiment.
Jones, James, Company G, 32nd Regiment.
Jones, J. V., Company C, 84th Regiment.
Keith, Marion, Company G, 25th Regiment.
Kempt, Larkin, Company C, 44th Regiment.
King, L. K., Company F, 4th Regiment.
Kirkland, J., Company K, 48th Regiment.
Landon, T. J., Company I, 12th and 47th Regiments.
Lawrence, Sergt. E. 5., 6th and 9th Regiments.
Lee, Alex M., Company B, 44th Regiment.
Lemons, L., Company F, 19th Regiment.
Lenimon, Henry, Company D, 32nd Regiment.
Lillard, R., Company C., 26th Regiment.
Lodor, A. Duke, Regiment.
Livingston, R. B., Company F, 19th Regiment.
Lutton (or Sutton), B., 12th Regiment.
McCrany, J. W., Company A, 11th Regiment.
McDonald, J. J., Company G, 51st Regiment.
McNight, B., Company I, 6th and 9th Regiments.
Malicote, William, Company I, 6th and 7th Regiments.
Manning, William, Company B, 37th Regiment.
Mapilla, John, Company E, 27th Regiment.
Martin, Dan, Company K, 16th Regiment.
Martin, Harris, Company F, 19th Regiment.
Martin, J. C., Company H, uth Regiment.
Massey, Sergt. J. W., Company H, 13th Regiment.
Maxwell, Thomas B., Company L, 6th Regiment.
Mayfield, William, Company F, 27th Regiment.
Medley, William, Company B, 5th Regiment.
Morgan, Andrew, Company C, 19th Regiment.
Moseley, D. W., Company C, 38th Regiment.
Murrys, Charles West, Company D, Battery.
Noah, John, Company F, 84th Regiment.
Packham, Alpheus, Company G, 13th Regiment.
Patter, L. R., Company B, 6th and 9th Regiments.
Patterson, L, Company G, 45th Regiment.
Petty, J. F., Company D, 47th Regiment.
Pemberton, E. C., Company K, 24th Regiment.
Pierce, J. R., Company C, 151 Regiment.
Pike, Joseph, Company K, 26th Regiment.
Price, J. T., Company E, 44th Regiment.
Pursly, Samuel, Company F, 47th Regiment.
Rankhorn, J. M., Company C, 28th Regiment.
Rilgo, W. E., Company F, 38th Regiment.
Roads, J. C., Company D, I2th Regiment.
Roberts, J. W., Company C, 8th Regiment.
Robinson, James, Company H, 1st Regiment.
Rogers, William, Company G, 12th Regiment.
Rush, W., Company D, 19th Regiment.
Rutledge, T. R., Company D, 26th Regiment.
Sanford, C. W., Company F, 28th Regiment.
Smith, B. A., Company I, 45th Regiment.
Steffield, G., Company K, 26th Regiment.
Stevenson, Thomas J., Company H, 4th Cavalry.
Stidham, T. H., Company C, 38th Regiment.
Wade, Thomas, Carnes Battery.
White, W. F., Company D, 33rd Regiment.
Werry, W. J., Company E, 51st Regiment.
Williams, H., Sappers and Miners 51st Regiment.
Williams, Joseph R., Company K, 2qth Regiment.
Win n, A. J., Company B, 4th Regiment.
Withers, W., Company C, 29th Regiment.
Witt, James M., Company B, 29th Regiment.
Womack, W. C., 16th Regiment.
York, W. H., Company D, 32nd Regiment.
Young, J. B., Company A, 11th Regiment.

TEXAS

Alday, W., Company K, 15th Regiment.
Blanchard, E., Company H, 15th Regiment.
Braver (Beaver), William, Company G, 11th Regiment.
Bullock, Novel, Company F, 9th Regiment.
Cleveland, J., Company E, i4th Regiment.
Frazer, J. D. B., Company H, 24th Regiment.
Hargrove, A. J., Company F, 9th Regiment.
Jones, J. J., Company C, 15th Regiment.
Moss, P., Company H, i4th Regiment.
Odell, A. B., Company H, 11th Regiment.
Smith, W. F., 9th Regiment.

SOLDIERS OF COMMANDS NOT NAMED BY STATES AND SOME UNKNOWN

Arrowwood, S. M., Company F, 4th Confederate.
Ayres, Lewis, Company and Regiment unknown.
Barnes, B., Company K, Col. Preston’s Cavalry.
Barrow, Amos, Water’s Battery.
Berry, S., 3rd Confederate Cavalry.
Blackman, R. C., Company E, Cox’s Battalion S. S.
Bowden, J. A. W., Company E, Cox’s Battalion S. S.
Bowen, James, Company A, Confederate Cavalry.
Breel, W., Company B, Water’s Battery.
Brown, E. P., Company B, Manney’s Battery.
Brown, Thomas, Company A, 3rd Confederate Cavalry.
Bullock, J. A., command unknown.
Calvin, Henry, Company B, Water’s Battery.
Campbell, James, Company E, 3rd Confederate Cavalry.
Carter, , Company F, Cox’s Battalion S. S.
Carroll, J. R., Company C. Cox’s Battalion S. S.
Clarke, J. B., Manney’s Battalion S. S.
Cox, W. E., Company E, 3rd Confederate.
Davis, Montgomery, Company D, 4th Confederate.
Dundy (Dandy), Company I, 8th Confederate.
Durham, Thomas, Waters’ Battery.
Fitzgerald, L. C., Company H, 9th Confederate.
Forrest, John, Company B, Manney’s Battalion S. S.
Goins, John, F. M. C.
Fox, F. M., Company K, Manney’s Battalion S. S.
Gifford, Joseph, command unknown.
Hallett, James, 1st Confederate Cavalry.
Harrel, Samuel, Company E, Sharp’s Battalion S. S.
Hackett, James, 1st Cavalry.
Herring, Edward, command unknown.
Holt, S. A., Dawson’s Battery.
Howard, D. P., command unknown.
Jones, F., Company C, McKee’s Battalion.
Kenner, William R., Company F, Limestone’s Battalion.
Lacks, Richard, Company D, 4th Confederate (Sweet’s).
Long, William S., Company B, Manney’s Battalion 5.5.
Mc , Thomas, command unknown.
McDonald, W., McKeown’s Escort.
Martin, B., Company B, Light Artillery.
Monahan, J., command unknown.
Norman, William, command unknown.
Pliilips, J. M., 1stConfederate Cavalry.
Pitts, M. J., Gibson’s Battalion.
Rainey, J. J., Company B, Manney’s Battalion.
Ricketts, R., command unknown.
Riser, Jacob, Company E, Cox’s Battalion S. S.
Robinson, B. H., Gibson’s Battalion.
Roy, J. T., Company F, 8th Confederate.
Royston, F. M., Company H, 3rd Confederate Cavalry.
Saunders, James R., Cox’s Battalion S. S.
Saunders, William, 8th Confederate.
Shelly, W. B., 1stBattalion, Hillard’s Legion.
Sneed, J. A., Company B, Russell’s Cavalry.
Syphus, Sylvanus, Company K.
Thompson, E. G., Company E, Newman’s Battalion.
Tinker, H., Company A, 3rd Confederate.
Turner, William, Company E., Cox’s Battalion S. S.
Ward, F. H., Company I, 8th Confederate Cavalry.
Ware, A. W., Gibson’s Battery.
Weatherford, J. G., Company B, Cox’s Battalion S. S.
Wutmaker, C. C., Gibson’s Battery.
A lady, a hospital matron or nurse.
Miller, Louis, 6th Federal Regiment, a Yankee.
Winbroot, E. J., 6th Federal Regiment, a Yankee.

Later eight bodies were found near Rossville Gap and were moved by Forrest Camp to the Confederate Cemetery.

Their names so far as known were:

Free, J. M., Confederate Army.
Herrin, J. M., 41st Alabama Regiment.
Ingraham, J. A., Tennessee Confederate Regiment.
Jordan, H. S., Company A, 41st Alabama.
Massey, J. H., 41st Alabama.
Watterson, Walker, Company H, 33rd Tennessee Regiment.
McNeil, B. F., Company F, 1stMississippi Regiment.
Unknown.

This completes the list of reinterments as given by R. Watkins.

SOME MEMBERS OF FORREST CAMP BURIED IN THE CONFEDERATE CEMETERY

Barbee, G. T., 31st Tennessee Regiment.
Crumley, John, Company I, 7th Georgia Regiment.
Hale, Madison, Company C, 3 1stTennessee Regiment.
Kimball, LeVert, Alabama Artillery.
Norment, William T., 1stBattalion, Washington Artillery, New Orleans, La.
Middleton, H. M.
Payne, John N., 1stCompany Washington Artillery, New Orleans, La.
Pritchett, Edward W., Company I, 1stTennessee Regiment.

Upon the authority of Dr. John Stewart French, his three uncles were buried in the Confederate Cemetery. They were:

Byron Brownlow French, Joseph Harrison French, and Timothy Allen French.

Source: Armstrong, Zella. “The History of Hamilton County and Chattanooga, Tennessee”. Volume 1

MARKERS OF THE CHATTANOOGA CONFEDERATE CEMETERY ERECTED AFTER 1892

[compiled by J.Sims, October 1997]

Name: / Section: / Marker Information:

ALLRED, Blackstone / A / VA, Co. H, 25th TN Infantry
ARMSTRONG, M. V. / A / Pvt. , Co. C, 5 TN Cav. (1844-1912)
BAILEY, John / A / VA, Co. D, AL Cav.
BAILEY, Thomas J. / A / Pvt. , 23rd GA Inf. (1832-1904)
BAILEY, Volner / A / VA, Co. B, 40th GA Inf.
BAIRD, Martha / B / Pvt. , (1850-1928)
BAIRD, Mary C. / B / Pvt. , wife of W. T. Baird (d. 1926)
BAIRD, Mattie W. / B / Pvt. , wife of J. M. Haley (1848-1937)
BAIRD, Samuel M. / B / Pvt. , Co. C, 45th TN Inf. (1843-1918)
BAIRD, W. T. / B / Pvt. , 10 TN Cav. , (d. 1924)
BARBEE, G. F. / B / VA, Co. C, 3rd TN Inf.
BEAVERS, Hiram O. / D / VA, Co. I, 5th TN Cav. (1846-1929)
BICE, Amos / A / VA, Co. G, 7th AL Inf.
BICE, William / A / Pvt. , (1842-1913)
BLEDSOE, A. S. / B / Pvt. , Lt. , Co. I, 17th Inf. (1837-1917)
BRACKEN, A. L. / B / Pvt. , (1845-1915)
BRACKEN, Laura A. / B / Pvt. , (1851-1928)
BROOKS, W. H. / A / VA, Co. E, 16th TN Cav.
BROWN, Alexander / A / Pvt. , 17th TX Inf.
BROWN, Jas. (C. ) / B / Pvt. , Co. C, 7th GA Inf. (d. 1912)
BROWN, John H. / B / VA, 4th TN Cav.
BROWN, J. S. / B / VA, Co. D, 1st TN Cav.
BROWN, W. C. / A / Pvt. , (1835-1903)
BUNCH, William F. / B / VA, Co. D, 1st TN Cav.
CAMPBELL, Amos A. / A / VA, Musician, Co. B, 20th NC Inf.
CARNEY, Thomas / A / VA&Pvt. CoA, 19thTN Inf (1834-1906)
CATHEY, S. C. / A / Pvt. , 6th TN Art. (d. 1906)
CHURCH, F. G. / B / VA, Co. B, 22nd GA Hvy. Art.
CLARK, George M. / A / Pvt. , (1845-1903)
CLARK, Senia / A / Pvt. (same as Geo. ), (1859-1932)
CLINTON, George W. / B / VA, 1st Lt,Co. A, 1st GA Inf.
COBB, W. J. / A / VA, Corp. , Co. F, 19th TN Inf.
COOKE, James Burch / C / Pvt. , Col. , 53rd TN Inf. , (1819-1899)
COOKE, Penelope McDermott / C / Pvt, “wife of J. B. “, (1830-75)
COOKE, Richard Fielding / C / Pvt. , “son”, (1859-1892)
COSBY, W. M / B / VA, Starneís TN Cav.
COLLINS, N. J. / A / Pvt. , Co. I, 35th TN Inf. (1833-1909)
CRAWFORD, E. D / A / VA, Corp. ,Co. A, 19th TN Inf.
CROCKETT, Ed T. / B / VA, “Confederate Soldier”
CROCKETT, Edward R. / A / VA, Co. A, 20th TN Inf.
CROSS, Robert G. / A / VA, Adj. , 14th TN Inf.
CRUMLEY, John / A / VA, GA Inf.
DAVIS, H. M. / B / Pvt. , Co. C, 3rd GA (d. 1920)
DEADERICK, Wm. Wallace / A / Pvt. , (1842-1913)
DAWSON, W. D. / A / Pvt. , Co. G, 19th VA Inf. ,(d. 1903)
DEAN, Jno. R. / A / Pvt. , 17th (TN Inf. ?), (1840-1906)
DEMENT, (mother of Thos. J. ) / A / Pvt. , (1841-1917)
DEMENT, Thomas J. / A / Pvt. , 6th VA Cav. , (1838-1915)
DESHA, Ella Sturgill / D / Pvt. , (1883-1936)
DESHA, Hamilton / D / Pvt. , “father”, (1848-1933)
DESHA, Hampton / D / Pvt. , “twin”, (1848-1935)
DESHA, Nannie Tymes / D / Pvt. , (1855-1932)
DEVINE, Charles / B / Pvt. , 2nd ARK Inf. , (d. 1918)
DICKINSON, Laurence Thomas / D / Pvt. , Co. A, 1st MD Cav, (1843-1923)
DICKINSON, Nannie Tibball / D / Pvt. ,”wife of L. T. “, (1845-1916)
DICKS, Emma I. / C / Pvt. , (1842-1928)
DICKS, Joseph / C / Pvt/VA, 1st SC Inf. (1845-1901)
DOBSON, E. J. / A / Pvt. , Capt. , Co. K, 22nd NC (1836-03)
DOYLE, C. A. Clowdis / B / Pvt. , (wife of John), (1839-1926)
DOYLE, John C. / B / Pvt. , Co. H, 2nd TN Cav, (1838-1922)
DUCKWORTH, D. F. / B / Pvt. , Co. B, 5th TN Cav. , (d. 1923)
DUNGER, Harry / B / Pvt. , Co. H, 2nd TN Cav. , (d. 1886)
DUNN, W. W. / A / Pvt. , (1831-1905)
EAVES, John F. / A / VA&Pvt, Co. C, 8th GA Inf, (1845-10)
FERGUSON, Bettie M. / B / Pvt. , (1847-1932)
FERGUSON, S. H. / B / Pvt. , 4th VA Inf. , (1842-1917)
FLORA, Theo. F. / B / VA, Co. L, 36th TN Inf.
FRAZIER, Annie Keith / C / Pvt. , (1848-1928)
FRAZIER, Sarah Ruth / C / Pvt, “Poet LaureateUDC” (1875-1956)
FRAZIER, S. J. A. / C / Pvt. ,Capt. ,Co. D, 18th TN,(1840-1921)
FREEMAN, D. H. / A / Pvt. ,Co. E, 3rd SC Reg. , (1839-1912)
FREEMAN, Julia Carter / A / Pvt. , (1852-19–)
FRY, M. M. / B / Pvt. , 3rd TN Inf/1st TN Cav,(1844-26)
GIBSON, Jeremiah / B / Pvt. , Co. D, 57th NC Inf, (1844-1917)
GILBREATH, Barney / A / VA, “Confederate Soldier”
GHORMLEY, Wm. Henderson / A / Pvt. , Co. C, 2nd TN Cav, (1839-1907)
GOULDING, B. L. / D / Pvt. , Signal Corps/Weather(1844-1934)
HACKETT, Wright Smith / A / VA, 1st Lt. , Co. C, 16th TN Inf. ,(d. 1864)
HALE, Madison / A / VA, Co. C, 39th TN Inf.
HANEY, J. J. / A / Pvt, Priceís Escort/4th TN Cav,(d. 1898)
HARBIN, W. J. / A / VA, “Confederate Soldier”
HARRIS, Ella Fuley / B / Pvt. , (1866-1926)
HARRIS, John A. / B / Pvt. , (1835-1910)
HARRIS, W. H. / A / VA, Co. K, 21st TN Inf.
HATCH, James M. / B / VA, Co. D, 61st NC Inf.
HEDGE(S), Nathaniel / C / Pvt/VA, (2nd) KY Inf. , (1830-1863)
HENDERSON, A. M. / B / Pvt. , Co. C, 13th TX Cav. , (d. 1923)
HENDERSON, Annie Turney / B / Pvt. , “wife of A. M. , (d. 1922)
HIGHTOWER, Thomas H. / B / VA, Lynchís Btty. , TN Hvy. Art.
HIX, James C. / B / Pvt. , Co. I, 35th GA Reg, (1842-1923)
HIX, Mary L / B / Pvt. ,(1854-1931)
HOLMAN, Thomas C. / D / VA, Co. K, 41st GA Inf.
HOLMAN, Victoria Pearson / D / Pvt. , “wife of Thos. C. Hallman”
HORTON, Martha A. Duncan / B / Pvt,wife of Saml. V. Horton,(1840-27)
HOUSE, H. (?) / A / Pvt. , Co. E, 4th TN Cav. , (1841-1910)
JONES, Jim / B / VA, Co. A, 1st TN Cav.
KEY, Lucius E. / B / VA, Sgt. , Co. I. , 13th GA Inf.
KIMBALL, Levert / A / Pvt. , AL Arty. , (d. 1892)
KINMAN, E. W. / A / VA, Co. A, 19th TN Inf.
LATIMER, James H. / D / VA, 1st Sgt. ,Co. I. , 49th GA Inf.
LATIMER, Mammie Stuart / D / Pvt, “wife of J. H. “,(1851-1926)
LEIGH, John Wesley / A / Pvt. , (1892-1910)
LEWIS, James / B / Pvt. , Co. I. , 3rd AL Cav. , (1846-1919)
LORENZEN, August A. / A / VA/Pvt, Co. G, LA Inf. (1840-1901)
MANNING, Rev. A. F. / B / Pvt. , Co. G, 8th GA Inf. , (1842-1926)
McMURRAY, F. G. / B / Pvt. , Co. B, 23rd AL, (d. 1923)
McMURRAY, Laura Taylor / B / Pvt. , (1845-1922)
McMURRAY, Lu. C. C. / B / VA, Co. F, 6th NC Inf. , (1840-1918)
MILLER, Burrus R. / A / Pvt. , Co. E, 2nd TN Inf. , (1843-1904)
MILLER, Lewis / B / VA, 6th Federal (POW)(d. 1863)
MITCHELL, Adam R. / B / VA, Co. H, 1st TN Cav.
MITCHELL, A. T. / A / VA, Co. F, 16th TN Inf.
MITCHELL, Charles — / A / Pvt. , Co. F?, MS Vol. ,(1835-03)
MORGAN, (C. ) K. / A / Pvt. , (1871-1884)
MORGAN, J. T. / A / Pvt. , Thos. Brig. ,Hill Div. ,(1845-92)
MORTON, S. M. / A / Pvt. , Co. K, 3rd AL Inf. , (1843-1914)
NISBET, J. C. / B / Pvt. , Col. , 66th GA Inf.
NISBET, Jennie Cooper / B / Pvt. , “wife of J. C. “, (d. 1918)
NOLAND, Ione / A / Pvt. , “Mother”
NORMENT, William T. / A / VA, Sgt. , 1st LA Arty.
OTT, W. A. / B / Pvt. , Capt. , 23rd TN Inf. , (d. 1919)
PALMER, A. W. / B / Pvt. ,Co. E, 31st GA Inf, (1845-1918)
PALMER, Eliz. Brause / B / Pvt. , (1857-1917)
PALMER, William W. / A / Pvt. , “Father”, (1843-1912)
PARKER, Patrick / B / Pvt. , 47th AL Inf. , (1841-1923)
PAYNE, John N. / A / Pvt/VA, Sgt. , 1st Co, Wash. Arty.
PENDLETON, Hugh T. / A / VA, Richmond Howitzer
PRICE, J. L / A / Pvt, Sgt, Co. B, Cutts Btty,(1843-06)
PRITCHETT, Edward / A / VA, Co. L, 14th TN Inf.
ROBERTSON, G. P. / A / Pvt. , (1845-1903)
ROE, Samuel B. / A / Pvt. , 50th GA, (1844-1902)
SHELTON, Erasmus A. / B / Pvt. , “Father”, (1846-1917)
SHULL, Franklin Tate / A / Pvt. , “Conf. Soldier”, (1843-1911)
SMITH, J. A. / A / Pvt. , Co. B, 4th TN Cav. , (d. 1903)
STEELE, Jno. B. / C / VA, Co. F, 2nd KY Inf. , (d. 1863)
STEPHENS, Eva / B / Pvt. , “Mother”, (1865-1952)
STEPHENS, Jack / B / VA&Pvt, Co. D,39th GA Inf,(d. 1926)
STURGILL, Mary Ann / D / Pvt. , “Mother”,(1850-1934)
STURGILL, Robert H. / D / VA, Co. K, 21st VA Cav,(1840-1937)
SWANEY, Julia Bentley / C / Pvt. , (d. 1899)
SWEAT, John / A / VA, Co. C, 21st GA Inf.
TAYLOR, A. C. / A / VA, Bennetís Cav.
TAYLOR, John R. / A / VA, Co. F, 23rd TN Cav.
TAYLOR, Thomas D. / B / VA, Co. C, Thomas Legion
THORN, Edward D. / A / Pvt. , Co. B, 8th GA, (1845-1911)
TODD, Lemuel M. / C / VA, Co. G, 10th SC Inf.
UMBARGER, Lydia J. / B / Pvt. , “Mother”, (1845-1925)
UNDERWOOD, Wallace / A / VA, “Confederate Soldier”
UNKNOWN, Hospital Matron / D / Pvt. (VA type in granite)
UNKNOWN, Negro Man / D / Pvt. (VA type in granite)
UNKNOWN, “104” / B / VA
UNKNOWN, #8 / B / VA (d. 1863)
UNKNOWN, #24 / B / VA
UNKNOWN, #46 / B / VA
UNKNOWN, #47 / B / VA
UNKNOWN / B / VA, d. 8/12/1862
UNKNOWN / B / VA
WALKER, John T. / C / Pvt. , 1st Lt. , Co. K, 13th SC SS
WALKER, Margaret Jones / C / Pvt. ,wife of John T. , (1843-1926)
WEATHERFORD, Silas / B / VA,Sgt, Co. G, 5th TN Cav,(d. 1919)
WELLS, B. F. / A / VA, “Confederate Soldier”
WILKERSON, W. M. / A / VA, Co. H, 21st GA Inf.
WINBROOT, E. J. / B / VA, 19th MI (POW)(d. 1863)
WOOD, Luke / B / VA, Co. E, 31st GA Inf.
YARRINGTON, Thomas / A / VA, Co. D, 3rd AL Inf.
YOUNG, I. F. / B / Pvt. , Co. H, 6th AL Inf,(1841-1920)

NOTES:

Chattanooga Confederate Cemetery SECTOR LOCATIONS:

A–Large sector in NW corner below obelisk and pavilion; two areas;
basically five rows of markers
to the central road with gutters.
B–Large sector in NE corner with two large rocks and a small flagpole(at
the two markers of Union
POWs); basically five rows of markers to the central road with gutters.
C- -Smaller sector to the East of the obelisk and pavilion dominated by a
large monument with Mary
at the foot of Jesusí cross.
D–Small sector of four sections nearest the large stone gate to the South
and including the new
memorial cross marker erected in 1997 by the N.B.Forrest Camp #3, Sons of
Confederate
Veterans, and the Patrick R. Cleburne Chapter #0158, Miltary Order of the
Stars and Bars
(MSO&B); dedication reads: “Peace be to the ashes of our Confederate dead
and honor be to their
memory.”

ABBREVIATIONS (other than states)
VA– Standard government issue marker now from the Veterans’ Administration,
240 pound marble
markers with pointed tops (only one marker is flat).
Pvt. –Any variety of private markers both upright and flat.
Inf. –Infantry
Cav. — Cavalry
Arty.–Artillery
Hvy. — Heavy
Div. –Division
Brig. — Brigade
Co.–Company

Supplemental Listing of Veterans Buried in the Chattanooga Confederate
Cemetery Chattanooga,
Tennessee

[ list compiled by J.Sims – 1998]

Veterans whose grave sites are confirmed:

O.N. Bice (d.11-17-1918) buried between G.F.Barbee and Martha Baird
Martin J. Dunn (d.1-11-1920) buried between Ott and Davis next to Byrum
W.J. Nichols (d.1-28-1919) buried between McMurray and Brown {GA Inf.}wife
adj.
Rev. S.A. Byrum (d.2-27-1920) buried between Ott and Davis next to Dunn
J.A. Lyle (d.11-1-1923) buried between Parker and Duckworth – wife adjacent
plot

Veterans Identified in UCV Records as Being in Cemetery, Locations Unknown

H.J. Bradford
Joseph Cooper (d.2-24-1914)
A.H. Dickenson (d.8-2-1916)
Capt. W.D. Dodson or Dobson
E. Jenkins (d.8-10-1915)
William J. Sandol (d.2-17-1917)
1st Sgt. Charles M. Todd (d.6-26-1915) Co.E, 1st AL Cav.
— Evans

10-9-98 Additions:

William T. Alexander Co.B, 30th AL
James Alfred Allen (d.1-30-1896) Co.A, 16th LA Inf.
J.G. Brown (d.2-19-1921
John T. Dillard (d.7-13-1897) Co.F, 19th TN Inf.
—-Fergerson (d.8-1904)
William G. Flynn (d.3-22-1898) Co.I, 26th TN Inf.
A.P. Harrington (d.9-17-1902)
J.T. Hill (d.11-1891)
Thomas J. Howard (d.8-8-1905)
E.J. Lockett (d.3-18-1891)
W.B. Mitchell (d.2-18-1903) MS
Green B. Reed (d.8-11-1891) Co.A, 16th AL
John Sivette (d.12-24-1896) Co.C, 21st GA

Veterans Identified by Miss Zella Armstrong ca.1930 as most probably in Confederate Cemetery as casualties of Snodgrass Hill 9-20-1863:

Lt. Carter
Capt. Handley
Lt. Williams
Pvt. Hendricks

*Note : In adjacent Jewish Cemetery, James Gottschalk is buried; he was a Confederate blockade runner.

Other grave identifications

“E.J. Winbroot” is Sgt. Edward J. Wentworth, Co.F, 19th Michigan Infantry, died at Academy Hospital, Chattannoga, 4-14-1863.

Shadrick Searcy (d.5-11-1936), “Colored Pensioner”, Co. I, 46th GA Infantry.
==O==
Albert G. Goans was enumerated as the head of a household in the 1900 census of Hamilton County, Enumeration District 51, page 9:

“Goans, Albert G. 40, born in August 1859 in TN
Sarah D. 39, born in November 1860 in TN
John H. 13, born in February 1887 in TN
Clyde M. 7, born in March 1893 in TN”
==O==
Mrs. Mattie Goens boarded at r s alley between Harrison av and E T V and G R R, 2 e of E T V and G R R Chattanooga, Tennessee in 1890 and 1891 according to Chattanooga city directories.
==O==
Franc Goines was baptized into Friendship Baptist Church February 14, 1869 in Hamilton County.
==O==
Jessica Goings was married about 1796 “near Chattanooga” to William Purvine [Purviance?], according to Bradley B. Garret­son, a great-great-grandson of Orinda, California. A son, Charles Purvine was born to them there in 1815. They lived in Cherokee territory [later the Chattanooga area] from about 1800 to about 1820. Later they removed to Morgan County, Illinois, perhaps to receive bounty land. William Purvine died there in 1832, and Jessica Goings Purvine died there in 1836. Charles Purvine removed to Iowa afterward and was in California in 1849.

Jessica Goings Purvine Relates
Tradition of Indian Massacre

By Bradley B. Garretson
105 Danza Court, Orinda, California, 94563

Jessica Goings Purvine, [c1775-1836] my g-g-grandmother related the story of an Indian massacre which became a tradition in my Purvine family. It was handed down orally for 150 years before my grandmother, Sarah Ann Robinson Purvine [1859-1930] finally put it down on paper about 1920. She had heard Mary Jane Camron Purvine [1820-1898], her mother-in-law tell the story many times.

Eleanor Garretson wrote that William Purvine was born about 1775 in Cabarrus County, NC. We speculate they met and married in the Holston settlement, but don’t really know. Records say they eventually settled near Chattanooga, Tennessee where they raised a family and lived until about 1820. This was Indian territory then, so we believe that they must have had some accommodation with the Indians. In 1820 they moved with their family to Illinois, where they lived the rest of their lives. William lived until 1832 and Jessica until 1836.

Jessica told her children about a Purvine family of eight from Cabarrus County, North Carolina who removed westward to the frontier. One morning while the father, Charles Purvine was doing his farm chores, his wife who was preparing breakfast, heard an unusual commotion at the barn. Looking out, she saw that Indians had surrounded her husband and were attacking him. She snatched up the baby and fled. She finally reached a settlement and safety. Investigators found that the Indians had killed the husband and the other five children and burned the house.

Jessica was married about 1796 to the surviving child, William Purvine probably in Melungia, the northeast corner of Tennessee where they lived briefly. By 1798, they had proceeded down the Tennessee River or Sequatchie River Valley to the Chattanooga area, at that time included in Knox County, Tennessee. Since these were Indian lands at that time, it is assumed that Jessica had “Cherokee connections.” The family lived there unmolested until they removed about 1820 to Morgan County, Illinois. They died there near the little town of Concord, Illinois.

William and Jessica told their children and grandchildren about the massacre, but none of them remembered where or when the tragedy took place. All they recalled was that their father was the sole survivor of the children and the slender genetic thread by which the family was perpetuated.

Children born to William Purvine and Jessica Goings Purvine include:

Annie Purvine born about 1797
John Purvine born about 1799
Elizabeth Purvine born about 1803
Catherine Purvine born about 1806
Nancy Purvine born about 1809
Martha Purvine born in 1812
Charles Purvine born in 1815
Jemima Purvine born in 1820

Annie Purvine, daughter of William Purvine and Jessica Goings Purvine, was born about 1797. She was married about 1813 to George Long. She died in 1849.

John Purvine, son of William Purvine and Jessica Goings Purvine, was born about 1799.

Elizabeth Purvine, daughter of William Purvine and Jessica Goings Purvine, was born about 1803 in Knox County. She was married to M. Dane about 1820. They lived in Tennessee.

Catherine Purvine, daughter of William Purvine and Jessica Goings Purvine, was born about 1806 in Knox County. She was married about 1823 to Charles Estes. They removed to Illinois.

Nancy Purvine, daughter of William Purvine and Jessica Goings Purvine, was born about 1809. She was married about 1827, husband’s surname Ray. They lived in Illinois.

Martha Purvine, daughter of William Purvine and Jessica Goings Purvine, was born in 1812. She was married about 1830 in Morgan County, Illinois to George Washington Johnson, a Kentuckian. They later removed to Sonoma County, California.

Charles Purvine, son of William Purvine and Jessica Goings Purvine, was born in 1815.

Jemima Purvine, daughter of William Purvine and Jessica Goings Purvine, was born in 1820. She was married about 1839 to Andrew Jackson Stanley, and they also removed to Sonoma County, California.
==O==
Thomas Goings, a laborer, boarded at 6 Hill Chattanooga, Tennessee in 1890 and 1891 according to Chattanooga city directories.
==O==
William S. Goings worked for Lookout Iron Co. while boarding at r 1024 William Chattanooga, Tennessee in 1890 and 1891 according to Chattanooga city directories.
==O==
Asa Goins was reported as the head of a household in the 1900 census of Hamilton County, Enumeration District 50, page 18:

“Goins, Asa 56, born in TN, October 1843
Sarah J. 35, born in TN, 1865
Hattie J. 2, born in TN, Jan. 1879,
daughter
Ina 16, born in TN, June 1883, step-dau.
Lizzie 7, born in TN, December 1892, dau.
Gracie 3, born in TN, Aug. 1896, dau.
Louie 1, born in TN, May 1899
==O==
Arthur Goins was the subject in the February 10, 1941 article in the “Chattanooga Times.” A photograph of the ferry operator appeared in connection with the story:

Arthur Goins Isn’t Sure About
Traditions of Origin of Race.

By John Fort

He had heard his father use the word “Melungeon”. His father had come from old “James county”, now a part of Hamilton–they were from Rhea county originally, or perhaps McMinn. The tradition was that the Goins family had come to Tennessee from Virginia, but of that he was not sure.
So says Arthur Goins, of the Hale’s Bar settlement, as he pilots the ferry over the Tennessee river just below the toll bridge on the Cummings Highway to Nashville. He is a “riverman,” small of stature-his eyes are bright, his movements quick. More than all else, in distinguishing characteristics, his face is slightly dark in coloring, a faintly foreign look. He might be a sailor from some distant port; he might be a fisherman or a navigator. Now he pilots a ferry and he swings the little motorboat around with expert ease.

The Goins family are “Melungeons,” so say all the old residents. One has to be an old resident even to know the queer word—its meaning is lost in modern parlance. Even Arthur Goins recalls only that he had heard his father use it . . .
==O==
B. E. Goins and Frank Crutchfield were true billed in an indictment handed down by the Hamilton County Grand Jury October 18, 1940 for “driving while drunk,” according to “The Chattanooga Times” of that date. At the same time B. W. Goins and Leila Williams were indicted for “public profanity.”
==O==
Bess Goins, daughter of Daniel Goins, was born in 1903. She died at age 92 January 29, 1995. Her obituary appeared in a Chattanooga newspaper.

“Bess Goins Morris of Knoxville, formerly of the Tyner community, died Sunday, Jan 29, 1995, in a nursing home there She was 92. Mrs Morris, who was a graduate of East Tennessee University in Johnson City, was the oldest living member of Tyner United Methodist Church. She was the wife of the late Paul T. Morris, a former principal of East Ridge Elementary school.

She was the daughter of the late Mr. and Mrs. Daniel Goins and the sister of the late Judge John C. Goins, Charles D. Goins, James Goins and Thomas Goins.

Survivors include a daughter, Mary Ann Rinearson, Knoxville and two grandchildren, Keith Rinearson, Atlanta and Robert M. Rinearson, West Palm Beach, Florida. Burial was in Hamilton Memorial Gardens.”
==O==
The obituary of Clarence Arlee Goins appeared in 1974 in a Chattanooga, Tennessee newspaper:

“Goins, Clarence Arlee, 44, of 1535 Putman Street, Detroit, Michigan, died Saturday morning in Detroit. Mr. Goins was a life-long resident of Chattanooga, but had been living in Detroit for the past six years, where he was employed by the Star Tool & Die Company.

Surviving are his wife, Mrs. Mary Lou Goins, of Detroit; three sons, Clarence Arlee Goins, Jr, Emmett M. Goins and Herbert A. Goins, all of Detroit; daughter, Mrs. Peggy Ann Plemmons of Chattanooga; sister, Mrs. Aileen Luker of Bismark, Arkansas; brother, Emmett Eugene Goins of Detroit; nine grandchildren and several nieces and nephews.

Funeral services will be held at 2:00 p.m. Wednesday in the Coulter Memorial Chapel with Sister Hazel Reed and Rev. M. E. Roberson, officiating. Interment will be in the Harrison Cemetery. The body is at the Ted T. Coulter Funeral Home.”
==O==
Ida Goins, a seamstress for L S Slayton, lived in Chattanooga, Tennessee in 1890 and 1891 according to Chattanooga city directories.
==O==
Obediah Goins worked for Davis & Shinn, Brick & Terra Cotta Co., while boarding at r 323 Boyce Chattanooga, Tennessee in 1890 and 1891 according to Chattanooga city directories.
==O==
W. V. Goins of Chattanooga signed an affidavit on June 18, 1908:

“I affirm that my parents were living in Hamilton County in 1851. My grandparents were all dead. Neither I nor any of my ancestors were ever on any Indian roll. I claim Indian descent thru both parents. My grandparents on my mother’s side were born in Virginia. On my father’s side they were born in Grainger County, Tennessee. They were all living in Hamilton County in 1835. I have heard them talk of the Indians, but don’t know that they ever lived with them. I have no negro blood in me. I was never held as a slave, nor were any of my ancestors.
W. V. [X] Goins
Chattanooga, Tennessee, June 18, 1908”

Sarah I. Scott of Winchester, Tennessee made an affidavit June 24, 1908:

“My name is Sarah I Scott. I live at Sewanee, Ten­nessee. I was born in 1859 at Harrison, Hamilton County, Tennessee. I claim through both my father and mother. I claim to be connected to the Cherokee tribe. My father died in 1862 and was about 40 years old. My mother died in 1894 and was 66 years old when she died. My mother and father were recognized as Indians where they lived. My grandparents came from South Carolina; it may have been North Carolina. My grandparents took part in tribal matters. I guess my father voted; I really don’t know. My parents and grandparents never got any money or land from the government. My father’s brother and mother’s brother got land in I.T. I have heard of my great grandparents being enrolled with the Cherokees. My great grandfather was Laban[?] Goins. I heard that he was enrolled. I never heard of my grandparents being enrolled. In 1882 my mother and I were living in Cannon County, Tennessee. I had an aunt that was enrolled in 1882. Her name was Sandal [Sandell] Goins. I heard that father’s father was enrolled; his name was Thomas Goins. I was not enrolled in 1882 because I did not hear about it at that time. I don’t remember any of Thomas Goins’ brothers and sisters; I just barely recollect him. My mother was raised up with the Indians. I heard her talk about being at the camp with them. The tribe went away and left her in North Carolina. Her parents did not go west. I guess [it was] because they were not full bloods. I heard that my grandparents went up in the mountains to keep from going west.

Sarah I. Scott
Winchester, Tennessee, June 24, 1908”

Sarah E. Boulder[n?] and her three children of Webbers Falls, Oklahoma were rejected as Cherokees, according to “Cherokees by Blood: Records of Eastern Cherokee Ancestry in the U. S. Court of Claims, 1906-1910” by Jerry Wright Jordon. She prepared an affidavit September 21, 1908:

“My name is Sarah E. Boulden; my post office is Oktaha, Oklahoma; I was born in Tennessee near Chattanooga in 1845; I moved west in 1862; I claim my Indian blood through both my mother and my father; in 1851 my mother was living in Tennessee; her maiden name was Mary McGill; in 1851 she was known as Mary Goins; my mother never drew any money that I have ever heard of; I tried to get an allotment with the Cherokees, but they refused me; Sandell Still was my father’s sister; we were all enrolled in Long Savannah, East Tennessee; my mother had two half-sisters, namely Elizabeth McGill and Nancy McGill; neither of them ever married, but Margaret Turnover was Eliza­beth’s daughter; my father and mother left Tennessee and came to Illinois in 1862; from Illinois we came here; my father had the following brothers and sisters, Sandell Still who first married a Field and then a Still, the next sister was Polly Clark who also went by the name of Polly Helton; John Going, Sanford Going, Martin Going and Thomas Going.

Sarah E. [X] Boulden
Muskogee, Oklahoma, September 21, 1908”

Indian affairs officials attached a note to the affidavit of Sarah E. Boulden: “Note, See Mary Goen Act of Congress roll. Sandell Still did not have a daughter named Mary.”

Polly Goins, age 52, made an affidavit in 1889 in support of the application of Martin Fields whom she identified as a son of George Fields, a “blood Cherokee of Hamilton County.” She stated that George Fields was married first [about 1800] to a woman whose name was Cassandra. Later he was remarried [about 1830] to Sandell Goins.

She declared that George Fields died about 1840 in Marion County, Tennessee. After his death she was remarried to George Still in Hamilton County. He died about 1857. She died about 1878 in Pope County, Illinois where three of her children lived.

She identified the children of George Fields as:

John Fields
Vilinta Fields
Polly Fields born about 1835,
married Nathan Goins
Rhoda Fields married Henry Goins
Issippi Fields married Calvin Bolin
Corzania [Cassandra?] Fields married James Goins
James Fields
Riley Fields
Martin Fields married Cynthianna Goins, Cherokee
daughter of Preston Goins and Betsy
McGill Goins of Hamilton County.

She identified the children of Martin Fields and Cynthianna Goins Fields as:

Tennessee Fields born in 1870
Jeanie Fields born about 1871
James Fields born about 1876
Julia Fields born about 1878

She identified the children of George Still and Sandell Goins Fields Still as:

Allen Still
Andrew Still
Elizabeth Still married Carter Goins

Jerry Wright Jordan wrote:

“This small roll [only 88 names] of the Eastern Cherokees is seldom mentioned and often overlooked, yet it was one of the criteria that Guion Miller used in deciding the eligibility of applicants to the Guion Miller Roll of 1906-1910. The introduction to the Roll on National Archives Microfilm Publication 7RA-06 states that the names contained in this roll were ommitted from the Siler Roll [1851], but had been included on the Mullay Roll of 1848. I know for a fact the names on the first page of this roll were not on the Mullay Roll.”

Name Relation Age Residence Amt. Rec’d
Sandell Still Head 45 Bledsoe Co, Tenn. $ 92.82
Rhoda Still daughter 13 Bledsoe Co, Tenn 92.82
Isiipi Still daughter 11 Bledsoe Co, Tenn 92.82
Cussana Still daughter 9 Bledsoe Co, Tenn 92.82
Riley Still son 7 Bledsoe Co, Tenn 92.82
Martin Still son 6 Bledsoe Co, Tenn 92.82
Allen Still son 2 Bledsoe Co, Tenn 92.82
Andrew Still son 1 Bledsoe Co, Tenn 92.82

Margaret Still Head 21 Hamilton Co, Tenn. 92.82
Geo. Franklin Still son 4 Hamilton Co, Tenn. 92.82
Cass Houston Still son 3 Hamilton Co, Tenn. 92.82
Joseph W. Still son 1-12 Hamilton Co, Tenn, 92.82

Mary Goen Head 20 Bledsoe Co, Tenn. 92.82
[daughter of Sandell Still]
Robert Goen son 2 Bledsoe Co, Tenn. 92.82

John Fields Head 18 Bledsoe Co, Tenn. 92.82
[son of Sandell Still]
Lydia Jane Fields daughter 1 Bledsoe Co, Tenn. 92.82
==O==
Cloie Hamby, mother of three children and a niece of Sarah E. Boulder, was rejected by the commission. She prepared an af­fidavit on the same date:

“My name is Cloie Hamby; my post-office is Oktaha, Oklahoma. I was born in Hamilton County, Kentucky [Tennessee] and am 38 years old; I am a niece of Sarah E. Boulder who has just testified and a sister of John Goins who is here, and his number is 3710; my mother Malissa McGill was a first cousin of Sarah E. Boulder and my father, John Goins, was her brother, and we claim our Indian blood from exactly the same source. I was born in Livingston County, Kentucky.”
Cloie Hamby
Muskogee, Oklahoma, September 21, 1908″

Martha Goins of Jasper, Tennessee filed Cherokee application No. 6290, according to “Cherokees by Blood: Records of Eastern Cherokee Ancestry in the U. S. Court of Claims, 1906-1910” by Jerry Wright Jordon. Her application was rejected with the explanation that no ancestors were never enrolled and no ancestor was a party to the treaties of 1835 and 1846. The applicant “appeared at Chattanooga, but left before her testimony could be taken.”
==O==
Maggie Goins Cooksey gave a deposition in 1909 to support her claim of being a Cherokee, according to “Cherokees by Blood: Records of Eastern Cherokee Ancestry in the U. S. Court of Claims, 1906-1910” by Jerry Wright Jordon:

“My name is Maggie Goins Cooksey; my post-office is Mackey, Oklahoma; I am about 34 years old; the appli­cation made for Thomas B. Cooksey was for me; my father’s name was Carter Goins; my mother’s name was Elizabeth Still; she was the daughter of Cassandra Still; my mother died about 18 or 20 years ago; she was living in Muskogee at the time of her death; she was born near Chattanooga, Tennessee; Andy Still was one brother of my mother; Allen and Andrew Still were other brothers; my mother’s half sisters were Polly Fields, Luzaney Goins and Rhoda Fields; I have some children, John, 16; Benton, 14; Robert, 11; Nannie, 12; Floyd, 8.”
Maggie Goins Cooksey
Vian, Oklahoma, March 15, 1909

Maggie Goins Cooksey died about 1955 and was buried in the Spade Mountain Cemetery in Adair County, Oklahoma on U.S. Highway 62, between Stillwell and Tahlequah.
==O==
William Goins worked for J C Roberts while living in Chattanooga, Tennessee in 1890 and 1891 according to Chattanooga city directories.
==O==
James John Goin was a resident of Mississippi Territory about 1765 shortly after England wrested control of the area from the French and the Spanish. Alabama Territory was formed from Mississippi Territory in 1798.

According to the research of Carolyn A. Ostroff, a great-great-great-granddaughter of Bellmore, New York, children born to James John Goin include:

Sandell Goins born about 1805
Mary “Polly” Goins born about 1806
Martin Goins born about 1809
Asa Goins born about 1811
George Washington Goins born about 1813
Sanford Goins born about 1815
Nathan Goins born about 1818
Jack Goins born about 1821
Thomas Goins born about 1825

Sandell Goin, daughter of James John Goin, was born about 1805, probably in Grainger County, Tennessee. She was married about 1828 to George Fields, a widower whose wife Cassandra Fields had died. George Fields died about 1840 in Marion County, Tennessee, according to an affidavit made in 1889 by Polly Goins.

Sandell Goin Fields was remarried in Hamilton County to George Still about 1841. He died about 1857, and she removed to Pope County, Illinois where three of her children lived. She died there about 1878.

According to Polly Fields Goins, who was born about 1835, children born to George Fields and Casandra Fields were:

John Fields born about 1802
Vilinta Fields born about 1803
Polly Fields born about 1805
Rhoda Fields born about 1807
Issippi Fields born about 1809
Corzania [Casandra] Fields born about 1812
James Fields born about 1815
Riley Fields born about 1818
Martin Fields born about 1822

Children born to George Still and Sandell Goins Fields Still include:

Allen Still born about 1843
Andrew Still born about 1845
Elizabeth Still born about 1849

Polly Fields, daughter of George Fields and Cassandra Fields, was born about 1805. She was married to Nathan Goins about 1822.

Rhoda Fields, daugher of George Fields and Cassandra Fields, was born about 1807. She was married about 1835 to Henry Goins. Henry Goins was born in Tennessee, according to his 1880 census enumeration of Pope County, Illinois. Henry Goins served in the Thirty-seventh Tennessee Infantry Regiment, Company G, during the Civil War, according to Imani Kea Greene. Henry Goins was remarried to Zana Harper.

Children born to Henry Goins and Rhoda Fields Goins, in Kentucky, according to Imani Kea Greene, include:

Thomas Goins born about 1837
William Goins born about 1839
Sarah Goins born about 1841
Mary Goins born about 1843
Ruth Goins born about 1846

Issippi Fields, daughter of George Fields and Cassandra Fields, was born about 1809. She was married about 1826 to Calvin Bolin.

Cassandra Fields, daughter of George Fields and Cassandra Fields, was born about 1812. She was married to James Goins about 1830.

Martin Fields, son of George Fields and Cassandra Fields, was born about 1822. He was married about 1845 to Cythianna Goins, daughter of Preston Goins and Betsy McGill of Hamilton County.

Children born to Martin Fields and Cynthianna Goins Fields include:

Tennessee Fields born in 1870
Jeanie Fields born about 1871
James Fields born about 1876
Julia Fields born about 1878

Tennessee Fields, daughter of Martin Fields and Cynthianna Goins Fields, was born in 1870.

Jeanie Fields, daughter of Martin Fields and Cynthianna Goins Fields, was born about 1871.

James Fields, son of Martin Fields and Cynthianna Goins Fields, was born about 1876.

Julia Fields, daughter of Martin Fields and Cynthianna Goins Fields, was born about 1878.

Allen Still, son of George Still and Sandell Goins Fields Still, was born about 1843. About 1862, his family removed to Pope County, Illinois, perhaps to escape the Civil War.

Andrew Still, son of George Still and Sandell Goins Fields Still, was born about 1845. At about age 17, his family removed to Pope County, Illinois.

Elizabeth Still, daughter of George Still and Sandell Goins Fields Still, was born about 1849. She was married about 1866 to Carter Goins.

Mary “Polly” Goins, daughter of James John Goins and Rhoda Duncan Goins, was born about 1805, probably in Grainger County, Tennessee. She was married about 1823, husband’s name Helton. Later she was remarried, husband’s name Clark, according to Sarah E. Boulden of Muskogee, Oklahoma in an affidavit dated September 21, 1908.

Martin Goins, son of James John Goins, was born about 1809.

Asa Goins, son of James John Goin and Rhoda Duncan Goins, was born about 1811. Asa Goins filed Indian Claim No. 10294 with the Dawes Commission, however it was withdrawn [probably in anticipation of it being denied]. There was a note attached to the document which was probably written by a Dawes official. It read, “The Goins family, if Indian, were Catawbas, and the only claim may be through the marriage of Sandell Goins Still.”

George Washington Goins, son of James John Goin and Rhoda Duncan Goin, was born about 1813. He was married about 1844 to Louise Golightly, according to Steve Smith. George Washington Goins filed Indian Claims Application No. 32017 with Dawes Commission in Oklahoma, and it was rejected. These applications were for land grants within the tribal lands, most of which were denied, according to Steve Smith.

George Washington Goins and Louise Golightly Goins died in Sebastian County, Arkansas and were buried there.

Sanford Goins, son of James John Goin and Rhoda Duncan Goins, was born about 1815. He was married about 1838 to Charity Helton, daughter of Harmon Helton and Sarah Morgan Helton. She was born in Hamilton about 1805. She appeared as a widow in the 1850 census composed of:

Nathan Goins born about 1840
Rhoda Goins born about 1842
Catherine “Katie” Goins born about 1845
Sarah Ann Goins born about 1847

Nathan Goins, son of James John Goin and Rhoda Duncan Goins, was born about 1818 in Hamilton County. He was married about 1841, to Mary McGill, according to an Internet report. The report reads:

“Minta Cobb, mother of Maude Bell Cobb and Johnnie Cobb, was the child of an unknown Goins. Minta’s paternal grandfather and grandmother were Nathan Goins and Mary McGill [1/2 Cherokee]. Nathan’s father was James Goins [1/2 Cherokee]. The parents of Mary McGill were an unknown Big Dollar, ‘full blood’ and Hannah Big Dollar, ‘half breed.’”

Children born to Nathan Goins and Mary McGill Goins include:

Joe Goins born about 1844
Jackson Goins born in 1851

Joe Goins, son of Nathan Goins and Mary McGill Goins, was born about 1844 in Hamilton County. He was married about 1867 to Sally Goins, a cousin of Dekalb County, according to Carolyn A. Ostroff.

Jackson Goins, son of Nathan Goins and Mary McGill Goins, was born about 1851. Jackson Goins was a native of Hamilton County, according to his affidavit published in “Cherokees by Blood: Records of Eastern Cherokee Ancestry in the U. S. Court of Claims, 1906-1910” by Jerry Wright Jordon:

“My name is Jackson Goins; I was born in Hamilton County, Tennessee in 1851; I am fifty-seven years old; I am the uncle of Marshall Goins; his father, Joe Goins, was my brother; I have applied for participation in this fund; I do not remember my application number; I have heard the testimony of Marshall Goins, and it is sub­stantially true to my best knowledge. I have not further testimony to help prove this claim.
Jackson [X] Goins
Dayton, Tenn, June 23, 1908”

His nephew, Marshall Goins gave a deposition on the same date:

My name is Marshall Goins; I was born in Wilson County, Tennessee; I am twenty-eight years old; I claim my Indian blood through my father and mother; my father’s name is Joe Goins; my mother’s maiden name was Sally Goins. My father was born in Hamilton County, Tennessee. I do not know what year he was born; my mother was born in Dekalb County, Tennessee. I do not know what year. My mother claimed her Indian blood through her father and mother. My father claimed his Indian blood through his mother. I do not know where my grandfather and grandmother were born, but I think they were born in the state of Tennessee. I do not know when they were born. Neither my father or mother were enrolled, but I think my grandfather, Nathan Goins was enrolled. Neither my father or mother or grandparents were never considered as a member of an Indian tribe and never received any money. I have never received any money. I never heard of any of my ancestors being held as slaves. I first learned of my Indian blood from my mother, and she said I was part Cherokee, but she never said how much. My father and ancestors through [whom] I claim were regarded as white people in the community in which they lived. I am regarded as a white man and associate with white people. I was twenty-one years old when my mother died and five years old when my father died. My father and mother never had an Indian name. I never heard of any ances­tors through whom I claim as having an Indian name. My grandmother on my father’s side resided in Hamilton County, Tennessee in 1851. I do not know why my ancestors were never enrolled.

Marshall [X] Goins

Jack Goins, son of James John Goins, was born about 1821.

Thomas Goin, son of James John Goins and Rhoda Duncan Goins, was born in Mississippi Territory [later to become Alabama] about 1825, according to Pam Parker, a descendant of Boise, Idaho. He, a Cherokee, was married about 1848 to Jamima Sinnes, the daughter of Benjamin Sinnes, according to Carolyn A. Ostroff. She stated that she found record of Benjamin Siness in 1835. At that time, he stated that he was 65 and a ferry boat owner.

Children born to Thomas Goin and Jamima Sinness Goin include:

Mary “Polly” Goin born about 1787

Mary “Polly” Goin, daughter of Thomas Goin and Jamima Sinnes Goin, was born about 1787. She was married about 1804 to Jacob Coots, according to a great-great-granddaughter, Elaine C. Eltgroth of Chester, California.

Children born to Jacob Coots and Mary “Polly” Goin Coots include:

Jestern Coots born about 1806

Jestern Coots, daughter of Jacob Coots and Mary “Polly” Goin Goots, was born about 1806. She was married about 1824 to John George Castoe, according to Eltgroth research. She filed an application with the Dawes Commission in Indian Territory for Cherokee rights.
==O==
Harvard Goins was enumerated as the head of Household No. 422 in the 1850 census of Hamilton County, Page 796. The family was rendered September 18, 1850 as:

“Goins, Harvard 46, farmer, born in Tennessee
Laborn 16, born in Tennessee, laborer
William 11, born in Tennessee
Duncan 9, born in Tennessee
Jane 7, born in Tennessee”

Charlie Goins was enumerated as the head of Household No. 423-423 adjoining Harvard Goins in the 1850 census of Hamilton County:

“Goins, Charlie 45, born in North Carolina
Nathan 18, born in Tennessee
Rhoda 15, born in Tennessee
Catharin 8, born in Tennessee
Sarah 5, born in Tennessee”
==O==
Henry Goins appeared as the head of a household in the 1850 census of Hamilton County, Household 663, page 831, Civil District 27. The family enumerated October 1, 1850, was recorded as:

“Goins, Henry 25, born in Tennessee, farmer
Martha 20, born in Tennessee”

Rolen Goins appeared as the head of a household in the 1850 census, Household 662, adjoining Henry Goins, page 830, Civil District 27. The family, enumerated October 1, 1850, was recorded as:

“Goins, Rolen 40, born in Tennessee, farmer
Elizabeth 35, born in Tennessee
John 14, born in Tennessee
Dodson 13, born in Tennessee
Harrison 10, born in Tennessee”
==O==
J. C. Goins and James Goins were recorded in 1870 in Hamil­ton County probate records as “working on public roads.
==O==
John Going was enumerated as the head of Household No. 667 Civil District 27 of Hamilton County. The family was recorded October 1, 1850 as:

“Going, John 50, born in TN, farmer, illiterate
Jane 40, born in TN, illiterate
Sarah 24, born in TN,
Nancey 22, born in TN
William 20, born in TN, laborer, illiterate
Mary 17, born in TN
Vica 14, born in TN
Henry 10, born in TN
Nathaniel 9, born in TN
Bradford 5, born in TN
Asahel 3, born in TN
Lydda 5/12, born in TN”
==O==
Martha Goins, Priscilla Goins, Mary Elizabeth Goins and Thomas Goins were identified as children of Prior L. Goins, deceased in Hamilton County probate records.
==O==
Mary Ann Goins was married to Alex Clark January 15, 1860 in Hamilton County, according to a letter written October 15, 1994 by Elroy Kirkpatrick, a great-grandson of Diamond Springs, California.
==O==
Rachel Goins, the wife of William Goins in the 1850 census of Hamilton County, was born in Tennessee in 1822.
==O==
Tabner Goins, a nonagenarian, was listed as the head of Household No. 747, Civil District, adjoining that of Carter Goins in the 1850 census of Hamilton County, page 843. The family was rendered as:

“Goins, Tabner 90, born in VA, male, no employment
Ann 22, born in Tennessee
William 3, born in Tennessee
James 1, born in Tennessee”

Carter Goins was enumerated as the head of Household No. 746, page 843 in the 1850 census of Hamilton County. The family was listed as:

“Goins, Carter 35, born in TN, carpenter, illiterate
Cyntha 30, born in Tennessee
William 14, born in Tennessee
Francis 12, born in Tennessee, male
James 10, born in Tennessee
Elizabeth 8, born in Tennessee
Jefferson 6, born in Tennessee
Vandola 2, born in Tennessee, female”
==O==
Nathan Goins was enumerated as the head of Household No. 750 in the 1850 census of Hamilton County. The family was listed October 4, 1850 as:

“Goins, Nathan 30, born in Tennessee, carpenter,
illiterate
Rila 25, born in Tennessee, illiterate
Emiley 15, born in Tennessee
Nelly 6, born in Tennessee
James 5, born in Tennessee”

A second Nathan Goins was enumerated as the head of a Household No. 749 in the 1850 census of Hamilton County, Page 843. The family was rendered October 4, 1850 as:

“Goins, Nathan 30, born in TN, farmer, illiterate
Mary 28, born in Tennessee
Sarah 9, born in Tennessee
William 5, born in Tennessee
John 3, born in Tennessee
Luanzy 1, born in Tennessee”

William Goins was listed as the head of Household 754, Civil District 27, in the 1850 census of Hamilton County. The fam­ily was recorded October 4, 1850 as:

“Goins, William 28, born in TN, farmer, illiterate
Sarah 29, born in Tennessee, illiterate
Lucinda 7, born in Tennessee
John 4, born in Tennessee
Molicia 2, born in Tennessee
Thomas 6/12, born in Tennessee”
==O==
James John Goin, regarded as a native of East Tennessee, which later became Claiborne County, was born about 1780 of parents unknown. He removed to Hamilton County and then across the state line into Alabama Territory which had been formed from Mississippi Territory in 1798. He was married there about 1803 to Rhoda Duncan, according to Patricia Lykins, a descendant.

According to the research of Carolyn A. Ostroff, a great-great-great-granddaughter of Bellmore, New York, children born to James John Goin and Rhoda Duncan Goin include:

Sandell Goins born about 1804
Thomas “Shade” Goins born about 1805
Mary “Polly” Goins born about 1806
Martin Goins born about 1809
Asa Goins born about 1811
Sanford Goins born about 1815
Nathan Goins born about 1818
Jack Goins born about 1821
Thomas Goins born about 1825

Sandell Goin, daughter of James John Goin and Rhoda Duncan Goin, was born about 1805, probably in Grainger County, Tennessee. She was married about 1828 to George Fields, a widower whose wife Cassandra Fields had died. George Fields died about 1840 in Marion County, Tennessee, according to an affidavit made in 1889 by Polly Goins.

Sandell Goin Fields was remarried in Hamilton County to George Still about 1841. He died about 1857, and she removed to Pope County, Illinois where three of her children lived. She died there about 1878.

According to Polly Fields Goins, who was born about 1835, children born to George Fields and Casandra Fields were:

John Fields born about 1802
Vilinta Fields born about 1803
Polly Fields born about 1805
Rhoda Fields born about 1807
Issippi Fields born about 1809
Corzania [Casandra] Fields born about 1812
James Fields born about 1815
Riley Fields born about 1818
Martin Fields born about 1822

Children born to George Still and Sandell Goins Fields Still include:

Allen Still born about 1843
Andrew Still born about 1845
Elizabeth Still born about 1849

Polly Fields, daughter of George Fields and Cassandra Fields, was born about 1805. She was married to Nathan Goins about 1822.

Rhoda Fields, daughter of George Fields and Cassandra Fields, was born about 1807. She was married about 1835 to Henry Goins. Henry Goins was born in Tennessee, according to his 1880 census enumeration of Pope County, Illinois. Henry Goins served in the Thirty-seventh Tennessee Infantry Regiment, Company G, during the Civil War, according to Imani Kea Greene. Henry Goins was remarried to Zana Harper.

Children born to Henry Goins and Rhoda Fields Goins, in Kentucky, according to Imani Kea Greene, include:

Thomas Goins born about 1837
William Goins born about 1839
Sarah Goins born about 1841
Mary Goins born about 1843
Ruth Goins born about 1846

Issippi Fields, daughter of George Fields and Cassandra Fields, was born about 1809. She was married about 1826 to Calvin Bolin.

Cassandra Fields, daughter of George Fields and Cassandra Fields, was born about 1812. She was married to James Goins about 1830.

Martin Fields, son of George Fields and Cassandra Fields, was born about 1822. He was married about 1845 to Cythianna Goins, daughter of Preston Goins and Betsy McGill Goins of Hamilton County.

Children born to Martin Fields and Cynthianna Goins Fields include:

Tennessee Fields born in 1870
Jeanie Fields born about 1871
James Fields born about 1876
Julia Fields born about 1878

Tennessee Fields, daughter of Martin Fields and Cynthianna Goins Fields, was born in 1870.

Jeanie Fields, daughter of Martin Fields and Cynthianna Goins Fields, was born about 1871.

James Fields, son of Martin Fields and Cynthianna Goins Fields, was born about 1876.

Julia Fields, daughter of Martin Fields and Cynthianna Goins Fields, was born about 1878.

Allen Still, son of George Still and Sandell Goins Fields Still, was born about 1843. About 1862, his family removed to Pope County, Illinois, perhaps to escape the Civil War.

Andrew Still, son of George Still and Sandell Goins Fields Still, was born about 1845. At about age 17, his family removed to Pope County, Illinois.

Elizabeth Still, daughter of George Still and Sandell Goins Fields Still, was born about 1849. She was married about 1866 to Carter Goins.

Thomas “Shade” Goins was born in Tennessee about 1805 to John [James?] Goins and Rhoda Duncan Goins, according to information supplied to the Dawes Commission by Calvin Goins, suggested as their son, who made Application No. 19529 on the Miller Rolls. He was married about 1830 to Orpha Helton, daughter of Harmon Helton and Sarah Morgan Helton.

Barbara Mason, a descendant of Mineral Wells, Texas referred to Thomas Goins as “Shade Goins.” J. M. Morley suggests that Thomas Goins and “Shade Goins” were kinsmen, both of whom were married to Orpha Helton. She was a sister to Charity Helton who was married to Sanford Goins.

Thomas Goins was enumerated as the head of Household 747, Page 843 in the 1850 census of Hamilton County. The family was rendered as:

“Goins, Thomas 45, born in TN, farmer, illiterate
Orpha 38, born in Tennessee, illiterate
Ann 19, born in Tennessee
Elizabeth 17, born in Tennessee
Charity 14, born in Tennessee
Delila 18, born in Tennessee
Joshua 10, born in Tennessee
Mary 7, born in Tennessee
Nancy 6, born in Tennessee
Rebecca 4, born in Tennessee
Molinda 1, born in Tennessee
Calvin 8/12, born in Tennessee”

“Thomas Goin” reappeared as the head of a household in the 1860 census of adjoining Bledsoe County, Tennessee, House­hold 453-453:

“Goin, Thomas 62, born in Tennessee, laborer, illiterate
Orpha 40, born in unknown, illiterate
Joshua 21, born in Tennessee, farm laborer
Nancy 17, born in Tennessee
Rebecca 15, born in Tennessee
Molina 13, born in Tennessee
Isabel 8, born in Tennessee
Matilda 7, born in Tennessee
Malisa 4, born in Tennessee
Sarah 1, born in Tennessee”

“Thomas Gowen, mulatto [or Melungeon],” believed to be Thomas Goins above, appeared as the head of a household in the 1870 census of Cannon County, Tennessee, Household No. 146-147, Civil District 6 on July 8, 1870. The family, living at Woodbury, Tennessee, was recorded as:

“Gowen, Thomas 70, born in Tennessee, mulatto,
farmer, illiterate
Orpha 60, born in Tennessee, illiterate,
mulatto
Rebecca 26, born in Tennessee, illiterate,
mulatto
Puss 24, born in Tennessee, illiterate,
mulatto
Isabel 18, born in Tennessee, mulatto
Matilda 17, born in Tennessee, mulatto
Riley 7, born in Tennessee, mulatto
Malissa 15, born in Tennessee, mulatto
Sarah 11, born in Tennessee, mulatto
Jane 6, born in Tennessee, mulatto
John 4, born in Tennessee, mulatto
Elly 3, born in Tennessee, mulatto
Calvin 3/12, born in Tennessee, mulatto
Cissy [?] 3/12, born in Tennessee,
mulatto”

In 1880 Orpha Helton Goins was enumerated as “white” and was living with a daughter and her children, all of whom were listed as “Indian.”

Children born to Thomas Goins and Orpha Helton Goins in­clude:

Ann Goins born about 1830
Delila Goins born about 1832
Elizabeth Goins born about 1833
Charity Goins born about 1836
Joshua Goins born about 1840
Mary Goins born about 1843
Nancy Goins born about 1844
Rebecca Goins born about 1846
Molinda “Puss” Goins born about 1848
Calvin Goins born about 1849
Isabel Goins born about 1852
Matilda Goins born about 1853
Malissa Goins born about 1855
Sarah Goins born about 1859
Jane Goins born about 1864
John Goins born about 1866
Calvin Goins born about 1870
Cissy Goins born about 1870

Ann Goins, daughter of Thomas Goins and Orpha Helton Goins, was born about 1820. She was recorded as a 19-year-old in the 1850 census of her father’s household.

Delila Goins, daughter of Thomas Goins and Orpha Helton Goins, was born about 1832.

Elizabeth Gons, daughter of Thomas Goins and Orpha Helton Goins, was born about 1833.

Charity Goins, daughter of Thomas Goins and Orpha Helton Goins, was born about 1836.

Joshua Goins, son of Thomas Goins and Orpha Helton Goins, was born about 1840.

Isabel Goins, daughter of Thomas Goins and Orpha Helton Goins, was born about 1852. She appeared in the 1870 census of her father’s household at age 18.

Matilda Goins, daughter of Thomas Goins and Orpha Helton Goins, was born about 1853. She appeared as a 17-year-old “mulatto” in the 1870 census enumeration of her father’s household of Coffee County, Tennessee. Sara Goins, family researcher of Dunlap, Tennessee, wrote February 1, 1997 that she and Moses Easterly Walker were parents of some children, however, “they each married someone else.”

On June 24, 1908, she gave a statement to the U. S. Court of Claims, according to “Cherokee by Blood” compiled by Jerry Wright Jordan:

“My name is Matilda Goins; I am acquainted with Benjamin F. Goins; I am a second cousin to Benjamin F. Goins; he gets Indian blood through his mother; his mother’s name was Rachel Goins; I think she was born in Hamilton County, Tennessee. in about 1837; she claimed her Indian blood through both her father and mother; her father’s name was Granville Goins; her mother’s name was Polly Goins; Granville Goins was born in Grainger County, Tennessee. I do not know where Polly Goins was born; I never heard that the mother of Benjamin Goins or any of the ancestors through whom he claims his Indian blood were ever enrolled; I never heard of them receiving any money, land or other benefits. In 1851, the mother of Benjamin Goins lived in Hamilton County, Tennessee. I do not know why she was never enrolled; neither the mother or any of the ancestors through whom he claims were ever held as slaves; Granville Goins had an Indian name; I do not remember what his Indian name was; he was nearly a full blood Cherokee and spoke the Cherokee language; Granville Goins was a member of the Cherokee tribe; he lived with the Cherokee Indians in Hamilton County. When they moved to the west, he went with them, but returned in a short time and settled in Tennessee. He went but a short distance with the Indians. I am an applicant for participation in this fund.

Matilda “X” Goins
Dayton, Tennessee, June 24, 1908.”

In the 1880 census Matilda Goins is enumerated as “Indian” with her seven-year-old son, John Lee Goins.

Children born to Moses Easterly Walker and Matilda Goins include:

John Lee Goins born about 1873
Mary Goins born about 1876

John Lee Goins, son of Moses Easterly Walker and Matilda Goins, was born 1873. He was married about 1902 to Minnie Holland.

Children born to John Lee Goins and Minnie Holland Goins include:

John Lee Goins, Jr. born in 1915

John Lee Goins, Jr, son of John Lee Goins and Minnie Holland Goins, was born in 1915. He was married about 1948, wife’s name Sarah A. He died in 1970. In 1997, Sara A. Goins, Foundation member, lived in Dunlap, Tennessee where she was active in the research of the Goins family.

Mary Goins, daughter of Isabel Goins and granddaughter of Thomas Goins and Orpha Helton Goins, was born in 1876, according to Kenny Ann Gibson Wood, a great-granddaughter of Tulsa, Oklahoma.

Mary Goins was married about 1895 to John Douglas who was born in September 1870 at Pikeville, Tennessee in Bledsoe County, Tennessee. She died in May 1899 in Bledsoe County.

Children born to John Douglas and Mary Goins Douglas include:

Brown Henry Douglas born June 19, 1896

Brown Henry Douglas, son of John Douglas and Mary Goins Douglas, was born June 19, 1896 at Pikeville. He was married June 19, 1918 at the Church of Christ in Maude, Oklahoma to Emma Perdema Mahoney. She was born July 8, 1899 at Guthrie, Oklahoma Territory to John Bailey Mahoney and Su­san Rebecca Harrellson Mahoney. She died January 10, 1919 at Maud, Oklahoma. Brown Henry Douglas died June 18, 1951 at Chattanooga, Tennessee.

Children born to them include:

Perdema Pearl Douglas born January 10, 1919

Perdema Pearl Douglas, daughter of Brown Henry Douglas and Emma Perdema Mahoney Douglas, was born January 10, 1919 at Maude. She was married July 17, 1935 at Konawa, Oklahoma to Thomas Kenneth Gibson. He was born October 30, 1915 at Purdy, Arkansas to William Roy Gibson and Mattie Ethel Baker Gibson. Thomas Kenneth Gibson died June 20, 1975 at Lakewood, Colorado. Perdema Pearl Douglas Gibson died September 27, 1983 at Tulsa.

Children born to them include:

Kenny Ann Gibson born September 19, 1936

Kenny Ann Gibson, daughter of Thomas Kenneth Gibson and Perdema Pearl Douglas Gibson, was born September 19, 1936 at Konawa. She was married June 4, 1954 at Tulsa to Dearl Logan Wood. They continued there in 1991 and 1997.

Malissa Goins, daughter of Thomas Goins and Orpha Helton Goins, was born about 1855.

Sarah Goins, daughter of Thomas Goins and Orpha Helton Goins, was born about 1859.

Jane Ann Goins, daughter of Thomas Goins and Orpha Helton Goins, was born about 1864. She appeared as a six-year-old in the 1870 census of Cannon County, Tennessee. She was married about 1881 to Louis Helton, according to a descendant, Barbara Mason of Mineral Wells, Texas.

Children born to Louis Helton and Jane Ann Goins Helton include:

William Helton born about 1885

William Helton, son of Louis Helton and Jane Ann Goins Helton, was born about 1885.

Children born to William Helton include:

Bertha Mae Helton born about 1915

Bertha Mae Helton, daughter of William Helton, was born about 1915, according to her daughter Barbara Mason.

John Goins, son of Thomas Goins and Orpha Helton Goins, was born about 1866. He appeared in the 1870 census of Cannon County as a four-year-old.

Calvin Goins, son of Thomas Goins and Orpha Helton Goins, was born about 1870.

Cissy Goins, daughter of Thomas Goins and Orpha Helton Goins, was born about 1870.
==O==
Adjoining the household of “Thomas Gowen” was that of “John Gowen, mulatto” as the head of Household 145-146. This family, also living at Woodbury, Civil District 6, on July 8, 1870, was recorded as:

“Gowen, John 35, born in TN, farmer,
mulatto, illiterate,
Casander 26, born in TN, illiterate
William L. 5, born in TN
Arlander 3, born in TN
James M. 1, born in TN”

Adjoining the household of “John Gowen, mulatto” was the household headed by Carter Gowen, mulatto”. The family was identified as household 144-145 and was recorded July 8, 1870 in Civil District 6 in Woodbury as:

“Gowen, Carter 26, born in Tennessee, farmer,
illit erate, mulatto
Elizabeth 17, born in TN, illiterate
Elizabeth 55, born in TN, illiterate
Nancy 25, born in TN, illiterate
Henry 13, born in TN”

It is assumed that Elizabeth Gowen, age 55, was the mother of Carter Gowen and that Nancy Gowen was his sister and Henry Gowen his brother.

Mary “Polly” Goins, daughter of James John Goin and Rhoda Duncan Goins, was born about 1806, probably in Grainger County, Tennessee. She was married about 1823, husband’s name Helton. Later she was remarried, husband’s name Clark, according to Sarah E. Boulden of Muskogee, Oklahoma in an affidavit dated September 21, 1908.

Martin Goins, son of James John Goin and Rhoda Duncan Goins, was born about 1809.

Asa Goins, son of James John Goin and Rhoda Duncan Goins, was born about 1811.

Sanford Goins, son of James John Goin and Rhoda Duncan Goins, was born about 1815. He was married about 1838 to Charity Helton, daughter of Harmon Helton and Sarah Morgan Helton. She was born in Hamilton about 1805. She appeared as a widow in the 1850 census composed of:

Nathan Goins born about 1840
Rhoda Goins born about 1842
Catherine “Katie” Goins born about 1845
Sarah Ann Goins born about 1847

Nathan Goins, son of James John Goin and Rhoda Duncan Goins, was born about 1818 in Hamilton County. He was married about 1841, to Mary McGill, according to an Internet report. The report reads:

“Minta Cobb, mother of Maude Bell Cobb and Johnnie Cobb, was the child of an unknown Goins. Minta’s paternal grandfather and grandmother were Nathan Goins and Mary McGill [1/2 Cherokee]. Nathan’s father was James Goins [1/2 Cherokee]. The parents of Mary McGill were an unknown Big Dollar, ‘full blood’ and Hannah Big Dollar, ‘half breed.’”

Children born to Nathan Goins and Mary McGill Goins include:

Joe Goins born about 1844
Jackson Goins born in 1851

Joe Goins, son of Nathan Goins and Mary McGill Goins, was born about 1844 in Hamilton County. He was married about 1867 to Sally Goins, a cousin of Dekalb County, according to Carolyn A. Ostroff.

Jackson Goins, son of Nathan Goins and Mary McGill Goins, was born about 1851. Jackson Goins was a native of Hamilton County, according to his affidavit published in “Cherokees by Blood: Records of Eastern Cherokee Ancestry in the U. S. Court of Claims, 1906-1910” by Jerry Wright Jordon:

“My name is Jackson Goins; I was born in Hamilton County, Tennessee in 1851; I am fifty-seven years old; I am the uncle of Marshall Goins; his father, Joe Goins, was my brother; I have applied for participation in this fund; I do not remember my application number; I have heard the testimony of Marshall Goins, and it is sub­stantially true to my best knowledge. I have not further testimony to help prove this claim.
Jackson [X] Goins
Dayton, Tenn, June 23, 1908″

His nephew, Marshall Goins gave a deposition on the same date:

My name is Marshall Goins; I was born in Wilson County, Tennessee; I am twenty-eight years old; I claim my Indian blood through my father and mother; my father’s name is Joe Goins; my mother’s maiden name was Sally Goins. My father was born in Hamilton County, Tennessee. I do not know what year he was born; my mother was born in Dekalb County, Tennessee. I do not know what year. My mother claimed her Indian blood through her father and mother. My father claimed his Indian blood through his mother. I do not know where my grandfather and grandmother were born, but I think they were born in the state of Tennessee. I do not know when they were born. Neither my father or mother were enrolled, but I think my grandfather, Nathan Goins was enrolled. Neither my father or mother or grandparents were never considered as a member of an Indian tribe and never received any money. I have never received any money. I never heard of any of my ancestors being held as slaves. I first learned of my Indian blood from my mother, and she said I was part Cherokee, but she never said how much. My father and ancestors through [whom] I claim were regarded as white people in the community in which they lived. I am regarded as a white man and associate with white people. I was twenty-one years old when my mother died and five years old when my father died. My father and mother never had an Indian name. I never heard of any ances­tors through whom I claim as having an Indian name. My grandmother on my father’s side resided in Hamilton County, Tennessee in 1851. I do not know why my ancestors were never enrolled.

Marshall [X] Goins
Dayton, Tenn, June 3, 1908”

Jack Goins, son of James John Goin and Rhoda Duncan Goins, was born about 1821.

Thomas Goin, son of James John Goins and Rhoda Duncan Goins, was born in Mississippi Territory [later to become Alabama] about 1825, according to Pam Parker, a descendant of Boise, Idaho. He, a Cherokee, was married about 1848 to Jamima Sinnes, the daughter of Benjamin Sinnes, according to Carolyn A. Ostroff. She stated that she found record of Benjamin Siness in 1835. At that time, he stated that he was 65 and a ferry boat owner.
==O==
Thomas Goins was born in Tennessee about 1805 to John [James?] Goins and Rhoda Duncan Goins, according to infor­mation supplied to the Dawes Commission by Calvin Goins, suggested as their son, who made Application No. 19529 on the Miller Rolls. He was married about 1830 to Orpha Helton, daughter of Harmon Helton and Sarah Morgan Helton.

Thomas Goins was enumerated as the head of Household 747, Page 843 in the 1850 census of Hamilton County. The family was rendered as:

“Goins, Thomas 45, born in TN, farmer, illiterate
Orpha 38, born in TN, illiterate
Ann 19, born in TN
Elizabeth 17, born in TN
Charity 14, born in TN
Delila 18, born in TN
Joshua 10, born in TN
Mary 7, born in TN
Nancy 6, born in TN
Rebecca 4, born in TN
Molinda 1, born in TN
Calvin 8/12, born in TN”

“Thomas Goin” reappeared as the head of a household in the 1860 census of adjoining Bledsoe County, Tennessee, Household 453-453:

“Goin, Thomas 62, born in TN, laborer, illiterate
Orpha 40, born in unknown, illiterate
Joshua 21, born in TN, farm laborer
Nancy 17, born in TN
Rebecca 15, born in TN
Molina 13, born in TN
Isabel 8, born in TN
Matilda 7, born in TN
Malisa 4, born in TN
Sarah 1, born in TN”

“Thomas Gowen, mulatto [or Melungeon],” believed to be Thomas Goins above, appeared as the head of a household in the 1870 census of Cannon County, Tennessee, Household No. 146-147, Civil District 6 on July 8, 1870. The family, living at Woodbury, Tennessee, was recorded as:

“Gowen, Thomas 70, born in TN, mulatto,
farmer, illiterate
Orpha 60, born in TN, illiterate,
mulatto
Rebecca 26, born in TN, illiterate,
mulatto
Puss 24, born in TN, illiterate,
mulatto
Isabel 18, born in TN, mulatto
Matilda 17, born in TN, mulatto
Riley 7, born in TN, mulatto
Malissa 15, born in TN, mulatto
Sarah 11, born in TN, mulatto
Jane 6, born in TN, mulatto
John 4, born in TN, mulatto
Elly 3, born in TN, mulatto
Calvin 3/12, born in TN, mulatto
Cissy [?] 5/12, born in TN, mulatto”

In 1880 Orpha Helton Goins was enumerated as “white” and was living with a daughter and her children, all of whom were listed as “Indian.”

Children born to Thomas Goins and Orpha Helton Goins in­clude:

Ann Goins born about 1830
Delila Goins born about 1832
Elizabeth Goins born about 1833
Charity Goins born about 1836
Joshua Goins born about 1840
Mary Goins born about 1843
Nancy Goins born about 1844
Rebecca Goins born about 1846
Molinda “Puss” Goins born about 1848
Calvin Goins born about 1849
Isabel Goins born about 1852
Matilda Goins born about 1853
Malissa Goins born about 1855
Sarah Goins born about 1859

Isabel Goins, daughter of Thomas Goins and Orpha Helton Goins, was born about 1852. She appeared in the 1870 census of her father’s household at age 18.

Matilda Goins, daughter of Thomas Goins and Orpha Helton Goins, was born about 1853. She appeared as a 17-year-old “mulatto” in the 1870 census enumeration of her father’s household of Coffee County, Tennessee. Sara Goins, family researcher of Dunlap, Tennessee, wrote February 1, 1997 that she and Moses Easterly Walker were parents of some children, however, “they each married someone else.”

On June 24, 1908, she gave a statement to the U. S. Court of Claims, according to “Cherokee by Blood” compiled by Jerry Wright Jordan:

“My name is Matilda Goins; I am acquainted with Benjamin F. Goins; I am a second cousin to Benjamin F. Goins; he gets Indian blood through his mother; his mother’s name was Rachel Goins; I think she was born in Hamilton County, Ten­nessee. in about 1837; she claimed her Indian blood through both her father and mother; her father’s name was Granville Goins; her mother’s name was Polly Goins; Granville Goins was born in Grainger County, Tennessee. I do not know where Polly Goins was born; I never heard that the mother of Benjamin Goins or any of the ancestors through whom he claims his Indian blood were ever enrolled; I never heard of them receiving any money, land or other benefits. In 1851, the mother of Benjamin Goins lived in Hamilton County, Ten­nessee. I do not know why she was never enrolled; neither the mother or any of the ancestors through whom he claims were ever held as slaves; Granville Goins had an Indian name; I do not remember what his Indian name was; he was nearly a full blood Cherokee and spoke the Cherokee language; Granville Goins was a member of the Cherokee tribe; he lived with the Cherokee Indians in Hamilton County. When they moved to the west, he went with them, but returned in a short time and settled in Tennessee. He went but a short distance with the In­dians. I am an applicant for participation in this fund.

Matilda “X” Goins
Dayton, Tennessee, June 24, 1908.”

In the 1880 census Matilda Goins is enumerated as “Indian” with her seven-year-old son, John Lee Goins.

Children born to Moses Easterly Walker and Matilda Goins include:

John Lee Goins born about 1873
Mary Goins born about 1876

John Lee Goins, son of Moses Easterly Walker and Matilda Goins, was born 1873. He was married about 1902 to Minnie Holland.

Children born to John Lee Goins and Minnie Holland Goins include:

John Lee Goins, Jr. born in 1915

John Lee Goins, Jr, son of John Lee Goins and Minnie Holland Goins, was born in 1915. He was married about 1948, wife’s name Sarah A. He died in 1970. In 1997, Sara A. Goins, Foundation member, lived in Dunlap, Tennessee where she was active in the research of the Goins family.

Mary Goins, daughter of Isabel Goins and granddaughter of Thomas Goins and Orpha Helton Goins, was born in 1876, according to Kenny Ann Gibson Wood, a great-granddaughter of Tulsa, Oklahoma.

Mary Goins was married about 1895 to John Douglas who was born in September 1870 at Pikeville, Tennessee in Bledsoe County, Tennessee. She died in May 1899 in Bledsoe County.

Children born to John Douglas and Mary Goins Douglas in­clude:

Brown Henry Douglas born June 19, 1896

Brown Henry Douglas, son of John Douglas and Mary Goins Douglas, was born June 19, 1896 at Pikeville. He was married Jun 19, 1918 at the Church of Christ in Maude, Oklahoma to Emma Perdema Mahoney. She was born July 8, 1899 at Guthrie, Oklahoma Territory to John Bailey Mahoney and Su­san Rebecca Harrellson Mahoney. She died January 10, 1919 at Maud, Oklahoma. Brown Henry Douglas died June 18, 1951 at Chattanooga, Tennessee.

Children born to them include:

Perdema Pearl Douglas born January 10, 1919

Perdema Pearl Douglas, daughter of Brown Henry Douglas and Emma Perdema Mahoney Douglas, was born January 10, 1919 at Maude. She was married July 17, 1935 at Konawa, Oklahoma to Thomas Kenneth Gibson. He was born October 30, 1915 at Purdy, Arkansas to William Roy Gibson and Mat­tie Ethel Baker Gibson. Thomas Kenneth Gibson died June 20, 1975 at Lakewood, Colorado. Perdema Pearl Douglas Gibson died September 27, 1983 at Tulsa.

Children born to them include:

Kenny Ann Gibson born September 19, 1936

Kenny Ann Gibson, daughter of Thomas Kenneth Gibson and Perdema Pearl Douglas Gibson, was born September 19, 1936 at Konawa. She was married June 4, 1954 at Tulsa to Dearl Logan Wood. They continued there in 1991 and 1997.

Adjoining the household of “Thomas Gowen” was that of “John Gowen, mulatto” as the head of Household 145-146. This family, also living at Woodbury, Civil District 6, on July 8, 1870, was recorded as:

“Gowen, John 35, born in TN, farmer,
mulatto, illiterate,
Casander 26, born in TN, illiterate
William L. 5, born in TN
Arlander 3, born in TN
James M. 1, born in TN”

Adjoining the household of “John Gowen, mulatto” was the household headed by Carter Gowen, mulatto”. The family was identified as household 144-145 and was recorded July 8, 1870 in Civil District 6 in Woodbury as:

“Gowen, Carter 26, born in TN, farmer, illit­
erate, mulatto
Elizabeth 17, born in TN, illiterate
Elizabeth 55, born in TN, illiterate
Nancy 25, born in TN, illiterate
Henry 13, born in TN”

It is assumed that Elizabeth Gowen, age 55, was the mother of Carter Gowen and that Nancy Gowen was his sister and Henry Gowen his brother.
==O==
Price Goins was enumerated as the head of Household 1293-1293 in the 1850 census of Hamilton County. The family was recorded October 26, 1850 as:

“Goins, Price 41, born in TN, farmer, $500
real estate
Martha 40, born in TN, illiterate
Andrew 16, born in TN
Rachel 14, born in TN
Joseph 13, born in TN
Preston 9, born in TN
Priscilla 7, born in TN
Thomas 3, born in TN
Mary 1, born in TN”
==O==
Mrs. Annie Lee Baker Gowan, daughter of John Baker was born August 31, 1899 in Tennessee. She was married about 1919 to E. V. Gowan. In 1931 they lived at 900 Highland Park Avenue in Chattanooga. She died there November 1, 1931, at age 32 of cancer, according to Tennessee DVS Death Certificate No. 21105. She was buried at Jackson, Tennessee November 4, 1931, according to her husband, certificate informant.
==O==
Edward Gowan, a machinist, boarded at 216 Whiteside, Chattanooga, according to the 1885 city directory. Edward continued working as a machinist for Lookout Iron Co. while boarding at 208 Whiteside, Chatanooga, in 1890 and 1891 according to Chattanooga city directories.
==O==
Thomas Gowan, a boilermaker for Casey and Hedges Manufacturing Co., boarded at 25 W Hooke, Chattanooga, Tennessee in 1890 and 1891 according to Chattanooga city directories.
==O==
William Gowan was enumerated as the head of a household in the 1900 census of Hamilton County, Enumeration District 58, page 3, living at 111 Fannin Street, Chattanooga:

“Gowan, William 53, born in TN, October 1846
Emma 47, born in TN, July 1852
Herman 23, born in TN, July 1876”
==O==
O. D. Gowans, an engineer for Woodworth & Company, lived at the corner of River and Hill Streets in 1881, ac­cording to the Chattanooga city directory.
==O==
Alfred Gowen was enumerated in the 1860 census of Hamilton County, Civil District 10, living in the household of Aaron Fuller, No. 1398-1400.
==O==
Lucinda Gowen was enumerated as the head of a household in the 1860 census of Hamilton County, Civil District 8, Household No. 122-122:

“Gowen, Lucinda 43, born in TN, housewife
Martha 6, born in TN”
==O==
Madison Gowen was enumerated as the head of a household in the 1860 census of Hamilton County. The household was reported as:

“Madison, Gowen 23, born in TN
Mary 19, born in TN”
==O==
Nathan Gowen was enumerated as the head of a household in the 1860 census of Hamilton County. The household was reported as:

“Gowen, Nathan 37, born in TN
Mary 26, born in TN
Robert 9, born in TN
Riley 3, born in TN”
==O==
Addie Gowens, a laundress, boarded at 15 Posey’s row, rear, Chattanooga in 1890 and 1891 according to Chattanooga city directories.
==O==
Martin Gowens appeared as the head of a household in the 1850 census, Household 1165, page 902, of Hamilton County. The family was listed as:

“Gowens, Martin 33, born in TN, farmer, illiterate
Amanda 28, born in TN, illiterate
Anderson 12, born in TN
Lawson 10, born in TN
Malinda 7, born in TN
James 4, born in TN
Taylor 2, born in TN”
==O==
“G. A. Gowen was enumerated as the head of a household in the 1860 census of Hamilton County. He was born about 1822 in North Carolina of parents unknown. The family was listed as:

“Gowen, G. A. 38, born in North Carolina, school
teacher, $4,000 real estate
Elizabeth 32, born in TN
Mary 6, born in TN
Sarah 2, born in TN”

Col. George A. Gowin was the commanding officer of the Sixth Tennessee Mounted Infantry Regiment, U.S.A. which was organized in Hamilton County October 24, 1864.

Flora Newby wrote:

“The first mention of the regiment in War Department records was dated November 30th,1864, when Gen. Steedman, with the major portion of his command,was preparing to join Maj-Gen. George H. Thomas for the defense of Nashville against Gen. Hood’s invasion. On this date, Lt-Col. Gowin was ordered to send 130 men at daybreak on December 1st to Cleveland, Tennessee, where they were to report to Col. Boughton, commanding the post.
No further mention of the regiment was found until January 21, 1865, when Gen. Steedman, back at Chattanooga, reported he had sent Gowin’s 6th Tennessee Mounted Infantry Regiment toward Somerville, Georgia,via Lafeyette. On February 2nd, at Ringgold, Georgia, Col. Gowin reported that on the previous night, he had attacked the guerilla leader, Gatewood, with 75 men in McLemore’s Cove, killing 14, and routing the remainder with the loss of most of their horses and arms.

On March 11,1865, the regiment was directed to report to Maj-Gen. Steedman,Commanding District of Etowah. In April, 80 men,under Maj. Bean, were reported as part of an expedition to Dalton, Georgia and Spring Place, Georgia, and to the Coosawattie River, lasting from April 1st-4th, in the course of which there were several skirmishes with guerillas.

Brownlow’s report states the regiment was placed under Brig-Gen. H. M. Judah, commanding First Brigade, 2nd Division, with headquarters at Decatur about the last of March, where it was employed in scouting until the surrender of the Confederate Army at Greensboro, N.C. Then it moved to Resaca, Georgia, where its men were employed as couriers along the railroad to Atlanta. On June 18th, 1865, the regiment was ordered to Nashville.”

Gen. Steedman already had concluded that Col. Gowin’s regiment was an ineffective cavalry unit. The General viewed “Gowin and his hogback cavalry” with contempt. It was composed of turncoat rebels who conveniently appeared as Union sympathizers in his eyes.

An incident in the closing days of the Civil War confirmed Gen. Steedman’s opinion of the Sixth Cavalry, U.S.A.

Some young women of Rhea County, Tennessee had organized themselves into a military unit called the Ray County Spartans.

The Rhea County Girls’ Company was created in the summer of 1862 through a combination of boredom and the desire to be a part of the war for Southern independence. Almost all of the “sidesaddle soldiers” had fathers or brothers in the Confederate military, and the young ladies evidently felt frustrated because their gender prevented them from enlisting. Since they could not actually join the Confederate Army, they did the next best thing: They created an army of their own.
Rhea County, located on the northern bank of the Tennessee River in Eeast Tennessee was one of the most pro-Confederate counties in the politically divided mountain region. The county provided seven companies for the Southern army against only one for the Union.

Mary McDonald, one of the oldest of the group, was duly elected captain. Caroline McDonald, evidently her sister-in-law, became first lieutenant. Anne Paine was picked for second lieutenant, while Rhoda Tennessee Thomison, daughter of William P. Thomison completed the commissioned list as a third lieutenant.

Named as noncommissioned officers were Jane Keith, first sergeant; Rachel Howard, second sergeant; Sallie Mitchell, third sergeant; and Minerva Tucker, fourth sergeant. The remaining members of the company had to be content with the rank of private. These included Barbare Allen, Josephine Allen, Martha Bell, Mary Crawford, Kate Dunwoody, Martha Early, Ann Gillespie, Jennie Hoyal, Kate Hoyal, Maggie Keith, Jane Locke, Louisa McDonald, Mary Ann McDobnald, Sidney McDonald, Mary Paine, Mary Robinson, Sarah Rudd and Margaret Sykes. All the young women came from prominent local families, and the average age was 18.

At first the Rhea County Spartans contented themselves with simply visiting their soldier sweethearts and relatives among the three companies stationed in the area, presenting them with gifts of food and clothing. In mid-1863, however, Union troops entered the area. The lady soldiers continued to hold clandestine meetings, if only to keep up their spirits and to exchange news of the war. Rural churches in the Washington area were their most common rendezvous. Almost certainly, the ladies must have engaged in at least a small amount of spying and information-gathering for the Confederate army.

Capt. John P. Walker and Lt. William Gothard of Gowin’s command, with the colonel’s approval, took it upon themselves to arrest the Rhea County Spartans as prisoners of war to teach them a lesson.

After Confederate General John Bell Hood led the Army of Tennessee to disaster at the Battle of Nashville in December 1864, Union troops gained uncontested control of Rhea County for the remainder of the war. Among the units active in the region was the 6th Tennessee Mounted Infantry [Federal]. Formed in Chattanooga in October 1864 to serve one year, the 6th Mounted Infantry was a ragtag regiment composed of a few genuine Tennessee Unionists combined with an unsavory assortment of Confederate draft dodgers and deserters. Its primary purpose was to combat the small band of Confederate irregulars who still roamed the Cumberland Mountains of east Tennessee and north Georgia. In the spring of 1865, Captain John P. Walker of Company B decided that the Rhea County Girls’ Company was just such an organization.
While the Spartans never had any official connection with either the Confederate Army or the state of Tennessee – Sixteen “sidesaddle soldiers” of the Rhea County Spartans cavalry company were “captured” in the Spring of 1865. In part to “teach them a lesson,” they were forced [while Union horse soldiers rode] to tramp along on a long march to the Tennessee River and Bell’s landing. It was dark and rainy, and the women frequently stumbled through puddles. Clammy mud oozed into their shoes. Their transportation arrived – a crude little steamboat called USS “Chattanooga,” one of the first of a series of vessels built by the Union Army at Bridgeport, Alabama, to supply the besieged Union garrison at Chattanooga. Armed guards guarded the “prisoners of war,” and they were forced to sleep on the floor although were not mistreated. Upon their arrival in Chattanooga, the decision was made to feed them send them back home. When the Spartans arrived back home in Rhea County, the war was nearly over, and they soon returned to the conventional role of 19th-century women

Captain Seth B. Moe of Ohio, assistant adjutant general of the Union Army’s Department of the Etowah, took in the spectacle and promptly sent for his commander, Maj. Gen. James B. Steedman. Steedman already viewed Gowin and his “hogback cavalry” with contempt; Walker’s latest escapade must have strengthened that feeling.

By the time William G. Allen wrote an account for “Confederate Veteran” magazine in 1911, the girl’s company had been all but forgotten. Only three of the Spartans were then still living: Mary McDonald, Mary Ann McDonald and Rhoda Thomison.

Gothard and his mounted men did escort seven of the female Rebels five miles from the Thomison house to Smith’s Cross Roads, transportation arrived–a crude little steamboat called USS Chattanooga. Their ordeal, however, was far from over.

When the boat paddled up to the wharf in Chattanooga, Walker rousted out his prisoners and marched them under guard up muddy Market Street to the provost marshal’s office on the corner of Seventh Street. Captain Seth B. Moe of Ohio, assistant adjutant general of the Union Army’s Department of the Etowah, took in the spectacle and promptly sent for his commander, Maj. Gen. James B. Steedman. Steedman already viewed Gowin and his “hogback cavalry” with contempt; Walker’s latest escapade must have strengthened that feeling.

If Walker expected to be congratulated on his victory, he was quickly disillusioned. Steedman sharply reprimanded the captain for taking up his time with such foolishness. He then ordered Moe to escort the ladies to the Central House hotel, where they were allowed to refresh themselves and were treated to the best meal the hotel could offer. While the Union general (a Northern Democrat with many Southern friends) went out of his way to demonstrate that not all Yankees were barbarians, he did require the women to take the oath of allegiance to the Union. Now Walker would have no further excuse to harass them.

An irritated Steedman wrote to Maj. Gen. George H. Thomas at Nashville recommending that the 6th Tennessee Mounted Infantry “be turned over to the State authorities of Tennessee and replaced with good cavalry.” Union Colonel Lewis Merrill was even more blunt. “The Sixth Tennessee and First Georgia [Union Regiments],” Merrill told Thomas, “are, in General Steedman’s opinion, utterly worthless. My own observation of the first named confirms this opinion. They are simply cowardly thieves–useless, except to keep a community embroiled and encourage guerrillas by running whenever attacked.”

.

Walker, a 38-year-old Rhea County farmer, was a typical Tennessee Unionist. Even though he owned real estate worth an impressive $1,000, Walker was “land poor.” In fact, the 1860 census listed his personal estate at a mere $180–scarcely more than the value of a top-quality horse. Dodging the Confederate conscript officers until the Union forces gained the upper hand, Walker hastened to join the Union victors and share in the spoils. He quickly acquired a reputation for harshness toward Southern sympathizers, using his authority to pay them back for such indignities as he felt he had suffered.

Walker certainly justified his reputation when he returned to Rhea County, for one of his first acts was to order the mass arrest of the girls’ company. As far as Walker was concerned, it was high time to teach the rebellious Southern ladies a lesson. Somehow he persuaded his commander, Lt. Col. George A. Gowin of Hamilton County, to go along with his plan.

On April 5, 1865, Walker sent out his men to round up the Rhea County Spartans. As a native of Rhea County, Walker knew not only who the troublesome ladies were but also where to find them. First Lieutenant William B. Gothard accordingly proceeded to the area south of Washington, where the Spartans’ officers lived.

Armed with a list of names, Gothard was ordered to arrest the women and report with them by noon the next day at the two-story house of William P. Thomison, a discharged Confederate soldier and the father of “Lieutenant” Rhoda Thomison. Other men from Walker’s company marched to apprehend the disloyal women in the countryside around Smith’s Cross Roads (now the town of Dayton) and Dunwoody’s Mill. A few of the Spartans managed to elude their pursuers, but some 16 of the young women were arrested at gunpoint and brought before Walker.

When they learned that they were to be sent to Chattanooga, the prisoners became understandably apprehensive. Mary McDonald penned a hasty note to the 6th Tennessee’s commander. She urged that Gothard, rather than Walker, be the one to accompany them. “Doubtless the girls would prefer him,” she said. “We all know him.” Gowin refused to agree, however, writing that Walker, “a married man, will go with your company.” Interestingly, the 6th Tennessee seems to have been alone in viewing the Spartans as a real military unit. It was an honor the unfortunate ladies could have done without.

> Page 1, 2, 3

This article was written by Charles Rice and originally published in America’s Civil War Magazine in July 1996.

The regiment was mustered out of service at Nashville, Tennessee June 30, 1865, according to “Goodspeed’s History of Tennessee.” “G. A. Gowin” was nominated on the Republican ticket for congressman from the Third District of Hamilton County August 17, 1880 at Chattanooga, according to “Goodspeed’s History of Tennessee” published in 1887.

T. R. Williams, Jr. of Chattanooga wrote in October 1990:

“I am seeking information on Col. George A. Gowin who was born in NC about 1827. He came to Hamilton County, Tennessee about 1852 and was married there November 24, 1852 to Elizabeth McGill, daughter of John McGill and Elizabeth Patterson McGill. The Gowins had six children, two of whom died in infancy. He is believed to have taught at Fairmount Academy on Walden’s Ridge before the War Between the States. In the 1860 census he was shown as “school teacher;” in 1870 he was recorded as “physician.”

During the war he fought with the Union Army in the Sixth Tennessee Mounted Infantry, U.S.A. [commanding officer] and afterwards was active in Hamilton County politics [nominated for Congress in 1880.]

He established the “Unconditional,” a newspaper in Harrison, TN and was once editor of a weekly newspaper, the “Monitor.” He lived in Daisy, Tennessee in his later years where he practiced medicine and was a Methodist minister. His death date is unknown, but it was between August 1881 and October 1883. George and Elizabeth Gowin, along with two infant daughters are buried in Soddy, Tennessee Presbyterian Cemetery. There is a government headstone for Gowin, but it contains no dates. One of my objectives is to discover his date of death so that I can mark his grave appropriately. Also I am interested in the Gowin family’s connection to the Melungeons and hope that a Foundation member can assist me. T. R. Williams, Jr, 6400 Middle Ridge Lane, Chattanooga, TN, 37343. 615/842-7285”
==O==
Namen I. Gowin was dismissed from Friendship Baptist Church by letter about 1868, according to the church records.
==O==
Nancy J. Gowin was received into Friendship Baptist Church “by letter” in December 1867, according to the records of the Hamilton County congregation.
==O==
Sallie Gowin was married to R. S. Coleman in 1880, according to Hamilton County marriage records.
==O==
William Gowin was received as a member of Friendship Baptist Church, Hamilton County, in October 1859, according to the church records. The record further reports that in October 1865 “he recanted his sins.” In November 1866 the church charged William Gowin with “drinking too much liquor,” and in December 1866 he was “excluded from the church.”
==O==
Eliza Gowins was enumerated as the head of a household in the 1850 census of Hamilton County, Household 758, page 844, Civil District 27. The family, recorded October 4, 1850 was reported as:

“Gowins, Eliza 35, born in TN, illiterate
Lawrilla 20, born in TN
Mary 14, born in TN
Charles 9, born in TN
Sarah 10/12, born in TN”

Descendant Researchers:

Vicki Goins Brannock, 4111 82nd St, Sacramento, CA, 95826, 916/428-2196
Louise Goins Richardson, 2207 E. Lake Street, Paragould, AR, 72450
T. R. Williams, Jr, 6400 Middle Ridge Lane, Chattanooga, TN, 37343, 615/842-
7285.
Kenny Ann Gibson Wood, 8718 S. 68th E. Avenue, Tulsa, OK, 918/481-1661

HANCOCK COUNTY, TENNESSEE

Hancock County, from its creation from Hawkins County and Claiborne County in 1844 has been the home of a number of Melungeon families. With its settlement on Newman’s Ridge is has become the most famous Melungeon center.

Anthony P. Cavender writing in “The Tennessee Anthropologist,” Volume 6, No. 1 stated:

“The anomalous physical appearance of the Melun­geons, notably their dark, tawny skin color, has stimulated numerous theories concerning their origin. It has been suggested by various observers that the Melungeons are the descendants of either Phoenician explorers, one of the “lost” tribes of Israel, gypsies, pre-Columbian Welsh explorers, Sir Walter Raleigh’s “lost” colony, or a group of shipwrecked Portuguese settlers. The very term “Melungeon” is shrouded in mystery as well.
It has been reported as being derived from the French “melange,” meaning “mixed”; from the Portuguese “melango,” meaning “shipmate”; or from the Greek “melan,” meaning “colored.” Scientific inquiries clearly show the origin of the Melungeons to be not as mystifying as the above mentioned theories suggest. Pollitzer and Brown’s [1969] genetic study of the Melungeons in Hancock County supports the theory that they, like the 200 mixed racial populations identified in the eastern United States, are the product of admixture between Indians, European Whites and Negroes.
On the basis of a thorough analysis of census records and other archival materials, Price (l95l) concludes that the ancestors of the Melungeons were persons of “free color” who migrated to Hancock County from the Piedmont area of Virginia and North Carolina during the late 1700’s and early 1800’s. Some of the traditional Melungeon surnames [Bell, Collins, Goins, Gibson, and Mullins] figure prominently in the early settlement of Hancock County. Vardy Collins, for example, is believed to be the first to settle in the Newman’s Ridge area, having moved from Virginia in 1779 or 17BO. Other early Melungeon settlers include Tyra Gibson, James Collins, and Solomon Collins. These men were recipients of land grants for their service in the Revolutionary War. Another early settler, George Goins, was granted a tract of land in Hancock County by the state of Kentucky. George Goins was the son of Joseph Goins, a Revolutionary War land grant recipient from North Carolina. Joseph Goins may be related to, or one of, the three Goins listed in Colonial records as having served in a mulatto military unit in 1754 [Grohse 1979].

In Hancock County the Melungeons settled along Blackwater and Big Sycamore creeks and on Newman’s Ridge. Because of the shortage of large tracts of flat, fertile land in these areas, the Melungeons were able to do little more than practice a rudimentary form of subsistence agriculture. Through time the terms “Melungeon” and “poverty” became synonomous with the Whites in the county. Their situation was made all the worse due to the White’s disdain of their Negro ancestry. Population pressure, limitations of the physical environment, and social ostracism induced many Melungeons to migrate. In the 1880’s, some migrated to southwest Virginia to work in the coal mines, others moved to South Carolina to find employment in the cotton mills. Those who decided to remain in the county turned to alternative measures such as moonshining to improve their economic status. Some of the better known folk tales about Melungeons in Hancock County concern the moonshining exploits of Big Mehala Mullins, who supposedly made the best ‘shine’ in east Tennessee in the late 1800’s.

Hancock County has experienced a steady decline in population since 1910. Between 1940 and 1970 over 2,300 people left the county for such cities as Baltimore, Washington and Detroit, according to the U.S. Department of Commerce. No doubt many Melungeons moved to cities, but some moved to other localities in Tennessee. A merchant in Sneedville sarcastically commented that several Melungeons recently moved to the Back Valley area so they could be ‘closer to the welfare office’ in Sneedville.

Social engineering efforts of the Presbyterian Church’s Board of Home Missions were somewhat effective in elevating the Melungeons. In 1882 Presbyterian missionaries established a settlement school in the Vardy community. The “target group” of the Presbyterians’ benevolent work were the illiterate poor. The school recruited students from Newman’s Ridge, Blackwater, and Big Sycamore Creek, which, as previously mentioned, were Melungeon communities. The settlement school, which operated until 1959, accomplished what the local one room school house could not, or did not want to do, by providing the very poor with the skills and knowledge necessary to participate in “mainstream” American society. Some of the Melungeons who successfully completed the academic program at the settlement school were sent hy the Board of Home Missions to Presbyterian colleges in North Carolina and Kentucky. After finishing college, many of the Melungeons returned to Hancock County and ohtained employment in teaching, government, and business. Of course, some left never to return.

Over the last three decades the Melungeons have been a “hot” topic for journalists in both the northern and southern parts of the United States. As a result of this exposure, people from all over the country descended upon Hancock County to see the “mysterious” Melungeons. It became apparent to members of Sneedville’s elite [merchants, educators, and well-to-do farmers] that the Melungeons had put the county on the map. More importantly, the Melungeons were bringing money into the third most impoverished county in the state based on mean effective buying income per household, according to Tennessee Education Association. While some people were complaining about the intrusion of “outsiders,” the elite conceived of a way to maximize the commercialization of the strong and growing interest in Melungeons.

Sometime during the mid 1960s, they commissioned Dr. Kermit Hunter of Southern Methodist University to write a play about the Melungeon legend, and they built an ouldoor theater in which to perform it. In terms of basic plot, the play, ‘Walk Toward the Sunset’ is a sentimental love story about an ‘outsider,’ a lumher agent, who falls in love with a Melungeon girl. More importantly, however, the play addresses the racist attitude toward Melungeons with candor and sympathy.

The first performance of the play occurred in 1969. Initially, the play was a great success. The sympathetic treatment of Melungeons in the play and the increasing tourist interest in these ‘mysterious people’ brought about a negative to positive transformation in the identity. A Melungeon was now a good thing to be. During its peak in popularity, tourists came from virtually every state east of the Mississippi. They were greeted graciously by the sheriff and his deputies who wore, as they still do, patches on their arms inscribed with ‘”Hancock County, Home of the Melungeons.’”

The Melungeons attracted the attention of a northern magazine, “Littell’s Living Age” which reported on them in its edition of March 1848, No. 254-31. The magazine article was a reprint from a “southern newspaper.” The newspaper was not identified but, Kevin Mullins, a reporter of Knoxville, Tennessee has concluded that the newspaper was “The Knoxville Register.”

“The Melungens:

[We are sorry to have lost the name of the southern newspaper from which this is taken.]

We give today another amusing and characteristic sketch from a letter of our intelligent and sprightly correspondent, sojourning at present in one of the seldom-visited nooks hid away in our mountains. You must know that within some ten miles of this owl’s nest, there is a watering-place, known hereabouts as “Blackwater Springs.” It is situated in a narrow gorge, scarcely one half a mile wide, between Powell’s Mountain and the Copper Ridge, and is, as you may suppose, almost inaccessible. A hundred men could defend the pass against even a Xerxian army. Now this gorge and the tops and sides of the adjoining mountains are inhabited by a singular species of the human animal called Melungens.

The legend of their history, which they carefully preserve, is this. A great many years ago, these mountains were settled by a society of Portugese adventurers, men and women–who came from the long shore parts of Virginia, that they may be freed from the restraints and drawbacks imposed upon them by any form of government. These people made themselves friendly with Indians, and freed, as they were, from any kind of social government, they uprooted all conventional forms of society, and lived in a delightful Utopia of their own creation, trampling upon the marriage relation, despising all forms of religion, and subsisting on corn [the only possible product of the soil] and the game of the woods. These intermixed with the Indians, and subse­quently their descendants [after the first advances of the whites into this part of the state] with the negroes and the whites, thus forming the present race of Melungens. They are tall, straight, well-formed people, of a dark copper color, with Circassian features, but wooly heads and similar appendages of our negro. They are priviledged voters in the state in which they live, and thus, you will percieve, are accredited citizens of the commonwealth. They are brave, but quarrelsome; and are hospitable and generous to strangers. They have no preachers among them, and are almost without knowledge of a Supreme Being. They are married by the established forms, but husband and wife separate at pleasure, without meeting with any reproach or disgrace from their friends. They are remarkably unchaste, and want of chastity on the part of the females is no bar to their marrying. They have but little association with their neighbors, carefully preserving their identity as a race, or class, or whatever you may call it; and are in every respect, save that they are under the state government, a separate and distinct people. Now this is no traveller’s story. They are really what I tell you, without abating or setting down aught in malice.

They are behind their neighbors in the arts. They use oxen instead of horses in their agricultural attempts, and their implements of husbandry are chiefly made by themselves of wood. They are, without exception, poor and ignorant, but apparently happy.

Having thus given you a correct geographical and scientific history of the people, I will proceed with my own adventures. The doctor was, as usual, my compagnon de voyage, and we stopped at ‘Old Vardy’s’, the hostelrie of the vicinage. Old Vardy is the “chief cook and bottle-washer” of the Melungens, and is really a very clever fellow; but his hotel savors strongly of that peculiar perfume that one may find in the sleeping-rooms of our negro servants, especially on a close, warm, summer’s evening. We arrived at Vardy’s in time for supper, and, that dispatched, we went to the spring, where were assembled several rude log huts, and a small sprinkling of ‘the natives,” together with a fiddle and other preparations for a dance. Shoes, stockings, and coats were unknown luxuries among them–at least we saw them not.

The dance was engaged in with the right hearty good will, and would have put to the blush the tame steppings of our beaux. Among the participants was a very tall, raw-boned damsel, with her two garments flutttering readily in the amorous night breeze, whose black eyes were lit up with an unusual fire, either from repeated visits to the nearest hut, behind the door of which was placed an open-mouthed stone jar of new-made corn whiskey, and in which was a gourd, with a “deuce a bit” of sugar at all, and no water nearer than the spring. Nearest her on the right was a lank, lantern-jawed, high-cheeked, long-legged fellow, who seemed similarly elevated. Now these two, Jord Bilson [that was he], and Syl Varmin [that was she], were destined to afford the amusement of the evening; for Jord, in cutting the pigeon-wing, chanced to light from one of his aerial flights right upon the ponderous pedal appendage of Syl, a compliment which this amiable lady seemed in no way disposed to accept kindly.

‘Jord Bilson,’ said the tender Syl, ‘I’ll thank you to keep your darned hoofs off my feet.’

‘Oh, Jord’s feet are so tarnal big he can’t manage ’em all by hisself,’ suggested some pacificator near by. ‘He’ll have to keep ’em off me,’ suggested Syl, ‘or I’ll shorten ’em for him.’

‘Now look here, Syl Varmin,’ answered Jord, somewhat nettled at both remarks, ‘I didn’t go to tread on your feet, but I don’t want you to be cutting up any rusties about. You’re nothing but a cross-grained critter, anyhow.’

‘And you’re a darned Melungen.’

‘Well, if I am, I ain’t no nigger-Melungen, anyhow–I’m Indian-Melungen, and that is more ‘an you is.’

‘See here, Jord,’ said Syl, now highly nettled, ‘I’ll give you a dollar ef you’ll go out on the grass and right it out.’

Jord smiled faintly and demurred, adding ‘Go home, Syl, and look under your puncheons and see if you can’t fill a bed outen the hair of them hogs you stole from Vardy.’

‘And you go to Sow’s Cave, Jord Bilson, ef it comes to that, and see how many shucks you got offen that corn you tuck from Pete Jomen. Will you take the dollar?’

Jord now seemed about to consent, and Syl reduced the premium by one half, and finally came down to a quarter, and then Jord began to offer a quarter, a half and finally a dollar; but Syl’s prudence equalled his, and seeing that neither was likely to accept, we return to our hotel, and were informed by Old Vardy that the sight we had just witnessed was no ‘onusual one.’ The boys and gals was jist having a little fun’.

And so it proved, for about midnight we were wakened by a loud noise of contending parties in fierce combat, and, rising and looking out from the chinks of our hut, we saw the whole party engaged in a grand melee; rising above the din of all which, was the harsh voice of Syl Varmin, calling out–

“Stand back here, Sal Frazer, and let me do the rest of the beaten of Jord Bilson; I hain’t forgot his hoofs yit’.

The melee closed, and we retired again, and by breakfast next morning all hands were reconciled, and the stone jar was replenished out of mutual pocket, and peace and quiet ruled where so lately all had been recriminations and blows.

After breakfast, just such as the supper had been at old Jack’s, save only that here we had a table, we started for Clinch River for a day’s fishing, where other and yet more amusing incidents awaited us. But as I have dwelt upon this early part of the journey longer than I intended, you must wait until the next letter for the concluding incidents.’

The following is taken from “Life Magazine,” June 26, 1970

The mystery of Newman’s Ridge
by John Fetterman

Mr. Fetterman is a journalist and author specializing in Appalachia.

“When the cold season comes, the wind bites and howls along Newman’s Ridge in east Tennessee, nudging the snow across silent, ancient graveyards and against sturdy cabins fashioned from monstrous hand-hewn poplar logs. Only the wind knows the origin of the dark-complexioned and handsome people who settled on the ridge, some say hundreds of years before Columbus found the New World, and the wind will not tell.

And so the swarms of historians, anthropologists, researchers and writers come here hoping to unravel the mystery, only to leave frustrated.

The ridge people are called Melungeons. One is Claude Collins, 35, a director of libraries for the Hancock County school board. Claude frequently walks the lonely paths atop Newman’s Ridge where he was born. On such a stroll, he turned to me and demanded: “Look at me. Do I look any different to you? Where do you think my people came from?”

The questions are old ones in east Tennessee and probably will never be answered. They are asked by all the Melungeons. Miss Martha Collins, who is president of Sneedville’s only bank; Corinne Bowlin, a college student; Monroe Collins, a dirt farmer. One can only repeat the legend.

The handsome Melungeons, with their dark eyes and finely chiseled features, whether they live on the ridge or have moved to the foot of it in the county seat town of Sneedville, speak fondly of their years upon the lonely, misty height.

Graying, neat and vibrant at 74, Miss Collins relaxes in her leather chair at the bank and recalls the frustrations of the local law enforcement officials who tried vainly for years to arrest the ridge’s whisky saleswoman, Aunt Mahala Mullins. All attempts to bring Aunt Mahala to justice failed because she weighed in excess of 400 pounds and could not pass through her cabin door.

“Everyone was very fond of Aunt Mahala,” Miss Collins said. “When she died they took away a part of a wall, wrapped her in quilts and gently rolled her down the hill to be buried.”

The Melungeons have always insisted that they are Portuguese, and their legend insists that they are descendants of those skilled seamen who sailed out of the western Mediterranean under Phoenician aegis to the New World, perhaps 2,000 years before Columbus.

Many scholars, notably Dr, Cyrus Gordon, Brandeis University’s noted Mediterranean researcher, do not lightly dismiss the Melungeon legend. There is much evidence of pre-Columbian transatlantic contacts. White gods with black beards came from the east and introduced the arts of metallurgy, irrigation, weaving, counting and writing throughout Central and South America. The Aztecs called the god Quetzalcoatle to the Mayas he was Kukulcan, to the Incas Viracocha. Indians in Georgia observed a harvest festival strikingly like the Biblical Feast of tabernacles. In east Tennessee the fair-haired, fair-skined Anglo-Saxon pioneers and hunters looked upon the dark people who lived on Newman’s Ridge with distrust.

The Melungeons do not have the copper skin, black eyes or beardless faces of the Cherokee, nor do they have the features of the Negro.

After talking with them and watching them one can only reaffirm the historic and somehow unsatisfactory appraisal: Melungeons look “Mediterranean.” Only the Melungeons. of all the people in the remote rocky foIds of Appalachia, have forgotten their own history. Elsewhere in the mountains, you are told proudly, My grandmother walked in from Carolina,” or “my kin was hunters from Virginny.” Not so with the Melungeons. Seventy-two year-old Ellis Stewart has lived all his life on the ridge. He scratches the stubble on his chin and answers, “I guess the folks up here been here just ’bout forever.

Some’s gone now. Where they came from I’ll never know. But someday they’ll come back up here like squirrels.”

It is a brave prophecy. Many of the Melungeons, like mountain people elsewhere, are today fleeing the poverty of the hills and seeking jobs in the cities to the north.

Others, like Claude Collins and Miss Martha Collins, have become successful in the limited economy of Sneedville. Corinne Bowlin—quiet, darkhaired and now a student at Vanderbilt University in Nashville, is a puzzled child of the legend. “I’ve been fascinated by the Melungeon legend all my life.” she said.

“Bowlin, you know, is a Melungeon name.” She speaks wearily of the researchers –some scientific and some just curious, who come to Hancock County to poke through the tiny graveyards and prowl the abandoned houses on the ridge. “They come in and take skull measurements and blood samples and make skin pigmentation studies and they never get any answers,” Miss Bowlin said.

One man who has sought the answers is Henry R. Price, an attorney and a meticulous historian who lives in nearby Rogersville, Tennessee. Price has traced the Melungeon immigration back through the lush valleys of southern Virginia and North Carolina, the valleys which were to become the eastern reaches of the Wilderness Road, the route of Daniel Boone and the great migration to the West. But the trail ends at the sea.

The sheriff of Fincastle County, Virginia was looking for Daniel Boone in 1770s, according to Jack Goins of Rogersville, Tennessee. He was wanted for a bad debt, the sheriff wrote on the warrant “Gone to Kentucky–cannot be served.” The warrant and the old records of Fincastle County are now found in the courthouse at Christiansburgh, Virginia, county seat for Montgomery County, Virginia.

Earliest records, Price found, referred to people along the valley trails who were called, “other free persons of color.” They bore the Melungeon names which appear on Newman’s Ridge:

Collins, Mullins, Brogan, Goins, Gibson, Bowlin. They were free of the restrictive legislation aimed at slaves and former slaves during the 1700s and 1800s. Furthermore, the Melungeons of that period were voting, paying taxes, acquiring land, making wills, owning slaves, securing marriage licenses and suing. They were successful farmers, whisky makers and traders, and even produced their own gold coins.

Miss Collins recalls that her grandfather once bought a farm on the ridge and produced $700 in gold from his pocket to pay for it.

Historians have said that the word “Melungeon” may be derived from the AfroPortuguese melungo, meaning “ship-mate.” And that Melungeon names, Brogan, Goins, Collins MulIins, now so English-sounding, may be traced back to the Portuguese Braganza, Magoens, Colinso and Mollen. [A few names are shared by many families.]

Claude Collins was walking slowly along the ridge, his eyes on the now abandoned house where he was born and where he spent his boyhood.

It was a good life up here. We worked hard and our fields were clean.”

Walking along with him, hearing that familiar twang of the mountain man coming from that improbably swarthy face, I found myself going over, in my mind, the legendary course that brought that face, those dark eyes. that coal-black hair from some mediterranean shore to this ridge. To the east, a few hundred miles beyond the misty horizon that is North Carolina, lies Cape Hatteras, graveyard of ships. I pictured a great ship, such as the Phoenician’s used, long before Rome was built, to explore the African coast and what is now Britain.

It was easy to imagine one of those vessels, westborne on the trade winds, dashed onto Hatteras’ rocks, its timbers, hewn from cedars o’ Lebanon that grew near Sidon and Tvre, shattered. It was a century and a half before Christ, when the avenging Romans had destroyed the Phoenicians’ metropolis of Carthage and were threatening their colonies on the Iberian peninsula. I saw survivors of the ruptured ship, men and women. strugle ashore and head west across the flat piedmont, into the green valleys of the Great Smokies and finally southwest up the beautiful valley of the Clinch River to this lonely ridge. I even pictured their commander, a compact man with dark eyes and blackbeard. pointing to it and saying, “This will he our home.”

“When somebody was burned out we’d have an all-day working,” Collins was saying.” People would come in and build a new home in a day.”

“Yes,” I said. “It does sound like a good life.” I almost called him admiral.
==O==
Alex Goins was enumerated as the head of a household in the 1900 census of Hancock County, Enumeration District 71, page 12:

“Goins, Alex 24, born in TN, May 1876
America 20, born in TN, January 1880
==O==
Alva Goins died in Tazewell at age 68, according to his obitu­ary in “Monroe Evening News.”
==O==
Mrs. Elizabeth Goins/Gowen was a resident of Hancock County about 1900, according to Teresa A. Turner. She suggested that her divorced mother, Mrs. Maletha “Letha” Anderson, “age about 65” was living with her at that time. Elizabeth Goins/Gowen had a sister, Lena McPherson, wife of Robert Vastine McPherson.
==O==
Isaac Goins and his wife, Elizabeth Goins, were residents of Powell Valley, Tennessee, according to Hila Lawson Shelton Goins, a daughter-in-law.

Children born to Isaac Goins and Elizabeth Goins include:

Garfield Goins born June 7, 1880

Garfield Goins, son of Isaac Goins and Elizabeth Goins, was born in Hancock County June 7, 1880. He was married about 1900, wife’s name unknown. He was remarried about 1905 to Susan Perkins, daughter of Richard Perkins and Cynthia Perkins. His third marriage was to Mrs. Hila Lawson Shelton about 1918. He died in Whitley County, Kentucky November 18, 1952, according to a son, Ancil Goins.

Children born to Garfield Goins and his first wife include:

Mattie Rose Goins born about 1902
Arthur Goins born about 1903

Children born to Garfield Goins and Susan Perkins Goins include:

Frank Goins born in 1906
Ancil Goins born in 1908
Jesse C. Goins born in 1916

Children born to Garfield Goins and Hila Lawson Shelton Goins include:

A. C. Goins born about 1919
Ronnie Goins born about 1921
Steve Goins born about 1923
Sue Goins born about 1926
==O==
Ida Mae Goins who was born about 1895 was married about 1912 in Hancock County to John Henry Vaughan who was born about 1891, according to Sharon Robinson in a message dated August 10, 2000.
==O==
Lambert Goins and his wife, Birdie Miles Goins, are buried in Goin Cemetery in Hancock County, according to a descendant, Cathy Martin. She described Lambert Goins as a descendant of Alexander Goins.
==O==
John Goins and his wife, Sidney Goins were residents of Thornhill, Tennessee in 1900, according to the research of Tena M. Wooten. Later they removed to Tazewell, Tennessee. It is believed that Sidney Goins was born about 1866.

“Sidney Goins” died December 2, 1947 in nearby Clay County, Kentucky at the age of 81, according to Kentucky Death Records, Volume 52, Certificate No. 25942.

Children born to them include:

Rufus Goins born about 1887
Tip Goins born about 1889
Lundie Goins born about 1891
Esther Goins born about 1894
Grace Goins born about 1897
Liddie Manila Goins born about 1900

Liddie Manila Goins, daughter of John Goins and Sidney Goins, was born in 1900 in Thornton, Tennessee, according to Tena M. Wooten, a great-great-granddaughter. Liddie Goins was married about 1918 to William Columbus Morton who was born in Sneedville in 1876. He was a son of George Morton and Ellen Morton.

Children born to William Columbus Morton and Liddle Manila Goins Morton include:

Charles Morton born about 1920
Bonnie Morton born about 1922
Paul Morton born about 1925
Raymond Morton born about 1928
==O==
The obituary of Michael Goins was published in the “Knoxville News-Sentinel” March 5, 2003:
“Michael “Little Crow” Goins,” age 36, of Sneedville, passed away Sunday, March 2, 2003. He was a member of Liberty Missionary Baptist Church. He was preceded in death by his grandparents, Brownlow Goins and Cora Goins and Bill Swiney and Sarah Swiney.
His survivors include his children, Anthony Goins and Ashley Goins of Sneedville; his wife, Darlene Goins of Sneedville; his parents, Woodrow ‘Crow’ Goins and Gladys Goins of Sneedville; his sisters and brothers-in-law, Kathy Goins Dalton and Roger Dalton of Bean Station, Christie Goins Dyer and Darrell Dyer of Powder Springs, Kendra Goins Spradling and Travis Spradling of Bean Station.

The funeral services will be held at 2:00 p.m. Friday, March 7, 2003 at McNeil Funeral Home Chapel, Rev. Curtis Reed, Rev. Roger Dalton, Rev. Kyle Gregory, Jr. and Rev. Larry McNally officiating. Interment will be in the Goins Cemetery.”
==O==
Nelly Goins, age 74, was enumerated as the head of a household of one person in the 1880 census of Hancock County. She was white, a housekeeper, and was born about 1806 in North Carolina to parents who were also born in North Carolina.
==O==
Ramon Virgil Goins was born at Sneedville in 1933. He was married about 1953 to Vergie Mae Helton who was born in 1936 at Rogersville, Tennessee. In 1954 Ramon Virgil Goins, a welder’s helper in oilfield construction, and Vergie Mae Helton Goins, lived at Hermleigh, Texas.

Children born to Ramon Virgil Goins and Vergie Mae Helton Goins include:

Andry Ann Goins born February 14, 1954

Andry Ann Goins, first child of Ramon Virgil Goins and Vergie Mae Helton Goins was born February 14, 1954 at Lorraine, Texas according to Mitchell County Texas Birth Book 21, page 70.
==O==
Sarah “Sally” Goins was born about 1844 in Tennessee, possibly Hancock County, of parents unknown, according to Christine Royster. She was married about 1863 to John Wilburn who was born about 1841 to Lewis Wilburn and Mila Millicent Wilburn. A child was born to them about 1864.

John Wilburn was enumerated as the head of a household in the 1850 census of Hancock County. They removed to Greenup County, Kentucky where they were enumerated in the 1880 census. They were recorded in adjoining Carter County, Kentucky in 1900 and 1910.
==O==
Tom Goins who was born about 1878 was married about 1901 in Hancock County to Orlena Trent who was born about 1875, according to Sharon Robinson in a message dated August 10, 2000. Orlena Trent was the daughter of Wiley Trent, a carpenter of Trent Valley and Elizabeth Seal Trent. Children born to Tom Goins and Orlena Trent Goins are unknown.
==O==
Susan Gowen was born in Morristown, Tennessee [now in Hamben County, Tennesee] September 22, 1800 of parents unknown, according to the research of Pat Melton. When Susan Gowen died May 9, 1893, she was living in Macomb County, Illinois in the home of her son-in-law and daughter, Tolbert Jaggard and Susan “Fanny” Jaggard.
==O==
Sarah E. Gowens was born in 1866 in Hancock County, ac­cording to “Tennessee Confederate Widows and Their Families” abstracted by Edna Weifering. She was married there in 1889 to Solomon Gardner who was born in 1839 in Washington County, Tennessee. He died in 1917 in Hawkins County, Tennessee, and she applied for Confederate Widows Pension No. 10185.
==O==
Isaac Gowines was recorded as the head of Household 34-57 in the 1850 census of Hancock County:

“Gowines, Isaac 46, born in NC
Mary 35, born in KY
Taff, Melvina 19,
John 1,
Vannoy, William 21,”
==O==
Eliza Gowins was enumerated as the head of Household No. 83-64 in the 1850 census of Hancock County:

“Gowins, Eliza 33, born in Virginia
Sarah 56, born in Virginia”

HARDEMAN COUNTY, TENNESSEE

The 1850 and 1860 census returns of Hardeman County contained no Gowens [or spelling variations].
==O==
J. A. Goings, who was born December 27, 1872 and died March 17, 1925, was buried in New Hope Church of Christ Cemetery, in Hardeman County.
==O==
Hester Gowan, who was born in 1904, died April 1, 1929 at age 25 was buried in Union Cemetery located on East McNeal Street in Bolivar, Tennessee.
==O==
Luther Gowan who was born October 22, 1878 and died July 9, 1966 was buried in Grand Junction Cemetery, Grand Junction, Tennessee. His wife, Blanche S. Gowan, who was born February 16, 1881, died April 6, 1964, is buried beside him.
==O==
Jessie May Underhill, daughter of E. R. Underhill and Judy Ann Taylor, was born August 1, 1890 in Hamilton County, according to Linda Sharp. Later her family removed to Hardin County, Tennessee and lived near Pittsburg Landing. She was mentioned in the legal records of her father dated there in January 1925. It is believed that she was married about 1908, husband’s name Goins. Of Jessie May Underhill Goins nothing more is known.

HAWKINS COUNTY, TENNESSEE

Hawkins County was a center of Melungeon settlement in the early days of Tennessee. When Hancock County was formed with land from Hawkins County and Claiborne County a great number of Melungeon families wound up in the new county.

Most of the individual enumeration sheets of the census of 1820 of the state of Tennessee were destroyed by fire in Washington, D. C. Fragments of the census for only ten counties and recaps of others escaped the fire. No enumer­ation sheets were available for Hawkins County. Recap sheets showed 310 “free persons of color” in the 1820 census.

It is obvious that the census enumerator in 1830 had difficulty in deciding whether to list the seven Goen and Goin families as “white” or “free colored people.” In the summary sheet 37 families composed of 331 people were recorded as “free colored” in 1830.

Phillip Edwin Roberts, Foundation member of Hendersonville, North Carolina compiled a list of heads of households of “Free Colored Persons,” regarded by some researchers as Melungeons, found in the 1830 census of Hawkins County:

Charles Beare John Collins
Dicey Bowling James Collins John Goen
Michael Bowling Charles Gibson Betsy Goen
Burton Cold [Cole?] Esau Gibson Harden Goen
Wiatt Collins Cherod Gibson Edmond Goodman
Andrew Collins Joseph F. Gibson Jordan Goodman
Martin Collins Andrew Gibson Thomas Hale
Simeon Collins Sheppard Gibson Betsy Jones
Vardy Collins Jordan Gibson John Minor
Mary Collins Polly Gibson Zacharia Minor
Levi Collins Jonathon Gibson Samuel Mullens
Benjamin Collins Jesse Gibson James Moore
Edmund Collins Fountain Goen Henry Mosely
Millenton Collins George Goen William Nichols

Enumerators had the same problem in adjoining Grainger and Claiborne counties. White and “free colored” were listed in consecutive entries which perhaps indicated adjacent locations. Some disabling statutes were installed in 1831, 1832 and 1834 in the Tennessee constitution to prevent free Negroes from certain rights enjoyed by the white citizens.

Heads of households of Free Persons of Color in the 1830 census of Hawkins County include: Fountain Goen, Harden Goen, George Goen, John Goen and Betsy Goen.
==O==
William Goen, regarded as a Melungeon, was born about 1771 in North Carolina to parents unknown. He was married about 1795, wife’s name unknown. She appeared as a few years older than he in the 1830 census. William Goen moved his family to Hawkins County, in the middle 1820s.

Most of the individual enumeration sheets of the census of 1820 of the state of Tennessee were destroyed by fire in Washington, D. C. Fragments of the census for only ten counties and recaps of others escaped the fire. No enumeration sheets were available for Hawkins County. Recap sheets showed 310 “free persons of color” in the 1820 census.

“William Going” received a land grant No. 14203 from the State of Tennessee on March 19, 1827 for 50 acres in Hawkins County.

It is obvious that the census enumerator in 1830 had difficulty in deciding whether to list the seven Goen and Goin families as “white” or “free colored people.” In the summary sheet 37 families composed of 331 people were recorded as “free colored” in 1830. William Goen was designated as “white” in this count; his son John Goen wound up as “free colored.”

“William Going,” received a land grant from the State of Tennessee, No. 14203, on March 19, 1827 for 50 acres of land in Hawkins County.

William Goen headed a household composed of nine people, page 73, in the 1830 census of Hawkins County. His household consisted of:

“Goen, William white male 50-60
white female 60-70
white male 20-30
white male 15-20
white female 15-20
white female 10-15
white male 5-10
white female 0-5”

In an adjacent location to William Goen was the household of John Goen, possibly a son, on page 73 in the 1830 census of Hawkins County.

“William Gowin” reappeared in the 1840 census of Hawkins County, page 225, as the head of a household. He was shown to be illiterate and a farmer. He appeared with a younger wife, suggesting that he was remarried during the decade.

The household of four was listed as:

“Gowin, William white male 60-70
white female 50-60
white male 20-30
white male 5-10”

It is believed that William Goen was influenced to remove to Jackson County, Indiana during the 1840s. “William Goen, age 79” was enumerated there in the 1850 census in the household of James Johnson, regarded as his son-in-law by Dr. Jerry Lee Goen, Foundation member of Shawnee, Oklahoma.

Children born to William Goen are believed to include:

Crispin Goen born about 1800
John Goen born about 1806
“Happy” Goen born about 1808
[son] born about 1812
[daughter] born about 1814
[daughter] born about 1817
[son] born about 1821
Melinda Goen born about 1824

Crispin Goen, regarded as the son of William Goen, was born about 1800 in North Carolina. He was married about 1823, wife’s name Lucinda, according to the research of Carol Mitchell.

The household of Crispin Goin appeared in the 1830 census of Hawkins County, page 80, as:

“Goin, Crispin white male 30-40
white female 20-30
white male 5-10
white male 0-5
white male 0-5
white female 0-5”

“Crispin Goin” received a land grant from the State of Ten­nessee, No. 18217 September 19, 1833 for 80 acres of land in Hawkins County.

“Chrispin Gowin” also appeared in the 1840 census of Hawkins County, page 225, indicating an adjacent location to William Gowin. Four members of the family were engaged in agriculture and two, probably the parents, were illiterate. The household was enumerated as:

“Gowin, Chrispin white male 30-40
white female 30-40
white female 15-20
white male 10-15
white male 10-15
white female 10-15”

Crispin Goen removed to Jackson County Indiana along with other members of his family.

The 1850 Census listed six families in Jackson County: Crispin Goen on page 169 Carr township, Stephen P. Goen on page 171 Carr township, William Goen on page 175 Carr township, George W. Goings on page 127 Redding township, John Goins on page 132 Redding township, and William W. Goins page 127 tedding Township.

Crispin Goen was enumerated as the head of Household No. 20 on page 169 in Carr township:

“Goen, Crispin 50, farmer, born in NC real estate _ $400,literate

Lucinda 51, born in NC, illiterate

James T. [F.?] 17, born in TN

Williamson 15, born in TN

Crispin 12, born in TN

Reuben P. 10, born in TN

Polly 7, born in IN

Loucindia 5, born in IN

Margaret 2, born in IN

Servis 5/12, born in IN, female

Thomas, Milo 26, born in TN, illiterate

Dr. Jerry Lee Goen noted that the John Thomas family was listed as Household 21, adjoining the household of Crispin Goen. He suggested that Milo Thomas was related to the Goen family.
Crispin Goen died in Jackson County about 1857, and his estate was administered by Elisha G. Goen, a son, according to the research of Dr. Jerry Lee Goen. He wrote January 29, 1998:

“The court record is in the courthouse at Brownstown, Indiana. Elisha had to go to court several different times to get the estate settled. First, to be assigned as the administrator, second to settle the estate, but the judge was not certain that he had paid all the creditors. Third, to reconcile the accounts, but the judge was not happy with the way he had shown the accounts and his own expenses. Finally the judge accepted everything, and the estate seemed to be worth $542.81 with $130.31 left for distribution.
Children born to Crispin Goen and Lucinda Goen include:

Thomas Goen born about 1826
Matilda Goen born June 12, 1829
James F. Goen born about 1833

Williamson Goen born about 1835

Crispin Goen, Jr. born about 1838

Reuben P. Goen born about 1840

Thomas Goen, son of Crispin Goen and Lucinda Goen, was born about 1827, probably in Hawkins County, Tennessee. He was brought to Indiana by his parents. He was married August 27, 1849 in Washington County, Indiana to Mary Briscoe, daughter of James Briscoe and Elizabeth “Betsy” Carriss Briscoe, according to Carol Mitchell. She was born about 1829 in Kentucky.

Mary Briscoe Goen died in 1907 in Jackson County, Indiana of “softening of the brain” and was buried in Leesville Cemetery.

Children born to Thomas Goen and Mary Briscoe Goen include:

Homer Benson Goen born July 24, 1860
Leonidus Goen born about 1861
Margrett Goen born about 1864
Clarence Goen born about 1868

Homer Benson Goen, son of Thomas Goen and Mary Briscoe Goen, was born July 24, 1860. He died December 3, 1910 in Lawrence County, Indiana.

Leonidas Goen, son of Thomas Goen and Mary Briscoe Goen, was born about 1861.

Margrett Goen, daughter of Thomas Goen and Mary Briscoe Goen, was born about 1864.

Clarence Goen, son of Thomas Goen and Mary Briscoe Goen, was born about 1868.

Matilda Goen, daughter of Crispin Goen and Lucinda Goen, was born June 12, 1829 in Tennessee, probably Hawkins County. She was brought to Indiana by her parents. She was married July 12, 1851 in Indiana. She was remarried June 22, 1856 in Washinton County to a cousin, Philip Goen, son of John W. Goen and Sarah Goen.

The family removed to Arkansas where Philip Goen operated a ferry boat on the Arkansas River for 10 years, then moved to Lawrence County, Missouri.

Matilda Goen Lawyer Goen died there at Pierce City, Missouri September 8, 1911 and was buried there in Olivet Baptist Church Cemetery.

[For details of their family see his section of the Manuscript.]

James T. [F?] Goen, son of Crispin Goen and Lucinda Goen, was born about 1833 in Tennessee, probably Hawkins County. He appeared as a 17-year-old in the 1850 census of his father’s household.

Williamson Goen, son of Crispin Goen and Lucinda Goen, was born about 1835 in Tennesse, probably Hawkins County. He was married to Mary Cordell April 10, 1858 in Jackson County, Indiana. Children born to Williamson Goen and Mary Cordell Goen are unknown.

Crispin Goen, Jr, son of Crispin Goen and Lucinda Goen, was born about 1838 in Tennessee, probably in Hawkins County. He was enumerated as a 12-year-old in the 1850 census of his father’s household. He enlisted in Jackson County as a private in the Indiana 7th Battery, Light Artillery during the Civil War. He was married at age 47 to Margaret Chastain August 29, 1885 in Washington County, Indiana. Children born to Crispin Goen, Jr. and Margaret Chastain Goen are unknown.

Reuben P. Goen, son of Crispin Goen and Lucinda Goen, was born about 1840 in Tennessee, probably in Hawkins County. He was enumerated as a 10-year-old in the 1850 census of his father’s household. He was enlisted in Company G, Indiana 25th Infantry Regiment during the Civil War.

==O==
In an adjacent location to William Goen was the household of John Goen, possibly a son, on page 73 in the 1830 census of Hawkins County. No adult male was listed in the enumeration so it is assumed that John Goen was a Melungeon with very dark coloring and did not “rate a mention.”

The household was listed as:

“Goen, John
white female 20-30
white female 5-10
white male 0-5
white male 0-5
white female 0-5”

“John Going” received a land grant from the state of Ten­nessee, No. 14156, on March 2, 1827 for 50 acres of land in Hawkins County. “John Goin” received a grant for 50 acres, No. 25972, on an unnoted date, also in Hawkins County. John Goen did not reappear in the 1840 census as the head of a household in Hawkins County.
==O==
Elisha Goin received a land grant from the State of Tennessee, No. 21475, for 50 acres on October 31, 1837. He received a second grant, No. 24377, for 150 acres on November 15, 1841.
==O==
“Peter Going and Agga Going came into court. She was sick,” according to an entry in Hawkins County Court minutes dated June 8, 1839.
==O==
James Goins appeared in Hawkins County County in May 1857 with witnesses to prove that he was born free. J. H. Vance, County Court Clerk noted, “James Goins presented the following as the best evidence that he can obtain of his Freedom:”

“State of Tennessee }
Hawkins County }

County Court, May Term 1857

Personally appeared in open court Aaron Mooney and Rodham Chesnutt, residents of said county and state, who being duly sworn, according to law, depose and say that they are well acquainted with James Goins, a colored man, who lately resided in Hawkins County, Tennessee and that they knew his mother who was a white woman, and his reputed Father was a mulatto, and that the said James Goins was born free.

Aaron Mooney
Rodham Chesnutt

I, James H. Vance, Clerk of the County Court of said county do certify that the foregoing is a true copy transcript from the Record of my Court. Given under my hand and official seal at office in Rogersville, the 7th day of May 1857.

J. H. Vance, Clerk”

In later years James Goins removed to Knoxville, Tennessee or else planned a visit there. His proof of freedom was presented to Knoxville Mayor’s Court, according to its minutes recorded between May 1886 and August 1889. The minute book in 1999 was in the Knox County Archives. A microfilm transcript of the minutes was placed in the McClung Historical Collection.
==O==
Thomas Goin was an early resident of Hawkins County and later appeared in Claiborne County, Tennessee when that county was formed.

Children born to Thomas Goin and Jamima Sinness Goin include:

Mary “Polly” Goin born about 1787

Mary “Polly” Goin, daughter of Thomas Goin and Jamima Sinnes Goin, was born about 1787. She was married about 1804 to Jacob Coots, according to a great-great-granddaughter, Elaine C. Eltgroth of Chester, California.

Children born to Jacob Coots and Mary “Polly” Goin Coots include:

Jestern Coots born about 1816

Jestern Coots, daughter of Jacob Coots and Mary “Polly” Goin Coots, was born about 1816 in Claiborne County, Tennessee, according to David E. Casto, a descendant. She was married about 1834 to John George Castoe, according to Eltgroth research. She filed an application with the Dawes Commission in Indian Territory for Cherokee rights.
==O==
The obituary of Mrs. Ona Arrington Goins appeared in the March 7, 2002 edition of the Rogersville, Tennessee newspaper:
“Ona Arrington Goins, born May 10, 1912, died Wednesday March 6, 2002 at Wellmont Hawkins County Hospital after a brief illness.

A faithful member of West View Baptist Church. Ona worked for many years at the Burger Bar where she was affectionally known as Granny.

She was preceded in death by her husband, McKinley Goins, parents Will and Jennie Reed Arrington, three brothers; Omer Arrington, Ora Arrington and John Arrington and one sister Annabell Gilreath.

Surviving are two sons; William Goins, Jack Harold Goins and wife Betty, one daughter, Joyce Goins Manis and husband Gene, all of Rogersville, seven grandchildren and nine great- grandchildren.

Services will be conducted at 8 p.m. Friday in Colboch-Price Funeral Home chapel with the Rev. Ray Mullins officiating. Graveside services will be conducted at 10 a.m. Saturday at Highland Cemetery. Pallbearers are Scott Goins, John Goins, Steve Goins, David Newberry, Rodney Farmer and Sam Carmack.
==O==
Elijah Gowin, son of parents unknown, was born about 1797 in Virginia. In the book “Melungeons: Examining an American Legend” by Pat Spurlock Elder mention is made of a letter [page 245] written in 1927 by William H. Goins in which he states that his grandfather George Goins, son of Joe Goins of Surry County, North Carolina, had one brother, Elijah Goins.

He was married about 1813, wife’s name Sarah. She was born in Virginia about 1794. In 1815 they lived in North Carolina, and about 1816 they returned to Virginia.

Elijah Gowin appeared in the 1840 census of Hawkins County, Tennessee, page 232, as the head of a household composed of two people. Both were illiterate. He was a farmer. The household was listed as:

“Gowin, Elijah white male 50-60
white female 50-60”

“Eliga Gowins” was shown in the 1850 census of Hancock County as the head of Household No. 83-83, also composed of two people, both illiterate. They were enumerated November 19, 1850 in the 33rd subdivision, east part, Hancock County, which had been carved from Hawkins County in 1844. The enumeration read:

“Gowins, Eliga 53, born in Virginia, chair maker
Sarah 56, born in Virginia”

Children born to Elijah Gowin and Sarah Gowin are believed to include:

Alexander Gowin born about 1815
John “Hammer John” Gowin born about 1816

Alexander Gowin, regarded as a son of Elijah Gowin and Sarah Gowin, was born about 1815 in North Carolina. He was married about 1832 in Hawkins County to Ethel “Ethie” Collins, daughter of Vardeman “Vardy” Collins and Peggy Gibson Collins. She was born in 1810.

The household of Alexander Gowin was adjoining that of Elijah Gowin in the 1840 census of Hawkins County, page 232 One of the men was engaged in farming and one in trade. All three adults were illiterate. The family consisted of:

“Gowin, Alexander white male 20-30
white female 30-40
white male 20-30
white male 0-5
white male 0-5”

Hancock County was formed from Hawkins County and Claiborne County in 1844, and “Alexandria Gowins,” regarded as Alexander Gowin, above was listed as the head of Household 123-123 in the 1850 census of Hancock County, 33rd subdivision, east part, as:

“Gowins, Alexandria 35, born in North Carolina,
$300 real estate, illiterate,
farmer,
Ethel 40, born in Tennessee
John 17, born in TN, farmer
Alfred 15, born in TN, farmer”

This family was located in the middle of the Melungeon community. Many Gibson and Collins families were listed in adjacent entries.

He enlisted in Company A, First Tennessee Cavalry Regiment, USA in the Civil War. When he died, he was buried at Goins Chapel Cemetery, according to Phil Goins, a descendant.

Children born to Alexander Gowins and Ethel “Ethie” Collins Gowins include:

John Goins born about 1832
Alfred Goins born in November 1833

John Goins, son of Alexander Gowin and Ethel Collins Gowin, was born in Tennessee about 1832. He was enumerated as a 17-year old farmer in the 1850 census. He was married about 1855 to Lucinda “Synda” Sexton who was born about 1839 to Solomon Sexton and Lucinda Maxey Sexton.

John Goins served in the First Tennessee Cavalry Regiment, U.S.A. during the Civil War. John Goins and Lucinda “Synda” Sexton Goins were buried in Goins Cemetery on Newmans Ridge.

Eleven children born to them, including:

George William Goins born about 1857
John Goins born about 1867
Howard Goins born about 1869
Alex Goins born in 1875
Freeling Goins born in 1878

Alex Goins, son of John Goins and Lucinda “Synda” Sexton Goins, was born in 1875, according to the Buckreis research. He was married about 1900 to America “Merkey” Collins, daughter of Brandon Collins and Martha Collins. Alex Goins died November 3, 1951, and American “Merkey” Collins Goins died September 25, 1957.

Eleven children were born to them, but five sons died in in­fancy and were buried in Goins Cemetery. Six children survived to have children of their own. Included were:

Winnie Goins born October 1, 1901
Fannie Goins born April 18, 1904
Veda Goins born about 1907
Martha Goins born July 14, 1911
Herbert Goins born July 2, 1914
Batavia “Jack” Goins born September 17, 1917

Winnie Goins, daughter of Alex Goins and America “Merkey” Collins Goins, was born October 1, 1901. She, at age 15, was married November 21, 1815 to John Jarnigan, age 26, son of Frank Jarnigan and Harriett Jarnigan by T. P. Graham. Later she was remarried to William Anderson. John Jarnigan was buried in Lee County, Virginia. William Anderson and Winnie Goins Jarnigan Anderson were buried in Morristown, Tennessee.

Fannie Goins, daughter of Alex Goins and America “Merkey” Collins Goins, was born April 18, 1904. She was married about 1919 to George Moore. He was buried in Goins Cemetery when he died. She died October 31, 1982 and was buried in Harrison Cemetery at Sneedville, Tennessee.

Veda Goins, daughter of Alex Goins and America “Merkey” Collins Goins, was born about 1907. She was married about 1923 to Odie Marion. Later she was remarried to Arthur Lamar and removed to Salem, Indiana. They died there.

Herbert Goins, son of Alex Goins and America “Merkey” Collins Goins, was born July 2, 1914. He was married about 1934 to Delia Phillips. She was born September 16, 1918 to Will Phillips and Harriett Phillips. About 1943, Herbert Goins was remarried to Margaret Potter who was born February 25, 1915. He died November 17, 1970 and was buried at Rogersville, Tennessee. Delia Phillips Goins died July 31, 1971 and was buried at Salem, Indiana. Margaret Potter died October 23, 1984 and was buried beside Herbert Goins.

Five children were born to Herbert Goins and Delia Phillips Goins:

Edith Goins born November 10, 1935
Herbert Goins, Jr. born January 12, 1937
Will Goins born October 25, 1938
Mary Ruth Goins born September 5, 1940
Pauline Goins born April 12, 1942

Edith Goins, daughter of Herbert Goins and Delia Phillips Goins, was born November 10, 1935. She was married to Kenneth Harvey who was born to Herbert Harvey and Lucinda Harvey October 9, 1913.

Children born to them include:

Clifford Harvey born July 24, 1956
Donald Ray Harvey born September 22, 1958
Johnny Harvey born February 8, 1960
Nancy Harvey born April 4, 1963
David Harvey born May 18, 1967

Herbert Goins, Jr, son of Herbert Goins and Delia Phillips Goins, was born January 12, 1937. He was married about 1958 to Jessie “Bootie” Tolle who was born October 16, 1940 to Ewin Tolle and Bertha Tolle.

Children born to Herbert Goins, Jr. and Jessie “Bootie” Tolle Goins include:

Herbert Daniel Goins born October 22, 1959
Teresa Goins born September 15, 1961

Herbert Daniel Goins, son of Herbert Goins, Jr. and Jessie “Bootie” Tolle Goins, was born October 22, 1959. He was married about 1977 to Rhonda Richards.

Children born to Herbert Daniel Goins and Rhonda Richards Goins include:

Teresa Goins born September 15, 1961

Teresa Goins, daughter of Herbert Daniel Goins and Rhonda Richards Goins, was born September 15, 1961. She was married about 1979 to Ralph Goins. Children born to Ralph Goins and Teresa Goins Goings include:

Crystal Goins born November 13, 1980
Troy Goins born October 21, 1981

Alfred Goins, son of Alexander Gowin and Ethel Collins Gowin, was born in Tennessee in November 1833, according to the research of Robert Goins, a descendant of Kentucky. He was enumerated as “Alfred Gowin,” a 15-year-old farmer in 1850.

Alfred Goins was married about 1860 to Hannah Gibson, born about 1840 to Yearby Gibson and Elizabeth “Betty” Gibson, according to William P. Grohse.

Of William P. Grohse, Jack Harold Goins wrote:

“The oldest Melungeon list I have seen was compiled by William P. Groshe in the 1960’s. He was a historian who lived in Vardy Valley. His list was basically taken from the families enumerated as “Free Persons of Color” on the 1830 Federal census of Hawkins County, Tennessee.

These Newman Ridge-Blackwater area Melungeons came to this section in the time frame 1787-1805. Most of them had previously lived along the back-woods sections of the New River areas of Virginia and North Carolina. They migrated to this area circa 1767 from the Flat River sections of Orange County, North Carolina. Historians have long recognized the 1755 tax list of Orange County as some of the same families who came to Newman Ridge. All of the siblings of these families did not migrate to Newman Ridge and or Blackwater area, some came through and journeyed on west. Others migrated from the New River area into Kentucky, Ohio, and West Virginia, while others moved near the border of North Carolina and South Carolina, others to the Broad River area of South Carolina. You can find these same families migration patterns on Revolutionary War Pension Applications, tax, land, court, and church records.

Where did they come from? This was the question Will Allen Dromgoole ask Calloway Collins in 1890, his reply “They were living as Indians in Virginia before they migrated to North Carolina.”

The most complicated part to me is not knowing the surnames of the Melungeon wives. Just recently a family discovered through research that the mother of Vardy Collins mother was a Vardeman and on most legal papers Vardy was known as Vardeman, or Vardiman Collins.”

Yearby Gibson was a son of Jonathan Gibson who was born in Virginia May 17, 1759, according to Willard G. Peil IV, a descendant. The Yearby Gibsons had other children named Sally Gibson, Thomas Gibson, Debba Gibson and John Gibson.

Alfred Goins was enlisted December 8, 1862, along with “John Goins and R. J. Goins” in the First Tennessee Cavalry Regiment, Company M and served until 1865, according to his pension record.

“Pvt. Alfred Goen” appeared on the muster roll of Company C, Forty-third Tennessee Infantry Regiment, CSA during the Civil War. Also serving in this regiment were Pvt. Anderson Goen, Pvt. Charles Goen, Pvt. Dodson Goen, Pvt. John Goen and Pvt. William A. Goins. Alfred Goins “switched sides” during the war, perhaps after being captured.

Pvt. Alfred Goins appeared on the muster roll of Company M, First Tennessee Cavalry Regiment, USA during the Civil War. Also enlisted in this regiment were “Pvt. Claiborne Goins, Pvt. John Goins, Pvt. R. J. Goins, Pvt. William Goins, Pvt. Zachariah Goins, Pvt. Alfred Gowen and Sgt. Burton M. Goins.” Burton McGinnis Goins, a ninth-generation descen­dant of Mihil Gowen, was the son of George Goins and Emily “Lively” Bunch Goins.

Hannah Gibson Goins died January 10, 1879 in Hancock County, according to Patricia Ann Goins Rice, a descendant of Shepherdsville, Kentucky.. He was remarried about 1880 to Mrs. Malvina “Vina” Johnson Mullins and lived on Newman’s Ridge.

They were enumerated in the 1880 census of Hancock County as:

“Goins, Alfred 42
Malvina 27
Thomas 18
Johnson, Landon 5, step-son”

Alfred Goins received land from “John Mullins et ux Mahala Mullins” July 30, 1889, according to Hancock County Deed Book 5, page 541. Simeon Collins and James H. Goins, unidentified, were witnesses.

Alfred Goins was reported to be suffering from a disability of “chronic diarrhea and lung trouble” in the 1890 Civil War vet­erans census.

Alfred Goins was recorded as the head of a household in the 1900 census of Hancock County, Enumeration District 73, page 2, 11th Civil District:

“Goins, Alfred 66, born in TN, Nov. 1833
Viney 47, born in TN, April 1853
Elizabeth 17, born in TN, Nov. 1882
Garfield 12, born in TN, May 1888
Lombard 9, born in TN, March 1891
Lydia M. 7, born in TN, April 1893
Samueal [Simeon] 3, born in TN, Mar. 1897”

Alfred Goins died September 4, 1907, “an old, old man,” [69], according to Rev. Arthur Hamilton Taylor. Alfred Goins was buried in Goins Cemetery on Newman’s Ridge. Alfred Goins had donated the land for the Goins Chapel and Goins Cemetery from his farm, according to Kevin Mullins of Knoxville, Tennessee, a great-great grandson of Malvina “Vina” Johnson Mullins Goins in a message written February 12, 1999. Kevin Mullins was a great-grandson of Landon “Lan” Mullins who appeared at age five in the 1880 enumeration of the household of Alfred Goins.

Malvina “Vina” Johnson Mullins Goins continued to live in 1933 when she was interviewed by the Rev. Taylor. She received the farm of Alfred Goins, but later transferred it to his sons, while reserving the Goins Cemetery.

Children born to Alfred Goins and Hannah Gibson Goins in­clude:

Buchanan Goins born about 1857
Julia Ann Goins born about 1858
Thomas Goins born March 8, 1862

Children born to Alfred Goins and Malvina “Viana” Johnson Goins include:

Elizabeth Goins born November 25, 1882
James Abram Garfield Goins born May 22, 1888
Lambert Goins born March 12, 1891
Lydia M. Goins born April 4, 1893
Symeon [Samuel?] Goins born March 6, 1897

Buchanan Goins, son of Alfred Goins and Hannah Gibson Goins was born in Hancock County about 1857. He was mar­ried about 1876 to his second cousin, Elizabeth “Betty” Goins, daughter of John “Hammer John” Goins and Catherine Williams Goins. She was born in 1855. He died at Penning­ton Gap, Virginia March 29, 1930, according to Willard G. Piel IV, a descendant of Tucson, Arizona. Elizabeth “Betty” Goins Goins died November 18, 1936 and was buried beside her husband.

Children born to Buchanan Goins and Elizabeth “Betty” Goins Goins include:

George Goins born about 1877
Julia Ann Goins born about 1879
Martha Goins born about 1880
Alfred Goins born September 1, 1886
Thomas Goins born March 16, 1888
John Buchanan Goins born September 29, 1894
Birdie Goins born in 1896

George Goins, son of Buchanan Goins and Elizabeth “Betty” Goins Goins, was born about 1877.

Julia Ann Goins, daughter of Buchanan Goins and Elizabeth “Betty” Goins Goins, was born about 1879.

Martha Goins, daughter of Buchanan Goins and Elizabeth “Betty” Goins Goins, was born about 1880.

Alfred Goins, son of Buchanan Goins and Elizabeth “Betty” Goins Goins, was born September 1, 1886.

Thomas Goins, son of Buchanan Goins and Elizabeth “Betty” Goins Goins, was born March 16, 1888.

John Buchanan Goins, son of Buchanan Goins and Elizabeth “Betty” Goins Goins, was born September 29, 1894 in Lee County, Virginia. He was married about 1914 to Addie Myr­tle Cox who was born in 1896 in Sullivan County, Tennessee. John Buchanan Goins was murdered in Lee County November 3, 1935.

Children born to John Buchanan Goins and Addie Myrtle Cox Goins include:

Claude K. Goins born in 1916
Hazel Elizabeth Goins born in 1920

Hazel Elizabeth Goins, daughter of John Buchanan Goins and Addie Myrtle Cox Goins, was born in Lee County in 1920. She was married about 1942 to Louis Farmer who was born in Bell County, Kentucky in 1910.

Children born to them include:

Elizabeth Farmer born February 14, 1944

Elizabeth Farmer, daughter of Louis Farmer and Hazel Goins Farmer, was born February 14, 1944 in Virginia. She was married about 1965 to William G. Piel III who was born February 28, 1943 in Illinois.

Children born to them include:

William G. Piel IV born March 25, 1968

William G. Piel IV, son of William G. Piel III and Elizabeth Farmer Piel, was born March 25, 1968. In 1996 he, a resident of Tucson, Arizona, was active in the research of his branch of the Goins family.

Birdie Goins, daughter of Buchanan Goins and Elizabeth “Betty” Goins, was born in 1896. She was married about 1923 to H. Ballard Newman. She died in 1981.

Thomas Goins, son of Alfred Goins and Hannah Gibson Goins, was born in Hancock County March 8, 1862, according to the research of Bob Goins, a descendant. He was married October 27, 1884 in Sneedville to Nancy Collins who was born to Conaway Collins and Elizabeth Ann “Eliza” Williams Collins May 8, 1869 in Hancock County.

Cora Sergent Goins reported that Thomas Goins was working on a rocky hillside, hoeing corn when he declared, “If I live ’til this day is over, I will leave this place and never hoe corn on this hill again.” They moved to Lee County, Virginia the next day. In 1900 they lived in Virginia and in 1901 in Kentucky.

Thomas Goins died October 12, 1933 in Letcher County, Kentucky and was buried at Thornton, Kentucky. Nancy Collins Goins died November 20, 1942 and was buried beside her husband.

Children born to Thomas Goins and Nancy Collins Goins in­clude:

Emily Goins born September 10, 1885
Rosa Goins born November 21, 1888
Clay Goins born May 10, 1890
Grant Goins born April 15, 1892
Louis Goins born March 12, 1894
Fannie Goins born January 22, 1896
Hassie Goins born November 27, 1898
Cas Goins born September 29, 1900
Pearlie Goins born June 5, 1901
William Goins born February 11, 1905
Noah Goins born October 18, 1906
Henry Goins born February 13, 1916

Emily Goins, daughter of Thomas Goins and Nancy Collins Goins, was born September 18, 1885 in Tennessee. She was married March 3, 1904 In Knott County, Kentucky to George Washington “Wash” Ferguson. He was born February 14, 1870 in West Virginia. She died in 1908 and was buried in Carr Creek Cemetery in Knott County, Kentucky. He was remarried April 28, 1912 in Knott County to Arzella “Doll” Amgburgey, according to Derek Gilbert of St. Louis.

Rosa Goins, daughter of Thomas Goins and Nancy Collins Goins, was born November 21, 1888 in Tennessee. She was married about 1907 to Richard Vance. She died in November 1965 and was buried in Letcher County, Kentucky.

Clay Goins, son of Thomas Goins and Nancy Collins Goins, was born May 10, 1890 in Tennessee. He was married about 1919 to Lillie Crase. He died August 12, 1975 and was buried in Goins Cemetery located “on his homeplace, 1/4 mile out of Whitesburg, Kentucky,” according to Patricia Ann Goins Rice. Children born to Clay Goins and Lillie Crase Goins are unknown.

Grant Goins, son of Thomas Goins and Nancy Collins Goins, was born April 15, 1892 in Tennessee. He died May 15, 1924 unmarried.

Louis Goins, son of Thomas Goins and Nancy Collins Goins, was born March 12, 1894 in Tennessee. He was married about 1919 to Marie Mason. He died in Letcher County June 16, 1974. Children born to Louis Goins and Marie Mason Goins are unknown.

Fannie Goins, daughter of Thomas Goins and Nancy Collins Goins, was born in Tennessee January 22, 1896. She was married about 1914 to Millard Lucas.

Hassie Goins, daughter of Thomas Goins and Nancy Collins Goins, was born November 28, 1896 in Tennessee. She was married about 1916 to Caleb Johnson. She died at Vicco, Kentucky and was buried “in a cemetery between Vicco and Hazard, Kentucky,” according to Patricia Ann Goins Rice.

Cas Goins, son of Thomas Goins and Nancy Collins Goins, was born September 29, 1900 in Lee County, Virginia. He was married August 25, 1921 to Ritter Jane Sergent. She was born May 31, 1905 to Joseph Richard “Doc” Sergent and Julia Hart Sergent.

Cas Goins was robbed and killed August 25, 1945, according to Patricia Ann Goins Rice. Bobby Goins shows the date as June 20, 1945 and was buried in Sergent Cemetery in Letcher County.. Ritter Jane Sergent Goins was remarried in 1947 to Gus Tolliver. She died July 12, 1982 and was buried in Sergent Cemetery.

Children born to Cas Goins and Ritter Jane Sergent Goins in­clude:

Gladys Goins born June 1, 1922
Homer Goins born April 24, 1924
Gomer Goins born October 1, 1926
Hoover Cas Goins born November 16, 1928
Kenneth Goins born January 22, 1935
Tommy Goins born about 1940

Gladys Goins, daughter of Cas Goins and Ritter Jane Sergent Goins, was born June 1, 1922. She was married about 1940 to George Blanton. Later she was remarried to Douglas Horn.

Homer Goins, son of Cas Goins and Ritter Jane Sergent Goins, was born April 24, 1924. He was married about 1946 to Cuba Irene Manns. Children born to Homer Goins and Cuba Irene Manns Goins are unknown.

Gomer Goins, son of Cas Goins and Ritter Jane Sergent Goins, was born October 1, 1926. He was married about 1949 to Maxine Tolliver. Of Gomer Goins and Maxine Tolliver Goins nothing more is known.

Hoover Cas Goins, son of Cas Goins and Ritter Jane Sergent Goins, was born November 16, 1928. He was married about 1951 to Ritter Ann Duncil. He was remarried September 25, 1958 in Detroit, Michigan to Anna Lea Sergent. She was born August 10, 1935 in Letcher County. Hoover Cas Goins died November 1, 1997.

Children born to Hoover Cas Goins and Ritter Ann Duncil Goins include:

Patricia Ann Goins born February 25, 1949

Children born to Hoover Goins and Anna Lea Sergent Goins include:

Bobby Goins born November 20, 1960

Patricia Ann Goins, daughter of Hoover Cas Goins and Rit­ter Ann Duncil Goins was born February 25, 1949 at Jenkins, Kentucky in Letcher County. She was married September 7, 1968 to James Harold Rice. He was born October 19, 1948 at Boston, Kentucky in Nelson County.

In 1993 they lived in Sheppardsville, Kentucky where she, a member of Gowen Research Foundation, was active in Goins family research. It is through her kindness that much of the material on Alfred Goins and Hannah Goins and descendants appear in this manuscript.

Bobby Goins, son of Hoover Cas Goins and Ritter Ann Duncil Goins, was born November 20, 1960 in Hamtramick, Michi­gan. He was married April 18, 1987 in Prestonburg, Kentucky to Valerie Lynne Barnett who was born in Jackson, Kentucky July 14, 1959. Children born to Bobby Goins and Valerie Lynne Barnett Goins are unknown.

Kenneth Goins, son of Cas Goins and Ritter Jane Sergent Goins, was born January 22, 1935. He was married about 1958 to Mildred Toliver, believed to be a sister to Maxine Tolliver. Later he was remarried to Joyce Collins. Children born to Kenneth Goins, Maxine Tolliver Goins and Joyce Collins Goins are unknown.

Tommy Goins, of Cas Goins and Ritter Jane Sergent Goins, was stillborn about 1940 and was buried in Thornton Ceme­tery.

Pearlie Goins, daughter of Thomas Goins and Nancy Collins Goins, was born was born June 1, 1901 in Kentucky. She was married about 1920 to John Patterson and lived in Georgia. She died December 8, 1988.

William Goins, son of Thomas Goins and Nancy Collins Goins, was born February 11, 1905. He was married about 1928 to Cora Sergent, believed to be a sister to Ritter Jane Sergent. He died of cancer February 8, 1986 in Letcher County and was buried in Thornton Cemetery. Children born to William Goins and Cora Sergent Goins are unknown.

Noah Goins, son of Thomas Goins and Nancy Collins Goins, was born October 18, 1906 in Bath County, Kentucky. He died April 24, 1969.

Henry Goins, son of Thomas Goins and Nancy Collins Goins, was born February 13, 1916 in Letcher County. He was mar­ried there about 1939, wife’s name Nolie. Later he was remar­ried, wife’s name Ruby. He died July 18, 1967 and was buried in Thornton Cemetery. Children born to Henry Goins, Nolie Goins and Ruby Goins are unknown

Elizabeth Goins, daughter of Alfred Goins and Malvina “Viana” Johnson Goins, was born November 25, 1882. She appeared at age 17 in the 1900 census of her father’s house­hold. She was married about 1900 to Jim Gibson, son of Jimmy Gibson and Vinie Alsup Gibson. They removed to Springfield, Illinois where he became a farmer.

James Abram Garfield Goins, son of Alfred Goins and Malv­ina “Viana” Johnson Goins, was born May 25, 1888 in Han­cock County. He appeared as a 12-year-old in the 1900 census of his father’s household. He died unmarried March 15, 1917, according to Patricia Ann Goins Rice.

“James A. Garfield Goins” and his wife Marjorie Goings were living in Redfield, Arkansas in January, 1989, according to Louise Goins Richardson of Paragould, Arkansas who corre­sponded with them. James A. Garfield Goins died in Redfield in March 1989.

Lambert Goins, son of Alfred Goins and Malvina “Viana” Johnson Goins, was born March 12, 1891 in Hancock County. He appeared as a nine-year-old in the 1900 census. He was married about 1914 to Birdie Brewer, daughter of Will Brewer and Mollie Castle Brewer. She was born April 29, 1898 at Sneedville, according to Cathy I. Martin, a great-granddaughter.

He “lived near his mother on Newman’s Ridge,” according to Rev. H. A. Taylor. Birdie Brewer Goins died February 21, 1973 at Rutledge Manor Nursing Home in Springfield, Illinois at the age of 73. Children born to Lambert Goins and Birdie Brewer Goins are unknown.

Lydia M. Goins, daughter of Alfred Goins and Malvina “Viana” Johnson Goins, was born April 4, 1893 in Hancock County. She appeared as a seven-year-old in the 1900 census. he was married to Robert Gibson, son of Jimmy Gibson and Vinie Alsup Gibson about 1911. Three children were born to him before his death. She was remarried to John Wringley, son of Bud Wringley and Alice Wringley. Three more chil­dren were born before his death. She was married for the third time to Ira Parks. An additional three children were born to them.

Symeon [Samuel] Goins, son of Alfred Goins and Malvina “Viana” Johnson Goins, was born March 6, 1897 in Hancock County. He appeared as a three-year-old in the 1900 census of his father’s household. He was married about 1924 to Mattie Long who was born October 20, 1905 to Mattie Long, daugh­ter of Dick Long and Malissa Goodman Long. Rev. Arthur Hamilton Taylor described them, “Symeon is large, florid, lives in the old John and Mahala Mullins house [1927]. Mattie is fairly large, has dark wavy hair and blue eyes and a live appearance.”

John Goins, son of Alexander Gowins and Ethie Collins Gowins, was born about 1840. John Goins enlisted December 14, 1862 in Company A, First Tennessee Cavalry Regiment. He showed his residence at Sneedville, Tennessee. He was discharged June 19, 1865, according to the 1890 census.

“John Goins” was enumerated as the head of a household in the 1880 census of Hancock County:

“Goins, John 37, born in TN
Mahala 47
Long, Martha 25, born in VA, step-daughter
Emily E. 5, born in TN, grand-
daughter
Susan 3, born in TN, grand-
daughter
Mintie 2, born in TN, grand-
daughter
William 2/12, born in TN, grandson”

John “Hammer John” Goins, regarded as the son of Elijah Gowin and Sarah Gowin, was born about 1816 in Virginia. He accompanied his parents in a move to Claiborne County, Tennessee

He was married about 1838 to Catherine Williams. According to Rev. Taylor, “Hammer John belonged to the older race of Goins who were fair-skinned. He was of medium size, red complexioned and lived on Newman’s Ridge.”

“John Gowins” was listed as the head of a household enumer­ated December 4, 1850 in Hancock County, 33rd subdivision, east part, as Household 383-106. The family consisted of:

“Gowins, John 34, born in VA, hammerman,
illiterate
Catherine 28, born in Virginia, illiterate
William 11, born in TN, attending school
Jane 9, born in TN
Wilson 7, born in TN
Catherine 3, born in TN
Alexandria 1, born in TN, male”

They reappeared in the 1880 census of Hancock County in the 11th District:

“Goins, John 59, born in VA
Catherine 49,
Lawson, George 35, son-in-law
Jane 39, daughter”
Mary 12, twin granddaughter
John 12, twin grandson”

It is believed that John “Hammer John” Goins died during the 1890s and was buried in Goins Cemetery on Newman’s Ridge.

Children born to John “Hammer John” Goins and Catherine Williams Goins include:

William Goins born about 1839
Jane Goins born about 1842
Wilson Goins born about 1843
Catherine Goins born about 1847
Alexander Goins born about 1849
Candace Goins born about 1851
Elizabeth “Betty” Goins born about 1852
Barsheba Goins born about 1854
Caroline Goins born in 1857
Margaret Goins born about 1859
John Goins born in 1868

William Goins, son of John “Hammer John” Goins and Catherine Williams Goins, was born about 1839 in Hancock County. He appeared in the 1850 census as an 11-year-old.

Jane Goins, daughter of John “Hammer John” Goins and Catherine Williams Goins, was born about 1842 in Hancock County.

According to Rev. Taylor, Jane Goins, “the daughter of John Goins and Catherine Williams Goins,” was enumerated in the 1870 census of Hancock County in the household of John A. Lovins, No. 383-383:

“Lovins, John A. 27
Lucinda 23
Henry 2
Charlie 1
Goins, Jane 28”

She was married in 1857 to George Lawson, son of Emanuel Lawson. T. Carl Lawson of Morristown, Tennessee wrote July 17, 2000 to identify Emanuel Lawson as a descendant of William Lawson, the Scottish rebel who was born in Montrose, Scotland June 26, 1731 and died in Scott County, Virginia April 18, 1826 and was buried in the Lawson Memorial Cemetery in Snowflake, Virginia.

According to William P. Grohse, two daughters were born to Jane Goins before her marriage:

Molly Goins born about 1855
Mandy Goins born about 1856

Children born to George Lawson and Jane Goins Lawson in­clude:

Birdie Lawson born about 1858
Mary Lawson [twin] born about 1868
John Lawson [twin] born about 1868

Wilson Goins, son of John “Hammer John” Goins and Catherine Williams Goins, was born about 1843.

Catherine Goins, daughter of John “Hammer John” Goins and Catherine Williams Goins, was born about 1847 in Hancock County. She appeared as a three-year-old in the 1850 census. She was married January 17, 1875 to Hillery Collins, son of Pascal Collins and Dorcus Gibson Collins, who was born in 1857.

They appeared in the 1880 census of Hancock County, 11th District:

“Collins, Hillery 23, born in TN
Catherine 27, born in TN
Goins, Caroline 23, born in TN,
sister-in-law
Collins, Hillery 13, born in VA, cousin”

Children born to them include:

Henry Collins born in 1877
Orvall Collins born in 1878

Alexander Goins, son of John “Hammer John” Goins and Catherine Williams Goins, was born about 1849. He was recorded as a one-year-old in the 1850 census.

Betty Goins, daughter of John “Hammer John” Goins and Catherine Williams Goins, was born was born in 1855, ac­cording to the research of Rev. Arthur Hamilton Taylor. She was married about 1875 to a cousin, Buchanan Goins, son of Alfred Goins and Hannah Gibson Goins. For names of their children, see his section.

Caroline Goins, daughter of John “Hammer John” Goins and Catherine Williams Goins, was born in 1857. She appeared in the 1880 census of Hancock County living in the household of her sister Catherine Goins Collins.

Margaret Goins, daughter of John “Hammer John” Goins and Catherine Williams Goins, was born about 1860. Of this indi­vidual nothing more is known.

John “Stiff John” Goins, son of John “Hammer John” Goins and Catherine Williams Goins, was born in 1868. He was married about 1891, wife’s name unknown and “moved to Jonesville,” according to Rev. Arthur Hamilton Taylor.

“John Goins” was married December 17, 1894 to Laura Collins, according to the research of Margaret Mabrey, an outstanding Hancock County researcher.
==O==
Burton McGinnis Goins [George8, Joseph7, Joseph6, Agnes5, Edward, Jr.4, Edward3, William2, Mihil1], son of George Goins and Emily “Lively” Bunch Goins, was born February 1, 1842 at Sneedville. His Civil War pension appli­cation shows his date of birth as April 1, 1842. He enlisted in Company A [Company H in one report], First Tennessee Cav­alry Regiment May 9, 1862, showing his address as Blackwa­ter, Virginia. He became a corporal and later the company quartermaster sergeant in Company A. He was honorably discharged in Nashville April 4, 1865. His military record de­scribed him as 5’6″ tall, blue eyes, auburn hair, dark complex­ion, weighing 150 lbs. Other members of this regiment were Pvt. Alfred Goins, Pvt. Claiborne Goins, Pvt. John Goins, Pvt. R. J. Goins, Pvt. William Goins, Pvt. Zachariah Goins and Pvt. Alfred Gowen.

He was married about 1870 to Sarah Jane Wyatt. She died May 10, 1873 in Hancock County, according to Mary Eng­land, Editor of “Reflections,” the Claiborne County, Ten­nessee Historical Society’s publication.

He was remarried about 1874 to Mary Ann Lawson, believed to be a daughter of Serena Lawson. Mary Ann Lawson Goins died January 25, 1885 in Lee County, Virginia. In 1887 he re­moved from Lee County back to Hancock County. He at the age of 47 was married for the third time to Rebecca Cox, age 37 May 25, 1889 in Jonesville, Virginia. She was born December 23, 1850 near Dryden, Virginia, the daughter of David Cox.

They removed to Jefferson County, Iowa in 1880 and returned to Lee County in 1884. He died at his home at Olinger, Vir­ginia January 21, 1922. He received Pension No. 1,064,208 for $50 monthly as the result of wounds in both hips and a chest injury resulting from a horse falling on him during the war, rendering him disabled.

Children born to Burton McGinnis Goins and Sarah Jane Wy­att Goins include:

George Washington Goins born March 8, 1872
[unnamed child] born March 10, 1873

Children born to Burton McGinnis Goins and Mary Ann Law­son Goins include:

Samuel J. T. Goins born January 5, 1877
William H. Goins born January 8, 1879
Thomas Jefferson Goins born February 1, 1881
Charley Burton Goins born May 12, 1883

No children were born to Burton M. Goins and Rebecca Cox Goins.
==O==
On November 27, 1850 the household of Zachariah Miner, No. 269-269, adjoining Isaiah Goins [from Rockingham County, North Carolina], was enumerated in the 1850 census of Hancock County 33rd subdivision, east part. Minor is a family name associated with the Gowens in Virginia and North Carolina. Prof. Henry Price noted that Minor was a Melungeon name. The family was enumerated as:

“Miner, Zachariah 52, born in VA, $2,500 real estate
Agness 42, born in TN
Alfred 22, born in TN
Sally 21, born in TN
Lydia 16, born in TN, attending school
Gilford 18, born in TN
Elizabeth 15, born in TN, attending school
Susan 13, born in TN, attending school
Claiborn 11, born in TN, attending school
Sarah 9, born in TN, attending school
James 6, born in TN
Aley 8, born in TN
Zachariah 6/12, born in TN”

Nearby in Household 289-289 the family of Louis Miner was enumerated in the 1850 census of Hancock County, 33rd sub­division, east part. The juxtaposition indicates a relationship with Zachariah Miner. The family was listed as:

“Miner, Louis 42, farmer, born in NC, $300 real
estate, illiterate
Sarah 36, born in Kentucky
Elizabeth 13, born in TN, attending school
John 12, born in TN, attending school
Mariah 11, born in TN, attending school
Anderson 9, born in TN, attending school
Hiram 3, born in TN
Nancy 6/12, born in TN”

The similar names which appeared in the family of Francis Gowins, Household No. 370-370, Hancock County, 33rd sub­division, east part, also suggest a relationship with the Miners.
==O==
Nettie Lee Goins was born August 22, 1886 in Tennessee, probably Hawkins County, according to Gwen Underwood, a great-granddaughter. She was married about 1906 to Charles Emory Underwood who was born February 16, 1883 in Tennessee to James S. Underwood who was born in 1855 in Hawkins County and Matilda Jane Lee Underwood. Nettie Lee Goins Underwood died February 17, 1944 in Wise County, Virginia. Charles Emory Underwood died there April 10, 1962. Children born to them are unknown.
==O==
Samuel Goins, of Hancock County made an application for a Confederate pension, No. 6598, to the state of Tennessee for service in the 29th Tennessee Infantry Regiment.
==O==
Hasting Goen received a land grant, No. 27758, for 240 acres July 22, 1850 in Hawkins County. “Hasten Goen” was married to Alvira Walker December 31, 1857, according to Jackson County, Indiana Marriage Book D, page 147. Children born to Hasting Goen and Alvira Walker Goen are unknown.
==O==
The 1860 census of Hawkins County included George Gow­ings, Binda Gowings, William Goins and Lewis Going [from Rockingham County, North Carolina.] George Gowings, age 15, born in Tennessee, lived in the household of an Anderson family.

The household of William Goins, No. 639-627, was located near the location of Binda Gowings. The family was listed as:

“Goins, William 30, farmer, born in NC, illiterate
Adelina 25
George 8
Julia 18”

Julia Goins was probably a sister to William Goins.
==O==
Alicia Maria “Alley” Hicks was married to William M. Goan in Hawkins County, August 31, 1865. She is identified as the daughter of John Hicks and Alice Leuth Hicks of Hawkins County by Roy Williams of Alabama. John Hicks is also identified as the father of William Hicks whose family is mentioned in “Kentucky: A History of the State.”

In the 1880 census the family of William M. Goan and Alicia Maria “Alley” Hicks Goan was enumerated in adjoining Hamblen County, Tennessee, Enumeration District 72, page 10, as:

“Goan, William M. 51, born in TN
Alley M. 39, born in TN
Martha C. 14, born in TN
Leander C. 12, born in TN
William C. 6, born in TN
James R. 3, born in TN
Alley L. 1, born in TN”
==O==
William Goings was born in 1764, place unknown, according to “Some Tennessee Heroes of the Revolution” by Arm­strong. William Goings served at age 16 under Capt. Tilmon Dixon in the First Regiment of the Virginia Continental Line in 1780. He fought in battles at Brandywine, Camden, Cow­pens, Guilford, Eutaw Springs and Yorktown, according to his pension application.

He was discharged at Yorktown, Virginia in 1783. William Goings was married in October 1893 in Caswell County, North Carolina, wife’s name Elizabeth. He was listed at age 64 in the 1818 pension list of Hawkins County.

In 1834 William Goings received PLW pension certificate No. 12757.

William Goings, private of the Virginia Continental Line, age 64, was listed in Hawkins County in the “Pension List of 1818” published in Washington in 1820. His birthplace was shown as Virginia in the volume, page 65. His residence was listed as “East Tennessee.” Daniel Going was listed as a pensioner on the same page. Zephaniah Gowen of Hawkins County also claimed service in the American Revolution.

Elizabeth Goings, who was born in 1768, applied for a widow’s pension July 7, 1838 at age 70.

Four children, unnamed, were mentioned in the pension applications. They were a son, born in 1809; a daughter, born in 1810; a daughter, born in 1815 and a son, born in 1818.
==O==
Mary R. Goan “18, born in July 1881 in Tennessee” enumer­ated in the household of Bitha Goan as her servant in the 1900 census of Hawkins County, Enumeration District 90, page 4.
==O==
Zephaniah Gowan of Rogersville, Tennessee was denied a pension for his service in the American Revolutionary War, due to the fact that he could not produce the specification of each tour, period, length, grade, names of company, and names of field officers.
==O==
“Hawkins County Will Book A, 1789-1850” records the wills of William Going, page 36 and Sarah Goin, page 35.
==O==
Binda Gowings appeared as the head of a household in the 1860 census of Hawkins County, Household 626-614. The family was listed as:

“Gowings, Binda 45, born in NC, domestic,
illiterate
Mathew 14, born in NC
John 13, born in TN
Alexander 8, born in TN”

The family lived near the residence of William Goins.
==O==
Elizabeth Gowins was married February 13, 1849 to Henry Kleinher, according to “Hawkins County, Tennessee Marriages, 1789-1850.”

112 Henderson Co, TN

HENDERSON COUNTY, TENNESSEE

Sarah Going[?] appeared as the head of Household 95-76 in the 1850 census of Henderson County:

“Going[?], Sarah 70, born in NC
Cynthia 38, born in TN
Minerva 35”
==O==
William C. Gowan was enumerated in the 1840 census of Henderson County, page 327 as the head of a household composed of:

“Gowan, William C. white male 50-60
white female 50-60
white female 20-30
white male 15-20
white male 15-20
white male 5-10
white male 5-10”

One transcriber showed the name of the householder as “William H. Gowan.” Three members of the family were en­gaged in agriculture. All members over 20 could read and write. There were no deaf, blind, pensioners or insane.

HENRY COUNTY, TENNESSEE

Cora Goin was married to Samie Egman June 11, 1898 in Henry County according to Tennessee Marriage records (1851-1900). Nothing more is known of Samie Egman and Cora Goin Egman.
==O==
Louise Gowan was born about 1812 in South Carolina [or Vir­ginia] of parents unknown, according to Jenny Lou Penick Garner, a great-great-granddaughter of Decatur, Georgia. Louise Gowan was married about 1830 in South Carolina to William Roland Altom/Altum. By 1835 they were living in Henry County. He died about 1905.

Children born to William Roland Altom and Louise Gowan Altom include:

Evaline Altom born about 1831
Emily Louise Altom born July 27, 1835
Frances Altom born about 1841
Martha Jane Altom born about 1843
Milton Pollock Altom born about 1845

Emily Louise Altom, daughter of William Roland Altom and Louise Gowan Altom, was born July 27, 1835 in Tennessee. She was married in Henry County July 18, 1850 to Henry Babb Walters. She died there in Manleyville, Tennessee December 7, 1867.

Children born to Henry Babb Walters and Emily Louise Altom Walters include:

William Roland “Bink” Walters born in 1851
Louisa Walters born in 1853
Anna Walters born in 1856
John Henry Walters born in 1858
Thomas Babb Walters born in 1860
Minnie Walters born in 1861
Mary Witt “Mollie” Walters born in 1866

Anna Walters, daughter of Henry Babb Walters and Emily Louise Altom Walters, was born in 1856. She was married about 1874 to William Quincy Lee.

Children born to them include:

Charles Franklin Lee born about 1880

Charles Franklin Lee, son of William Quincy Lee and Anna Walters Lee, was born about 1880. He was married about 1910 to Ruby Evett Loyd.

Children born to them include:

Joe Herbert Lee born about 1922

Joe Herbert Lee, son of Charles Franklin Lee and Ruby Evett Loyd Lee, was born about 1922. In 1997 he, a member of the Foundation, lived in Weatherford, Texas.

Mary Witt “Mollie” Walters, daughter of Henry Babb Walters and Emily Louise Altom Walters, was born in 1866. She was married about 1885 to Elijah Warren “Lige” Penick who was born in 1856. He died in 1918, and she died in 1946.

Children born to them include:

Eliza Ann Penick born in 1886
Mary Emily Penick born in 1888
Enloe Penick born in 1890
John Henry Walters Penick born in 1893
Elijah Charles Penick born in 1895
William Jennings Bryan Penick born in 1896
Joe Newton Penick born in 1902
Roland Altom Penick born in 1904

Elijah Charles Penick, son of Elijah Warren “Lige” Penick and Mary Witt “Mollie” Walters Penick, was born in 1895. He was married about 1936 to Betty Lou McDonald who was born in 1908. He died in 1977, and she died in 1983.

Children born to them include:

Charlene Penick born in 1938
Jenny Lou Penick born in 1939

Jenny Lou Penick, daughter of Elijah Charles Penick and Betty Lou McDonald Penick, was born in 1939. She was married about 1960 to Phillip Edward Garner who was born in 1938. In 1995 they lived in Decatur, Georgia where she, a member of Gowen Research Foundation, was active in the research of her family.

Children born to them include:

Philip Andrew Garner born in 1962
Julie Ann Garner born in 1964
==O==
Louisa Gowen was married to William A. Rowland of Altum, Tennessee in Henry County, according to Mrs. Webb A. Walker of Portageville, Missouri. She advised in 1961 that she was a descendant.

HICKMAN COUNTY, TENNESSEE

Isaac Goin was magistrate in Hickman County in 1885 according to “Spence’s History of Hickman County, Tennessee.”
==O==
Alvin Daniel Goins was born July 13, 1913 in Hickman County, and died August 15, 1946 in Williamson TN, according to Tennessee birth records.
==O==
Angeline Goins was born in April 1887 in Hickman County, according to Tennessee birth records.
==O==
Daniel Fletcher Goins was born January 18, 1886 in Hickman County, and died September 9, 1946 in Nashville TN, according to Tennessee birth records.
==O==
Elizabeth Jane Goins was born September 12, 1932 in Hickman County, and died June 23, 1984 in Hickman, according to Tennessee birth records.
==O==
Emma Goins was born in January 1884 in Hickman County, according to Tennessee birth records.
==O==
Etta Mae Goins was born February 21, 1879 in Hickman County, and died December 5, 1905, according to Tennessee birth records.
==O==
Eugenia A. Goins was married December 20, 1877 to Andrew J. Anglin, according to “Hickman County, Tennessee Marriages, 1813-1896.” “A. J. Anglen” was enumerated at age 23 in the 1860 census of Hickman County.
==O==
Fletch Goins was born in August 1895 in Hickman County, according to Tennessee birth records.
==O==
George C. Goins was born in October 1890 in Hickman County, according to Tennessee birth records.
==O==
Hattie May Goins was bornt October 25, 1923 in Hickman County and died May 30 1997 in Madison TN, according to Tennessee birth records.
==O==
James Howard Goins was born October 9, 1915 in Hickman County, and died June 8, 1986 in Dearborn Michigan, according to Tennessee birth records.
==O==
J. Goins and J. G. Goins were listed in the Muster roll of the 48th Tennessee Infantry Regiment during the Civil War, according to “Spence’s History of Hickman County, Tennessee.”
==O==
J. R. Goins was listed in the Muster roll of the 24th Tennessee Infantry Regiment of Hickman County during the Civil War, according to “Spence’s History of Hickman County, Tennessee.”
==O==
John A. Goins was born in February 1889 in Hickman Count, according to Tennessee birth records.
==O==
John Hensley Goins was born December 30, 1909 in Hickman County and died January 27, 1910, according to Tennessee birth records.
==O==
Jordan (Pea) Lewis Goins was born about 1883 in Hickman County, and died in 1952 in Texas, according to Tennessee birth records.
==O==
Isaac Chambers Goins was born September 12, 1870 in Hickman County, and died July 3, 1958 in Hickman County, according to Tennessee birth records.
==O==
L. L. Goins was married to Elizabeth Garton February 17, 1866 in Hickman County according to Tennessee Marriage records (1851-1900). Nothing more is known of L. L. Goins and Elizabeth Garton Goins.
==O==
Leonard A. Goins died in 1908 in Hickman County according to “Tennessee Deaths,” number 44541.
==O==
Lester B. Goins was born August 1, 1919 in Hickman County and died January 24, 1993 in Hickman County, according to Tennessee birth records.
==O==
Lucy May Goins was born July 13, 1888 in Hickman County and died October 10, 1971 in Nashville TN, according to Tennessee birth records.
==O==
Mary P. Goins was married to Virgil J. Martin December 23, 1875 in Hickman County according to Tennessee Marriage records (1851-1900). Nothing more is known of Virgil J. Martin and Mary P. Goins Martin.
==O==
Oma Francis Goins was born May 11, 1920 in Hickman County, and died August 22, 1996 in Nashville, according to Tennessee birth records.
==O==
Otto Goins was born in November 1892 in Hickman County, according to Tennessee birth records.
==O==
Sarah Ann Elizabeth Goins was born December 1, 1910 in Hickman County, and died August 21, 1987 in Madison TN, according to Tennessee birth records.
==O==
Susie Ann Goins was born in February 1878 in Hickman County, and died in 1968 in Texas, according to Tennessee birth records.
==O==
Theodora (Dorie) Goins was born in January 1869, and died in 1957 in Texas, according to Tennessee birth records.
==O==
Thomas Goins was married to Nancy J. Jenkins December 30, 1873 in Hickman County according to Tennessee Marriage records (1851-1900). Nothing more is known of Thomas Goins and Nancy Jenkins Goins.

HUMPHREYS COUNTY, TENNESSEE

Isaac Goen paid tax on “one white poll” in 1837 and 1838 in Humphreys County, according to “Humphreys County, Tennessee Records.”
==O==
Thompson B. Goun was enumerated as the head of a house­hold in the 1830 census of Humphreys County, page 300. The family was rendered as:

Goun, Thompson B. white male 30-40
white female 20-30
white male 5-10
white female 0-5
white male 0-5
white male 0-5
female slave 0-10″

JACKSON COUNTY, TENNESSEE

Ada J. Goins was born in Tennessee in August 1879. She died of meningitis at age eight months in Jackson County in April 1880, according to “Tennessee Mortality Schedules.”

JEFFERSON COUNTY, TENNESSEE

Anna Chilton Goan was born in 1815. She was married about 1840 to Alexander Felknor, son of James Felknor and Anne Guthrie Felknor. He was born 1818 in Hawkins County, Tennessee and died in Jefferson County.

Children born to them include:

Louis H. Felknor born in 1852

Lewis H. Felknor, son of Alexander Felknor and Anna Chilton Goan Felknor, was born in 1852 in Jefferson County. He died in 1906 in Hamblen County, Tennessee.
==O==
White Goan was married September 7, 1841 to Hannah Snoddy, according to “Jefferson County, Tennessee Marriages, 1774-1850.” Of White Goan and Hannah Snoddy Goan nothing more is known.
==O==
Anna C. Goans was married September 23, 1841 to Alexander Felknor, according to “Jefferson County, Tennessee Mar­riages, 1774-1850.”
==O==
Eliza Goans was married October 21, 1847 to William Ham­mond, according to “Jefferson County, Tennessee Mar­riages, 1774-1850.”
==O==
Shadrach Goans was born about 1808 in Tennessee. He was recorded in the 1850 census of Jefferson as the head of House­hold 12-658:

“Goans, Shadrack 42, born in TN
Margaret 27, born in TN”
==O==
“Daniel Goan” was enumerated as the head of a household in the 1880 census of Jefferson County, Enumeration District 174, page 24, Civil District 12. The household was recorded as:

“Goan, Daniel 46, born in TN
Terressa 47, born in TN
William 20, born in TN
Hanner L. 16, born in TN
Emley 12, born in TN
Margrate 10, born in TN
Marthy 8, born in TN
John J. 6, born in TN
Harden 6, born in TN”
==O==
“Ezekiel Goins” received Tennessee State land grant No. 13622 for 50 acres in Jefferson County January 10, 1827.

“Ezekial Goan” was enumerated as the head of a household in the 1830 census of Jefferson County, page 281. The family was enumerated as:

“Goan, Ezekial white male 20-30
white female 20-30
white male 0-5”

Ezekial Goan, a farmer, reappeared in the 1840 census of Jef­ferson County, page 325:

“Goan, Ezekial white male 30-40
white female 20-30
white male 10-15
white male 5-10
white male 5-10
white female 0-5
white male 0-5
white male 0-5
white male 0-5”

One adult in the household was illiterate.

“Ezekiel Goan” was recorded as the head of Household 1891-914 in the 1850 census of nearby Johnson County:

“Goan, Ezekiel 47, born in TN
Leannor 43, born in TN
William M. 21
Nancy J. 18
Daniel J. 15
Robert 15
Rufus 13
Shadrach 11
Ezekial 9
Fanny A. 7
Prudence 5
Josiah 3”
==O==
John J. Goan, son of Daniel Goan and Terressa Goan, was enumerated as the head of a household in the 1900 census of Jefferson County, Enumeration District 45, page 8, 5th Civil District:

“Goan, John J. 25, born in June 1874 in TN
Dosia 18, born in May 1882 in TN, wife”
==O==
Shadrack Goans was born about 1808 in Tennessee. He was recorded in the 1850 census of Jefferson as the head of House­hold 12-658:

“Goans, Shadrack 42, born in TN
Margaret 27, born in TN:
==O==
Ezekiel Goen was married January 12, 1828 to Leanna McLanahan, according to “Jefferson County, Tennessee Marriages, 1774-1850.” Children born to Ezekiel Goen and Leanna McLanahan Goen are unknown.
==O==
Polly Goen was married March 21, 1818 to George Curry, ac­cording to “Jefferson County, Tennessee Marriages, 1774-1850.”
==O==
William Goen was married June 27, 1809 to Betsy Jones ac­cording to “Jefferson County, Tennessee Marriages, 1774-1850.” Of William Goen and Betsy Jones Goen nothing more is known.
==O==
Bengamen Goens was married to Anny Jones December 15, 1799, according to “Jefferson County, Tennessee Marriages, 1774-1850.” Children born to Bengamen Goens and Anny Jones Goens are unknown.
==O==
James Goens was married to Mary Williams May 5, 1858, according to “Jefferson County, Tennessee Marriages, 1774-1850.” Of James Goens and Mary Williams Goens nothing more is known.
==O==
Van Goens was married November 23, 1895 to Cordie Campbell, according to “Jefferson County, Tennessee Marriages, 1774-1850.” Of Van Goens and Cordie Campbell Goens nothing more is known.
==O==
Ann Goin was enumerated as the head of a household in the 1830 census of Jefferson County, page 286, as:

“Goin, Ann white female 60-70
white female 20-30”

“Ann Going” reappeared as the head of a household in the 1840 census of Jefferson County. The household, No. 229, was composed of:

“Going, Ann white female 70-80
white female 40-50
white male 20-30
white male 20-30
white female 20-30
white female 20-30
white male 80-90”
==O==
Mary Goin was married July 23, 1806 to Job Self, according to “Jefferson County, Tennessee Marriages, 1774-1850.”
==O==
A. Going deeded land to S. A. Going in Jefferson County Jan­uary 4, 1937 [confirm with copy], according to Jefferson County Deed Book 426, page 391. The land was originally from the D. Easley estate.
==O==
David Goin was married to Priscilla Jarnagin June 27, 1795 by Thomas Snoddy, justice of the peace, according to Jefferson County marriage records. Of David Goin and Priscilla Jarnagin Goin nothing more is known.
==O==
Benjamin Goins was married December 15, 1799 to Ann Jones, according to “Jefferson County, Tennessee Marriages, 1774-1850.” Children born to Benjamin Goins and Ann Jones Goins are unknown.
==O==
James Goins was married September 11, 1815 to Peggy Midget, according to “Jefferson County, Tennessee Mar­riages, 1774-1850.” Children born to James Goins and Peggy Midget Goins are unknown.
==O==
Susanna Goins was married to Daniel Campbell in 1819, ac­cording to records of the Presbyterian Church in Jefferson County.
==O==
William Goins was born about 1793, parents and place unknown. He was married April 21, 1817 in Jefferson County, Tennessee to Mrs. Priscilla Mayes Daniel, widow of Edward Daniel, Jr.

A Daniel couple, Edward Daniel and Ann Daniel, regarded as the parents of Edward Daniel, Jr, were received June 2, 1804 in Claiborne County, Tennessee by Big Springs Baptist Church, according to the church minutes.

Vickie Lomon, a Daniel descendant wrote May 19, 2003:

“Edward Daniel and Anne Daniel were members of the Holy Matrimony Creek Church in Rockingham County, North Carolina in 1776. This church was situated right on the North Carolina and Virginia state lines. Edward’s sister, Ester Daniel who married Philemon Lacy were also members of the church.

Edward Daniel and Anne Daniel lived in Henry County, Virginia from about 1776 to 1800 when they migrated to Clairborne County, Tennessee. Edward was a messenger to the Bethel Church.

Edward Daniel and Anne Daniel were closely associated with James Goins and Hannah Goings and Rachel Moody. Whenever they were received by a church or dismissed by letter, these individuals were frequently with them. Edward Daniel died in 1833 Grainger County.

Most of Edward Daniel’s children married into the family of Henry Mayes and Phoebe Mayes. One of his sons, William Daniel was married in 1822 to Martha Mayes in Grainger County. John Daniel, son of William Daniel and Martha Mayes Daniel, was born about 1823. He was married in 1842 to Mary Annah Jeffreys, daughter of Marmaduke Norfleet Jeffreys and Hannah Louise Hill Jeffreys.

John Daniel and Mary Annah Jeffreys Daniel removed to Benton County, Arkansas.”

Priscilla Mayes was born about 1795 on the South Holston River in Hawkins County, Tennessee [North Carolina]. She was married first December 27, 1811 in Hamblen County, Tennessee to Edward Daniel, Jr. who was born about 1793. Priscilla Mayes Daniel Goins died about 1849 in Grainger County, Tennessee. Children born to them are unknown.
==O==
Andrew Gowan was married to Mary Reneau July 22, 1800, according to “Jefferson County, Tennessee Marriages, 1774-1850.” Children born to Andrew Gowan and Mary Reneau Gowan are unknown.
==O==
Martha Gowan was married to Joseph Denson February 9, 1797, according to “Jefferson County, Tennessee Marriages, 1774-1850.”
==O==
James Gowan was married to Peggy Russell May 5, 1795, ac­cording to “Jefferson County, Tennessee Marriages, 1774-1850.” Of James Gowan and Peggy Russell Gowan nothing more is known.
==O==
James Gowan was married to Betsy Doherty May 6, 1796, ac­cording to “Jefferson County, Tennessee Marriages, 1774-1850.” Of James Gowan and Betsy Doherty Gowan nothing more is known.
==O==
Nancy Gowan was married to Thomas Baker April 9, 1818. according to “Jefferson County, Tennessee Marriages, 1774-1850.”
==O==
Thomas J. Gowin was enumerated as the head of a household in the 1900 census of Jefferson County, Enumeration District 74, page 12, 3rd Civil District:

“Gowin, Thomas J. 30, born in TN in February 1870
Louisa 66, born in SC in February 1834,
grandmother”
==O==
Sarah McGowan was married February 1, 1822 at White Pine, Tennessee in Jefferson County to Christopher Moyers, Jr. He was born about 1798 to Christopher Moyers. and Susannah Moyers, according to Nancy Dodge.

Children born to Christopher Moyers, Jr. and Sarah McGowan Moyers include:

John Alexander Moyers born about 1824

John Alexander Moyers, son of Christopher Moyers, Jr. and Sarah McGowan Moyers, was born about 1824. He was married July 29, 1849 to Nancy Gann. He changed his name to Myers shortly afterward.

Gowen Research Foundation Phone:806/795-8758, 795-9694
5708 Gary Avenue E-mail: gowen@sbcglobal.net
Lubbock, Texas, 79413-4822 GOWENMS.120, 10/01/02
Internet: http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.com/~gowenrf
http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.com/~gowenrf

Descendant Researchers:

Willis T. Finley, 307 Fairview Dr, Longview, TX, 75604, 903/759-0415
Bonnie Goan Good, Box 331, Wellington, MO, 64097

JOHNSON COUNTY, TENNESSEE

Margaret Goins was enumerated as the head of a household in the 1870 census of Johnson County:

“Goins, Margaret 31, born in NC, mulatto
Lititia 13, born in NC, mulatto
Elizabeth 11, born in NC, mulatto
Margaret 9, born in NC, mulatto
Rebecca 5, born in NC, mulatto
Bass, Abecca 21, born in NC, mulatto
James 65, born in NC, mulatto, farm
laborer, $400 real estate”

KNOX COUNTY TENNESSEE

No families of interest to Gowen chroniclers appeared in the 1820 census of Knox County. William Gowns, John Gowns and Edward Gowns were listed as heads of households in the 1830 census of Knox County.
==O==
Dollie Goin died in 1910 in Knox County according to “Tennessee Deaths,” record number 48040.
==O==
Pete Goings died in 1909 in Knox County according to “Tennessee Deaths,” record number 48367.
==O==
Sallie Goings died in 1911 in Knox County according to “Tennessee Deaths,” record number 49489.
==O==
Civil War veterans who served as Union troops of the U. S. Army who were living in Knox County in 1890 include:

Last First Rating Regiment Co.
Goins, Asa Pvt. 7th KY Infantry D
Goins, Canedy Pvt. 49th KY Infantry G
Goins, Galloway Pvt. 18th KY Infantry E
Goins, John Corp. 55th KY Infantry F
Goins, Joseph Pvt. 7th KY Infantry D
Goins, Lemuel Pvt. 18th KY Infantry E
==O==
Felex Goins died in 1910 in Knox County according to “Tennessee Deaths,” record number 48314.
==O==
Willie Clurton Goins died in 1910 in Knox County according to “Tennessee Deaths,” record number 48175.
==O==
Mary Goan was married to Jonathan Courtney October 15, 1805, according to “Knox County, Tennessee Marriages, 1784-1900.”
==O==
Albert S. Goans was recorded as the head of a household in the 1900 census of Knox County, Enumeration District 92, page 7, Civil District 18:

“Goans, Albert S. 32, born in TN in June 1867
Ella R. 29, born in TN in December 1870
Jennie 13, born in TN in March 1887
Felix 10, born in TN in November 1889
Katy 7, born in TN in August 1892”
==O==
Arthur F. Goans was a resident in Knox County in December 2000 when his wife, Mabel Lorena Walls Goans died, according to her obituary in the December 20, 2000 edition of “The Oak Ridger:”

“Mabel Lorena Walls Goans, 83, of Knoxville, died Monday, Dec. 18, 2000, at Baptist Hospital in Knoxville. Mrs. Goans was a member of Beech Park Baptist Church of Oliver Springs and had been a member of the choir for many years. She graduated in the first class of the American Red Cross Gray Ladies in 1943. Her family said she gave of herself to the Knoxville area Red Cross for 58 years and still attended the annual gatherings of the organization.

During World War II, she worked at Oak Ridge in support of the war efforts. She was the daughter of Algie Walls and Pearl Giles Walls. She is survived by her husband of 59 years, Arthur F. Goans; her son, Derrick Scott Lunsford of Morris Plains, N.J.; her sister, Barbara Walls Hensley and her husband, Frank V. Hensley, of Clinton; her brother, Benjamin T. Walls and his wife, Edna Walls, of Oliver Springs; and by many nieces and nephews.

The funeral will be held at 8 p.m. Thursday, Dec. 21, in the Broadway Chapel of Rose Mortuary, 1421 Broadway N.E., Knoxville, with the Rev. Earl Wilson officiating. Family and friends will meet at 10:45 a.m. Friday, Dec. 22, at the main entrance at Highland Memorial Cemetery, Knoxville, for an 11 a.m. graveside service.”
==O==
Drury Goans was born in South Carolina served in Churchman’s Company of Tennessee militia in the War of 1812, according to “War of 1812 Pensioners” by Virgil D. White. He lived in Knox County from 1851 to 1871. His wife died prior to March 1871, and he died prior to July 1, 1889.

Samuel C. Goans, 19, was enumerated in the 1850 census of household of Drury Goans, No. 379-241.
==O==
Eliza J. Goans was married October 23, 1877 to Jacob Miller, according to “Knox County, Tennessee Marriages, 1784-1900.”
==O==
Hattie Goans was married November 16, 1886 to Robert Wal­lace, according to “Knox County, Tennessee Marriages, 1784-1900.”
==O==
James C. Goans was married to Susannah White October 31, 1850, according to “Knox County, Tennessee Marriages, 1784-1900.” Children born to James C. Goans and Susannah White Goans are unknown.
==O==
James W. Goans was married to Margaret Louise Reed Au­gust 31, 1890, according to “Knox County, Tennessee Mar­riages, 1784-1900.” Children born to James W. Goans and Margaret Louise Reed Goans are unknown.
==O==
Martha Goans was married August 22, 1850 to William H. McCampbell, according to “Knox County, Tennessee Mar­riages, 1784-1900.”
==O==
Martin R. Goans was married April 11, 1880 to Alice A. Cobb, according to “Knox County, Tennessee Marriages, 1784-1900.” Martin R. Goans and his wife, Alice A. Cobb Goans were residents of adjoining Loudon County, Tennessee in 1882 and in 1901.

Children born to Martin R. Goans and Alice A. Cobb Goans include:

Katie Goans born September 29, 1882

Katie Goans, daughter of Martin R. Goans and Alice A. Cobb Goans, was born in Loudon County September 29, 1882. She died October 8, 1883 and was buried in Starkee Creek Ceme­tery.

An infant born to Martin R. Goans and Alice A. Cobb Goans De.­cember 9, 1901 died December 13, 1901 and was also buried in Starkee Creek Cemetery.
==O==
Sarah C. Goans was married to Thomas J. Coram February 22, 1866, according to “Knox County, Tennessee Marriages, 1784-1900.” On the same day, perhaps in a double ceremony, Mary E. Goans was married to Wilson A. Coram.
==O==
Alex Goins was recorded as the head of a household in the 1900 census of Knox County, Enumeration District 63, page 9, Civil District 1, living at 118 Hudson Street in Knoxville:

“Goans, Alex 45, born in TN in 1855
Tina 40, born in TN in 1860
Chas. L. 17, born in TN in September 1883
M. E. 15, born in TN in July 1886
Ella 8, born in TN in October 1891”
==O==
Drury Goans was enumerated as the head of Household 379 in the 1850 census of Knox County:

“Goans, Drury 57, born in Tennessee
Mary 52, born in Tennessee
Martha J. 22, born in Tennessee
Samuel C. 19, born in Tennessee
Priscilla 16, born in Tennessee
Manerva A. 15, born in Tennessee
Rufus 13, born in Tennessee
Mary A. 11, born in Tennessee
Pleasant 9, born in Tennessee
==O==
Stewart Goens was married to Eliza Alexander, November 5, 1897, according to “Knox County, Tennessee Marriages, 1784-1900.” Of Stewart Goens and Eliza Alexander Goens nothing more is known.
==O==
Annie Goin was married December 1, 1891 to William B. Karnes, according to “Knox County, Tennessee Marriages, 1784-1900.”
==O==
George Goin was married to Susan Cox June 23, 1857, ac­cording to “Knox County, Tennessee Marriages, 1784-1900.” Children born to George Goin and Susan Cox Goin are unknown.
==O==
Mary L. Goin was married to John T. Ammond September 1, 1892, according to “Knox County, Tennessee Marriages, 1784-1900.”
==O==
Preston Lee Goin was married to Prudence Ann “Prudy” Cox, daughter of Richard Cox, October 17, 1850, according to “Knox County, Tennessee Marriages, 1784-1900.”

Her 103rd birthday was reported in the February 7, 1924 edition of the “Leon Reporter” of Leon, Iowa:

“Leon Reporter, Leon, Iowa
Thursday, February 7, l924

The Oldest Lady in Mercer County, Celebrated the Event at Her Home, Jan. 25

Mrs. Prudy Ann Goins celebrated her l03rd birthday Friday, Jan. 25 at her home in the southeast part of Princeton. She is probably the oldest lady in the State. Although she has attained an age which is seldom reached, she still retains all her mental faculties. Her memory is wonderful, not only of dates that transpired years ago, but incidents that are happening daily.

She is very jovial and always ready to greet her many friends with a smile. She carries on a very interesting conversation.

“Aunt Prudy,” as she is familiarly called, was born twelve miles east of Knoxville, Tennessee where she grew to womanhood, receiving what little education was afforded by the schools of that time, most of which were subscription and lasted only a few months of the year.

In 1841, [1850?] she was married to Preston Lee Goins. In 1860, she and her husband, with the Dykes and Brogans, there being fifty-two in the caravan, moved to Mercer County, making the trip overland with oxteams, settling north of Princeton. The dwellings of the pioneers were made of logs with little furniture. So far as money was concerned, the demand was supplied by wolf scalps and beeswax. Deer, wild turkey and game of all kinds were plentiful.

Mrs. Goins is the mother of nine children. Those living are: William Goins and Mrs. J. N. Faulkner, of Princeton, Albert Goins and Jesse Goins, of Kansas City. She has nine grandchildren, nineteen great-grandchildren and two great-great-grandchildren.

Mr. Goins died 48 years ago, and she moved to Princeton shortly after his death. Besides raising her own children, she has raised three other sets of children, one being the children of her sister, and one each for two of her sons.

Those who enjoyed the l2 o’clock dinner with her were her husband’s cousin, Robert Griffin of Princeton, her daughter-in-law, Mrs. May Walters of Kansas City, Kansas; her granddaughter, Mrs. Pearl Dayer, of Kansas City, and her great grandson, Eddie White of Kansas City, Mrs. Rachel Ragan of Mercer; Leora Holmes; Mr. and Mrs. H. R. Spencer.

The family has always been known for their longevity. Her father, Richard Cox, lived to be 105 years old and his father was 110. Her mother died in Princeton at the age of 98 years.

She united with the Methodist Church at the age of l5 and feels that everyone should devote their whole life to Him who doeth all things well. She told each caller Friday that she wants them to live so they can meet her on the other shore.

All day Friday her friends could be seen going to and from the home of “Aunt Prudy” carrying tokens of love and remembrances to this beloved lady. Over sixty-five persons brought and sent presents which ranged from flowers and fruit, etc., to a dress pattern. The teachers and their pupils in the grades sent her a lovely miscellaneous shower.

She wishes to thank everyone who so kindly remembered her.”

[From the “Princeton Telegraph.]”

[This article was sent to the “Leon Reporter” by the “Princeton Telegraph,” and kindly copied by Nancee [McMurtrey] Seifert, with permission from the “Leon Journal Reporter.”]
==O==
William B. Goin was enumerated as the head of a household in the 1900 census of Knox County, Enumeration District 82, page 15, Civil District 12:

“Goin, William B. 25, born in TN in May 1876
Minnie A. 20, born in TN in May 1880”
==O==
Mrs. Hester Goines was baptized March 10, 1861 into the First Presbyterian Church of Knoxville, Tennessee, according to “Nineteenth Century Tennessee Church Records” by Byron Sistler.
==O==
Calvin Goings was married May 1, 1843 to Milly Henderson, according to “Knox County, Tennessee Marriages, 1784-1900.” Children born to Calvin Goings and Milly Henderson Goings are unknown.
==O==
Niss S. Goings was married December 23, 1841 to James M. Pryor, according to “Knox County, Tennessee Marriages, 1784-1900.”
==O==
Sarah J. Goings was married to James M. Pryor December 25, 1841, according to “Knox County, Tennessee Marriages, 1784-1900.”
==O==
Dr. Goins, a surgeon from Tennessee serving in the U. S. Army, was captured by the Confederates and imprisoned in Knoxville, Tennessee, according to “War Department Re­ports” Series II, Volume 5.

Dr. K. C. Devine, a Confederate surgeon, wrote a report November 22, 1862 describing the difficulty he had in rejoining his regiment after he had been captured by Union forces. Following a battle near Perryville, Kentucky Dr. K. C. Devine had stayed behind to care for wounded. Devine stated that he and a fellow doctor were imprisoned as hostages for a fellow doctor [USA] named “Goins” whom, a citizen, Dr. Hall, reported was in a dungeon on bread and water at Knoxville. The ill-treatment accorded Dr. Goins was the result of his being a Tennesseean who the Confederates considered a traitor.
==O==
Albert S. Goins was married December 27, 1885 to Ella A. Reed, according to “Knox County, Tennessee Marriages, 1784-1900.” Of Albert S. Goins and Ella A Reed Goins noth­ing more is known.
==O==
Alice E. Goins was married to Jerry T. Logan November 17, 1881, according to “Knox County, Tennessee Marriages, 1784-1900.”
==O==
Arthur Goins, negro, 12, born in Tennessee, “birth date un­known,” was enumerated in the household of his uncle, Thomas Tate in the 1900 census of Knox County, Enumera­tion District 69, page 16, Civil District 2.
==O==
Bettie Goins was married November 23, 1876 to McMillan P. Sherrod, according to “Knox County, Tennessee Marriages, 1784-1900.”
==O==
Cassie E. Goins was married to Hugh A. Garrett August 1, 1874, according to “Knox County, Tennessee Marriages, 1784-1900.”
==O==
Clinton A. Goins was married to Alice E. Mason July 1, 1875, according to “Knox County, Tennessee Marriages, 1784-1900.” Children born to Clinton A. Goins and Alice E. Mason Goins are unknown.
==O==
Eliza Goins was married to Elihu Boggs August 14, 1862, ac­cording to “Knox County, Tennessee Marriages, 1784-1900.”
==O==
Emma Goins was married to Robert Morrison April 11, 1881, according to “Knox County, Tennessee Marriages, 1784-1900.”
==O==
Felix W. Goins was married January 14, 1866 to Martha Maget, according to “Knox County, Tennessee Marriages, 1784-1900.” Of Felix W. Goins and Martha Maget Goins nothing more is known.
==O==
Henry Goins was married August 18, 1894 to Lucy Ferguson, according to “Knox County, Tennessee Marriages, 1784-1900.” Children born to Henry Goins and Lucy Ferguson Goins are unknown.
==O==
Hiley Goins was married to Perry C. Childress July 6, 1899, according to “Knox County, Tennessee Marriages, 1784-1900.” Children born to Hiley Goins and Perry C. Childress Goins are unknown.
==O==
Ibby [Abbie?} A. Goins was married to Ples C. Conner De­cember 7, 1898, according to “Knox County, Tennessee Mar­riages, 1784-1900.”
==O==
J. C. Goins, a veteran of the Fifth-Eighth Tennessee Infantry Regiment, Company F, CSA, was a resident of Knox County in 1914 according to his reply to a questionnaire circulated by the Tennessee Historical Society.
==O==
James Goins was married to Lucy Johnson July 4, 1890, ac­cording to “Knox County, Tennessee Marriages, 1784-1900.” Children born to James Goins and Lucy Johnson Goins are unknown.
==O==
James Goins was married to Bertha E. Scott November 11, 1897, according to “Knox County, Tennessee Marriages, 1784-1900.” Of James Goins and Bertha E. Scott Goins noth­ing more is known.
==O==
John Goins was married August 8, 1897 to Rhoda Badgett, ac­cording to “Knox County, Tennessee Marriages, 1784-1900.” Of John Goins and Rhoda Badgett Goins nothing more is known.
==O==
John Thomas Goins and his wife, Lottie Morton Goins were residents of Knox County February 22, 1901 when a daughter,
Carrie Jane Goins was born. She was married about 1922 to Horace Lee Vowell. Carrie Jane Goins Vowell died May 8, 1994. Her obituary appeared in

“Carrie Jane Goins Vowell, 93, of Lake City died Sunday, May 8, in Lake City Health Care Center, where she has resided several years.

Mrs.Vowell was born February 22, 1901, in Knoxville to John Thomas Goins and Lottie Morton Goins. She was a home-maker. She was a member of Longfield Baptist Church.

She was survived by one sister, Ethel Goins Woods of Lake City. Mrs.Vowell was preceded in death by her husband, Horace Lee Vowell,in 1972 and a son, Claude H. Vowell in 1956. Burial was Tuesday morning at Oak Grove Cemetery.”
==O==
Joseph Goins was married March 22, 1882 to Harriet Ander­son, according to “Knox County, Tennessee Marriages, 1784-1900.” Children born to Joseph Goins and Harriet An­derson Goins are unknown.
==O==
Livie Goins was married February 6, 1884 to Jack Strong, ac­cording to “Knox County, Tennessee Marriages, 1784-1900.”
==O==
Maggie Goins was married to John Hoss February 10, 1881, according to “Knox County, Tennessee Marriages, 1784-1900.”
==O==
Malvina Goins was married to Thomas Bird April 11, 1835, according to “Knox County, Tennessee Marriages, 1784-1900.”
==O==
Martha Ann Goins was married February 2, 1873 to John David Weeden, according to “Knox County, Tennessee Marriages, 1784-1900.”x
==O==
Martha J. Goins was married December 5, 1858 to Samuel Burris, according to “Knox County, Tennessee Marriages, 1784-1900.”
==O==
Mary Goins was married to Henry Evans January 11, 1891, according to “Knox County, Tennessee Marriages, 1784-1900.”
==O==
Mary H. Goins was married to Calvin C. Wallace July 29, 1875, according to “Knox County, Tennessee Marriages, 1784-1900.”
==O==
Matilda A. Goins was married to Shadrick F. Callaway Jan­uary 7, 1866, according to “Knox County, Tennessee Mar­riages, 1784-1900,”
==O==
Mollie Goins was married to Washington Hall August 7, 1882, according to “Knox County, Tennessee Marriages, 1784-1900.”
==O==
Nancy Goins was married to Jubilee Bradley April 13, 1837, according to “Knox County, Tennessee Marriages, 1784-1900.” Jubilee Bradley was born in Virginia in 1808, according to “Dade County Missouri Families” by Dorothy Anderson York.

They removed to Missojuri about 1846. The family appeared in the 1860 census of Dade County Missouri:

“Bradley, Jubilee 52, born in VA
Nancy
William 18, born in TN
Thomas D. 17, born in TN
John W. 13, born in MO
Mary A. 10, born in MO
Hamilton 6, born in MO”
==O==
Priscilla Jane Goins was married October 24, 1858 to Samuel Larew, according to “Knox County, Tennessee Marriages, 1784-1900.”
==O==
Rebecca P. Goins was married to Temple H. Coram Decem­ber 29, 1867, according to “Knox County, Tennessee Mar­riages, 1784-1900.”
==O==
Robert Goins was married to Catharine Hardin June 24, 1889, according to “Knox County, Tennessee Marriages, 1784-1900.” Children born to Robert Goins and Catharine Hardin Goins are unknown.
==O==
Robert Goins was married to Mary Pages September 23, 1896, according to “Knox County, Tennessee Marriages, 1784-1900.” Of Robert Goins and Mary Pages Goins nothing more is none.
==O==
Sam R. Goins and Anna Wilburn Goins were the parents of Hattie Ethel Goins who was born November 5, 1899, according to Jo Ann Pierce of Clinton, Washington, a granddaughter of Hattie Ethel Goins.
==O==
Sarah Goins was married to Alexander Franklin September 28, 1893, according to “Knox County, Tennessee Marriages, 1784-1900.”
==O==
Shedrick Goins was married January 14, 1868 to Susan Burchell, according to “Knox County, Tennessee Marriages, 1784-1900.” Children born to Shedrick Goins and Susan Burchell Goins are unknown.
==O==
Thomas Goins was married to Sue Davis April 21, 1900, ac­cording to “Knox County, Tennessee Marriages, 1784-1900.” Of Thomas Goins and sue Davis Goins nothing more is known.

Tiney Goins was married to George W. Bailey November 24, 1884, according to “Knox County, Tennessee Marriages, 1784-1900.”
==O==
Tobias Goins was married to Annie Tipton August 24, 1891, according to “Knox County, Tennessee Marriages, 1784-1900.” Children born to Tobias Goins and Annie Tipton Goins are unknown.
==O==
Washington Goins was married to Carrie Brice December 30, 1886, according to “Knox County, Tennessee Marriages, 1784-1900.” Children born to Washington Goins and Carrie Brice Goins are unknown.
==O==
William Goins was married March 2, 1879 to Lottie Bowman, according to “Knox County, Tennessee Marriages, 1784-1900.” Three months later James Goins, possibly a brother, was married to Jane Bowman on June 5, 1879. Lottie Bow­man Goins and Jane Bowman Goins are regarded as sisters.
==O==
William Goins was married to Ella Bettis June 15, 1887, ac­cording to “Knox County, Tennessee Marriages, 1784-1900.” Children born to William Goins and Ella Bettis Goins are unknown.
==O==
William Goins was married to Casander Brokes [{Brooks?] January 22, 1896, according to “Knox County, Tennessee Marriages, 1784-1900.” Children born to William Goins and Casander Brokes Goins are unknown.
==O==
William Goins was married to Minnie Ann Horton October 16, 1898, according to “Knox County, Tennessee Marriages, 1784-1900.” Of William Goins and Minnie Ann Horton Goins nothing more is known.
==O==
George Washington Gowan was a resident of Knoxville about 1880. He was married about 1884, to Lillie Harvey. He was living in Redfield, Arkansas in 1885 when their first child was born. He was living in Commerce, Texas in 1896 when their second child was born. It is believed that Lillie Harvey Gowan died about this time.

On November 17, 1900 George Washington Gowan and his second wife, Sallie R. Gowan received a warranty deed to a lot in Hundley Park Addition, Commerce, according to Hunt County, Texas Deed Book 107, page 293. On April 15, 1902 George Washington Gowan received a deed to a lot in Commerce from Sanger Bros, according to Hunt County Deed Book 172, page 9.

George Washington Gowan and Sallie R. Gowan gave a warranty to J. A. Crawford March 12, 1903 to their property in Hundley Park Addition, according to Hunt County Deed Book 125, page 219. George Washington Gowan had other real estate transactions in Commerce to the time of his death in 1906.

Probate of George Washington Gowan is covered in Hunt County Probate Book J, pages 265, 266, 322, 324, Book 0, pages 294, 299 and Book T, pages 401, 402, and 403.

Between the time of his death and the time of the probate Sal­lie R. Gowan had remarried to H. D. Speaks. On November 18, 1912 Sallie R. Gowan Speaks, “widow of George Washington Gowan” was appointed guardian of the minor children, according to Hunt County Probate Book J, pages 265 and 266. She posted bond of $1,600.

H. D. Speaks took over the management of the estate and on May 10, 1913 sold a residence formerly owned by George Washington Gowan for $1,000 as down payment for “poor land” in Rains County, Texas and later lost it all when the land was sold for the indebtedness against it. H. D. Speaks died before April 4, 1918.

Children born to George Washington Gowan and Lillie Harvey Gowan include:

Lee Edwin Gowan born in 1888
Libby Gowan born October 12, 1896

Children born to George Washington Gowan and Sallie R. Gowan include:

Neville Otto “Frank” Gowan born in 1901
Lillian J. “Libby” Gowan born May 23, 1904
Julia Gowan born about 1908
B. J. Gowan born about 1910

Lee Edwin Gowan, son of George Washington Gowan and Lillie Harvey Gowan, was born at Redfield, Arkansas in 1888. He received a 1/20 interest in 10 acres of land in Orange County, Texas March 4, 1909 from J. P. Eddleman, according to Orange County Deed Book 5, page 298.

He received a deed from M. L. Linscomb April 5, 1910 to four acres of land in Shelton Survey for $2,200, according to Orange County Deed Book 3, page 506. About 1912 he was married to Lillian Olive Harris, a teacher, who was born at Cooper, Texas in 1888. Lee Edwin Gowan and Lillian Olive Harris Gowan received a deed from W. B. Simmons, Jr. and a release from W. H. Stark in connection with the land he pur­chased in Shelton Survey, according to Orange County Deed Book 15, page 189, page 471.

In 1915 Lee Edwin Gowan was the manager of a lumber yard at Checotah, Oklahoma and lived at 612 West First Street there.

Lee Edwin Gowan received a deed from D. M. Matthews July 3, 1920, according to Palo Pinto County, Texas Deed Book 104, page 369. He and Lillian Alice Harris Gowan gave a deed of trust to Matthews for a lot in Slaughter & Barber Ad­dition to the city of Mineral Wells, Texas, according to Palo Pinto County Deed of Trust Book 20, page 564.

Lee Edwin Gowan received a release on real estate from R. E. Good, June 14, 1922, according to Palo Pinto County Deed Book 117, page 535. Lee Edwin Gowan and Lillian Alice Har­ris Gowan received an extension on property in Mineral Wells from O. L. Swift July 1, 1922, according to Palo Pinto County Deed Book 115, page 539.

Lee Edwin Gowan was married to Miss Emma Francis McGe­hee July 3, 1924, according to Palo Pinto County Mar­riage Book 7, page 53. In 1925 Lee Edwin Gowan, a sales­man for Packard-Scruggs Com­pany, and Emma Francis McGehee Gowan, lived at 1572 Lipscomb Avenue in Wichita Falls, Texas, ac­cording to the city directory. In 1926 he ap­peared in the Wichita Falls directory as a salesman for Lloyd Weaver Company, residing at 1804 Monroe.

He gave a lease contract on his residence in Mineral Wells to H. B. Chaney January 9, 1926, according to Palo Pinto County Deed Book 135, page 592.

In 1926 Lee Edwin Gowan was listed in the Abilene, Texas city directory living at 300 Grape. In 1928 he appeared living in Abilene, and his wife, at that time was Ola Epley Gowan. They lived at 416 Or­ange according to the directory. On April 13, 1928 Ola Epley Gowan received a deed from A. E. Pool for a lot in Abilene, consideration was $1,000.

In 1929 Lee Edwin Gowan was listed in the city directory as secretary-treasurer of Carothers Motors, Inc. and lived at 1134 South 8th Street. In 1931 through 1935 Lee Edwin Gowan was listed as president of Gowan Motors, a DeSoto-Plymouth agency operating at 1390 North First Street, and lived at 517 Grape. Ola Epley Gowan was listed as vice-president of the corporation. In 1934 and 1935 his residence was shown at 1641 Belmont.

On May 19, 1937 Lee Edwin Gowan and Ola Epley Gowan gave a deed of trust to Standard Savings & Loan Association in Abilene in the purchase of a residence according to Taylor County Deed Book 113, page 347. In 1942 through 1944 they lived at 1918 South 9th Street in Abilene.

In 1946 he was listed in the city directory as the owner of Gowan Real Estate, and lived at 390 Meander. In 1948 the real estate firm was listed as Gowan and Sloan Real Estate. In the 1951 and 1953 editions of the directory Lee Edwin Gowan was the owner of Gowan Real Estate and lived at 1718 Bel­mont.

Lee Edwin Gowan continued in the real estate business, ac­cording to the 1955 city directory, which showed him to live at 1035 Amarillo. In 1969 he received a deed of trust from William L. Burke to property in Cason Cove, according to Brown County, Texas Deed of Trust Book 140, page 194.

Children born to Lee Edwin Gowan and Lillian Alice Harris Gowan include:

Carrie Bess Gowan born November 27, 1915

Carrie Bess Gowan, daughter of Lee Edwin Gowan and Lil­lian Alice Harris Gowan, was born November 27, 1915 at Checotah, Oklahoma. In 1931 she was listed in the Abilene city directory living in the home of her father at 517 Grape. Her birth record was recorded October 19, 1948 in Lubbock County, Texas, ac­cording to Lubbock County Birth Book 19, page 272. In 1935 she was a student at the University of Texas living in the Scot­tish Rite Dormitory, according to the Austin, Texas city direc­tory.

Libbie Gowan, daughter of George Washington Gowan and Lillie Harvey Gowan, was born October 12, 1896 in Fannin County, according to Fannin County Birth Book 23, page 1262. It is believed that both she and mother died shortly af­terwards.

Children born to George Washington Gowan and Sallie R. Gowan include:

Neville Otto Gowan born in 1901

Neville Otto “Frank” Gowan son of George Washington Gowan and Sallie R. Gowan, was born in 1901 at Commerce. He was first married about 1930, wife’s name Lucille. Later he lived at Wapanucki, Oklahoma and at Atoka, Oklahoma.

He was employed by Rock Island Railroad for 43 years. “Mr. Harrison of Clinton, Oklahoma” was mentioned as a cousin to Neville Otto “Frank” Gowan. On May 17, 1958 he was married to Mrs. Sylvia Didier and lived at 1029 West 6th Street, Elk City, Oklahoma, according to Wheeler County, Texas Marriage License 69898.

Neville Otto “Frank” Gowan died on Thanksgiving Day, 1970. Sylvia Didier Gowan continued to lived in Elk City in September 1971 when she was visited by Arlee Claud Gowen.

Children born to Neville Otto “Frank” Gowan and Lucille Gowan include:

Wynona Lee Gowan born in 1926

Wynona Lee Gowan, daughter of Neville Otto “Frank” Gowan and Lucille Gowan, was born about 1926. She was married June 6, 1945 to John Horace Stringer in Elk City, ac­cording to Beckham County, Oklahoma Marriage Book 24, page 163. Wynona Gowan Stringer was married second, hus­band’s name Leleune. In 1971 Wynona Gowan Stringer Leleune lived at Duncan, Oklahoma.

Children born to George Washington Gowan and Sallie R. Gowan include:

Lillian J. “Libbie” Gowan born May 23, 1904
Julia Gowan born about 1908
B. J. Gowan born about 1910

Lillian J. “Libbie” Gowan, daughter of George Washington Gowan and Sallie R. Gowan, was born May 23, 1904 at Com­merce, according to Hunt County Birth Book 1, page 120.

She was married September 23, 1916 to D. O. Whaley, ac­cording to Hunt County Marriage Book S, page 179. They lived at Bonham, Texas on April 4, 1918. She died in 1970 at McAllister, Oklahoma.

Julia Gowan, daughter of George Washington Gowan and Sal­lie R. Gowan, was born at Commerce about 1908. She was mentioned in the probate of her father’s will in 1912, 1913 and 1918.

B. J. Gowan, son of George Washington Gowan and Sallie R. Gowan, was born at Commerce about 1910. He was men­tioned as deceased in the probate proceedings of his father in 1918.
==O==
Julia Ella Gowan was married to Samuel E. Lowrance on Octo­ber 12, 1899 in Knox County, according to “Knox County, Tennessee Marriages, 1784-1900.”.
==O==
R. Wilson Gowan was enumerated as the head of a household in the 1900 census of Knox County, Enu­meration District 58, page 16:

“Gowan, R. Wilson 55, born in NC in August 1844
Ella 55, born in IN in October 1844
==O==
Richard N. Gowan also listed as Richard W. Gowan, re­ceived Tennessee state Confederate Pension No. 10564 for service in the Forty-Second North Carolina Infantry Regi­ment. He was living in Knox County in 1915.
==O==
W. T. Gowan was married to Susie Cheatman December 29, 1894 in Knox County. W. V. Newman was the bondsman. Of W. T. Gowan and Susie Cheatham Gowan nothing more is known.
==O==
William Gowan was listed as the head of a household enu­merated in the 1850 census of Knox County, Household No. 563-563:

“Gowan, William 60, born in Maryland, farmer,
$2,000 real estate
Mary 54, born in TN
Sarah 26, born in TN
Margarett 23, born in TN
Robert 18, born in TN, farmer,
attending school
Mary Ann 15, born in TN
William 13, born in TN”
==O==
William T. Gowan, age 24, was married to Ellen G. Salmon, age 21 June 13, 1899 in Knox County. R. A. McClure was the bondsman. William T. Gowan was enumerated as the head of a household in the 1900 census of Knox County, Enumeration District 58, page 16, living on Cumberland Street in Knoxville:

“Gowan, William T. 25, born in NE in September 1874
E. Gertrude 23, born in Eng. in January 1877”

Children born to William T. Gowan and Ellen Gertrude Salmon Gowan are unknown.
==O==
John Gowans was listed as the head of a household in the 1850 census of Knox County, Household No. 608-608:

“Gowans, John 60, born in Maryland, farmer
Elizabeth 50, born in TN
Sarah R. 24, born in TN
Latica Ann 20, born in TN
Narcisia Bell 15, born in TN
Ailsey 12, born in TN
Joseph 0, born in TN
Mahala 8, born in TN
Malinda 8, born in TN
Smith, William 10, born in TN
James 8, born in TN
Catherine 5, born in TN”
==O==
Adeline Gowens negro, was married to John Russell July 28, 1859, according to “Knox County, Ten­nessee Marriages” by Rosco Carlisle d`Armand and Virginia Carlisle.
==O==

KNOX COUNTY, TENNESSEE–B

Daniel Gowin was married December 23, 1839 to Maria Cole, according to “Knox County Tennessee, Marriages. 1784-1900” “Daniel Gowns”, a blind man, was listed as the head of a household in the 1850 census of Knox County, Household No. 561:

“Gowns, Daniel 52, born in VA, blind, cooper
Mariah 60, born in NC
William B. A. 21, born in NC”

Children born to Daniel Gowin and Maria Cole Gowin include:

William B. A. Gowin born about 1829
==O==
Jesse Harrison Gowin was born about 1840 in Knoxville, Tennessee, according to a tradition in the family of Mary R. McKenney, Foundation member of Dallas, Texas. About 1860 he was married to Sarah Jane Hicks who was born in April 1843, and in 1862, they lived in Loudon County, Tennessee where a son was born.

Shortly afterward, Jesse Harrison Gowin enlisted in Confederate service, died during the Civil War and was buried at Biloxi, Mississippi, according to a family legend. “Harrison H. Gowen” served as a private in the 26th Tennessee Infantry Regiment, Company I. “J. Gowens” served as a private in Company C, 28th Tennessee Cavalry Regiment. Kenneth Sid­ney Reeves, a descendant of Oklahoma City reports that he has been told that Jesse Harrison Gowin was a schoolteacher and was killed in his classroom during the Civil War.

Sarah Jane Hicks Gowin was remarried to Robert R. Redpath who removed to Richland County, Illinois about 1868. They were enumerated in the 1870 census of Marion County at Omega, Illinois and reappeared in the 1880 census. By 1900, Sarah Jane Hicks Gowin Redpath was in Aurora Township, Lawrence County, Missouri, living near her youngest son, Bert Redpath who was enumerated with David Corliss and Amanda Robertson Corliss. Amanda Robertson Corliss was a sister to Sarah Ann “Sally” Robertson Gowin.

Children born to Jesse Harrison Gowin and Sarah Jane Hicks Gowin include only one known son:

Jesse Harrison Gowin, Jr. born July 28, 1862

Jesse Harrison Gowin, Jr, son of Jesse Harrison Gowin and Sarah Jane Hicks Gowin, was born July 28, 1862 in Loudon County. He was taken to Marion County, Illinois about 1867 by his stepfather. He was married about 1887 in Seymour, Missouri to Sarah Ann “Sallie” Robertson. She was born February 27, 1871 at Lebanon, Missouri in Laclede County to William Robertson and Sarah Jane Fetters Robertson.

In 1893 they lived in Lawrence County, Missouri and by 1895 were back in Laclede County. They removed to Muskogee County, Oklahoma about 1902 and lived their until their deaths. He died about 1939 of a heart attack and was buried in Muskogee County. When she died, she was buried beside her husband.

Children born to Jesse Harrison Gowin, Jr. and Sarah Ann “Sallie” Robertson Gowin include:

Charles Dottson Gowin born May 24, 1889
John Roy Gowin born December 7, 1890
Mabel Melissa Gowin born July 5, 1893
Edith Clara Gowin born July 12, 1895
Jessie Flossie Gowin born November 6, 1897
Edward Guy Gowin born December 22, 1900
Nettie Gladys Gowin born July 27, 1902
Alta Marie Gowin born September 15, 1905
Bert Gowin born June 4, 1908
George Richard Gowin born March 30, 1911

Charles Dottson Gowin, son of Jesse Harrison Gowin, Jr. and Sarah Ann “Sallie” Robertson Gowin, was born May 24, 1899 in Missouri. He was married about 1922, wife’s name Della. He was later remarried, wife’s name Minnie. He died April 12, 1953 in Tahlequah, Oklahoma. Children born to Charles Dottson Gowin, Della Gowin and Minnie Gowin are unknown.

John Roy Gowin, son of Jesse Harrison Gowin, Jr. and Sarah Ann “Sallie” Robertson Gowin, was born December 7, 1890 in Missouri. He died there January 1, 1947.

Mabel Melissa Gowin, daughter of Jesse Harrison Gowin, Jr. and Sarah Ann “Sallie” Robertson Gowin, was born July 5, 1893 at Aurora, Missouri, in Lawrence County. She was mar­ried about 1913 to Dan Johnson. Later she was remarried to Vernon L. Knapp. She died September 4, 1970 in Tulsa, Okla­homa.

Edith Clara Gowin, daughter of Jesse Harrison Gowin, Jr. and Sarah Ann “Sallie” Robertson Gowin, was born July 12, 1895 at Lebanon, Missouri. She was married June 1, 1914 to Guy W. Griffith. She died October 14, 1984.

Jessie Flossie Gowin, daughter of Jesse Harrison Gowin, Jr. and Sarah Ann “Sallie” Robertson Gowin, was born November 6, 1897 in Missouri. She was married about 1918 to Stephen Brown. She was remarried to William Sidney Reeves.

Children born to William Sidney Reeves and Jessie Flossie Gowin Reeves include:

Kenneth Sidney Reeves born about 1926

Kenneth Sidney Reeves, son of William Sidney Reeves and Jessie Flossie Gowin, Reeves was born about 1926, place un­known. He was married about 1949, wife’s name Joyce. In 1997 they lived in Oklahoma City where they as Foundation members are active in the research of their family history. It is through their courtesy that much of the information in this sec­tion appears.

Edward Guy Gowin, son of Jesse Harrison Gowin, Jr. and

Sarah Ann “Sallie” Robertson Gowin, was born December 22, 1899. He was enumerated in the 1900 census. He was married about 1922 to Naomi Ward Allen. He died December 15, 1962. Children born to Edward Guy Gowin and Naomi Ward AllenGowin are unknown.

Nettie Gladys Gowin, daughter of Jesse Harrison Gowin, Jr. and Sarah Ann “Sallie” Robertson Gowin, was born July 27, 1902 in Muskogee. She was married about 1931 to William Meeks. She died in Tulsa January 9, 1993.

Alta Marie Gowin, daughter of Jesse Harrison Gowin, Jr. and Sarah Ann “Sallie” Robertson Gowin, was born September 15, 1905 in Oklahoma. She was married about 1923 to Jack Kelly. Later she was remarried to Ernest Cobb. She died January 15, 1940.

Bert Gowin, son of Jesse Harrison Gowin, Jr. and Sarah Ann “Sallie” Robertson Gowin, was born June 4, 1908 in Muskogee. He was married about 1931, wife’s name Grace. Later he was remarried, wife’s name Zelma. He died in March 1972. Children born to Bert Gowin, Grace Gowin and Zelma Gowin are unknown.

George Richard Gowin, son of Jesse Harrison Gowin, Jr. and Sarah Ann “Sallie” Robertson Gowin, was born March 30, 1911 in Oklahoma. He was married about 1934 to Mae Wilburton. He died May 3, 1995. Children born to George Richard Gowin and Mae Wilburton Gowin are unknown.

“George Richard Gowin,” age 84, “retired from Sheffield Steel,” died in 1995, according to the “Tulsa World.” He was buried at Collinsville, Oklahoma.
==O==
Ritter Gowin was married to John Roddy January 18, 1839 in Knox County, according to Knox County, Tennessee Marriages,1784-1900.” Jesse R. Brock was the bondsman. Jesse R. Brock was also the bondsman for the wedding of Daniel Gowin to Maria Cole December 23, 1839 in Knox County.

John Roddy was mentioned as a landowner in Spartanburg County, South Carolina in the will of Major John “Buck” Gowen written November 10, 1809.

Goan Morgan was married to Malinda Nevilles December 27, 1797 in Knox County, according to the research of Ryan D. Neaveill of Champaign, Illinois.

Researchers:

Mary R. McKenney, 3421 Amherst, Dallas, TX, 75225, 214/691-5384
Kenneth Sidney & Joyce Reeves, 621 SW 32nd, Oklahoma City, OK, 73109,
405/634-8977

http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.com/~gowenrf

The bible, in the possession of Mattie Lou Gowan Lane of Memphis, Tennessee, records that James Marion Gowan died February 29, 1932. He, a farmer, died of pneumonia at age 70, according to Tennessee DVS Death Certificate No. 5429. He was buried at Booneville, according to Mrs. Sterling Mills, informant of Fayetteville.

Mary Matilda Thompson Buntley Gowan died “sitting in her chair” in her home in Mimosa May 31, 1938, according to Ten­nessee DVS Death Certificate No.10409. She was buried be­side her husband, ac­cording to her daughter, Bettie Eliza­beth Gowan Mills, informant of Fayetteville.

In another volume of bible inscriptions, complied by Wilma Swing, Ruth C. Morgan, Lee Hudson, Pamela Joy Swing and Mattie Lou Gowan Lane, several individuals of interest to Gowen chroniclers are mentioned.

Children born to James Marion Gowan and Mary Matilda Thompson Buntley Gowan include:

Jacob Hirman Gowan born May 6, 1883
James William Gowan born September 12, 1884
Bettie Elizabeth Gowan born April 6, 1888
Mattie Lou Gowan born October 7, 1889
Berry Curlee Gowan born November 8, 1894
Annie Jane Gowan born December 12, 1896
Samuel Hipps Gowan born February 8, 1902
Ena May Gowan born December 9, 1904

Jacob Hirman Gowan, son of James Marion Gowan and Mary Matilda Thompson Buntley Gowan, was born May 6, 1883 probably in Lincoln County. He did not marry.

James William Gowan, son of James Marion Gowan and Mary Matilda Thompson Buntley Gowan, was born Septem­ber 12, 1884, probably in Lincoln County. He was married to Ruthie Warden August 15, 1907.

Children born to James William Gowan and Ruthie Warden Gowan include:

Harold Gowan born about 1909
Katherine Gowan born about 1911
Forrest Gowan born about 1914

Bettie Elizabeth Gowan, daughter of James Marion Gowan and Mary Matilda Thompson Buntley Gowan, was born April 6, 1888. She was married December 30, 1907 to Ster­ling Mills. In 1938 they lived at Fayetteville

Mattie Lou Gowan, daughter of James Marion Gowan and Mary Matilda Thompson Buntley Gowan, was born October 7, 1889. She was married to Ezell Lane August 30, 1900. Later Mattie Lou Gowan Lane lived in Memphis, Tennessee.

Berry Curlee Gowan, son of James Marion Gowan and Mary Matilda Thompson Buntley Gowan, was born November 8, 1894. He did not marry. He died March 5, 1930, at age 35 “of cerebro spinal meningitis,” according to his Tennessee BVS Death Certificate No. 6294, signed by T. A. Patrick, M.D. He was buried in Booneville Cemetery, according to Sam Gowan of Mulberry, Tennessee, informant

An unnamed infant daughter of Sam Gowan was born February 8, 1910 and died the following day, according to Tennessee Death Certificate No. 54368.

The tombstone at the grave of Berry Curlee Gowan erroneously states that he was the “son of A. Berry Gowan and Ophia Faulkner Gowan.” A. Berry Gowan was born August 10, 1865.

“A. B. Gowan” was married to S. E. Hudson October 15, 1892, according to Lincoln County Marriage Book 2, page 69. Apparently Mrs. S. E. Hudson Gowan died within the decade. A. Berry Gowan was remarried September 14, 1901 to Ophia Faulkner by J. E. Poindexter, Court Clerk, according to Lincoln County Marriage Book 3, page 74.

Also located in Booneville Cemetery are the graves of “A. Berry Gowan, born August 10, 1865, died May 11, 1945;” “Ophia Faulkner Gowan, born April 14, 1880, died August 15, 1938;” “Mary B. Gowan, 1865-1938” and “D. Ernest Gowan, born February 4, 1910 and died April 15, 1950.”

Children born to A. Berry Gowan and Ophia Faulkner Gowan, according to “Lincoln County, Tennessee Bible Records,” Volume 4, by Mabel Abbott Tucker and Jane Warren Waller, include:

William Cowden Gowan born December 3, 1904

William Cowden Gowan, son of A. Berry Gowan and Ophia Faulkner Gowan was born December 3, 1904 in Lincoln County. He was married December 11, 1927 to Mildred Adana Smith, who was born April 25, 1909.

Children born to William Cowden Gowan and Mildred Adana Smith Gowan include:

Hirman Cowden Gowan born March 20, 1935

Hirman Cowden Gowan, son of William Cowden Gowan and Mildred Adana Smith Gowan was born March 20, 1935. He was married December 23, 1962 to Linda Faye Brown. Of Hirman Cowden Gowan and Linda Faye Brown Gowan and de­scendants nothing more is known.

Annie Jane Gowan, daughter of James Marion Gowan and Mary Matilda Thompson Buntley Gowan, was born Decem­ber 12, 1896, probably in Lincoln County. She was married to William C. Robyn in 1921.

Apparently Annie Jane Gowan was married earlier to Everett Bedwell because they were the parents of Mabel Bedwell, who was born September 11, 1912.

Samuel Hipps Gowan, son of James Marion Gowan and Mary Matilda Thompson Buntley Gowan, was born February 8, 1902. He was married to Mary Louise Little August 9, 1923.

Children born to Samuel Hipps Gowan and Mary Louise Lit­tle Gowan include:

Evelyn Louise Gowan born September 29, 1924

Evelyn Louise Gowan, daughter of Samuel Hipps Gowan and Mary Louise Little Gowan, was born September 29, 1924. She was married to James David Lane August 21, 1950.

Ena Mae Gowan, daughter of James Marion Gowan and Mary Matilda Thompson Buntley Gowan, was born December 8, 1904, probably in Lincoln County. She was married to Charles Holland June 9, 1930.

According to another bible owned by Lee Hudson, Mimosa Road, Fayetteville, Tennessee, Mattie Francis Gowan was married to William Bell Hudson July 10, 1877. She was born in Lincoln County December 24, 1859. William Bell Hudson was later married to Alice L. Thomison November 8, 1896.
==O==
James D. Gowan was married to Maggie Daniel January 22, 1872, according to Lincoln County marriage records. Children born to James D. Gowan and Maggie Daniel Gowan are unknown.
==O==
Gary H. Gowan, son of Sam Gowan and Mary Prosser Gowan, was born March 8, 1864 in Tennessee. In 1929 he was farming near Mimosa, Tennessee in Lincoln County. He died there of “heart trouble, with no physician attending,” ac­cording to Ten­nessee BVS Death Certificate 27289. He was buried there in Prosser Graveyard, according to Jim Gowan, informant of Fayetteville.
==O==
Mattie F. Gowan was married to W. B. Hudson July 10, 1877 in Lincoln County according to Tennessee Marriage records (1851-1900).
==O==
Nancy Ann Gowan was married to Benjamin Bedford November 21, 1855 in Lincoln County according to Tennessee Marriage records (1851-1900).
==O==
S. H. Gowan was married to Mattie Raney December 3, 1891 in Lincoln County according to Tennessee Marriage records (1851-1900).
==O==
Daniel H. Gowen was married September 10, 1841 to Mary Ann Myrick by John Moore, J. P, according to “Lincoln County, Tennessee Marriages, 1823-1850.” Children born to Daniel H. Gowen and Mary Ann Myrick Gowen are unknown.
==O==
Mary Ann Gowen, a widow, appeared in the 1880 census of Lincoln County as the head of a household in Enumeration District 123, page 30, Fayetteville District 8, enumerated as:

“Gowen, Mary Ann 36, born in TN, father born in
TN, mother born in TN,
common laborer, illiterate”
Dovey E. 3, born in TN, father born in
TN, mother born in TN,
daughter
Dilmer 10/12, born in TN, father born in
TN, mother born in TN, son,
born in July”

Children born to Mrs. Mary Ann Gowen include:

Dovey E. Gowen born about 1877
Dilmer Gowen born about 1879
==O==
S. H. Gowan was married to Mattie Ramsey December 2, 1891, according to Lincoln marriage Records. “S. H. Gowen” was involved in land transactions in Lincoln County September 9, 1901 and October 7, 1907, according to Lincoln County Deed Book JJ, pages 73 and 386. He deeded 72 acres of land to John A. Keith for $880. Children born to S. H. Gowan and Mattie Ramsey Gowan are unknown.
==O==
Frances Gowen was married to Merdica Reed January 6, 1870 in Lincoln County according to Tennessee Marriage records (1851-1900).
==O==
Hamilton Gowen was married to Frances Prosser January 4, 1859 in Lincoln County according to Tennessee Marriage records (1851-1900).
==O==
J. C. Gowen was married to Miss S. D. McAfee September 16, 1893, according to Lincoln County marriage records.
==O==
Samuel E. Gowen was married Mary E. Prosser April 19, 1859 in Lincoln County according to Tennessee Marriage records (1851-1900). Nothing more is known of Samuel E. Gowen and Mary E. Prosser Gowen.
==O==
Buried in Porch Cemetery at Bookhill, Tennessee was “W. H. C. Gowen.” No dates were given on his headstone. Adjoining were the graves of “William H. Porch, died Sep. 1870” and “Pheby” whose grave was marked with a fieldstone, according to “Cemetery Inscriptions of Lincoln County, Tennessee.”

LOUDON COUNTY, TENNESSEE

Virginia Goins was born July 2, 1920. She died May 28, 1963 and was buried in Davis Cemetery in Loudon County. James Albert Goins was born July 27, 1915. He died January 25, 1928 and was buried in Davis Cemetery.

MADISON COUNTY, TENNESSEE

Carl Gowan died in 1911 in Madison County according to “Tennessee Deaths,” record number 60187.
==O==
Mary Gowan, regarded as a widow, was enumerated as the head of a household in the 1880 census of Madison County:

“Gowan, Mary 47, born in Tennessee
Martha 23, born in Arkansas
Ella 18, born in Tennessee
Ada 12, born in Tennessee
Lutha 8, born in Tennessee”
==O==
Mary E. Gowan died in 1911 in Madison County according to “Tennessee Deaths,” records number 60191.
==O==
Mary Susan Gowan was married to William Andrew Poteete May 29, 1870 in Madison County according to Tennessee Marriage Records [1851-1900].
==O==
Robert Gowan and his wife, Etta Gowan were believed to be residents of Madison County about 1890. Children born to them include:

James Roscoe Gowan born about 1890

James Roscoe Gowan, son of Robert Gowan and Etta Gowan, was born about 1890, probably in Madison County. He was married in 1914 in Carroll County to Murlene Marion Wood, daughter of Lonnie Wood, born 1876 and Addie Stubbs Wood. Lonnie Wood died in 1940 and was buried in Friendship Cemetery in Gibson County, Tennessee. Addie Stubbs Wood was born in 1878 and died in 1964. She was buried beside her husband.

James Roscoe Gowan died in July 1967 and was buried in Oakwood Cemetery in Milan, Tennessee.

Later she was remarried, husband’s name Bailey. Murlene Marion Wood Gowen Bailey died in January 1976 and was buried in Oakwood Cemetery at Milan, Tennessee

Children born to James Roscoe Gowan and Murlene Marion Wood Gowan include:

Frances Patricia Gowan born October 12, 1917
Maudene Gowan [twin] born about 1920
Maurene Gowan [twin] born about 1920

Frances Patricia Gowan, daughter of James Roscoe Gowan and Marion M. Wood Gowan, was born October 12, 1917 in Jackson, Tennessee. Frances Patricia Gowan Black Bixler died in 1953 at Dallas, Texas and was buried in Oakwood Cemetery in Milan, Tennessee, according to Brenda Black McCaskill, her granddaughter..
==O==
Pleasant Gowan was married to Mary A. E. Harris July 30, 1849, according to “Madison County, Tennessee Marriages, 1827-1850.” Children born to Pleasant Gowan and Mary A. E. Harris Gowan are unknown.
==O==
Lillie Gowen, “age 24, born in December 1875 in South Carolina” and “Margurite Gowen, “age 6, born in March 1894 in Indiana” were recorded as lodgers with Susan Ellen Fryer in the 1900 census of Carroll County, Enumeration District 138, page 8.
==O==
Mary Gowen was married to Lemuel Day July 26, 1849, according to “Madison County, Tennessee Marriages, 1827-1850.”
==O==
A negro, William Gowin, age 18, a servant born in Tennessee, whose parents were born in Tennessee, was living in the Household of Mary A. Johnson in the 1880 census of Carroll County, Enumeration District 18, page 5.

MARION COUNTY, TENNESSEE

Daniel Goin was enumerated as the head of Household No. 444-444, Seventh Civil District in the 1850 census of Marion County. The family was enumerated as:

“Goin, Daniel 53, born in NC, farmer, illiterate
Charlotte 40, born in TN
Daniel 18, born in Tennessee, farmer
Malinda 14, born in TN
Lucinda 11, born in Tennessee
John 8, born in TN
Martha 5, born in TN
Charlotte 3, born in TN
Goin, Elizabeth 30, born in TN
Daniel 5, born in TN
Nancy 2, born in TN”
==O==
Andrew J. Going was enumerated as the head of a household in the 1900 census of Marion County, Enumeration District 96, page 14, Civil District 12:

“Going, Andrew J. 48, born in December 1851 in TN
Millie R. 46, born in March 1854 in TN”
==O==
Mrs. Essie Ware Goins died November 24, 1985 at South Pittsburg, Tennessee. She was born in 1901 in Alabama to Joseph Ware and Ellen Landers Quarles Ware. Ellen Landers Quarles was the daughter of Francis Quarles and Delia Summey. Essie Ware was married to Lee Goins about 1919.
==O==
Maude Goins, aunt of John Lee Bray II, recorded the following birth records in her bible. They were submitted October 24, 2000 by Linda Bray York who reported that her father was married to Laura Goins, daughter of Madge Irwin Goins. She also mentioned that Rhoda Caroline Goins, daughter of John Goins [below] of Marion County, was married to Joseph Eaton Beaty. Many of this family were buried in Rankin’s Cove Cemetery in Jasper, Tennessee.

Bible entries were:

John Goins born June 5, 1865
Thomas Goins born August 25, 1869
Mary Goins born February 24, 1871
Susan Goins born July 17, 1876
Martha June Goins born December 1, 1879
died December 7, 1881
Nancy Goins born June 29, 1881
Eliza Goins born January 7, 1873
Shirley Goins born February 10, 1876
William Albert Goins born March 14, 1878
James Goins born January 25, 1878

William Goins was enumerated as the head of a household in the 1830 census of Marion County. His household was recorded as:

“Goins, William white male 30-40
white female 30-40
white female 10-15
white male 5-10
white female 5-10
white male 0-5
white male 0-5
white male 0-5”
==O==
Three young men, apparently brothers, composed Household 41-41, 4th Civil District in Marion County, Tennessee in the 1870 census. The enumeration taken on August 8, 1870, page 6, showed Jasper, Tennessee as the post office address of:

“Gowen, Alexander 20, farm laborer, born in TN
David 18, farm laborer, born in TN,
illiterate
George W. 16, farm laborer, born in TN

MARSHALL COUNTY, TENNESSEE

Mary Ann Gowen was married to Thomas Smith March 15, 1846, according to “Marshall County, Tennessee Marriages, 1836-1870.”
==O==
Samuel W. McGowan was married February 27, 1879 to Dillie T. Shupe, according to Marshall County marriage records. Children born to Samuel W. McGowan and Dillie T. Shupe McGowan are unknown.

Gowen Research Foundation Phone:806/795-8758, 795-9694
5708 Gary Avenue E-mail: gowen@sbcglobal.net
Lubbock, Texas, 79413-4822 GOWENMS.112, 01/09/02
Internet: http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.com/~gowenrf

Membership Application

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HENDERSON COUNTY, TENNESSEE

Sarah Going[?] appeared as the head of Household 95-76 in the 1850 census of Henderson County:

“Going[?], Sarah 70, born in NC
Cynthia 38, born in TN
Minerva 35”
==O==
William C. Gowan was enumerated in the 1840 census of Henderson County, page 327 as the head of a household composed of:

“Gowan, William C. white male 50-60
white female 50-60
white female 20-30
white male 15-20
white male 15-20
white male 5-10
white male 5-10”

One transcriber showed the name of the householder as “William H. Gowan.” Three members of the family were en­gaged in agriculture. All members over 20 could read and write. There were no deaf, blind, pensioners or insane.

HENRY COUNTY, TENNESSEE

Cora Goin was married to Samie Egman June 11, 1898 in Henry County according to Tennessee Marriage records (1851-1900). Nothing more is known of Samie Egman and Cora Goin Egman.
==O==
Louise Gowan was born about 1812 in South Carolina [or Vir­ginia] of parents unknown, according to Jenny Lou Penick Garner, a great-great-granddaughter of Decatur, Georgia. Louise Gowan was married about 1830 in South Carolina to William Roland Altom/Altum. By 1835 they were living in Henry County. He died about 1905.

Children born to William Roland Altom and Louise Gowan Altom include:

Evaline Altom born about 1831
Emily Louise Altom born July 27, 1835
Frances Altom born about 1841
Martha Jane Altom born about 1843
Milton Pollock Altom born about 1845

Emily Louise Altom, daughter of William Roland Altom and Louise Gowan Altom, was born July 27, 1835 in Tennessee. She was married in Henry County July 18, 1850 to Henry Babb Walters. She died there in Manleyville, Tennessee December 7, 1867.

Children born to Henry Babb Walters and Emily Louise Altom Walters include:

William Roland “Bink” Walters born in 1851
Louisa Walters born in 1853
Anna Walters born in 1856
John Henry Walters born in 1858
Thomas Babb Walters born in 1860
Minnie Walters born in 1861
Mary Witt “Mollie” Walters born in 1866

Anna Walters, daughter of Henry Babb Walters and Emily Louise Altom Walters, was born in 1856. She was married about 1874 to William Quincy Lee.

Children born to them include:

Charles Franklin Lee born about 1880

Charles Franklin Lee, son of William Quincy Lee and Anna Walters Lee, was born about 1880. He was married about 1910 to Ruby Evett Loyd.

Children born to them include:

Joe Herbert Lee born about 1922

Joe Herbert Lee, son of Charles Franklin Lee and Ruby Evett Loyd Lee, was born about 1922. In 1997 he, a member of the Foundation, lived in Weatherford, Texas.

Mary Witt “Mollie” Walters, daughter of Henry Babb Walters and Emily Louise Altom Walters, was born in 1866. She was married about 1885 to Elijah Warren “Lige” Penick who was born in 1856. He died in 1918, and she died in 1946.

Children born to them include:

Eliza Ann Penick born in 1886
Mary Emily Penick born in 1888
Enloe Penick born in 1890
John Henry Walters Penick born in 1893
Elijah Charles Penick born in 1895
William Jennings Bryan Penick born in 1896
Joe Newton Penick born in 1902
Roland Altom Penick born in 1904

Elijah Charles Penick, son of Elijah Warren “Lige” Penick and Mary Witt “Mollie” Walters Penick, was born in 1895. He was married about 1936 to Betty Lou McDonald who was born in 1908. He died in 1977, and she died in 1983.

Children born to them include:

Charlene Penick born in 1938
Jenny Lou Penick born in 1939

Jenny Lou Penick, daughter of Elijah Charles Penick and Betty Lou McDonald Penick, was born in 1939. She was married about 1960 to Phillip Edward Garner who was born in 1938. In 1995 they lived in Decatur, Georgia where she, a member of Gowen Research Foundation, was active in the research of her family.

Children born to them include:

Philip Andrew Garner born in 1962
Julie Ann Garner born in 1964
==O==
Louisa Gowen was married to William A. Rowland of Altum, Tennessee in Henry County, according to Mrs. Webb A. Walker of Portageville, Missouri. She advised in 1961 that she was a descendant.

HICKMAN COUNTY, TENNESSEE

Isaac Goin was magistrate in Hickman County in 1885 according to “Spence’s History of Hickman County, Tennessee.”
==O==
Clagget Goins was born about 1872 in Hickman County TN, and died in 1953 in Texas, according to Tennessee birth records.
==O==
Eugenia A. Goins was married December 20, 1877 to Andrew J. Anglin, according to “Hickman County, Tennessee Marriages, 1813-1896.” “A. J. Anglen” was enumerated at age 23 in the 1860 census of Hickman County.
==O==
Gertie May Goins was born June 19, 1913 in Hickman Tennesse and died March 5, 1964 in Nashville TN, according to Tennessee birth records.
==O==
John Lewis Allen Goins was born in 1926 in Hickman TN, and died February 7, 1997 in Davidson TN, according to Tennessee birth and death records.
==O==
John Gilford Goins was born September 26, 1842 in Hickman County, and died February 21 in Wichita TX, according to Tennessee birth records.
==O==
J. Goins and J. G. Goins were listed in the Muster roll of the 48th Tennessee Infantry Regiment during the Civil War, according to “Spence’s History of Hickman County, Tennessee.”
==O==
J. R. Goins was listed in the Muster roll of the 24th Tennessee Infantry Regiment of Hickman County during the Civil War, according to “Spence’s History of Hickman County, Tennessee.”
==O==
L. L. Goins was married to Elizabeth Garton February 17, 1866 in Hickman County according to Tennessee Marriage records (1851-1900). Nothing more is known of L. L. Goins and Elizabeth Garton Goins.
==O==
Mary P. Goins was married to Virgil J. Martin December 23, 1875 in Hickman County according to Tennessee Marriage records (1851-1900). Nothing more is known of Virgil J. Martin and Mary P. Goins Martin.
==O==
Thomas Goins was married to Nancy J. Jenkins December 30, 1873 in Hickman County according to Tennessee Marriage records (1851-1900). Nothing more is known of Thomas Goins and Nancy Jenkins Goins.

HUMPHREYS COUNTY, TENNESSEE

Isaac Goen paid tax on “one white poll” in 1837 and 1838 in Humphreys County, according to “Humphreys County, Tennessee Records.”
==O==
Thompson B. Goun was enumerated as the head of a house­hold in the 1830 census of Humphreys County, page 300. The family was rendered as:

Goun, Thompson B. white male 30-40
white female 20-30
white male 5-10
white female 0-5
white male 0-5
white male 0-5
female slave 0-10″

JACKSON COUNTY, TENNESSEE

Ada J. Goins was born in Tennessee in August 1879. She died of meningitis at age eight months in Jackson County in April 1880, according to “Tennessee Mortality Schedules.”

JEFFERSON COUNTY, TENNESSEE

Anna Chilton Goan was born in 1815. She was married about 1840 to Alexander Felknor, son of James Felknor and Anne Guthrie Felknor. He was born 1818 in Hawkins County, Tennessee and died in Jefferson County.

Children born to them include:

Louis H. Felknor born in 1852

Lewis H. Felknor, son of Alexander Felknor and Anna Chilton Goan Felknor, was born in 1852 in Jefferson County. He died in 1906 in Hamblen County, Tennessee.
==O==
White Goan was married September 7, 1841 to Hannah Snoddy, according to “Jefferson County, Tennessee Marriages, 1774-1850.” Of White Goan and Hannah Snoddy Goan nothing more is known.
==O==
Anna C. Goans was married September 23, 1841 to Alexander Felknor, according to “Jefferson County, Tennessee Mar­riages, 1774-1850.”
==O==
Eliza Goans was married October 21, 1847 to William Ham­mond, according to “Jefferson County, Tennessee Mar­riages, 1774-1850.”
==O==
Shadrach Goans was born about 1808 in Tennessee. He was recorded in the 1850 census of Jefferson as the head of House­hold 12-658:

“Goans, Shadrack 42, born in TN
Margaret 27, born in TN”
==O==
“Daniel Goan” was enumerated as the head of a household in the 1880 census of Jefferson County, Enumeration District 174, page 24, Civil District 12. The household was recorded as:

“Goan, Daniel 46, born in TN
Terressa 47, born in TN
William 20, born in TN
Hanner L. 16, born in TN
Emley 12, born in TN
Margrate 10, born in TN
Marthy 8, born in TN
John J. 6, born in TN
Harden 6, born in TN”
==O==
“Ezekiel Goins” received Tennessee State land grant No. 13622 for 50 acres in Jefferson County January 10, 1827.

“Ezekial Goan” was enumerated as the head of a household in the 1830 census of Jefferson County, page 281. The family was enumerated as:

“Goan, Ezekial white male 20-30
white female 20-30
white male 0-5”

Ezekial Goan, a farmer, reappeared in the 1840 census of Jef­ferson County, page 325:

“Goan, Ezekial white male 30-40
white female 20-30
white male 10-15
white male 5-10
white male 5-10
white female 0-5
white male 0-5
white male 0-5
white male 0-5”

One adult in the household was illiterate.

“Ezekiel Goan” was recorded as the head of Household 1891-914 in the 1850 census of nearby Johnson County:

“Goan, Ezekiel 47, born in TN
Leannor 43, born in TN
William M. 21
Nancy J. 18
Daniel J. 15
Robert 15
Rufus 13
Shadrach 11
Ezekial 9
Fanny A. 7
Prudence 5
Josiah 3”
==O==
John J. Goan, son of Daniel Goan and Terressa Goan, was enumerated as the head of a household in the 1900 census of Jefferson County, Enumeration District 45, page 8, 5th Civil District:

“Goan, John J. 25, born in June 1874 in TN
Dosia 18, born in May 1882 in TN, wife”
==O==
Shadrack Goans was born about 1808 in Tennessee. He was recorded in the 1850 census of Jefferson as the head of House­hold 12-658:

“Goans, Shadrack 42, born in TN
Margaret 27, born in TN:
==O==
Ezekiel Goen was married January 12, 1828 to Leanna McLanahan, according to “Jefferson County, Tennessee Marriages, 1774-1850.” Children born to Ezekiel Goen and Leanna McLanahan Goen are unknown.
==O==
Polly Goen was married March 21, 1818 to George Curry, ac­cording to “Jefferson County, Tennessee Marriages, 1774-1850.”
==O==
William Goen was married June 27, 1809 to Betsy Jones ac­cording to “Jefferson County, Tennessee Marriages, 1774-1850.” Of William Goen and Betsy Jones Goen nothing more is known.
==O==
Bengamen Goens was married to Anny Jones December 15, 1799, according to “Jefferson County, Tennessee Marriages, 1774-1850.” Children born to Bengamen Goens and Anny Jones Goens are unknown.
==O==
James Goens was married to Mary Williams May 5, 1858, according to “Jefferson County, Tennessee Marriages, 1774-1850.” Of James Goens and Mary Williams Goens nothing more is known.
==O==
Susan Goens was married August 31, 1819 to Daniel Campbell, according to “Jefferson County, Tennessee Marriages, 1774-1850.”
==O==
Van Goens was married November 23, 1895 to Cordie Camp­bell, according to “Jefferson County, Tennessee Marriages, 1774-1850.” Of Van Goens and Cordie Campbell Goens nothing more is known.
==O==
Ann Goin was enumerated as the head of a household in the 1830 census of Jefferson County, page 286, as:

“Goin, Ann white female 60-70
white female 20-30”

“Ann Going” reappeared as the head of a household in the 1840 census of Jefferson County. The household, No. 229, was composed of:

“Going, Ann white female 70-80
white female 40-50
white male 20-30
white male 20-30
white female 20-30
white female 20-30
white male 80-90”
==O==
Mary Goin was married July 23, 1806 to Job Self, according to “Jefferson County, Tennessee Marriages, 1774-1850.”
==O==
A. Going deeded land to S. A. Going in Jefferson County Jan­uary 4, 1937 [confirm with copy], according to Jefferson County Deed Book 426, page 391. The land was originally from the D. Easley estate.
==O==
David Goin was married to Priscilla Jarnagin June 27, 1795 by Thomas Snoddy, justice of the peace, according to Jefferson County marriage records. Of David Goin and Priscilla Jarnagin Goin nothing more is known.
==O==
Benjamin Goins was married December 15, 1799 to Ann Jones, according to “Jefferson County, Tennessee Marriages, 1774-1850.” Children born to Benjamin Goins and Ann Jones Goins are unknown.
==O==
James Goins was married September 11, 1815 to Peggy Midget, according to “Jefferson County, Tennessee Mar­riages, 1774-1850.” Children born to James Goins and Peggy Midget Goins are unknown.
==O==
Susanna Goins was married to Daniel Campbell in 1819, ac­cording to records of the Presbyterian Church in Jefferson County.
==O==
Andrew Gowan was married to Mary Reneau July 22, 1800, according to “Jefferson County, Tennessee Marriages, 1774-1850.” Children born to Andrew Gowan and Mary Reneau Gowan are unknown.
==O==
Martha Gowan was married to Joseph Denson February 9, 1797, according to “Jefferson County, Tennessee Marriages, 1774-1850.”
==O==
James Gowan was married to Peggy Russell May 5, 1795, ac­cording to “Jefferson County, Tennessee Marriages, 1774-1850.” Of James Gowan and Peggy Russell Gowan nothing more is known.
==O==
James Gowan was married to Betsy Doherty May 6, 1796, ac­cording to “Jefferson County, Tennessee Marriages, 1774-1850.” Of James Gowan and Betsy Doherty Gowan nothing more is known.
==O==
Nancy Gowan was married to Thomas Baker April 9, 1818. according to “Jefferson County, Tennessee Marriages, 1774-1850.”
==O==
Thomas J. Gowin was enumerated as the head of a house­hold in the 1900 census of Jefferson County, Enumeration District 74, page 12, 3rd Civil District:

“Gowin, Thomas J. 30, born in TN in February 1870
Louisa 66, born in SC in February 1834,
grandmother”
==O==
Sarah McGowan was married February 1, 1822 at White Pine, Tennessee in Jefferson County to Christopher Moyers, Jr. He was born about 1798 to Christopher Moyers. and Susannah Moyers, according to Nancy Dodge.

Children born to Christopher Moyers, Jr. and Sarah McGowan Moyers include:

John Alexander Moyers born about 1824

John Alexander Moyers, son of Christopher Moyers, Jr. and Sarah McGowan Moyers, was born about 1824. He was married July 29, 1849 to Nancy Gann. He changed his name to Myers shortly afterward.

Gowen Research Foundation Phone:806/795-8758, 795-9694
5708 Gary Avenue E-mail: gowen@sbcglobal.net
Lubbock, Texas, 79413-4822 GOWENMS.120, 07/07/00
Internet: http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.com/~gowenrf

Descendant Researchers:

Willis T. Finley, 307 Fairview Dr, Longview, TX, 75604, 903/759-0415
Bonnie Goan Good, Box 331, Wellington, MO, 64097

JOHNSON COUNTY, TENNESSEE

Margaret Goins was enumerated as the head of a household in the 1870 census of Johnson County:

“Goins, Margaret 31, born in NC, mulatto
Lititia 13, born in NC, mulatto
Elizabeth 11, born in NC, mulatto
Margaret 9, born in NC, mulatto
Rebecca 5, born in NC, mulatto
Bass, Abecca 21, born in NC, mulatto
James 65, born in NC, mulatto, farm
laborer, $400 real estate”

KNOX COUNTY TENNESSEE

No families of interest to Gowen chroniclers appeared in the 1820 census of Knox County. William Gowns, John Gowns and Edward Gowns were listed as heads of households in the 1830 census of Knox County.
==O==
Civil War veterans who served as Union troops of the U. S. Army who were living in Knox County in 1890 include:

Last First Rating Regiment Co.
Goins, Asa Pvt. 7th KY Infantry D
Goins, Canedy Pvt. 49th KY Infantry G
Goins, Galloway Pvt. 18th KY Infantry E
Goins, John Corp. 55th KY Infantry F
Goins, Joseph Pvt. 7th KY Infantry D
Goins, Lemuel Pvt. 18th KY Infantry E
==O==
Mary Goan was married to Jonathan Courtney October 15, 1805, according to “Knox County, Tennessee Marriages, 1784-1900.”
==O==
Albert S. Goans was recorded as the head of a household in the 1900 census of Knox County, Enumeration District 92, page 7, Civil District 18:

“Goans, Albert S. 32, born in TN in June 1867
Ella R. 29, born in TN in December 1870
Jennie 13, born in TN in March 1887
Felix 10, born in TN in November 1889
Katy 7, born in TN in August 1892”
==O==
Arthur F. Goans was a resident in Knox County in December 2000 when his wife, Mabel Lorena Walls Goans died, according to her obituary in the December 20, 2000 edition of “The Oak Ridger:”

“Mabel Lorena Walls Goans, 83, of Knoxville, died Monday, Dec. 18, 2000, at Baptist Hospital in Knoxville. Mrs. Goans was a member of Beech Park Baptist Church of Oliver Springs and had been a member of the choir for many years. She graduated in the first class of the American Red Cross Gray Ladies in 1943. Her family said she gave of herself to the Knoxville area Red Cross for 58 years and still attended the annual gatherings of the organization.

During World War II, she worked at Oak Ridge in support of the war efforts. She was the daughter of Algie Walls and Pearl Giles Walls. She is survived by her husband of 59 years, Arthur F. Goans; her son, Derrick Scott Lunsford of Morris Plains, N.J.; her sister, Barbara Walls Hensley and her husband, Frank V. Hensley, of Clinton; her brother, Benjamin T. Walls and his wife, Edna Walls, of Oliver Springs; and by many nieces and nephews.

The funeral will be held at 8 p.m. Thursday, Dec. 21, in the Broadway Chapel of Rose Mortuary, 1421 Broadway N.E., Knoxville, with the Rev. Earl Wilson officiating. Family and friends will meet at 10:45 a.m. Friday, Dec. 22, at the main entrance at Highland Memorial Cemetery, Knoxville, for an 11 a.m. graveside service.”
==O==
Drury Goans was born in South Carolina served in Churchman’s Company of Tennessee militia in the War of 1812, according to “War of 1812 Pensioners” by Virgil D. White. He lived in Knox County from 1851 to 1871. His wife died prior to March 1871, and he died prior to July 1, 1889.

Samuel C. Goans, 19, was enumerated in the 1850 census of household of Drury Goans, No. 379-241.
==O==
Eliza J. Goans was married October 23, 1877 to Jacob Miller, according to “Knox County, Tennessee Marriages, 1784-1900.”
==O==
Hattie Goans was married November 16, 1886 to Robert Wal­lace, according to “Knox County, Tennessee Marriages, 1784-1900.”
==O==
James C. Goans was married to Susannah White October 31, 1850, according to “Knox County, Tennessee Marriages, 1784-1900.” Children born to James C. Goans and Susannah White Goans are unknown.
==O==
James W. Goans was married to Margaret Louise Reed Au­gust 31, 1890, according to “Knox County, Tennessee Mar­riages, 1784-1900.” Children born to James W. Goans and Margaret Louise Reed Goans are unknown.
==O==
Martha Goans was married August 22, 1850 to William H. McCampbell, according to “Knox County, Tennessee Mar­riages, 1784-1900.”
==O==
Martin R. Goans was married April 11, 1880 to Alice A. Cobb, according to “Knox County, Tennessee Marriages, 1784-1900.” Martin R. Goans and his wife, Alice A. Cobb Goans were residents of adjoining Loudon County, Tennessee in 1882 and in 1901.

Children born to Martin R. Goans and Alice A. Cobb Goans include:

Katie Goans born September 29, 1882

Katie Goans, daughter of Martin R. Goans and Alice A. Cobb Goans, was born in Loudon County September 29, 1882. She died October 8, 1883 and was buried in Starkee Creek Ceme­tery.

An infant born to Martin R. Goans and Alice A. Cobb Goans De.­cember 9, 1901 died December 13, 1901 and was also buried in Starkee Creek Cemetery.
==O==
Sarah C. Goans was married to Thomas J. Coram February 22, 1866, according to “Knox County, Tennessee Marriages, 1784-1900.” On the same day, perhaps in a double ceremony, Mary E. Goans was married to Wilson A. Coram.
==O==
Alex Goins was recorded as the head of a household in the 1900 census of Knox County, Enumeration District 63, page 9, Civil District 1, living at 118 Hudson Street in Knoxville:

“Goans, Alex 45, born in TN in 1855
Tina 40, born in TN in 1860
Chas. L. 17, born in TN in September 1883
M. E. 15, born in TN in July 1886
Ella 8, born in TN in October 1891”
==O==
Drury Goans was enumerated as the head of Household 379 in the 1850 census of Knox County:

“Goans, Drury 57, born in Tennessee
Mary 52, born in Tennessee
Martha J. 22, born in Tennessee
Samuel C. 19, born in Tennessee
Priscilla 16, born in Tennessee
Manerva A. 15, born in Tennessee
Rufus 13, born in Tennessee
Mary A. 11, born in Tennessee
Pleasant 9, born in Tennessee
==O==
Stewart Goens was married to Eliza Alexander, November 5, 1897, according to “Knox County, Tennessee Marriages, 1784-1900.” Of Stewart Goens and Eliza Alexander Goens nothing more is known.
==O==
Annie Goin was married December 1, 1891 to William B. Karnes, according to “Knox County, Tennessee Marriages, 1784-1900.”
==O==
George Goin was married to Susan Cox June 23, 1857, ac­cording to “Knox County, Tennessee Marriages, 1784-1900.” Children born to George Goin and Susan Cox Goin are unknown.
==O==
Mary L. Goin was married to John T. Ammond September 1, 1892, according to “Knox County, Tennessee Marriages, 1784-1900.”
==O==
Preston L. Goin was married to Prudence A. Cox October 17, 1850, according to “Knox County, Tennessee Marriages, 1784-1900.” Of Preston Goin and Prudence A. Cox Goin nothing more is known.
==O==
William B. Goin was enumerated as the head of a household in the 1900 census of Knox County, Enumeration District 82, page 15, Civil District 12:

“Goin, William B. 25, born in TN in May 1876
Minnie A. 20, born in TN in May 1880”
==O==
Mrs. Hester Goines was baptized March 10, 1861 into the First Presbyterian Church of Knoxville, Tennessee, according to “Nineteenth Century Tennessee Church Records” by Byron Sistler.
==O==
Calvin Goings was married May 1, 1843 to Milly Henderson, according to “Knox County, Tennessee Marriages, 1784-1900.” Children born to Calvin Goings and Milly Henderson Goings are unknown.
==O==
Niss S. Goings was married December 23, 1841 to James M. Pryor, according to “Knox County, Tennessee Marriages, 1784-1900.”
==O==
Sarah J. Goings was married to James M. Pryor December 25, 1841, according to “Knox County, Tennessee Marriages, 1784-1900.”
==O==
Dr. Goins, a surgeon from Tennessee serving in the U. S. Army, was captured by the Confederates and imprisoned in Knoxville, Tennessee, according to “War Department Re­ports” Series II, Volume 5.

Dr. K. C. Devine, a Confederate surgeon, wrote a report November 22, 1862 describing the difficulty he had in rejoining his regiment after he had been captured by Union forces. Following a battle near Perryville, Kentucky Dr. K. C. Devine had stayed behind to care for wounded. Devine stated that he and a fellow doctor were imprisoned as hostages for a fellow doctor [USA] named “Goins” whom, a citizen, Dr. Hall, reported was in a dungeon on bread and water at Knoxville. The ill-treatment accorded Dr. Goins was the result of his being a Tennesseean who the Confederates considered a traitor.
==O==
Albert S. Goins was married December 27, 1885 to Ella A. Reed, according to “Knox County, Tennessee Marriages, 1784-1900.” Of Albert S. Goins and Ella A Reed Goins noth­ing more is known.
==O==
Alice E. Goins was married to Jerry T. Logan November 17, 1881, according to “Knox County, Tennessee Marriages, 1784-1900.”
==O==
Arthur Goins, negro, 12, born in Tennessee, “birth date un­known,” was enumerated in the household of his uncle, Thomas Tate in the 1900 census of Knox County, Enumera­tion District 69, page 16, Civil District 2.
==O==
Bettie Goins was married November 23, 1876 to McMillan P. Sherrod, according to “Knox County, Tennessee Marriages, 1784-1900.”
==O==
Cassie E. Goins was married to Hugh A. Garrett August 1, 1874, according to “Knox County, Tennessee Marriages, 1784-1900.”
==O==
Clinton A. Goins was married to Alice E. Mason July 1, 1875, according to “Knox County, Tennessee Marriages, 1784-1900.” Children born to Clinton A. Goins and Alice E. Mason Goins are unknown.
==O==
Eliza Goins was married to Elihu Boggs August 14, 1862, ac­cording to “Knox County, Tennessee Marriages, 1784-1900.”
==O==
Emma Goins was married to Robert Morrison April 11, 1881, according to “Knox County, Tennessee Marriages, 1784-1900.”
==O==
Felix W. Goins was married January 14, 1866 to Martha Maget, according to “Knox County, Tennessee Marriages, 1784-1900.” Of Felix W. Goins and Martha Maget Goins nothing more is known.
==O==
Henry Goins was married August 18, 1894 to Lucy Ferguson, according to “Knox County, Tennessee Marriages, 1784-1900.” Children born to Henry Goins and Lucy Ferguson Goins are unknown.
==O==
Hiley Goins was married to Perry C. Childress July 6, 1899, according to “Knox County, Tennessee Marriages, 1784-1900.” Children born to Hiley Goins and Perry C. Childress Goins are unknown.
==O==
Ibby [Abbie?} A. Goins was married to Ples C. Conner De­cember 7, 1898, according to “Knox County, Tennessee Mar­riages, 1784-1900.”
==O==
J. C. Goins, a veteran of the Fifth-Eighth Tennessee Infantry Regiment, Company F, CSA, was a resident of Knox County in 1914 according to his reply to a questionnaire circulated by the Tennessee Historical Society.
==O==
James Goins was married to Lucy Johnson July 4, 1890, according to “Knox County, Tennessee Marriages, 1784-1900.” Children born to James Goins and Lucy Johnson Goins are unknown.
==O==
James Goins was married to Bertha E. Scott November 11, 1897, according to “Knox County, Tennessee Marriages, 1784-1900.” Of James Goins and Bertha E. Scott Goins noth­ing more is known.
==O==
John Goins was married August 8, 1897 to Rhoda Badgett, ac­cording to “Knox County, Tennessee Marriages, 1784-1900.” Of John Goins and Rhoda Badgett Goins nothing more is known.
==O==
Joseph Goins was married March 22, 1882 to Harriet Ander­son, according to “Knox County, Tennessee Marriages, 1784-1900.” Children born to Joseph Goins and Harriet An­derson Goins are unknown.
==O==
Livie Goins was married February 6, 1884 to Jack Strong, ac­cording to “Knox County, Tennessee Marriages, 1784-1900.”
==O==
Maggie Goins was married to John Hoss February 10, 1881, according to “Knox County, Tennessee Marriages, 1784-1900.”x
==O==
Malvina Goins was married to Thomas Bird April 11, 1835, according to “Knox County, Tennessee Marriages, 1784-1900.”
==O==
Martha Ann Goins was married February 2, 1873 to John David Weeden, according to “Knox County, Tennessee Mar­riages, 1784-1900.”
==O==
Martha J. Goins was married December 5, 1858 to Samuel Burris, according to “Knox County, Tennessee Marriages, 1784-1900.”
==O==
Mary Goins was married to Henry Evans January 11, 1891, according to “Knox County, Tennessee Marriages, 1784-1900.”
==O==
Mary H. Goins was married to Calvin C. Wallace July 29, 1875, according to “Knox County, Tennessee Marriages, 1784-1900.”
==O==
Matilda A. Goins was married to Shadrick F. Callaway Jan­uary 7, 1866, according to “Knox County, Tennessee Mar­riages, 1784-1900,”
==O==
Mollie Goins was married to Washington Hall August 7, 1882, according to “Knox County, Tennessee Marriages, 1784-1900.”
==O==
Nancy Goins was married to Jubilee Bradley April 13, 1837, according to “Knox County, Tennessee Marriages, 1784-1900.” Jubilee Bradley was born in Virginia in 1808, according to “Dade County Missouri Families” by Dorothy Anderson York.

They removed to Missojuri about 1846. The family appeared in the 1860 census of Dade County Missouri:

“Bradley, Jubilee 52, born in VA
Nancy
William 18, born in TN
Thomas D. 17, born in TN
John W. 13, born in MO
Mary A. 10, born in MO
Hamilton 6, born in MO”
==O==
Priscilla Jane Goins was married October 24, 1858 to Samuel Larew, according to “Knox County, Tennessee Marriages, 1784-1900.”
==O==
Rebecca P. Goins was married to Temple H. Coram Decem­ber 29, 1867, according to “Knox County, Tennessee Mar­riages, 1784-1900.”
==O==
Robert Goins was married to Catharine Hardin June 24, 1889, according to “Knox County, Tennessee Marriages, 1784-1900.” Children born to Robert Goins and Catharine Hardin Goins are unknown.
==O==
Robert Goins was married to Mary Pages September 23, 1896, according to “Knox County, Tennessee Marriages, 1784-1900.” Of Robert Goins and Mary Pages Goins nothing more is none.
==O==
Sam R. Goins and Anna Wilburn Goins were the parents of Hattie Ethel Goins who was born November 5, 1899, according to Jo Ann Pierce of Clinton, Washington, a granddaughter of Hattie Ethel Goins.
==O==
Sarah Goins was married to Alexander Franklin September 28, 1893, according to “Knox County, Tennessee Marriages, 1784-1900.”
==O==
Shedrick Goins was married January 14, 1868 to Susan Burchell, according to “Knox County, Tennessee Marriages, 1784-1900.” Children born to Shedrick Goins and Susan Burchell Goins are unknown.
==O==
Thomas Goins was married to Sue Davis April 21, 1900, ac­cording to “Knox County, Tennessee Marriages, 1784-1900.” Of Thomas Goins and sue Davis Goins nothing more is known.

Tiney Goins was married to George W. Bailey November 24, 1884, according to “Knox County, Tennessee Marriages, 1784-1900.”
==O==
Tobias Goins was married to Annie Tipton August 24, 1891, according to “Knox County, Tennessee Marriages, 1784-1900.” Children born to Tobias Goins and Annie Tipton Goins are unknown.
==O==
Washington Goins was married to Carrie Brice December 30, 1886, according to “Knox County, Tennessee Marriages, 1784-1900.” Children born to Washington Goins and Carrie Brice Goins are unknown.
==O==
William Goins was married March 2, 1879 to Lottie Bowman, according to “Knox County, Tennessee Marriages, 1784-1900.” Three months later James Goins, possibly a brother, was married to Jane Bowman on June 5, 1879. Lottie Bow­man Goins and Jane Bowman Goins are regarded as sisters.
==O==
William Goins was married to Ella Bettis June 15, 1887, ac­cording to “Knox County, Tennessee Marriages, 1784-1900.” Children born to William Goins and Ella Bettis Goins are unknown.
==O==
William Goins was married to Casander Brokes [{Brooks?] January 22, 1896, according to “Knox County, Tennessee Marriages, 1784-1900.” Children born to William Goins and Casander Brokes Goins are unknown.
==O==
William Goins was married to Minnie Ann Horton October 16, 1898, according to “Knox County, Tennessee Marriages, 1784-1900.” Of William Goins and Minnie Ann Horton Goins nothing more is known.
==O==
George Washington Gowan was a resident of Knoxville about 1880. He was married about 1884, to Lillie Harvey. He was living in Redfield, Arkansas in 1885 when their first child was born. He was living in Commerce, Texas in 1896 when their second child was born. It is believed that Lillie Harvey Gowan died about this time.

On November 17, 1900 George Washington Gowan and his second wife, Sallie R. Gowan received a warranty deed to a lot in Hundley Park Addition, Commerce, according to Hunt County, Texas Deed Book 107, page 293. On April 15, 1902 George Washington Gowan received a deed to a lot in Commerce from Sanger Bros, according to Hunt County Deed Book 172, page 9.

George Washington Gowan and Sallie R. Gowan gave a warranty to J. A. Crawford March 12, 1903 to their property in Hundley Park Addition, according to Hunt County Deed Book 125, page 219. George Washington Gowan had other real estate transactions in Commerce to the time of his death in 1906.

Probate of George Washington Gowan is covered in Hunt County Probate Book J, pages 265, 266, 322, 324, Book 0, pages 294, 299 and Book T, pages 401, 402, and 403.

Between the time of his death and the time of the probate Sal­lie R. Gowan had remarried to H. D. Speaks. On November 18, 1912 Sallie R. Gowan Speaks, “widow of George Washington Gowan” was appointed guardian of the minor children, according to Hunt County Probate Book J, pages 265 and 266. She posted bond of $1,600.

H. D. Speaks took over the management of the estate and on May 10, 1913 sold a residence formerly owned by George Washington Gowan for $1,000 as down payment for “poor land” in Rains County, Texas and later lost it all when the land was sold for the indebtedness against it. H. D. Speaks died before April 4, 1918.

Children born to George Washington Gowan and Lillie Harvey Gowan include:

Lee Edwin Gowan born in 1888
Libby Gowan born October 12, 1896

Children born to George Washington Gowan and Sallie R. Gowan include:

Neville Otto “Frank” Gowan born in 1901
Lillian J. “Libby” Gowan born May 23, 1904
Julia Gowan born about 1908
B. J. Gowan born about 1910

Lee Edwin Gowan, son of George Washington Gowan and Lillie Harvey Gowan, was born at Redfield, Arkansas in 1888. He received a 1/20 interest in 10 acres of land in Orange County, Texas March 4, 1909 from J. P. Eddleman, according to Orange County Deed Book 5, page 298.

He received a deed from M. L. Linscomb April 5, 1910 to four acres of land in Shelton Survey for $2,200, according to Orange County Deed Book 3, page 506. About 1912 he was married to Lillian Olive Harris, a teacher, who was born at Cooper, Texas in 1888. Lee Edwin Gowan and Lillian Olive Harris Gowan received a deed from W. B. Simmons, Jr. and a release from W. H. Stark in connection with the land he pur­chased in Shelton Survey, according to Orange County Deed Book 15, page 189, page 471.

In 1915 Lee Edwin Gowan was the manager of a lumber yard at Checotah, Oklahoma and lived at 612 West First Street there.

Lee Edwin Gowan received a deed from D. M. Matthews July 3, 1920, according to Palo Pinto County, Texas Deed Book 104, page 369. He and Lillian Alice Harris Gowan gave a deed of trust to Matthews for a lot in Slaughter & Barber Ad­dition to the city of Mineral Wells, Texas, according to Palo Pinto County Deed of Trust Book 20, page 564.

Lee Edwin Gowan received a release on real estate from R. E. Good, June 14, 1922, according to Palo Pinto County Deed Book 117, page 535. Lee Edwin Gowan and Lillian Alice Har­ris Gowan received an extension on property in Mineral Wells from O. L. Swift July 1, 1922, according to Palo Pinto County Deed Book 115, page 539.

Lee Edwin Gowan was married to Miss Emma Francis McGe­hee July 3, 1924, according to Palo Pinto County Mar­riage Book 7, page 53. In 1925 Lee Edwin Gowan, a sales­man for Packard-Scruggs Com­pany, and Emma Francis McGehee Gowan, lived at 1572 Lipscomb Avenue in Wichita Falls, Texas, ac­cording to the city directory. In 1926 he ap­peared in the Wichita Falls directory as a salesman for Lloyd Weaver Company, residing at 1804 Monroe.

He gave a lease contract on his residence in Mineral Wells to H. B. Chaney January 9, 1926, according to Palo Pinto County Deed Book 135, page 592.

In 1926 Lee Edwin Gowan was listed in the Abilene, Texas city directory living at 300 Grape. In 1928 he appeared living in Abilene, and his wife, at that time was Ola Epley Gowan. They lived at 416 Or­ange according to the directory. On April 13, 1928 Ola Epley Gowan received a deed from A. E. Pool for a lot in Abilene, consideration was $1,000.

In 1929 Lee Edwin Gowan was listed in the city directory as secretary-treasurer of Carothers Motors, Inc. and lived at 1134 South 8th Street. In 1931 through 1935 Lee Edwin Gowan was listed as president of Gowan Motors, a DeSoto-Plymouth agency operating at 1390 North First Street, and lived at 517 Grape. Ola Epley Gowan was listed as vice-president of the corporation. In 1934 and 1935 his residence was shown at 1641 Belmont.

On May 19, 1937 Lee Edwin Gowan and Ola Epley Gowan gave a deed of trust to Standard Savings & Loan Association in Abilene in the purchase of a residence according to Taylor County Deed Book 113, page 347. In 1942 through 1944 they lived at 1918 South 9th Street in Abilene.

In 1946 he was listed in the city directory as the owner of Gowan Real Estate, and lived at 390 Meander. In 1948 the real estate firm was listed as Gowan and Sloan Real Estate. In the 1951 and 1953 editions of the directory Lee Edwin Gowan was the owner of Gowan Real Estate and lived at 1718 Bel­mont.

Lee Edwin Gowan continued in the real estate business, ac­cording to the 1955 city directory, which showed him to live at 1035 Amarillo. In 1969 he received a deed of trust from William L. Burke to property in Cason Cove, according to Brown County, Texas Deed of Trust Book 140, page 194.

Children born to Lee Edwin Gowan and Lillian Alice Harris Gowan include:

Carrie Bess Gowan born November 27, 1915

Carrie Bess Gowan, daughter of Lee Edwin Gowan and Lil­lian Alice Harris Gowan, was born November 27, 1915 at Checotah, Oklahoma. In 1931 she was listed in the Abilene city directory living in the home of her father at 517 Grape. Her birth record was recorded October 19, 1948 in Lubbock County, Texas, ac­cording to Lubbock County Birth Book 19, page 272. In 1935 she was a student at the University of Texas living in the Scot­tish Rite Dormitory, according to the Austin, Texas city direc­tory.

Libbie Gowan, daughter of George Washington Gowan and Lillie Harvey Gowan, was born October 12, 1896 in Fannin County, according to Fannin County Birth Book 23, page 1262. It is believed that both she and mother died shortly af­terwards.

Children born to George Washington Gowan and Sallie R. Gowan include:

Neville Otto Gowan born in 1901

Neville Otto “Frank” Gowan son of George Washington Gowan and Sallie R. Gowan, was born in 1901 at Commerce. He was first married about 1930, wife’s name Lucille. Later he lived at Wapanucki, Oklahoma and at Atoka, Oklahoma.

He was employed by Rock Island Railroad for 43 years. “Mr. Harrison of Clinton, Oklahoma” was mentioned as a cousin to Neville Otto “Frank” Gowan. On May 17, 1958 he was married to Mrs. Sylvia Didier and lived at 1029 West 6th Street, Elk City, Oklahoma, according to Wheeler County, Texas Marriage License 69898.

Neville Otto “Frank” Gowan died on Thanksgiving Day, 1970. Sylvia Didier Gowan continued to lived in Elk City in September 1971 when she was visited by Arlee Claud Gowen.

Children born to Neville Otto “Frank” Gowan and Lucille Gowan include:

Wynona Lee Gowan born in 1926

Wynona Lee Gowan, daughter of Neville Otto “Frank” Gowan and Lucille Gowan, was born about 1926. She was married June 6, 1945 to John Horace Stringer in Elk City, ac­cording to Beckham County, Oklahoma Marriage Book 24, page 163. Wynona Gowan Stringer was married second, hus­band’s name Leleune. In 1971 Wynona Gowan Stringer Leleune lived at Duncan, Oklahoma.

Children born to George Washington Gowan and Sallie R. Gowan include:

Lillian J. “Libbie” Gowan born May 23, 1904
Julia Gowan born about 1908
B. J. Gowan born about 1910

Lillian J. “Libbie” Gowan, daughter of George Washington Gowan and Sallie R. Gowan, was born May 23, 1904 at Com­merce, according to Hunt County Birth Book 1, page 120.

She was married September 23, 1916 to D. O. Whaley, ac­cording to Hunt County Marriage Book S, page 179. They lived at Bonham, Texas on April 4, 1918. She died in 1970 at McAllister, Oklahoma.

Julia Gowan, daughter of George Washington Gowan and Sal­lie R. Gowan, was born at Commerce about 1908. She was mentioned in the probate of her father’s will in 1912, 1913 and 1918.

B. J. Gowan, son of George Washington Gowan and Sallie R. Gowan, was born at Commerce about 1910. He was men­tioned as deceased in the probate proceedings of his father in 1918.
==O==
Julia Ella Gowan was married to Samuel E. Lowrance on Octo­ber 12, 1899 in Knox County, according to “Knox County, Tennessee Marriages, 1784-1900.”.
==O==
R. Wilson Gowan was enumerated as the head of a household in the 1900 census of Knox County, Enu­meration District 58, page 16:

“Gowan, R. Wilson 55, born in NC in August 1844
Ella 55, born in IN in October 1844
==O==
Richard N. Gowan also listed as Richard W. Gowan, re­ceived Tennessee state Confederate Pension No. 10564 for service in the Forty-Second North Carolina Infantry Regi­ment. He was living in Knox County in 1915.
==O==
W. T. Gowan was married to Susie Cheatman December 29, 1894 in Knox County. W. V. Newman was the bondsman. Of W. T. Gowan and Susie Cheatham Gowan nothing more is known.
==O==
William Gowan was listed as the head of a household enu­merated in the 1850 census of Knox County, Household No. 563-563:

“Gowan, William 60, born in Maryland, farmer,
$2,000 real estate
Mary 54, born in TN
Sarah 26, born in TN
Margarett 23, born in TN
Robert 18, born in TN, farmer,
attending school
Mary Ann 15, born in TN
William 13, born in TN”
==O==
William T. Gowan, age 24, was married to Ellen G. Salmon, age 21 June 13, 1899 in Knox County. R. A. McClure was the bondsman. William T. Gowan was enumerated as the head of a household in the 1900 census of Knox County, Enumeration District 58, page 16, living on Cumberland Street in Knoxville:

“Gowan, William T. 25, born in NE in September 1874
E. Gertrude 23, born in Eng. in January 1877”

Children born to William T. Gowan and Ellen Gertrude Salmon Gowan are unknown.
==O==
John Gowans was listed as the head of a household in the 1850 census of Knox County, Household No. 608-608:

“Gowans, John 60, born in Maryland, farmer
Elizabeth 50, born in TN
Sarah R. 24, born in TN
Latica Ann 20, born in TN
Narcisia Bell 15, born in TN
Ailsey 12, born in TN
Joseph 0, born in TN
Mahala 8, born in TN
Malinda 8, born in TN
Smith, William 10, born in TN
James 8, born in TN
Catherine 5, born in TN”
==O==
Adeline Gowens negro, was married to John Russell July 28, 1859, according to “Knox County, Ten­nessee Marriages” by Rosco Carlisle d`Armand and Virginia Carlisle.
==O==

KNOX COUNTY, TENNESSEE–B

Daniel Gowin was married December 23, 1839 to Maria Cole, according to “Knox County Tennessee, Marriages. 1784-1900” “Daniel Gowns”, a blind man, was listed as the head of a household in the 1850 census of Knox County, Household No. 561:

“Gowns, Daniel 52, born in VA, blind, cooper
Mariah 60, born in NC
William B. A. 21, born in NC”

Children born to Daniel Gowin and Maria Cole Gowin include:

William B. A. Gowin born about 1829
==O==
Jesse Harrison Gowin was born about 1840 in Knoxville, Tennessee, according to a tradition in the family of Mary R. McKenney, Foundation member of Dallas, Texas. About 1860 he was married to Sarah Jane Hicks who was born in April 1843, and in 1862, they lived in Loudon County, Tennessee where a son was born.

Shortly afterward, Jesse Harrison Gowin enlisted in Confederate service, died during the Civil War and was buried at Biloxi, Mississippi, according to a family legend. “Harrison H. Gowen” served as a private in the 26th Tennessee Infantry Regiment, Company I. “J. Gowens” served as a private in Company C, 28th Tennessee Cavalry Regiment. Kenneth Sid­ney Reeves, a descendant of Oklahoma City reports that he has been told that Jesse Harrison Gowin was a schoolteacher and was killed in his classroom during the Civil War.

Sarah Jane Hicks Gowin was remarried to Robert R. Redpath who removed to Richland County, Illinois about 1868. They were enumerated in the 1870 census of Marion County at Omega, Illinois and reappeared in the 1880 census. By 1900, Sarah Jane Hicks Gowin Redpath was in Aurora Township, Lawrence County, Missouri, living near her youngest son, Bert Redpath who was enumerated with David Corliss and Amanda Robertson Corliss. Amanda Robertson Corliss was a sister to Sarah Ann “Sally” Robertson Gowin.

Children born to Jesse Harrison Gowin and Sarah Jane Hicks Gowin include only one known son:

Jesse Harrison Gowin, Jr. born July 28, 1862

Jesse Harrison Gowin, Jr, son of Jesse Harrison Gowin and Sarah Jane Hicks Gowin, was born July 28, 1862 in Loudon County. He was taken to Marion County, Illinois about 1867 by his stepfather. He was married about 1887 in Seymour, Missouri to Sarah Ann “Sallie” Robertson. She was born February 27, 1871 at Lebanon, Missouri in Laclede County to William Robertson and Sarah Jane Fetters Robertson.

In 1893 they lived in Lawrence County, Missouri and by 1895 were back in Laclede County. They removed to Muskogee County, Oklahoma about 1902 and lived their until their deaths. He died about 1939 of a heart attack and was buried in Muskogee County. When she died, she was buried beside her husband.

Children born to Jesse Harrison Gowin, Jr. and Sarah Ann “Sallie” Robertson Gowin include:

Charles Dottson Gowin born May 24, 1889
John Roy Gowin born December 7, 1890
Mabel Melissa Gowin born July 5, 1893
Edith Clara Gowin born July 12, 1895
Jessie Flossie Gowin born November 6, 1897
Edward Guy Gowin born December 22, 1900
Nettie Gladys Gowin born July 27, 1902
Alta Marie Gowin born September 15, 1905
Bert Gowin born June 4, 1908
George Richard Gowin born March 30, 1911

Charles Dottson Gowin, son of Jesse Harrison Gowin, Jr. and Sarah Ann “Sallie” Robertson Gowin, was born May 24, 1899 in Missouri. He was married about 1922, wife’s name Della. He was later remarried, wife’s name Minnie. He died April 12, 1953 in Tahlequah, Oklahoma. Children born to Charles Dottson Gowin, Della Gowin and Minnie Gowin are unknown.

John Roy Gowin, son of Jesse Harrison Gowin, Jr. and Sarah Ann “Sallie” Robertson Gowin, was born December 7, 1890 in Missouri. He died there January 1, 1947.

Mabel Melissa Gowin, daughter of Jesse Harrison Gowin, Jr. and Sarah Ann “Sallie” Robertson Gowin, was born July 5, 1893 at Aurora, Missouri, in Lawrence County. She was mar­ried about 1913 to Dan Johnson. Later she was remarried to Vernon L. Knapp. She died September 4, 1970 in Tulsa, Okla­homa.

Edith Clara Gowin, daughter of Jesse Harrison Gowin, Jr. and Sarah Ann “Sallie” Robertson Gowin, was born July 12, 1895 at Lebanon, Missouri. She was married June 1, 1914 to Guy W. Griffith. She died October 14, 1984.

Jessie Flossie Gowin, daughter of Jesse Harrison Gowin, Jr. and Sarah Ann “Sallie” Robertson Gowin, was born November 6, 1897 in Missouri. She was married about 1918 to Stephen Brown. She was remarried to William Sidney Reeves.

Children born to William Sidney Reeves and Jessie Flossie Gowin Reeves include:

Kenneth Sidney Reeves born about 1926

Kenneth Sidney Reeves, son of William Sidney Reeves and Jessie Flossie Gowin, Reeves was born about 1926, place un­known. He was married about 1949, wife’s name Joyce. In 1997 they lived in Oklahoma City where they as Foundation members are active in the research of their family history. It is through their courtesy that much of the information in this sec­tion appears.

Edward Guy Gowin, son of Jesse Harrison Gowin, Jr. and

Sarah Ann “Sallie” Robertson Gowin, was born December 22, 1899. He was enumerated in the 1900 census. He was married about 1922 to Naomi Ward Allen. He died December 15, 1962. Children born to Edward Guy Gowin and Naomi Ward AllenGowin are unknown.

Nettie Gladys Gowin, daughter of Jesse Harrison Gowin, Jr. and Sarah Ann “Sallie” Robertson Gowin, was born July 27, 1902 in Muskogee. She was married about 1931 to William Meeks. She died in Tulsa January 9, 1993.

Alta Marie Gowin, daughter of Jesse Harrison Gowin, Jr. and Sarah Ann “Sallie” Robertson Gowin, was born September 15, 1905 in Oklahoma. She was married about 1923 to Jack Kelly. Later she was remarried to Ernest Cobb. She died January 15, 1940.

Bert Gowin, son of Jesse Harrison Gowin, Jr. and Sarah Ann “Sallie” Robertson Gowin, was born June 4, 1908 in Muskogee. He was married about 1931, wife’s name Grace. Later he was remarried, wife’s name Zelma. He died in March 1972. Children born to Bert Gowin, Grace Gowin and Zelma Gowin are unknown.

George Richard Gowin, son of Jesse Harrison Gowin, Jr. and Sarah Ann “Sallie” Robertson Gowin, was born March 30, 1911 in Oklahoma. He was married about 1934 to Mae Wilburton. He died May 3, 1995. Children born to George Richard Gowin and Mae Wilburton Gowin are unknown.

“George Richard Gowin,” age 84, “retired from Sheffield Steel,” died in 1995, according to the “Tulsa World.” He was buried at Collinsville, Oklahoma.
==O==
Ritter Gowin was married to John Roddy January 18, 1839 in Knox County, according to Knox County, Tennessee Marriages,1784-1900.” Jesse R. Brock was the bondsman. Jesse R. Brock was also the bondsman for the wedding of Daniel Gowin to Maria Cole December 23, 1839 in Knox County.

John Roddy was mentioned as a landowner in Spartanburg County, South Carolina in the will of Major John “Buck” Gowen written November 10, 1809.

Goan Morgan was married to Malinda Nevilles December 27, 1797 in Knox County, according to the research of Ryan D. Neaveill of Champaign, Illinois.

Researchers:

Mary R. McKenney, 3421 Amherst, Dallas, TX, 75225, 214/691-5384
Kenneth Sidney & Joyce Reeves, 621 SW 32nd, Oklahoma City, OK, 73109,
405/634-8977

http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.com/~gowenrf

James Marion Gowan was married June 4, 1882 to Mrs. Mary Matilda Thompson Buntley, according to Lincoln County marriage records.

The bible, in the possession of Mattie Lou Gowan Lane of Memphis, Tennessee, records that James Marion Gowan died February 29, 1932. He, a farmer, died of pneumonia at age 70, according to Tennessee DVS Death Certificate No. 5429. He was buried at Booneville, according to Mrs. Sterling Mills, informant of Fayetteville.

Mary Matilda Thompson Buntley Gowan died “sitting in her chair” in her home in Mimosa May 31, 1938, according to Tennessee DVS Death Certificate No.10409. She was buried beside her husband, according to her daughter, Bettie Eliza­beth Gowan Mills, informant of Fayetteville.

In another volume of bible inscriptions, complied by Wilma Swing, Ruth C. Morgan, Lee Hudson, Pamela Joy Swing and Mattie Lou Gowan Lane, several individuals of interest to Gowen chroniclers are mentioned.

Children born to James Marion Gowan and Mary Matilda Thompson Buntley Gowan include:

Jacob Hirman Gowan born May 6, 1883
James William Gowan born September 12, 1884
Bettie Elizabeth Gowan born April 6, 1888
Mattie Lou Gowan born October 7, 1889
Berry Curlee Gowan born November 8, 1894
Annie Jane Gowan born December 12, 1896
Samuel Hipps Gowan born February 8, 1902
Ena May Gowan born December 9, 1904

Jacob Hirman Gowan, son of James Marion Gowan and Mary Matilda Thompson Buntley Gowan, was born May 6, 1883 probably in Lincoln County. He did not marry.

James William Gowan, son of James Marion Gowan and Mary Matilda Thompson Buntley Gowan, was born Septem­ber 12, 1884, probably in Lincoln County. He was married to Ruthie Warden August 15, 1907.

Children born to James William Gowan and Ruthie Warden Gowan include:

Harold Gowan born about 1909
Katherine Gowan born about 1911
Forrest Gowan born about 1914

Bettie Elizabeth Gowan, daughter of James Marion Gowan and Mary Matilda Thompson Buntley Gowan, was born April 6, 1888. She was married December 30, 1907 to Ster­ling Mills. In 1938 they lived at Fayetteville

Mattie Lou Gowan, daughter of James Marion Gowan and Mary Matilda Thompson Buntley Gowan, was born October 7, 1889. She was married to Ezell Lane August 30, 1900. Later Mattie Lou Gowan Lane lived in Memphis, Tennessee.

Berry Curlee Gowan, son of James Marion Gowan and Mary Matilda Thompson Buntley Gowan, was born November 8, 1894. He did not marry. He died March 5, 1930, at age 35 “of cerebro spinal meningitis,” according to his Tennessee BVS Death Certificate No. 6294, signed by T. A. Patrick, M.D. He was buried in Booneville Cemetery, according to Sam Gowan of Mulberry, Tennessee, informant

An unnamed infant daughter of Sam Gowan was born February 8, 1910 and died the following day, according to Tennessee Death Certificate No. 54368.

The tombstone at the grave of Berry Curlee Gowan erroneously states that he was the “son of A. Berry Gowan and Ophia Faulkner Gowan.” A. Berry Gowan was born August 10, 1865.

“A. B. Gowan” was married to S. E. Hudson October 15, 1892, according to Lincoln County Marriage Book 2, page 69. Ap­parently Mrs. S. E. Hudson Gowan died within the decade. A. Berry Gowan was remarried September 14, 1901 to Ophia Faulkner by J. E. Poindexter, Court Clerk, according to Lincoln County Marriage Book 3, page 74.

Also located in Booneville Cemetery are the graves of “A. Berry Gowan, born August 10, 1865, died May 11, 1945;” “Ophia Faulkner Gowan, born April 14, 1880, died August 15, 1938;” “Mary B. Gowan, 1865-1938” and “D. Ernest Gowan, born February 4, 1910 and died April 15, 1950.”

Children born to A. Berry Gowan and Ophia Faulkner Gowan, according to “Lincoln County, Tennessee Bible Records,” Volume 4, by Mabel Abbott Tucker and Jane Warren Waller, include:

William Cowden Gowan born December 3, 1904

William Cowden Gowan, son of A. Berry Gowan and Ophia Faulkner Gowan was born December 3, 1904 in Lincoln County. He was married December 11, 1927 to Mildred Adana Smith, who was born April 25, 1909.

Children born to William Cowden Gowan and Mildred Adana Smith Gowan include:

Hirman Cowden Gowan born March 20, 1935

Hirman Cowden Gowan, son of William Cowden Gowan and Mildred Adana Smith Gowan was born March 20, 1935. He was married December 23, 1962 to Linda Faye Brown. Of Hirman Cowden Gowan and Linda Faye Brown Gowan and de­scendants nothing more is known.

Annie Jane Gowan, daughter of James Marion Gowan and Mary Matilda Thompson Buntley Gowan, was born Decem­ber 12, 1896, probably in Lincoln County. She was married to William C. Robyn in 1921.

Apparently Annie Jane Gowan was married earlier to Everett Bedwell because they were the parents of Mabel Bedwell, who was born September 11, 1912.

Samuel Hipps Gowan, son of James Marion Gowan and Mary Matilda Thompson Buntley Gowan, was born February 8, 1902. He was married to Mary Louise Little August 9, 1923.

Children born to Samuel Hipps Gowan and Mary Louise Lit­tle Gowan include:

Evelyn Louise Gowan born September 29, 1924

Evelyn Louise Gowan, daughter of Samuel Hipps Gowan and Mary Louise Little Gowan, was born September 29, 1924. She was married to James David Lane August 21, 1950.

Ena Mae Gowan, daughter of James Marion Gowan and Mary Matilda Thompson Buntley Gowan, was born Decem­ber 8, 1904, probably in Lincoln County. She was married to Charles Holland June 9, 1930.

According to another bible owned by Lee Hudson, Mimosa Road, Fayetteville, Tennessee, Mattie Francis Gowan was married to William Bell Hudson July 8, 1877. She was born in Lincoln County December 24, 1859. William Bell Hudson was later married to Alice L. Thomison November 8, 1896.
==O==
Gary H. Gowan, son of Sam Gowan and Mary Prosser Gowan, was born March 8, 1864 in Tennessee. In 1929 he was farming near Mimosa, Tennessee in Lincoln County. He died there of “heart trouble, with no physician attending,” ac­cording to Tennessee BVS Death Certificate 27289. He was buried there in Prosser Graveyard, according to Jim Gowan, informant of Fayetteville.
==O==
Mattie F. Gowan was married to W. B. Hudson July 10, 1877 in Lincoln County according to Tennessee Marriage records (1851-1900).
==O==
Nancy Ann Gowan was married to Benjamin Bedford November 21, 1855 in Lincoln County according to Tennessee Marriage records (1851-1900).
==O==
S. H. Gowan was married to Mattie Raney December 3, 1891 in Lincoln County according to Tennessee Marriage records [1851-1900].
==O==
Daniel H. Gowen was married September 10, 1841 to Mary Ann Myrick, according to “Lincoln County, Tennessee Mar­riages, 1823-1850.” Children born to Daniel H. Gowen and Mary Ann Myrick Gowen are unknown

Mary Ann Gowen appeared in the 1880 census of Lincoln County as the head of a household in Enumeration District 123, page 30, Fayetteville District 8, enumerated as:

“Gowen, Mary Ann 36, born in TN, father born in
TN, mother born in TN,
common laborer, illiterate”
Dovey E. 3, born in TN, father born in
TN, mother born in TN,
daughter
Dilmer 10/12, born in TN, father born in
TN, mother born in TN, son,
born in July”
==O==
S. H. Gowan was married to Mattie Ramsey December 2, 1891, according to Lincoln marriage Records. “S. H. Gowen” was involved in land transactions in Lincoln County September 9, 1901 and October 7, 1907, according to Lincoln County Deed Book JJ, pages 73 and 386. He deeded 72 acres of land to John A. Keith for $880. Children born to S. H. Gowan and Mattie Ramsey Gowan are unknown.
==O==
Frances Gowen was married to Merdica Reed January 6, 1870 in Lincoln County according to Tennessee Marriage records (1851-1900).
==O==
Hamilton Gowen was married to Frances Prosser January 4, 1859 in Lincoln County according to Tennessee Marriage records (1851-1900).
==O==
Samuel E. Gowen was married Mary E. Prosser April 19, 1859 in Lincoln County according to Tennessee Marriage records (1851-1900). Nothing more is known of Samuel E. Gowen and Mary E. Prosser Gowen.
==O==
Buried in Porch Cemetery at Bookhill, Tennessee was “W. H. C. Gowen.” No dates were given on his headstone. Adjoining were the graves of “William H. Porch, died Sep. 1870” and “Pheby” whose grave was marked with a fieldstone, according to “Cemetery Inscriptions of Lincoln County, Tennessee.”

LOUDON COUNTY, TENNESSEE

Virginia Goins was born July 2, 1920. She died May 28, 1963 and was buried in Davis Cemetery in Loudon County. James Albert Goins was born July 27, 1915. He died January 25, 1928 and was buried in Davis Cemetery.

MADISON COUNTY, TENNESSEE

Mary Gowan, regarded as a widow, was enumerated as the head of a household in the 1880 census of Madison County:

“Gowan, Mary 47, born in Tennessee
Martha 23, born in Arkansas
Ella 18, born in Tennessee
Ada 12, born in Tennessee
Lutha 8, born in Tennessee”
==O==
Mary Susan Gowan was married to William Andrew Poteete May 29, 1870 in Madison County according to Tennessee Marriage Records [1851-1900].
==O==
Robert Gowan and his wife, Etta Gowan were believed to be residents of Madison County about 1890. Children born to them include:

James Roscoe Gowan born about 1890

James Roscoe Gowan, son of Robert Gowan and Etta Gowan, was born about 1890, probably in Madison County. He was married about 1913 to Murlene Marion Wood, daughter of Lonnie Wood and Addie Stubbs Wood.

Children born to James Roscoe Gowan and Murlene Marion Wood Gowan include:

Frances Patricia Gowan born October 12, 1917
Maudene Gowan [twin] born about 1920
Maurene Gowan [twin] born about 1920

Frances Patricia Gowan, daughter of James Roscoe Gowan and Marion M. Wood Gowan, was born October 12, 1917 in Jackson, Tennessee. Frances Patricia Gowan died in 1953 at Dallas, Texas.
==O==
Pleasant Gowan was married to Mary A. E. Harris July 30, 1849, according to “Madison County, Tennessee Marriages, 1827-1850.” Children born to Pleasant Gowan and Mary A. E. Harris Gowan are unknown.
==O==
Lillie Gowen, “age 24, born in December 1875 in South Carolina” and “Margurite Gowen, “age 6, born in March 1894 in Indiana” were recorded as lodgers with Susan Ellen Fryer in the 1900 census of Carroll County, Enumeration District 138, page 8.
==O==
Mary Gowen was married to Lemuel Day July 26, 1849, according to “Madison County, Tennessee Marriages, 1827-1850.”
==O==
A negro, William Gowin, age 18, a servant born in Tennessee, whose parents were born in Tennessee, was living in the Household of Mary A. Johnson in the 1880 census of Carroll County, Enumeration District 18, page 5.

MARION COUNTY, TENNESSEE

Daniel Goin was enumerated as the head of Household No. 444-444, Seventh Civil District in the 1850 census of Marion County. The family was enumerated as:

“Goin, Daniel 53, born in NC, farmer, illiterate
Charlotte 40, born in TN
Daniel 18, born in Tennessee, farmer
Malinda 14, born in TN
Lucinda 11, born in Tennessee
John 8, born in TN
Martha 5, born in TN
Charlotte 3, born in TN
Goin, Elizabeth 30, born in TN
Daniel 5, born in TN
Nancy 2, born in TN”
==O==
Andrew J. Going was enumerated as the head of a household in the 1900 census of Marion County, Enumeration District 96, page 14, Civil District 12:

“Going, Andrew J. 48, born in December 1851 in TN
Millie R. 46, born in March 1854 in TN”
==O==
Mrs. Essie Ware Goins died November 24, 1985 at South Pittsburg, Tennessee. She was born in 1901 in Alabama to Joseph Ware and Ellen Landers Quarles Ware. Ellen Landers Quarles was the daughter of Francis Quarles and Delia Summey. Essie Ware was married to Lee Goins about 1919.
==O==
Maude Goins, aunt of John Lee Bray II, recorded the following birth records in her bible. They were submitted October 24, 2000 by Linda Bray York who reported that her father was married to Laura Goins, daughter of Madge Irwin Goins. She also mentioned that Rhoda Caroline Goins, daughter of John Goins [below] of Marion County, was married to Joseph Eaton Beaty. Many of this family were buried in Rankin’s Cove Cemetery in Jasper, Tennessee.

Bible entries were:

John Goins born June 5, 1865
Thomas Goins born August 25, 1869
Mary Goins born February 24, 1871
Susan Goins born July 17, 1876
Martha June Goins born December 1, 1879
died December 7, 1881
Nancy Goins born June 29, 1881
Eliza Goins born January 7, 1873
Shirley Goins born February 10, 1876
William Albert Goins born March 14, 1878
James Goins born January 25, 1878

William Goins was enumerated as the head of a household in the 1830 census of Marion County. His household was recorded as:

“Goins, William white male 30-40
white female 30-40
white female 10-15
white male 5-10
white female 5-10
white male 0-5
white male 0-5
white male 0-5”
==O==
Three young men, apparently brothers, composed Household 41-41, 4th Civil District in Marion County, Tennessee in the 1870 census. The enumeration taken on August 8, 1870, page 6, showed Jasper, Tennessee as the post office address of:

“Gowen, Alexander 20, farm laborer, born in TN
David 18, farm laborer, born in TN,
illiterate
George W. 16, farm laborer, born in TN

MARSHALL COUNTY, TENNESSEE

Mary Ann Gowen was married to Thomas Smith March 15, 1846, according to “Marshall County, Tennessee Marriages, 1836-1870.”
==O==
Samuel W. McGowan was married February 27, 1879 to Dillie T. Shupe, according to Marshall County marriage records. Children born to Samuel W. McGowan and Dillie T. Shupe McGowan are unknown.

113 Maury Co, TN

MAURY COUNTY, TENNESSEE

Andrew Gowan was married to Lucy Elliott August 2, 1811, according to “Maury County, Tennessee Marriages, 1807-1850.” He was listed on the tax rolls of Maury County in 1813 and 1814.

“Pvt. Andrew Goins” was enlisted in Capt. Andrew Patterson’s Company of Tennessee militia and died January 30, 1815, perhaps following the Battle of New Orleans.

“Lucy Goins, widow of Andrew Goins” was entitled to a “half-pay pension,” according to “Widows and Orphans of the War of 1812.” If a soldier died in the war or died after the war as a result of his wounds, his widow and orphans were entitled to a pension at one-half of the deceased soldier’s pay. Beneficiaries remained on the pension rolls for five years. The pension ceased if the widow remarried during that period.

The estate of “Andrew Goan” was administered by Nathaniel Sims in 1815, according to Maury County Will Book A1, page 182.

On September 6, 1829, William Stratton, “guardian of the heirs of Andrew Gowen,” made a report of their schooling, ac­cording to “Maury County, Tennessee Cousins.”

Children born to Andrew Gowan and Lucy Elliott Gowan are regarded as:

Isaac Mathis Goins born in 1811
Levi Goins born about 1813

Isaac Mathis Goins, regarded as a son of Andrew Gowan and Lucy Elliott Gowan, was born in Tennessee in 1811. Professionally he became a shoemaker. In 1839 he lived in Maury County. Isaac Mathis Goins was mar­ried to Mary Lucy “Polly” Adkison July 29, 1841, according to “Maury County, Tennessee Marriages, 1807-1850.” She was born in 1816 in Maury County to Jordan Adkison and Mary Charity Ezell Adkison.

By 1850 they had re­moved to adjoining Hickman County.

Isaac Mathis Goins was enumerated as the head of Household 712-100 in the 1850 census of Hickman County:

“Goins, Isaac 39, born in Tennessee, shoemaker
Mary 34, born in Tennessee
Jordon 10, born in Tennessee
John 7, born in Tennessee
Ellen 6, born in Tennessee
Lewis 4, born in Tennessee
Isaac 2, born in Tennessee”

“Isaac M. Goin,” was a justice of the peace in Hickman County in 1853 and 1854, according to “History of Hickman County, Tennessee.”

Mary Lucy “Polly” Adkison Goins died before 1870 in Hickman County.

Children born to Isaac Mathis Goins and Mary Lucy “Polly” Adkison Goins include:

Jordan Reece Goins born January 29, 1839
John Gilford Goins born September 26, 1842
Ellen Goins born in 1844
Louis G. Goins born in 1846
Isaac Mathis Goins, Jr. born November 28, 1848
James Knox Polk Goins born May 3, 1852
Thomas J. Goins born in 1855
Mary P. “Mollie” Goins born in 1856

Jordan Reece Goins, son of Isaac Mathis Goins and Mary Lucy “Polly” Adkison Goins, was born in 1839 in Maury County, ac­cording to “Tennessee Confederate Widows and Their Families” abstracted by Edna Weifering. He appeared as a 10-year-old in the house­hold of his father in the 1850 census of Hickman County.

Jordan Reece Goins was enlisted in Company H, 24th Tennessee Infantry Regiment which was organized August 6, 1861, ac­cording to “History of Hickman County, Tennessee.” “Jourdon R. Goins” was married January 3, 1869 in Hickman County to Thankful Tilitha Jenkins, according to “Hickman County, Tennessee Mar­riages, 1813-1896.” The marriage date was February 29, 1868, according to Michael J. Goins of Detroit, Michigan. The bride was born June 12, 1842, according to Michael J. Goins.

Jordan Reece Goins died April 13, 1904 in Hickman County, and Thankful Tilitha Jenkins Goins filed Tennessee Widows Pension Application No. 4300. She died there May 6, 1917, according to the research of Donald Lyvonn Cribbs.

Children born to them include:

Mary E. Goins born December 27, 1869
Sarah Goins born about 1870
Jordan Anderson Goins born May 23, 1873
Rosa “Rosie” Goins born May 19, 1875
Alice Goins born April 9, 1877
Jennie Goins born August 7, 1881

Mary E. Goins, daughter of Jordan Reece Goins and Thankful Tilitha Jenkins Goins, was born December 27, 1869 in Hickman County. Mary E. Goins, at age 15, was married December 18, 1885 to James D. Baird, according to “Hickman County, Tennessee Mar­riages, 1813-1896.”

Children born to them include:

Beulah Baird born October 6, 1891
Dennis Baird born September 2, 1896

Beulah Baird, daughter of James D. Baird and Mary E. Goins Baird, was born October 6, 1891. She was married about 1918, to B. E. Bains.

Children born to them include:

Evelyn Bains born about 1920
Irene Bains born about 1923

Evelyn Bains, daughter of B. E. Bains and Beulah Baird Bains, was born about 1920. She was married about 1939 to Pat Johnson.

Irene Bains, daughter of B. E. Bains and Beulah Baird Bains, was born about 1923. She was married about 1941, husband’s name Francis.

Dennis Baird, son of James D. Baird and Mary E. Goins Baird, was born September 2, 1896. He was married about 1918, wife’s name Beulah.

Children born to Dennis Baird and Beula Baird include”

Sarah Goins, daughter of Jordan Reece Goins and Thankful Tilitha Jenkins Goins, was born about 1870. She was married about 1888, husband believed to be Frizzell.

Jordan Anderson Goins, son of Jordan Reece Goins and Thankful Tilitha Jenkins Goins, was born May 23, 1873 in Hickman County. He was married there May 3, 1899 to Sara Ann Overby who was born there May 2, 1876.

“Anderson J. Goins” was recorded as the head of a household in the 1900 census of Hickman County, Enumeration District 41, page 16, Civil District 4:

“Goins, Anderson J. 27, born in May 1873 in Tennessee
Sarah A. 24, born in May 1876 in Tennessee”

He died there December 3, 1924, and she died there February 27, 1947.

Children born to Jordan Anderson Goins and Sarah Ann Overby Goins include:

Maggie L. Goins born in 1901
Nissie Goins born about 1902
Jordan Alex Goins born June 13, 1903
Ellis Anderson Goins born June 15, 1905
John T. Goins born in 1909
Elisha Goins born in 1912

Maggie L. Goins, daughter of Jordan Anderson Goins and Sarah Ann Overby Goins, was born in 1901 in Hickman County. She did not marry.

Nissie Goins, daughter of Jordan Anderson Goins and Sarah Ann Overby Goins, was born in 1903 in Hickman County. She was married about 1922 to Henry Russell.

Jordan Alex Goins, son of Jordan Anderson Goins and Sarah Ann Overby Goins, was born June 13, 1903 in Hickman County. He was married April 13, 1931 to Mary Russell who was born March 15, 1913. He died February 9, 1980.

Children born to Jordan Alex Goins and Mary Russell Goins include:

Bernice Goins born about 1933
Marge Goins born about 1934
Roy Goins born about 1936
Clifford Goins born in 1938

Clifford Goins, son of Jordan Alex Goins and Mary Russell Goins, was born in 1938. He died in 1952.

Ellis Anderson Goins, son of Jordan Anderson Goins and Sarahy Ann Overby Goins, was born June 15, 1905 in Hickman County. He was married about 1928 to Dessie Lee Davidson who was born January 4, 1906.

Children born to Ellis Anderson Goins and Dessie Lee Davidson Goins include:

Betty Lois Goins born November 25, 1929
Hazel Goins born about 1932

Betty Lois Goins, daughter of Ellis Anderson Goins and Dessie Lee Davidson Goins, was born November 25, 1929 in Hickman County. She was married December 23, 1949 to James R. Litton who was born there September 8, 1929.

Children born to James R. Litton and Betty Lois Goins Litton include:

Patricia Litton born February 29, 1952

Patricia Litton, daughter of James R. Litton and Betty Lois Goins Litton, was born February 29, 1952 in Dickson County, Tennessee. She was married February 2, 1974 to James Michael Slaughter.

Children born to them include:

Jennifer Nicole Slaughter born Dec. 25, 1976
Jay Michael Slaughter born June 27, 1986
Leeann Litton Slaughter [twin] born Sept. 15, 1987
Lindsey C. Slaughter [twin] born Sept. 15, 1987

Rosa “Rosie” Goins, daughter of Jordan Reece Goins and Thankful Tilitha Jenkins Goins, was born May 19, 1875 in Hickman County. “Rosie Goins” was married February 5, 1891 to John Frizzell, according to “Hickman County, Tennessee Marriages, 1813-1896.”

Alice Goins, daughter of Jordan Reece Goins and Thankful Tilitha Jenkins Goins, was born April 9, 1877 in Hickman County. Alice Goins was married December 27, 1891, at the age of 14, to W. Campbell Bradley, according to “Hickman County, Tennessee Marriages, 1813-1896.”

Jennie Goins, daughter of Jordan Reece Goins and Thankful Tilitha Jenkins Goins, was born August 7, 1881 in Hickman County. She was married about 1898 to Lee Toy who was born in April 1873 in Pennsylvania.

Children born to them include:

Curtis Toy born in 1901
Cudlece Toy born in 1903
Stella Toy born in 1905
Nellie Toy born in 1907

John T. Goins, son of Jordan Anderson Goins and Sarah Ann Overby Goins, was born in 1909 in Hickman County. He was married to Leva Haskins about 1922.

Children born to John T. Goins and Leva Haskins Goins include:

Curtis Goins born about 1924
Freed Goins born about 1926
Nelson Goins born about 1929
Dorothy Goins born about 1933

Elisha Goins, son of Jordan Anderson Goins and Sarah Ann Overby Goins, was born in 1912 in Hickman County.

John Gilford Goins, son of Isaac Mathis Goins and Mary Lucy “Polly” Adkison Goins, was born in Tennessee September 26, 1842, according to the research of Donald Lyvonn Cribbs. He appeared as a seven-year-old in the household of his father in the 1850 census of Hickman County.

He served in Company E, 48th Tennessee Infantry Regiment, according to Michael J. Goins, a great-grandson. He was married about 1866 to Angeline Toney Parker who was born May 5, 1846, according to Michael J. Goins.

John Gilford Goins and Angeline Toney Parker Goins were residents of Wichita County, Texas in 1915. Angeline Toney Parker Goins died Jan­uary 20, 1915 in Wichita County.

John Gilford Goins received a war­ranty deed from R. R. Brooks September 28, 1916 to the southwest quarter of Section 51, Block 15, Wilbarger County, for $6,400, according to Wilbarger County Deed Book 62, page 621. John Gilford Goins died there February 21, 1922, ac­cording to BVS File 6363. At the time of his death he owned 100 acres of land in Block 29, Red River Valley Lands in Wi­chita County, valued at $17,500 and the southwest quarter of Section 51, Block 15 in Wilbarger County, Texas, valued at $5,500. Personal property, notes and bonds added an addi­tional $20,000 to the estate.

Children born to John Gilford Goins and Angeline Toney Parker Goins include:

Theodora J. “Dorie” Goins born in 1869
Isaac Chambers Goins born about 1871
J. Clagett Goins born about 1872
George Goins born about 1874
Susan Ann “Susie” Goins born about 1877
Jordan L. Goins born about 1883

Theodora J. “Dorie” Goins, son of John Gilford Goins and Angeline Toney Parker Goins, was born in 1869 in Hickman County. “Dorie Goins” was married May 16, 1886 to Susan Tyler, ac­cording to “Hickman County, Tennessee Marriages, 1813-1896.” Later he was remarried, wife’s name Maggie. She was illiterate.

In 1923, Theodora J. “Dorie” Goins and Maggie Goins lived at Big Cabin, Craig County, Oklahoma. On January 16, he sold his interest in the Wilbarger County portion of his father’s estate to his brother, George Goins for $1,200, according to Wilbarger County Deed Book 91, page 96.

Theodora J. “Dorie” Goins died in 1957 in Texas, according to the research of Donald Lyvonn Cribbs.

Children born to Theodora J. “Dorie” Goins, Susan Tyler Goins and Maggie Goins include:

Myrell Goins born about 1890

Isaac Chambers “Chame” Goins, son of John Gilford Goins and Angeline Goins, was born about 1871, probably in Hickman County, Tennessee. He was married about 1893 to Betty Ray and removed to Wichita County, Texas. Betty Ray Goins died about a year later. Isaac Chambers Goins re­ceived an early land grant of 80 acres in Wichita County from the state of Texas, according to State Land Commissioner Records. He apparently returned to Tennessee after the death of Betty Ray Goins. He was remarried to Anne Belle Jenkins August 6, 1911 in Hickman County. She was born there March 21, 1887. Anna Belle Jenkins Goins died May 22, 1921 in Hickman County and was buried in Jenkins Cemetery, according to “Hickman County, Tennessee Cemetery Records.”

Buried along­side was his in­fant son, unnamed, who was “born and died September 12, 1925.” “Chame Goins”, believed to be I. C. Goins, “born 1870, died 1958” was also buried in the fam­ily plot. Alongside was Lucy Goins, “born 1895, died 1954,” be­lieved to be his second wife.

On February 24, 1923, he, a widower, sold his in­heritance in his father’s Wilbarger County farm to his brother, George Goins, accord­ing to Wilbarger County Deed Book 91, page 511.

Isaac Chambers Goins was remarried to Lucy F. Jenkins, regarded as a sister to Anna Belle Jenkins, a few weeks after her death. She was born in 1895. On October 9, 1937, while still a resident of Lyles, Tennessee, Hickman County, he gave a full release on the Wilbarger County farm, according to Wilbarger County Deed Book, page 587.

Lucy F. Jenkins Goins died in 1954, and Isaac Chambers Goins died in 1958 in Hickman County. She was buried alongside her sister. He and an unnamed son, “born and died September 12, 1925” was also buried in the family plot.

Children born to Isaac Chambers Goins and Betty Ray Goins are unknown.

Children born to Isaac Chambers Goins and Anna Belle Jenkins Goins include:

Gertie May Goins born June 19, 1913
James Howard Goins born October 9, 1915
Mary Alma Goins born May 9, 1917
Lester B. Goins born August 15, 1919
[infant] born in May 1921

Children born to Isaac Chambers Goins and Lucy F. Jenkins Goins include:

Hautie Sue Goins born about 1924
[son] born September 12, 1925
John Allen “Lewis” Goins born in 1926
Elizabeth Jane Goins born in 1932

Gertie May Goins, daughter of Isaac Chambers Goins and Anna Belle Jenkins Goins, was born June 19, 1913. She was married September 17, 1932 to Valley Stevens who was born March 3, 1909. She died March 5, 1964, and he died February 2, 1971.

Children born to Valley Stevens and Gertie May Goins Stevens include:

Billy Ray Stevens born October 22, 1934
Norma Joyce Stevens born June 1, 1936
Roy Lynn Stevens born May 2, 1940
Arthur Wayne Stevens born June 22, 1942
Jerry Clifford Stevens born September 2, 1945

Norma Joyce Stevens, daughter of Valley Stevens and Gertie May Stephens, was born June 1, 1936. She was married about 1955 to Austin Chambers. She died May 1, 1990.

James Howard Goins, son of Isaac Chambers Goins and Anna Belle Jenkins Goins, was born October 9, 1915. He was married in March 1946 in Inkster, Michigan to Helen Petro who was born in Ohio August 6, 1912. He died June 8, 1985 in Detroit, Michigan.

Children born to James Howard Goins and Helen Petro Goins include:

Michael James Goins born December 24, 1950

Michael James Goins, son of James Howard Goins and Helen Petro Goins, was born December 24, 1950. He was married June 5, 1971 to Judith Mamie Henderson who was born July 21, 1951. Children born to Michael James Goins and Judith Mamie Henderson Goins are unknown.

Mary Alma Goins, daughter of Isaac Chambers Goins and Anna Belle Jenkins Goins, was born May 9, 1917 in Hickman County. She was married about 1937 to Delmar “Jack” Worley. He died before May 1996.

Children born to them include:

James Orville Worley born October 9, 1938
William Spence Worley born April 11, 1940
Bobby Lee Worley born November 24, 1941
Larry B. Worley born August 25, 1943
Kenneth Darrell Worley born December 14, 1945
Sherry Dale Worley born May 7, 1953

Lester B. Goins, son of Isaac Chambers Goins and Anna Belle Jenkins Goins, was born August 15, 1919. He was married about 1941 to Belva Cochran.

Children born to Lester B. Goins and Belva Cochran Goins include:

Barbara Ann Goins born July 26, 1943

An infant was born to Isaac Chambers Goins and Anna Belle Jenkins Goins in May 1921 and died in infancy.

Hautie Sue Goins, daughter of Isaac Chambers Goins and Lucy F. Jenkins Goins, was born about 1924. She was married about 1942 to Bobby Bryant. Later she was remarried to Monroe Russell.

An infant son was born to Isaac Chambers Goins and Lucy F. Jenkins Goins September 12, 1925 and died the same day.

John Allen “Lewis” Goins, son of Isaac Chambers Goins and Lucy F. Jenkins Goins, was born in 1926 in Hickman County. He died February 7, 1997 in Goodletsville, Tennessee.

Elizabeth Jane Goins, daughter of Isaac Chambers Goins and Lucy F. Jenkins Goins, was born in 1932. She was married about 1953 to Harvel Moss. He died in 1986.

Children born to them include:

Harvel Moss, Jr. born about 1954
Pamela Alise Moss born about 1955
Iris Kay Moss born about 1957
Jerry Randall Moss born about 1959
Terry Wayne Moss born about 1962
Brenda Joy Moss born about 1964
Teena Darlene Moss born about 1967
David Mark Moss born about 1970
Dorcas Jane Moss born about 1972
Larry Ray Moss born about 1975
Timothy Earl Moss born about 1978
Angela Denise Moss born about 1981

J. Claggett Goins, son of John Gilford Goins and Angeline Goins, was born about 1871, probably in Tennessee. He was married about 1898, wife’s name Ida May.

In 1922 J. Claggett Goins and Ida May Goins lived at Burkburnett, Texas. They sold their inheritance in the Wilbarger County farm of John Gilford Goins to his brother, George Goins Septem­ber 11, 1922 for $2,400, according to Wilbarger County Deed Book 91, page 98. “J. C. Goins” died in nearby Mon­tague County September 14, 1932, according to BVS File 39598.

George Goins, son of John Gilford Goins and Angeline Goins, was born August 12, 1874 in Hickman County. He was mar­ried to Maggie King about 1899. Maggie King Goins was born at Keller, Texas in 1881. In 1901 George Goins was a farmer lo­cated at Iowa Park, Texas.

George Goins and Maggie King Goins, “formerly Maggie King Goins of Archer City, Texas” gave a cor­rection deed to R. G. Cate to 171 acres of land in Tarrant County, Texas “located 11 miles northwest of Ft. Worth, Texas” May 12, 1902, according to Tarrant County Deed Book 165, page 83. Consideration was $193.

It is believed that George Goins and Maggie King Goins were divorced about 1902, and it is thought that George Goins was remarried about 1904. “Maggie Goins,” believed to Maggie King Goins, died August 20, 1938 in Wichita County, Texas, according to BVS File 39696.

A son was born to “George Goins and Susie Goins” February 9, 1905, according to Wichita County Birth Book 1, page 24. At that time they lived eight miles south of Iowa Park, Texas. Of Susie Goins nothing more is known. George Goins was remar­ried April 17, 1919 to Miss Bertha M. Crisp, according to Wilbarger County Texas Marriage Book 6, page 1. She was born in 1899.

Following the death of his father, George Goins began to pur­chase the interest of the other heirs of a farm in Wilbarger County. By 1923 he had completed the five pur­chases. Ap­parently he continued to own the farm through out his life­time. George Goins continued to live in Wilbarger County in 1942.

George Goins and Bertha M. Crisp Goins were residents of Fargo, Texas in Wilbarger County in 1949. George Goins died Octo­ber 11, 1949, at the age of 75, according to Wilbarger County Death Book 3, page 218. Death of the retired farmer was at­tributed to a cerebral hemorrhage. He was buried in East­view Cemetery, Vernon, Texas.

Bertha M. Crisp Goins was named administrator of the estate which included the 160-acre farm which was valued at $11,032.88, according to Wilbarger County Probate Book 17, page 448. She received a war­ranty deed to a lot in Vernon, April 13, 1956, according to Wilbarger County Deed Book 204, page 1.

Bertha M. Crisp Goins gave a warranty deed to her farm to Ce­cil Clay Goins, believed to be her step-son and his wife, Lil­lian Lucille Mason Goins, for $32,000, according to Wilbarger County Deed Book 287, page 704. Bertha M. Crisp died in 1977 in Wilbarger County.

It is believed that children born to George Goins and Maggie King Goins include:

Claude Miller Goins born July 30, 1901
Cecil Clay Goins born about 1903
[son] born February 9, 1905

Claude Miller Goins, son of George Goins and Maggie King Goins was born, July 30, 1901 in Wichita County, according to Wichita County Birth Certificate 3625.

He was married June 27, 1925 to Miss Estella Parker, ac­cording to Wilbarger County Marriage Book 8, page 292. Estella Parker was born in Dallas County, Texas in 1907, the daughter of Moses E. Parker and Sarah E. Parker. Moses E. Parker moved to Fargo in 1910, died there in 1920 of cancer and was buried in Fargo Cemetery. He was a farmer and owned 240 acres of land located 12 miles north of Vernon, according to Wilbarger County Deed Book 118, page 514.

Claude Miller Goins and Estella Parker Goins were residents of Wilbarger County in 1931, in 1933 and in 1960. He was a farmer.

Children born to Claude Miller Goins and Estella Parker Goins include:

Jeanette Goins born December 21, 1931
J. Delbert Goins born December 3, 1933

Jeanette Goins, daughter of Claude Miller Goins and Estella Parker Goins, was born December 21, 1931, according to Wilbarger County Birth Book 5, page 381. “Jeanette Alma Goins” was married to Edward Newton Goins April 5, 1953, according to Carson County, Texas Marriage Book 6, page 132.

J. Delbert Goins, son of Claude Miller Goins and Estella Parker Goins was born December 3, 1933, ac­cording to Wilbarger County Probate Birth Book 9, page 261.

Cecil Clay Goins, son of George Goins and Maggie King Goins, was born in 1903, at Holliday, Texas in Wichita County. Cecil Clay Goins appeared in the 1922 city directory of Wichita Falls, living at 2011 Elizabeth.

He was married to Miss Lillian Lucille Mason, who was born in 1910 at Fargo, February 11, 1927, ac­cording to Wilbarger County Marriage Book 9, page 224.

Cecil Clay Goins and Lillian Lucille Mason Goins, received a war­ranty deed from C. O. Olive April 24, 1933 to ¼ acre in the Southeast quarter of Section 37, Block 15 for $27.50, ac­cording to Wilbarger County, Texas Deed Book 128, page 119. On De­cember 21, 1933 they received a warranty deed to one acre ad­joining from L. F. Suttle for $200, according to Wilbarger County Deed Book 129, page 563. Cecil Clay Goins received a quit claim deed from Stockgrowers Bank, a bankrupt company of Purdin, Missouri July 11, 1939 for 100 acres for $1,637.35, according to Wilbarger County Deed Book 145, page 633.

Cecil Clay Goins and Lillian Lucille Mason Goins gave a war­ranty Deed to Rubie Lee Crisp October 9, 1939 to one acre of land for $300, according to Wilbarger County Deed Book 146, page 160.

Cecil Clay Goins lived at Route 1, Vernon in 1943-1944. He was the father of “Bill W. Goins,” a freshman engineering stu­dent at Texas Technological College, Lubbock, Texas at that time.

Cecil Clay Goins purchased land from Eva L. Richardson October 3, 1944 for $13,200, according to Wilbarger County Deed Book 158, page 411. They sold land to Frank King October 1, 1945, according to Wilbarger County Deed Book 189, page 93.

Cecil Clay Goins was one of the trustees of the Church of Christ at Fargo September 26, 1954, according to Wilbarger County Deed Book 193, page 608.

Cecil Clay Goins and Lillian Lucille Mason Goins received one acre of land from Ada Hutson March 11, 1967, according to Wilbarger County Deed Book 252, page 59.

Children born to Cecil Clay Goins and Lillian Lucille Goins in­clude:

Billy Ray Goins born January 15, 1937
George Allen Goins born June 21, 1939
Cecil Don Goins born November 11, 1948

Billy Ray Goins, son of Cecil Clay Goins and Lillian Lucille Mason Goins, was born January 15, 1937, according to Wilbarger County Birth Book 5, page 561. He was married about 1958 to Charlie Sue Sanders, who was born in 1937 in Corsicana, Texas. They were residents of Vernon in 1960 where he was employed as a bookkeeper.

They received a warranty deed to lots in Mason Subdivision, Vernon from Sands Development Corpora­tion for $11,300, ac­cording to Wilbarger County Deed Book 226, page 409. They sold the property to Weldon Brite April 1, 1965, ac­cording to Wilbarger County Deed Book 236, page 527. “Billy Ray Goins” received a deed to land in Montgomery County, Texas in 1969, according to Montgomery County Deed Book 689, page 427.

Apparently Billy Ray Goins and Charlie Sue Sanders Goins were divorced about 1971. Billy Ray Goins was married to Carolyn Ellen Carey December 22, 1973, according to Wilbarger County Marriage Book 27, page 57.

Billy Ray Goins and Carolyn Ellen Carey Goins received a warranty deed from Ivan Dorman July 29, 1974 to one acre of land for $1,110, according to Wilbarger County Deed Book 299, page 540.

Children born to Billy Ray Goins and Charlie Sue Sanders Goins include:

Barry Paul Goins born August 8, 1960

Barry Paul Goins, son of Billy Ray Goins and Charlie Sue Sanders Goins, was born August 8, 1960, ac­cording to Wilbarger County Birth Certificate No. 9973. Billy Ray Goins and his brother, Cecil Don Goins, received a warranty deed from their parents to 400 acres of land for $114,250, ac­cording to Wilbarger County Deed Book 307, page 485.

George Allen Goins, son of Cecil Clay Goins and Lillian Lu­cille Mason Goins, was born June 21, 1939, according to City of Vernon Birth Book 9, page 350. George Allen Goins was married June 22, 1957 to Patricia Jane Shores, according to Wilbarger County Marriage Book 20, page 321. Of George Allen Goins and Patricia Jane Shores Goins nothing more is known.

Cecil Don Goins, son of Cecil Clay Goins and Lillian Lucille Mason Goins, was born November 11, 1948, according to Wilbarger County Birth Certificate No. 3701. He was still a single man when he joined his brother, Billy Ray Goins, in pur­chasing 400 acres of land from his parents, according to Wilbarger County Deed Book 307, page 485.

Susan Ann “Susie” Goins, daughter of John Gilford Goins and Angeline Goins, was born about 1877, probably in Ten­nessee. She was mar­ried October 12, 1905 to Andrew H. Seidlitz, according to Wichita County Marriage Book 2, page 257. In 1922, Andrew H. Seidlitz and Susan Ann “Susie” Goins Seidlitz lived in Wilbarger County. They sold their interest in the farm in Wilbarger County, inherited from her father to her brother, George Goins, January 16, 1923, ac­cording to Wilbarger County Deed Book 91, page 97.

Children born to them include:

Essie Lou Seidlitz born in 1906
Bessie Bee Seidlitz born in 1908
Willis Dollie Seidlitz born in 1910
Gladys Opal Seidlitz born in 1912
Hollice Faye Seidlitz born in 1914
Geneva Seidlitz born in 1916
Mildred Lois Seidlitz born in 1918
Thelda Marie Seidlitz born in 1920
Evelyn Jo Seidlitz born in 1922

Jordan P. Goins, son of of Isaac Chambers Goins and Lucy F. Jenkins Goins, was born about 1883. He was married about 1906 to Ida Brown. He died in 1952. Children born to Jordan P. Goins and Ida Brown Goins are unknown.

Jordan L. Goins, son of John Gilford Goins and Angeline Goins, was born about 1870, probably in Tennessee. He was married Jan­uary 31, 1907, to Ida Brown, according to Wichita County Marriage Book 3, page 57. He was remarried to Jonnie M. Crowell January 21, 1916, according to Wichita County Mar­riage Book 5, page 216. Of Ida Brown Goins nothing more is known.

In 1923 Jordan L. Goins and Jonnie M. Crowell Goins lived at Burkburnett, Texas. On September 11, 1922 Jordan L. Goins sold his portion of the Wilbarger inheritance to his brother George Goins for $1,200, ac­cording to Wilbarger County Deed Book 91, page 98.

Ellen Goins, daughter of Isaac Mathis Goins and Mary Lucy “Polly” Adkison Goins was born in 1844 in Tennessee. She appeared in the 1850 census of Hickman County as a six-year-old living in the household of her father.

Louis G. Goins, son of Isaac Mathis Goins and Mary Lucy “Polly” Adkison Goins was born in Tennessee in 1846, according to the 1850 census of Hick­man County. He was married February 17, 1866 to Elizabeth Elliott. The bride’s name was shown as Elizabeth Garton in the research of Donald Lyvonn Cribbs.

Children born to Louis G. Goins and Elizabeth Elliott Goins include:

Mary Goins born in 1867
William Martin Goins born April 4, 1870
Bell Goins born in 1874
Isaac Goins born in 1875

Mary Goins, daughter of Louis G. Goins and Elizabeth Elliott Goins, was born in 1867 in Hickman County.

William Martin Goins, son of Louis G. Goins and Elizabeth Elliott Goins, was born April 4, 1870 in Hickman County. He was married about 1890 to Mollie Chitwood. In 1895 William Martin Goins and Mollie Chitwood Goins lived at Iowa Park, Texas. Mollie Chitwood Goins died prior to 1956. William Martin Goins, a widower, died June 19, 1956 of myocardial infarction, ac­cording to Wichita County, Texas Death Cer­tificate No. 14011. He was buried in Burkburnett Cemetery, Burkbur­nett, Texas, according to Wendell Ray Goins, informant.

Children born to William Martin Goins and Mollie Chitwood Goins include:

William Estel Goins born May 19, 1895

William Estel Goins, son of William Martin Goins and Mol­lie Chitwood Goins, was born May 18, 1895 at Iowa Park. He served in World War I. He was married November 15, 1919 to Ruby Jewel Hennis, according to Wichita County Marriage Book 7, page 307.

William Estel Goins and Ruby Jewel Goins lived in Burk­burnett for the next 50 years. They were listed in the city di­rectory of Wichita Falls from 1943 to 1957 as residents of Burkburnett. He was employed by the post office in Wichita Falls during that period. In 1968 they lived at 218 West 4th Street, Burk­burnett. William Estel Goins died April 3, 1968 of “lung trouble”, according to Wichita County, Death Cer­tificate No. 16427. He was buried in Burkburnett Cemetery.

Bell Goins, daughter of Louis G. Goins and Elizabeth Elliott Goins, was born in 1874 in Hickman County.

Isaac Goins, son of Louis G. Goins and Elizabeth Elliott Goins, was born in Hickman County in 1875.

Isaac Mathis Goins, Jr, son of Isaac Mathis Goins and Mary Lucy “Polly” Adkison Goins, was born in Tennessee November 28, 1848. He appeared in the household of his father in the 1850 census of Hickman County as a two-year-old. “I. M. Gowins” was married there December 20, 1875 to Sarah Evelyn Martin who was born there July 20, 1855, according to “Hickman County, Tennessee Marriages, 1813-1896.”

She was the daughter of Jackson S. R. “Jack” Martin and Fatima “Timy” Vaughn Martin, according to Donald Lyvonn Cribbs. He operated a store in Hickman County.

He died July 14, 1930 in Hickman County, and she died there January 31, 1942.

Children born to Isaac Mathis Goins, Jr. and Sarah Evelyn Martin Goins include:

Sarah “Sally” Goins born in 1877
Jordan A. Goins born September 29, 1878
William C. Goins born in 1882
Talitha E. Goins born in 1883
Daniel Fletcher Goins born January 18, 1886
Lucy Maye Goins born July 13, 1888
Silas Lee Goins born in October 1889
James I. Johnson Goins born in October 1898

Sarah “Sally” Goins, daughter of Isaac Mathis Goins, Jr. and Sarah Evelyn Martin Goins, was born in 1877. She was married about 1894 to Allen McCord.

Jordan A. Goins, son of Isaac Mathis Goins, Jr. and Sarah Evelyn Martin Goins, was born September 29, 1878 in Hickman County. He was married in 1900 to Susie A. Litton who was born June 18, 1881. He died February 17, 1947, and she died July 20, 1953.

Children born to Jordan A. Goins and Susie A. Litton Goins include:

John William Isaac “Ike” Goins born in 1902
Elizabeth L. “Lizzie” Goins born in 1905
Sarah L. Goins born in 1906
Daniel A. Goins born in 1908
Ellen F. Goins born in 1911
Ruby E. Goins born in 1914
Frank Goins born October 15, 1915
Elson Goins born in 1917

John William Isaac “Ike” Goins, son of Jordan A. Goins and Susie A. Litton Goins, was born in 1902.

Elizabeth L. “Lizzie” Goings, daughter of Jordan A. Goins and Susie A. Litton Goins, was born in 1905.

Sarah L. Goins, daughter of Jordan A. Goins and Susie A. Litton Goins, was born in 1906. She was married about 1924, husband’s name Jenkins.

Children born to them include:

Vera Jenkins born about 1926
Janie Jenkins born about 1928
Susie Jenkins born about 1930
John Jenkins born about 1933
Dorris Jenkins born about 1936

Daniel A. Goins, son of Jordan A. Goins and Susie A. Litton Goins, was born in 1908.

Ellen F. Goins, daughter of Jordan A. Goins and Susie A. Litton Goins, was born in 1911.

Ruby E. Goins, daughter of Jordan A. Goins and Susie A. Litton Goins, was born in 1914.

Frank Goins, son of Jordan A. Goins and Susie A. Litton Goins, was born in Hickman County October 15, 1915. He died there September 6, 1916.

Elson Goins, son of Jordan A. Goins and Susie A. Litton Goins, was born in 1917.

William C. Goins, son of Isaac Mathis Goins, Jr. and Sarah Evelyn Martin Goins, was born September 29, 1878 in Hickman County. He was married there about 1904 to Mary Emma Lee Beasley. She was born in 1887 to Cicero Beasley and Elizabeth Clark Beasley. He died about 1959 in Florida, and she died there in 1970.

Children born to William C. Goins and Mary Emma Lee Beasley Goins include:

William Alton Goins born in 1905
Leonard A. Goins born in 1906
Evelyn E. Goins born in 1909
James M. Goins born in 1912
Hershel Lee Goins born in 1915
Silus Johnson Goins born in 1917
Mamie Allison Goins born in 1919
Frank Ivan Goins born in 1923
Arnold Lavern Goins born in 1932

William Alton Goins, son of William C. Goins and Mary Emma Lee Beasley Goins, was born in 1905 in Hickman County. He was married about 1928 to Myrtle E. Griffin. No children were born to William Alton Goins and Myrtle E. Griffin Goins.

Leonard A. Goins, son of William C. Goins and Mary Emma Lee Beasley Goins, was born in 1906. He died in 1908.

Evelyn E. Goins, daughter of William C. Goins and Mary Emma Lee Beasley Goins, was born in 1909 in Hickman County. She was married about 1928 to Raymond H. Cribbs who was born November 21, 1902. He died March 25, 1975.

Children born to them include:

Donald Lyvonn Cribbs born in 1931
Marye Carolyn Cribbs born in 1945

Donald Lyvonn Cribbs, son of Raymond H. Cribbs and Evely E. Goins Cribbs, was born in 1931. He was married about 1955 to Carolyn Cooper Shreeve who was born in 1936. In 1997 they lived in New Market, Alabama where he, a Foundation member, was active in the research of his branch of the family.

Children born to Donald Lyvonn Cribbs and Carolyn Cooper Shreeve Cribbs include:

Mary Catherine Cribbs born in 1957
Donald Lyvonn Cribbs, Jr. born in 1959
John Calvin Cribbs born in 1961
Carol Elizabeth Cribbs born in 1962

Mary Catherine Cribbs, daughter of Donald Lyvonn Cribbs and Carolyn Cooper Shreeve Cribbs, was born in 1957. She was married about 1977 to Michael O. Mann who was born in 1957 in Benton County, Mississippi.

Children born to Michael O. Mann and Mary Catherine Cribbs Mann include:

Christae Michelle Mann born in 1979
Catherine A. Mann born in 1982

Donald Lyvonn Cribbs, Jr, son of Donald Lyvonn Cribbs and Carolyn Cooper Shreeve Cribbs, was born in 1959. He was married about 1992 to Kathryn E. Garrison who was born in 1963.

Children born to Donald Lyvonn Cribbs, Jr. and Kathryn E. Garrison Cribbs include:

Raymond Wesley Cribbs born in 1994

John Calvin Cribbs, son of Donald Lyvonn Cribbs and Carolyn Cooper Shreeve Cribbs, was born in 1961.

Carol Elizabeth Cribbs, daughter of of Donald Lyvonn Cribbs and Carolyn Cooper Shreeve Cribbs, was born in 1962. She was married about 1986 to Larry Keith McKinnon.

Children born to them include:

Brianna C. McKinnon [twin] born in 1988
Brian C. McKinnon [twin] born in 1988

Marye Carolyn Cribbs, daughter of Raymond H. Cribbs and Evelyn E. Goins Cribbs, was born in 1945. She was married about 1967 to Robert R. Deadman who was born in 1944.

Children born to Robert R. Deadman and Marye Carolyn Cribbs include:

Scott R. Deadman born in 1969
Ryan Robert Deadman born in 1972

James M. Goins, son of William C. Goins and Mary Emma Lee Beasley Goins, was born in 1912 in Hickman County. He was married about 1935, wife’s name Ruby. He was remarried about 1939 to Mary Helen McBride who was born in 1921.

Children born to James M. Goins and Ruby Goins are unknown. Children born to James M. Goins and Mary Helen McBride Goins include:

William Gerald Goins [twin] born in January 1941
Peggy Joyce Goins [twin] born in January 1941
Richard Lee Goins born in 1945

William Gerald Goins, twin son of James M. Goins and Mary Helen McBride Goins, was born in 1941.

Peggy Joyce Goins, twin daughter of James M. Goins and Mary Helen McBride Goins, was born in 1941. She was married about 1961 to Bedford Leland Dabney who was born in 1942. She was remarried about 1974 to Elmo Wayne Matthews who was born in 1941.

Children born to Bedford Leland Dabney and Peggy Joyce Goins Dabney include:

David Leland Dabney born in 1963
Gregory Scott Dabney born in 1965
Deborah M. Dabney born in 1967

Children born to Elmo Wayne Matthews and Peggy Joyce Goins Dabney Matthews include:

Elmer W. Matthews born in 1976

Richard Lee Goins, son of James M. Goins and Mary Helen McBride Goins, was born in 1945.

Hershel Lee Goins, son of William C. Goins and Mary Emma Lee Beasley Goins, was born in 1915 in Hickman County. He was married about 1940 to Helen Louise McMahan who was born in 1919.

Children born to Hershel Lee Goins and Helen Louise McMahan Goins include:

Sandra Lee Goins born in 1942

Sandra Lee Goins, daughter of Hershel Lee Goins and Helen Louise McMahan Goins, was born in 1942. She was married about 1967 to James Arthur MacLean who was born in 1945.

Children born to them include:

James Arthur MacLean II born in 1969

Silus Johnson Goins, son of William C. Goins and Mary Emma Lee Beasley Goins, was born in 1917 in Hickman County. He was married about 1942 to Ruby Cude. She died about 1994.

Children born to Silus Johnson Goins and Ruby Cude Goins include:

Douglas Goins born about 1944

Douglas Goins, son of Silus Johnson Goins and Ruby Cude Goins, was born about 1944. He died about 1991.

Mamie Allison Goins, daughter of William C. Goins and Mary Emma Lee Beasley Goins, was born in 1919 in Hickman County. She was married about 1946 to Farrell Ward Bassett who was born in 1942.

Children born to them include:

Malcolm Lynn Bassett born in 1950
Melany Sherril Bassett born in 1952
Stephen Farrell Bassett born in 1954
Carroll Craig Bassett born in 1956

Malcoln Lynn Bassett, son of Farrell Ward Bassett and Mamie Allison Goins Bassett, was born in 1950. He was married about 1974 to Mona Diane Golding who was born in 1956.

Children born to them include:

Malcolm Lynn Bassett, Jr. born in 1976
Daphne Allison Bassett born in 1979
Peter Bradley Bassett born in 1987

Melany Sherril Bassett, daughter of of Farrell Ward Bassett and Mamie Allison Goins Bassett, was born in 1952. She was married about 1978 to Mark Nesmith.

Children born to them include:

Jason Nesmith born in 1980
Carrie Nesmith born in 1983

Stephen Farrell Basset, son of Farrell Ward Bassett and Mamie Allison Goins Bassett, was born in 1954. He was married about 1981 to Susan Clark.

Children born to them include:

Heath Clark Bassett born in 1984
Kelly Michelle Bassett born in 1986
Holly Brooke Bassett born in 1989

Carlton Craig Bassett, son of Farrell Ward Bassett and Mamie Allison Goins Bassett, was born in 1956. He was married about 1980 to Elizabeth Ann Simmons who was born in 1960.

Children born to them include:

Jessica Eilene Bassett born in 1982
Craig Dean Bassett born in 1984
Brandon Michael Bassett born in 1990

Frank Ivan Goins, son of William C. Goins and Mary Emma Lee Beasley Goins, was born in 1923. He was married about 1946 to Willie V. Ragan who was born in 1920. No children were born to Frank Ivan Goins and Willie V. Ragan Goins.

Arnold Lavern Goins, son of William C. Goins and Mary Emma Lee Beasley Goins, was born in 1932 in Hickman County. He was married about 1953 to Mary E. Williams who was born in 1934.

Children born to them include:

Arnold David Goins born in 1955
Sherry Elizabeth Goins born in 1956
William Mark Goins born in 1958
Lalani Ann Goins born in 1960
Timothy Lee Goins born in 1962

Arnold David Goins, son of Arnold Lavern Goins and Mary E. Williams Goins, was born in 1955. He was married to Marina Frances Jaramillo about 1974. He died in 1980.

Children born to Arnold David Goins and Marina Frances Jaramillo Goins include:

Angelic Desarae Goins born in 1975

Sherry Elizabeth Goins, daughter of Arnold Lavern Goins and Mary E. Williams Goins, was born in 1956. She was married about 1978 to Jerry Henry Revels III. She was remarried about 1985 to Jose Severo Cifuentes.

Children born to Jerry Henry Revels III and Sherry Elizabeth Goins Revels include:

Mary Elizabeth Revels born in 1980
Jerry Henry Revels IV born in 1982

Children born to Jose Severo Cifuentes and Sherry Elizabeth Goins Revels Cifuentes include:

Krista Ann Cifuentes born in 1987
Jose Serero Cifuentes III born in 1988

William Mark Goins, son of Arnold Lavern Goins and Mary E. Williams Goins, was born in 1958.

Lalani Ann Goins, daughter of Arnold Lavern Goins and Mary E. Williams Goins, was born in 1960. She was married about 1980 to Wallace Dean Cains.

Timothy Lee Goins, son of Arnold Lavern Goins and Mary E. Williams Goins, was born in 1962. He was married about 1989 to Connie Revels who was married in 1958.

Children born to Timothy Lee Goins and Connie Revels Goins include:

Calvin Lee Goins born in 1981

Talitha E. Goins, daughter of Isaac Mathis Goins, Jr. and Sarah Evelyn Martin Goins, was born in August 1883 at Bon Aqua, Tennessee in Hickman County. She was married there April 27, 1902 to Allen Tolbert Overby who was born there September 29, 1877. He died in Hickman County in 1944, and she died there in 1964.

Children born to them include:

John Wilson Overby born June 17, 1903
Jerome Frank Overby born July 16, 1904
Charlie Marvin Overby born September 26, 1905
[son] born June 3, 1907
Ellis G. Overby born August 8, 1911
Mary Frances Overby born September 6, 1913
May Goins

Jerome Frank Overby, son of Allen Tolbert Overby and Talith E. Goins Overby, was born July 16, 1904 in Hickman County. He was married about 1930, wife’s name Ruby Jennette

Children born to Jerome Frank Overby and Ruby Jennette Overby include:

Mary Jane Overby born about 1932
Gary Wayne Overby born in 1944

Charlie Marvin Overby, son of Allen Tolbert Overby and Talith E. Goins Overby, was born September 26, 1905 in Hickman County. He was married about 1935 to Zelna Mae Bates. Children born to them are unknown.

A son was born to Allen Tolbert Overby and Talith E. Goins Overby June 3, 1907 and died in the same year.

Ellis G. Overby, son of Allen Tolbert Overby and Talitha E. Goins Overby, was born August 8, 1911. He died there September 5, 1912.

Mary Frances Overby, daughter of Allen Tolbert Overby and Talitha E. Goins Overby, was born September 6, 1913 in Hickman County. She died there October 16, 1914.

Daniel Fletcher “Fletch” Goins, son of Isaac Mathis Goins, Jr. and Sarah Evelyn Martin Goins, was born January 18, 1886 in Hickman County.

Gayle Coberly, a descendant of “Fletcher Goins” wrote August 5, 1998 that he was her great-grandfather. She wrote, “My great-grandmother, Rose Luella Burford, divorced him and moved to Arkansas in 1900 with her family. In 1905 she remarried. They had a daughter named Leona Essie Goins and a son named Jesse Goins.”

Daniel Fletcher “Fletch” Goins was [re?]married about 1909 to Nancy S. Martin, daughter of John J. Martin and Lizzie Martin. She was born in Hickman County August 13, 1888 and died there January 7, 1937. He died there September 10, 1946. They were buried in Martin Cemetery in Hickman County with no marker and no dates, ac­cording to “Hickman County, Tennessee Cemetery Records,” by Catherine Griffin Lynn. A son “Fletch” Goins [no marker] was buried beside his parents. Daniel Fletcher “Fletch” Goins and his wife Nancy Martin Goins.

Children born to Daniel Fletcher “Fletch”. Goins and Nancy S. Martin Goins include:

Annie Goins born December 1, 1910
John Henry Goins born about 1911
Alvie Goins born July 10, 1913
Ola Goins born October 4, 1916
Oma Goins born May 11, 1920
Hattie Goins born October 25, 1923
“Fletch” Goins born about 1926

Lucy Mae Goins, daughter of Isaac Mathis Goins, Jr. and Sarah Evelyn Martin Goins, was born July 13, 1888 in Hickman County. She was married to John D. Overby about 1904. He was born there September 1, 1885 and died there September 1, 1957. She died there October 10, 1971. Children born to them are unknown.

Silas Lee Goins, son Isaac Mathis Goins, Jr. and Sarah Evelyn Martin Goins, was born in October 1889 in Hickman County He was married about 1912, wife’s name Rosetta. She died about 1917, and he was soon remarried in Hickman County to Ludie B. Jenkins who was born there June 4, 1902. Silas Lee Goins died there in October 1945, and Ludie B. Jenkins Goins died there October 13, 1959.

Children born to Silas Lee Goins and Rosetta Goins include:

[son] born about 1914
May Goins born about 1916

Children born to Silas Lee Goins and Ludie B. Jenkins Goins include:

Delois Goins born in 1918
William Talbert Goins born August 5, 1920
Edith Christine Goins born in 1923
Vera Goins born in 1925
Floyd Wilson Goins born in July 1927
Lesley Goins born in 1930
Wilma Goins born in 1933
Imogene Goins born in 1935
` Charles Silas Goins born in 1943

A son was born to Silas Lee Goins and Rosetta Goins about 1914 and died in infancy.

May Goins, daughter of Silas Lee Goins and Rosetta Goins, was born about 1916. After the death of her mother, she was reared by Allen Tolbert Overby and Talitha E. Goins Overby. She was married to Woodrow Burns about 1933.

Delois Goins, daughter of Silas Lee Goins and Ludie B. Jenkins Goins, was born in 1918. She died October 1, 1928.

William Talbert Goins, son of Silas Lee Goins and Ludie B. Jenkins Goins, was born August 4, 1920

Edith Christine Goins, daughter of Silas Lee Goins and Ludie B. Jenkins Goins, was born in 1923. She was married about 1940, husband’s name Creasy.

Vera Goins, daughter of Silas Lee Goins and Ludie B. Jenkins Goins, was born about 1925. She was married about 1946, husband’s name Law.

Floyd Wilson Goins, son of Silas Lee Goins and Ludie B. Jenkins Goins, was born in July 1927. He died in U.S. naval service in 1954.

Lesley Goins, son of Silas Lee Goins and Ludie B. Jenkins Goins, was born in 1930.

Wilma Goins, daughter of Silas Lee Goins and Ludie B. Jenkins Goins, was born in 1933. She was married about 1951 to Ray Booker.

Imogene Goins, daughter of Silas Lee Goins and Ludie B. Jenkins Goins, was born in 1935. She was married to John Harrington about 1953.

Charles Silas Goins, son of Silas Lee Goins and Ludie B. Jenkins Goins, was born in 1943.

James I. Johnson Goins, son of Isaac Mathis Goins, Jr. and Sarah Evelyn Martin Goins, was born in October 1898 in Hickman County. He died there in 1950.

James Knox Polk Goins, son of Isaac Mathis Goins and Mary Lucy “Polly” Adkison Goins, was born May 3, 1852 in Hickman County. He was married there September 6, 1876 to Rosanna V. Tyler who was born there in 1858. She is regarded as a sister of Susan Tyler. After her death, he was remarried in 1901 to Emily Mary Oakley [or Cotham], according to Michael J. Goins. Emily Mary Oakley Goins was born July 20, 1852. He died in Hickman County February 8, 1925, and Emily Mary Oakley Goins died there November 26, 1935.

No children were born to James Knox Polk Goins and Emily M. Ggins. Children born to James Knox Polk Goins and Rosanna V. Tyler Goins include:

Etta Mae Goins born February 21, 1879
James Oliver Goins born July 13, 1882

Etta Mae Goins, daughter of James Knox Polk Goins and Rosanna V. Tyler Goins, was born February 21, 1879. She was married July 28, 897 to Johnson S. Richards who was born September 30, 1876. She died December 5, 1905, and he died January 17, 1955.

Children born to them include:

James Arch Richards born July 27, 1898
Lydia Frances Richards born September 16, 1900
Robert L. Richards born November 8, 1902
[infant] born in 1905, died in 1905

James Oliver Goins, son of James Knox Polk Goins and Rosanna V. Tyler Goins, was born July 13, 1882 in Hickman County. He died there September 21, 1972 at age 90.

Thomas J. Goins, son of Isaac Mathis Goins and Mary Lucy “Polly” Adkison Goins, was born in 1855 in Tennessee, probably Hickman County. He was married there December 30, 1873 to Nancy Jane Jenkins, according to “Hickman County, Tennessee Marriages, 1813-1896.” She died before 1925. He was remarried to Nancy Newton December 30, 1873. He was later remarried a third time, wife’s name Lou, according to Michael J. Goins.

Children born to Thomas J. Goins and Nancy Jane Jenkins Goins include:

Low Goins born about 1875
Alice Goins born about 1876
Isaac C. Goins born about 1877
Josh Goins born about 1878

Low Goins, son of Thomas J. Goins and Nancy Jane Jenkins Goins, was born about 1875. He was married about 1898, wife’s name unknown.

Children born to them include:

Clara L. Goins born about 1900
Clark Goins born about 1902
James Goins born about 1905

Alice Goins, daughter of Thomas J. Goins and Nancy Jane Jenkins Goins, was born about 1876 in Hickman County. She was married about 1893, husband’s name believed to be Bradley.

Isaac C. Goins, son of Thomas J. Goins and Nancy Jane Jenkins Goins, was born about 1877 in Hickman County.

Josh Goings, son of Thomas J. Goins and Nancy Jane Jenkins Goins, was born about 1878 in Hickman County.

Mary P. “Mollie” Goins, daughter of Thomas J. Goins and Nancy Jane Jenkins Goins, was born about 1856 in Hickman County. She was married December 23, 1875 to Virgil Andrew Jackson Martin, according to “Hickman County, Tennessee Mar­riages, 1813-1896.” He was born there in 1852. She died there in 1892, and he died there in 1939.

Children born to them include:

Campbell Martin born about 1874
Amanda L. Martin born February 24, 1882
Henry Martin born November 5, 1885
Lula B. Martin born October 9, 1888
==O==
William L. Going was married December 20, 1868 to Roda Scribner by I. S. Renfro, J.P, according to Maury County mar­riage records. The county clerk wrote a notation, “Do not pub­lish” on the margin of the license. Children born to William L. Going and Roda Scribner Going are unknown.
==O==
Jane Oakley Goins, who was born July 21, 1849, died Novem­ber 30, 1935 and was buried at Goshen Methodist Cemetery in Maury County, according to “Maury County, Tennessee Cemeteries.”
==O==
Nelly Gowan, age 80, a farmer born in North Carolina ap­peared in the 1870 census of Maury County.
==O==
Elizabeth Tomlin Gowen, who was born 1909 and died in 1963, was buried at Rose Hill Cemetery at Columbia, Ten­nessee.
==O==
Margaret Gowens was the head of a household which ap­peared in the 1840 census of Maury County as:

“Margaret Gowens white female 30-40
white female 15-20
white male 10-15
white male 10-15
white male 5-10
white female 5-10
white female 5-10
white female 0-5″
==O==
John Gowin, a farmer, age 19, appeared in the 1870 census of Maury County.
==O==
Individuals who lived in Maury County in 1971 included: Mrs. Marvin Gowan, Old Stage Road, Cedar Grove, Ten­nessee; Mrs. Hallie Gowan, Highway 70, Cedar Grove, Fran­cis Gowan, Highway 70 South, Cedar Grove, Cecil Gowan, Terry Road, Cedar Grove.

Descendant Researchers

Donald L. Cribbs, 156 Cranbrook Drive, New Market, AL, 35761-9521, 205/379-2594,
E-mail: xtfn26@prodigy.com
Michael J. Goins, 7695 Beaverland, Detroit, MI, 48239, E-mail: Angels2MK@aol.com
==O==
Thomas Hall, Melungeon/Mulatto/Negro, was a resident of Maury County in 1835 when he gave an affidavit to a Justice of the Peace there concerning his ancestry.

State of Tennessee }
Maury County }

This day personally appeared before me, Jesse L. Crawford, one of the Justices of the peace in and for said county, Thomas Hall and made proof of private testimony that the said Thomas Hall is entitled to all of the privileges of a private citizen. Thomas Hall’s great-grandfather on his father’s sid was a Poutagee and his great-grandfather on his mother’s sid was an Englishman, and Thomas Hall’s grandfather on his father’s sid was of the Poutagee decent, and his grandfather on his mother’s sid was n Irishman, and his own father was of the Poutagee desent, and his mother was a white American born woman.

Sworn to and executed before me this the 19th day of September 1835.
James L. Crawford, J.P.
Witnessed by:
Prescott [X] Reprun
Lonny [X] Halls”

Thomas Hall removed to Marion County, Arkansas about 1843, and, perhaps to avoid discrimination due to his “dark complexion,” filed the same affidavit at Yellville, Arkansas. When he removed to Missouri in 1850, he filed the same affidavit at the courthouse in Oregon County, Missouri February 13, 1850 and at the courthouse in Howell County, Missouri May 4, 1890. Thomas Hall died in Howell County December 30, 1888 at South Fork, Missouri.

MC MINN COUNTY, TENNESSEE

William Goin, a Melungeon, was born in East Tennessee about 1830, probably at Athens, Tennessee.

Children born to William Goin include:

Alfred Goin
Charles Goin
George Goin
Sterling Henry Going
Mary Goin
Jasper Goin
Ellen Goin
Sarah Goin

Mrs. Frances Upstead, Jefferson, Oregon, developed a his­tory of this family, according to Roy Lee Goin, a nephew.

Jasper Goin, son of William Goin, was born at Athens about 1863. Later he migrated to Carlton, Ore­gon and lived there in 1919.

Children born to Jasper Goin include:

Roy Lee Goin born in 1919

Roy Lee Goin, a Melungeon, and son of Jasper Goin, was born at Carlton in 1919. He enlisted in the U. S. Army dur­ing World War II. On April 1, 1944 he was married to Dorothy Sue Simp­son, according to Taylor County, Texas Marriage Book 20, page 346. In 1945 they lived at Winters, Texas. In 1953 Roy Lee Goin, a warehouseman for Ben E. Keith Company, and Dorothy Sue Simpson Goin, lived on Route 2, Abilene, Texas.

Roy Lee Goin was appointed guardian of his daughter, Leah Susan Goin June 19, 1953 when she inher­ited $2,000, ac­cording to Taylor County Probate Court File No. 4847.

In 1973 Roy Lee Goin and Dorothy Sue Simpson Goin lived at Clyde, Texas where he was a volunteer fireman. While an­swering a fire call in January 1974, he and three other fire­man attempted to extinguish a fire near a pick-up truck. The truck carried a cargo of nitroglycerin and exploded as the four ap­proached, killing all of them instantly.

Children born to Roy Lee Goin and Dorothy Sue Simpson Goin include:

Leah Susan Goin born February 19, 1945
Gary Goin born about 1947

Leah Susan Goin, daughter of Roy Lee Goin and Dorothy Sue Simpson Goin, was born February 19, 1945 at Winters, Texas, according to Runnells County Birth Book 12, page 287.

About 1967 she was married to Larry Moseley. In 1973 they lived at Grand Prairie, Texas. In May 1974, Leah Susan Goin Moseley, estranged from her husband lived at Baird, Texas.

Gary Goin, son of Roy Lee Goin any Dorothy Sue Simpson Goin, was born about 1947. In 1974 he lived at Waco, Texas with his wife and family.

Andrew Goins was enumerated as the head of Household 1516-662 in the 1850 census of McMinn County:

“Goins, Andrew 35, born in Tennessee
Elizabeth 50, born in Tennessee
Thomas 16, born in Tennessee
Jane 12, born in Tennessee”
==O==
Hugh H. Goins was married to Narcissa C. Blackwell September 23. 1865 in McMinn County, according to McMinn County Marriage Book F, page 26. Children born to Hugh H. Goins and Narcissa C. Blackwell Goins are unknown.
==O==
Nancy Ann Goins was married to Matthew Stallion November 17, 1844, according to “McMinn County, Tennessee Mar­riages, 1820-1850.”
==O==
William Goins was enumerated as the head of Household 1518-664 in the 1850 census of McMinn County:

“Goins, William 27, born in North Carolina, farmer
Rachel 28, born in Tennessee
Elizabeth 7, born in Tennessee
Stephen 5, born in Tennessee
Hugh 1, born in Tennessee
Vice 11, born in Tennessee”
==O==
Rebecca Gowen appeared in the 1850 census of McMinn County as a 19-year-old living in the household of Daniel K Agnew and his wife, Jane Agnew, Household No. 234-587. Rebecca Gowen was born in 1831 in North Carolina.

MONROE COUNTY, TENNESSEE

John Going was married to Nancy Jane Thompson August 2, 1841, according to “Monroe County, Tennessee Marriages, 1838-1850.” Of John Going and Nancy Jane Going nothing more is known.
==O==
Alexander Goings was married to Sarah Thompson November 15, 1841, according to “Monroe County, Tennessee Mar­riages, 1838-1850.” Children born to Alexander Goings and Sarah Thompson Goings are unknown.
==O==
Susan Goins was married to Nelson Isabell June 11, 1869 in Monroe County, according to “Monroe County, Tennessee Records” by Reba Bayless Boyer.
==O==
F. E. Goins was married to Calvin Brandon September 4, 1869 in Monroe County, according to “Monroe County, Tennessee Records” by Reba Bayless Boyer.
==O==
Dotson Gowing was married to Nancy Moore October 24, 1856, according to Monroe County marriage records. Of Dot­son Gowing and Nancy Moore Gowing nothing more is known.
==O==
G. A. Gowan was named executor of the estate of William Cunningham, deceased in Monroe County in September, 1859.
==O==
John Going was married to Nancy Jane Thompson August 2, 1841, according to “Monroe County, Tennessee Records” by Reba Bay­less Boyer.

114 Montgomery Co, TN

MONTGOMERY COUNTY, TENNESSEE

Andrew Gowans and William Gowans, natives of Scotland, and believed to be brothers, were residents of Montgomery County in the late 1840s.

Andrew Gowans was born in Scotland in 1805. He was mar­ried to Mrs. Ann McLane March 27, 1850, according to Mont­gomery County marriage records.

They appeared in the 1850 census of Montgomery County, Household 78-503 as:

“Gowans, Andrew 45, born in Scotland, $1,200 real
estate
Ann 38, born in Scotland
McLeon,
Margaret 12, born in New Jersey, step-daughter
Mary J. 5
Helen W. 3”

William Gowans was born in 1810 in Scotland. William Gowans was married November 21, 1839 to Margarette Johnson. He was remarried to Elizabeth S. Van Hook May 16, 1848, according to “Montgomery County, Tennessee Marriages, 1802-1850.”. “William McLean,” probably related to Ann McLane, was the bondsman.

William Gowans appeared in the 1850 census of Montgomery County as the head of Household 77-503, adjoining the resi­dence of Andrew Gowans:

“Gowans, William 40, farmer, born in Scotland
Elizabeth 30, born in TN
Sarah J. 2, born in TN
Van Hook, Frances 19, born in TN”

The household of William Gowans reappeared in the 1860 cen­sus of Montgomery County in the “district north and east of Cumberland River”, Household No. 885-885. The family was recorded as:

“Gowans, William 50, born in Scotland, shoemaker,
$1,250 real estate, $250
personal property
E. S. 40, born in TN
S. J. 11, born in TN, female
J. W. 9, born in TN, son
P. C. 7, born in TN, son
Lizzie 4, born in TN, daughter”

When William Gowans and Elizabeth S. Van Hooser Gowans died they were buried in Gowans Cemetery located near Ring­gold, Tennessee.

Children born to William Gowans and Elizabeth S. Van Hooser Gowans include:

Sarah Jane Gowans born in 1848
John W. Gowans born August 31, 1850
P. C. Gowans born in 1853
Lizzie Gowans born in 1856

Sarah Jane Gowans, daughter of William Gowans and Eliza­beth S. Van Hooser Gowans, was born in 1848. She ap­peared in the household of her father in the 1850 census of Montgomery County as a two-year-old and reappeared there in the 1860 cen­sus as an 11-year-old. She was married De­cember 13, 1871 to William H. Matthews. When Sarah Jane Gowans Matthews died she was buried in Matthews Ceme­tery, Civil District 7, Montgomery County, Tennessee.

John Gowans, son of William Gowans and Elizabeth S. Van Hooser Gowans, was born August 31, 1850 in Montgomery, County. He appeared in the 1860 census of Montgomery County as a nine-year-old living in the household of his fa­ther. He was married about 1870 to Tennessee Trice.

John W. Gowans died June 8, 1877 and was buried in Gowans Cemetery near Ringgold. Tennessee Trice Gowans died June 20, 1883, about age 50, and was buried in Gowans Cemetery. Two small children of John W. Gowans and Ten­nessee Trice Gowans were also buried in Gowans Cemetery.
==O==
David Gowen appeared as the head of a household in the 1850 census of Montgomery County. The family was recorded as:

“Gowen, David 49, born in Virginia, farmer
Sophie 41, born in North Carolina
Robert 20, born in TN
Nancy 17, born in TN
Harvey 14, born in TN”

Harvey Gowen, age 25, appeared in the 1860 census of Lin­coln County, Tennessee.
==O==
MOORE COUNTY, TENNESSEE

S. H. Gawan was recorded as the head of a household in the 1900 census of Moore County, Enumeration District 99, page 1, Civil District 8:

“Gawan, S. H. 36, born in March 1864 in TN
Mae 33, born in February 1867 in TN
M. P. E. 57, born in October 1842 in TN,
mother
==O==
Joseph Gowin was enumerated as the head of a household in the 1900 census of Moore County, Enumeration District 100, page 7, Civil District 10:

“Gowin, Joseph 45, born in October 1854 in TN
Fannie 44, born in May 1856 in TN
Clara 19, born in March 1881 in TN
Lee 17, born in October 1882 in TN
Walter 15, born in August 1884 in TN
Docia 13, born in February 1887 in TN”

OBION COUNTY, TENNESSEE

Eliza Goins was married to Joseph Parrish October 24, 1872, according to Obion County marriage records. E. L. Williams was surety.
==O==
S. C. Goins, was the bride of R. S. Warford November 17, 1870, according to Obion County marriage records. E. Kim­berlin was surety.

POLK COUNTY, TENNESSEE

Solomon Goans was enumerated as the head of a household in the 1850 census of Polk County, Household 432-444:

“Goans Solomon 50, born in Tennessee
Elizabeth 30, born in Tennessee
Mary J. 10
Lilla 9
Sarah 7
Alexander 6
John H. 4”

RHEA COUNTY, TENNESSEE

Martha Goin was married March 3, 1842 to James H. Dun, according to “Rhea County, Tennessee Marriages, 1808-1850.”
==O==
Miller Goin, negro was enumerated as the head of a household in the 1900 census of Rhea County, Enumeration District 87, page 12, Civil District 13:

“Goin, Miller 58, born in 1842 in TN,
negro
Tilda 50, born in 1850 in TN
Cora W. 19, born in April 1881 in
TN, daughter
Houston 6, born in January 1894 in
TN, son”
Creasman, Martha 28, born in August 1882 in
TN, sister-in-law
Edith May 1, born in June 1889 in
TN, niece
==O==
Rufus Goin, negro was enumerated as the head of a household in the 1900 census of Rhea County, Enumeration District 87, page 6, Civil District 6:

“Goin, Rufus 35, born in 1865 in TN, negro
Nancy 27, born in January 1873 in TN
William C. 12, born in January 1888 in TN
Hunter 10, born in July 1889 in TN
Mamie 4, born in December 1895 in TN
Dolly 2, born in May 1898 in TN”
==O==
Acie Goins was born in James County, Tennessee about 1880. He came to Graysville at an early age and married Sara Bolden. It was a second marriage for perhaps both of them. They had nine children plus some step-children.

Among children born to Acie Goins and Sarah Bolden Goins was:

Alvin Goins born September 14, 1903

Alvin Goins was the subject of an article written by Bennie McKenzie Fleming for “History of Rhea County, Tennessee” She wrote:

“Alvin Goins, a lifelong resident of Rhea County, was born Septem­ber 14, 1903, of Melungeon parentage in the Brown Rock section of Graysville, a sparsely popu­lated area on the road leading to Montague. This was the rural part of the county where most of the Melun­geons lived. Alvin was the youngest of about nine chil­dren and several half sib­lings.

His father was Acie Goins, who was born in James County and came to the Graysville community at an early age. He married Sara Bolden, whose family lived in the same area.

Alvin never learned to read or write because he was in­jured when he was kicked in the head at the age of five by a mule. This was confirmed by Mrs. Hazel Keith, a former teacher in the Graysville School. With no formal education, but apparently possessed with an innate abil­ity coupled with a passion for ciphering, he is consid­ered a mathematical genius.

He can perform a remarkable feat of compu­tation in his head that would baffle a math professor. Given the day, month, and year of someone’s birth, in a few seconds Alvin can estimate the exact number of days that elapsed since then. Tested out by author Jean Patterson Bible from a tape recording she made when she interviewed him for her book about Melungeons, his figures were found to be correct down to the last digit.

Alvin worked in numerous lumber mills, one being in South Day­ton and from time to time on TVA projects. including Fontana Dam. When Oak Ridge was being developed, Alvin got a job there for a while with a sawmill company. It was said that he could accurately figure, in about five minutes, the amount of board feet of lumber on a truck loaded with logs: e.g., given the number of logs, length and width, he would tell you how many slabs to cut off. He was fired when they learned that he was illiterate.

Another story that Alvin remembers was when a brick building was being erected and for days the contractors were puzzled over the amount of brick to be ordered. Alvin, in a matter of minutes after being given the di­mensions of the building and number of windows and doors, told them the number of bricks required. Skepti­cally, the amount of bricks were ordered and when the building was completed, only three bricks were left over.

As a boy, Alvin explored the mountains about Graysville, as was typical of Melungeon youths at that time. He knew as he does today where all the coal out­croppings were and the entrance to all the mines, even those abandoned. He was once married to a “mail‑order bride” but the marriage lasted only a short time.

For the past several years, Alvin has frequented the Court House, especially the Trustee and Registrar of Deeds offices, counting Registrar Gladys Best one of his best friends since she reads and interprets his letters to him and he trusts her explicitly. He wears a heavy coat splattered with amber, which is his “office” as he keeps big packages of mail, some months old, secured by rubber bands in the numerous pockets. He never leaves home without wearing this coat, summer or winter.

The last of his original family, he lives alone in his pro­ject apartment in Dayton, his mind alert for his 86 years. He has several nieces who care for him when he allows them. He is very independent and completely honest. Alvin has not been well lately, hospitalized a few times in the past year. The last time he was transferred to the Rhea County Nursing Home, but after two weeks, he went back to his apartment. He says that neighbors and people in Dayton are kind and help him,. and he was not happy being confined.”
==O==
Arch Goins was recorded as the head of a household in the 1900 census of Rhea County, Enumeration District 86, page 3, Civil District 15:

“Goins, Arch 25, born in September 1874 in TN
Florence 16, born in 1884 in GA”
==O==
Asbury Goins, negro was enumerated as the head of a household in the 1900 census, Enumeration District 87, page 13, Civil District 13:

“Goins, Asbury 23, born in January 1877 in TN
Vesta A. 20, born in November 1879 in TN
Clarence E. 9/12, born in August 1899, in TN”
==O==
Eliza Jane Goins was born in Dayton, Tennessee in 1909. She was married to William Henry Harrison who was born in Tulsa, Oklahoma in 1870, and they lived in Chattanooga, Tennessee until 1956. They lived in Hamilton County, Ohio from 1956 until 1963.
==O==
Ike Goins was born in Rhea County, March 30, 1872, ac­cording to affidavit he made “to the public” May 4, 1938, which was recorded in Hopkins County, Texas Deed Book 147, page 133.

In the affidavit he stated that he had lived in Rhea County all his life and that he was married to Mary Rudd Price, the third child of Mrs. Jane Hard Rudd, as her second husband. She was previously divorced from Lee Price. Ike Goins and Mary Rudd Price Goins were married for 33 years before her death at age 58. No children were born to this union.

Ike Goins gave a quit claim deed to Haynes Construction Com­pany to land in Hopkins County February 10, 1941, ac­cording to Hopkins County Deed Book 147, page 137.
==O==
Jane Gowings was married to Finney Rawlins December 24, 1812, according to “Rhea County, Tennessee Marriages, 1808-1850.”

ROANE COUNTY, TENNESSEE

William Goens was married to Ann Baker May 13, 1834, according to “Roane County, Tennessee Marriages, 1801-1855.” Children born to William Goens and Ann Baker Goens are unknown.
==O==
[Check this against .002]
Sherrod Going and his mother, Sophia Going, appeared in Roane County Chancery Court records in 1825.
==O==
Zeory Goings appeared as the head of a household in the 1840 census of Roane County, page 47. The family was com­posed of:

“Goings, Zeory white male 30-40
white female 30-40
white female 5-10
white male 5-10
white male 0-5
white female 0-5
white male 0-5”
==O==
Adeline G. Goins was married to Tobias Gallimore October 8, 1868.
==O==
Anderson Goins was married to Miss M. C. Carson February 9, 1872, according to “Roane County, Tennessee Marriages, 1801-1855.” Of Anderson Goins and M. E. Carson Goins nothing more is known.
==O==
Claiborn Goins was married to Ludda Underwood April 22, 1865 in Roane County.
==O==
Daniel Goins was married September 30, 1871 to Susan Harman, according to “Roane County, Tennessee Marriages, 1801-1855.” Children born to Daniel Goins and Susan Harman Goins are unknown.
==O==
Dotson Goins appeared as the head of a household enumer­ated in the 1850 census of Roane County, Household 386, page 695. The family appeared as:

“Goins, Dotson 46, born in TN
Nancy 65, born in TN
Dotson 10”
==O==
Edward Goins was married to Margaret Riddle September 18, 1897.
==O==
E. J. Goins was married June 20, 1885 to Anna Goodner, according to “Roane County, Tennessee Marriages, 1801-1855.” Children born to E. J. Goins and Anna Goodner Goins are unknown.
==O==
Elijah Goins was married to Margaret D. Alexander October 24, 1865 in Roane County.
==O==
Granvil Goins was married to Louisa Owens November 4, 1873, according to “Roane County, Tennessee Marriages, 1801-1855.” Children born to Granvil Goins and Louisa Owens Goins are unknown.
==O==
Jinrey Goins was married to Michael Fleming March 24, 1865 in Roane County.
==O==
John Goins was married November 5, 1853 to Charlotte Burgis, according to “Roane County, Tennessee Marriages, 1801-1855.” Children born to John Goins and Charlotte Burgis Goins are unknown.
==O==
John W. Goins was married to Dinah Chilcutt December 14, 1864, according to “Roane County, Tennessee Marriages, 1801-1855.” Of John W. Goins and Dinah Chilcutt Goins nothing more is known.
==O==
Lizzie Goins was married to Jack Thompson September 10, 1886, according to “Roane County, Tennessee Marriages, 1801-1855.”
==O==
Margaret Ann Goins was married to Timothy Johnson September 14, 1870, according to “Roane County, Tennessee Marriages, 1801-1855.”
==O==
Martha Goins was married to James Havens February 23, 1871, according to “Roane County, Tennessee Marriages, 1801-1855.”
==O==
Martha C. Goins was married to Hugh Johnson June 24, 1871, according to “Roane County, Tennessee Marriages, 1801-1855.”
==O==
Mary E. Goins was married to J. M. Gold October 4, 1886, according to “Roane County, Tennessee Marriages, 1801-1855.”
==O==
Mary E. Goins was married to R. T. Humphries July 29, 1886, according to “Roane County, Tennessee Marriages, 1801-1855.”
==O==
Susan C. Goins was married to W. H. P. Evans May 23, 1877, according to “Roane County, Tennessee Marriages, 1801-1855.”
==O==
William Goins appeared as the head of a household enumer­ated in the 1850 census of Roane County, Household 755, page 746. The family was recorded as:

Goins, William 45, born in Virginia
Anne 45, born in North Carolina
Claborn 15,
Nancy 14,
Thomas 11,
Eliza J. 8,”
==O==
William Goins was married to Mary Staples in Roane County.
==O==
William D. Goins was married to Sarah Fields November 20, 1894.
==O==
Nathan Gowen appeared on the 1805 tax list of Roane County.
==O==
Obadiah Gowen wrote his will in Roane County in 1858, according to the research of Sarah Foster Kelley, historian of Nashville, Tennessee.

ROBERTSON COUNTY, TENNESSEE

Basha Goin was enumerated as the head of a household in the 1850 census of Robertson County, Household 1874-207:

“Goin, Basha 47, born in Tennessee
Sally 45, born in Tennesseee
Rhody 22,
Nancy 20
James 16
Mary 14
Thomas 12,
Andrew 10,
Martha J. 8,
John W. 4″
==O==
Roy Goin, a negro, was recorded as the head of a household in the 1900 census of Robertson County, Enumeration District 415, page 11, Civil District 1:

Goin, Roy 46, born in December 1853 in TN
Nancy 45, born in March 1855 in TN
Virgil 22, born in September 1877 in TN
Irvin 21, born in January 1879 in TN
Lula 18, born in March 1882 in TN
Oscar 16, born in December 1883 in TN
Fanny M. 10, born in March 1890 in TN
Puss 7, born in December 1892 in TN
Jenny B. 6, born in February 1894 in TN
Nancy L. 5, born in March 1895 in TN
Frank A. B. 10/12, born in July 1899 in TN
Goin, Mollie 19, born in February 1881 in TN,
daughter-in-law”
==O==
Benjamin Gowen was enumerated as the head of a house­hold in the 1840 census of Robertson County, page 181.
==O==
John W. Gowen was enumerated as the head of Household 534-16 in the 1850 census of Robertson County:

“Gowen, John W. 23, born in Tennessee
Matilda 30, born in Tennessee
Lucinda 21”
==O==
Samuel M. Gowen was dismissed August 18, 1798 from Red River Primitive Baptist Church, according to “The Warren Family of Trigg County, Kentucky” by Martha Jane Stone of Lexington, Kentucky. Red River Primitive Baptist Church was organized July 25, 1791, and the church was located at the mouth of the Sulphur Fork of Red River. Five other churches in Tennessee and Kentucky were spawned as Red River mem­bers through the years elected to organize new congregations.
==O==
Mr. B. Goyne was a member of Red River Primitive Baptist Church in 1810, according to “Churches of Robertson County, Tennessee.”

RUTHERFORD COUNTY, TENNESSEE

A petition dated August 10, 1803 requesting the formation of a new county was circulated through the southeastern portion of Davidson and Williamson Counties, receiving 256+ signatures. The petition pointed out to the General Assembly that “is is inconvenient for your petitioners to attemd Courts, General Musters, Elections, etc. at the towns of Nashville and Franklin.”

The petition recommended by metes and bounds the size and shape of the proposed county:

“Beginning on the top of a ridge dividing the waters of Stone’s River & Mill Creek, in the Williamson County line, & running southwardly with said ridge as to leave all the waters of Mill Creek & Harpeth River in Williamson County, until the ridge intersects the now Eastern boundary of said Williamson County;, thence continue South with said line of Williamson County to the south boundary of this state; thence with the line of Wilson County North and Northwestwardly with said county line eo an elm and white ash, the corner of said county, which is Northeast from the mouth of Hurricane Creek which is four miles and thirty-six poles; thence from the mouth of Hurricane Creek southwest to the top of the first mentioned ridge; thence with said ridge Southwardly to the beginning.”

At the same time, there was another petition being circulated that requested that a new county not be created. Most of the estimated 3,000 population of the area were clustered in the Stewart’s Creek-Stone’s River area, centered around Jefferson, Tennessee, the earliest settlement in the new county.

Rutherford County was established from Davidson County and Williamson County by an act of the Tennessee General Assembly October 25, 1803. Rutherford County was organized January 3, 1804, according to “An 1803 Census of Rutherford County, Tennessee” by Robert M. McBride.
==O==
Sam Goin was recorded as the head of a household in the 1900 census of Rutherford County, Enumeration District 117, page 10, Civil District 17:

“Goin, Sam 33, born in April 1867 in TN
Sarah A. 32, born in April 1868 in TN
Ernest 14, born in January 1886 in TN
Callie 11, born in February 1889 in TN
Lizzie 9, born in March 1891 in TN
Anna 5, born in May 1895 in TN
Bettie 2, born in November 1897 in TN
John 1/12, born in May 1900 in TN”
==O==
Cynthia M. Gowan was married May 9, 1832 to Alexander B. Carns, according to “Rutherford County, Tennessee Marriages, 1804-1850.”
==O==
Mary J. Gowan was married to Benjamin P. Norman February 2, 1846, according to “Rutherford County, Tennessee Marriages, 1804-1850.”
==O==
Catherine Gowen was enumerated in the 1850 census of Rutherford County living in the household of Stokeley White, No. 1044:

“White, Stokeley 46, born in Kentucky, farmer,
$4,000 real estate
Jane 46, born in South Carolina
William B. 12, born in Tennessee
Ann 11, born in Tennessee
Jane S. 9, born in Tennessee
Gowen, Catherine 55, born in Tennessee
Catherine E. 19, born in Tennessee

Catherine E. Gowen was married November 23, 1854 to Granville L. Norman, according to Rutherford County marriage records.
==O==
Eliza Gowen was married to John R. Quimby October 12, 1837, according to “Rutherford County, Tennessee Marriages, 1804-1850.”
==O==
“James Gowen” appeared in the 1880 census of Rutherford County, Enumeration District 199, page 19:

“Gowen, James 51, farmer born in TN, fa­ther born in
TN, mother born in TN
Elisa 45, wife, born in born in TN, fa­ther
born in TN, mother born in TN
John 29, farmer, born in TN, father born
in TN, mother born in TN, single
Josie [?] 20, born in TN, father born in TN,
mother born in TN
James 17, farmer, born in TN, father born
in TN, mother born in TN
Charley 12, born in TN, father born in TN,
mother born in TN
Maggie 6, born in TN, father born in TN,
mother born in TN”
==O==
John Gowen, “born April 16, 1851–died November 9, 1926” was buried in Bascom Cemetery, near Verilla, Tennessee, ac­cording to “Tombstone Inscriptions & Manuscripts” by Jeanette Tillotson Acklen.
==O==
Kendrew Gowen was married to Lyda Williams July 13, 1846, according to “Rutherford County, Tennessee Marriages, 1804-1850.” Children born to Kendrew Gowen and Lyda Williams Gowen are unknown.
==O==
Anna Goin was born March 1, 1895. She was married about 1915, husband’s name Simmons. Anna Goin Simmons died August 31, 1961 and was buried in Donnell Cemetery.
==O==
Elizabeth Amy Goin was born March 22, 1891. She died Octo­ber 20, 1906 and was buried in Donnell Cemetery, located one mile north of Lofton, Tennessee, according to “Rutherford County, Tennessee Cemtery Records” Volume 2 by Rutherford County Historical Society.
==O==
Lillie Vera Goin was born March 2, 1912. She died April 11, 1912 and was buried in Donnell Cemetery.
==O==
James Ray Goins lived in Auburntown Road, Milton, Ten­nessee in 1971, according to the telephone directory.
==O==
M. Gowan was the head of a family that appeared in the 1860 census of Rutherford County enumerated as:

“Gowen, M. 35, farmer, born in TN, $800 real estate
A. 26, born in TN
J. A. 8, born in TN, son
M. C. 7, born in TN
Irving 5, born in TN
K. P. 3, born in TN
==O==
Rendrew Gowan was married to Lyda Williams July 18, 1846, according to Rutherford County Marriage Book 1804-1872, page [?]. Of Rendrew [Kendrew Gowan] Gowan and Lyda Williams Gowan nothing more is known.
==O==
William M. Gowan was married to Mary M. Brains March 10, 1832, according to Rutherford County Marriage Book 1804-1872, page 37. Of William M. Gowan and Mary M. Brains Gowan nothing more is known.
==O==
Thomas C. Gowin was enumerated as the head of a household in the 1860 census of Rutherford County, Household 1217-1209, page 80:

Gowin, Thomas O. 53, wagonmaker, born in SC
M. H. 35, female, born in TN
B. H. 21, male, bridge builder, born in
TN
F. J. 18, male, born in TN
J. H. 15, male, born in TN
J. S. 8, male born in TN
S. M. 11, female born in TN
M. P. 9, female, born in TN”
==O==
Margaret Gown, age 18 years, 11 months 15 days, died March 28, 1885, and was buried in Evergreen Cemetery, Murfrees­boro, according to “Old Cemetery Records” quoted in a letter from Miss Ada Young, Murfreesboro, dated May 6, 1976.
==O==
William B. McGowen was married August 15, 1837 to Martha J. Batey, according to Rutherford County marriage records. Children born to William B. McGowen and Martha J. Batey McGowen are unknown.
==O==
Mahulda Gowen Hand, daughter of Elkins M. Hand and Rachel Kellly Hand, was born in Rutherford County January 31, 1817, according to Carol A. Denny, a descendant of Amarillo, Texas. Mahulda Gowen Hand was married November 23, 1834 to Alfred Tyra Byler in Lauderdale County, Alabama.
==O==
James P. Quigley was married March 23, 1855 to Mary E. Hall, according to Rutherford County marriage records.
==O==
The estate of “Gowen Whetmore, deceased” was probated in Rutherford County in April 1817. Patsy Whitmore, adminis­tratrix reported to the court February 15, 1817 that his estate was appraised at $142.74 including $19 due on “two months and 17 days in U.S. Service.”

SEQUATCHIE COUNTY, TENNESSEE

Steve Goin was married May 21, 1890 to Bessie Russell, according to “Sequatchie County, Tennessee Marriges, 1850-1922.” Children born to Steve Goin and Bessie Russell Goin are unknown.
==O==
Mary Goins was married July 9, 1905 to Ranzo Harmon, according to “Sequatchie County, Tennessee Marriages, 1858-1922.”

SHELBY COUNTY, TENNESSEE

John Fortson was listed as a worker employed by E. S. Goens residing at 99 Hernando in the 1891 Memphis city directory.
==O==
No families of Gowen [or spelling variations] appeared in the 1850 census of Shelby County or in the 1866 city directory of Memphis.
==O==
Oliver Gawin, negro was enumerated as the head of a house­hold in the 1990 census of Shelby County, Enumeration Dis­trict 90, page 11, 5th Civil District located at 170 Auction Street in Memphis:

“Gawin, Oliver 50, born in 1850 in NC
Sarah 50, born in 1850 in TN
Lucas, Ruth 18, born in May 1882 in TN, stepdaughter
==O==
Sam Gawan, “negro, 40, born in January 1860 in Illinois” was recorded as a lodger with William Booth at 82 Front Street, Memphis in in the 1900 census, Enumeration District 61, page 21.
==O==
M. Goin was enumerated as the head of a household in the 1900 census of Shelby County, Enumeration District 97, -page 8 living at 95 St. Paul Street, Memphis:

“Goin, M. 30, born in May 1870 in AL
Augusta 28, born in October 1871 in AL
James S. 7/12, born in April 1900, in TN”
==O==
Sam B. Going, was born in “MS”, assumed to be Mississippi in 1838. He was married about 1860, wife’s name unknown. Col. Sam B. Going lived on West Main Street in Mem­phis in 1878. Col. Sam B. Going, “white male, age 40, married” died in the yellow fever epidemic in Memphis September 9, 1878.
==O==
Everett Goings was born in Memphis December 22, 1919. He was married in 1945 at Hobbs, New Mexico to Theora McKen­zie, who was born at Pine Island, Minnesota February 19, 1905, according to Lea County, New Mexico Marriage Book 13, page 7785. The groom, age 26, was sta­tioned at Hobbs Army Air Field, and the bride, age 41, was a resident of San Antonia, Texas.. Of Everett Goings and The­ora McKenzie Goings noth­ing more is known.
==O==
Demas C. Gowan was born in 1848. He died in Shelby County in 1853.
==O==
Fred A. Gowan was a resident of Memphis in 1959 and also in 1971, according to the telephone directory.
==O==
Gladys M. Gowan lived at 1129 Hale Road, Memphis, in 1971, according to the telephone directory.
==O==
Granville L. Gowan lived at 4939 Knight-Arnold Road, ac­cording to the 1971 Memphis telephone directory. He main­tained an office in the National Bank of Commerce Building at that time.
==O==
Gowan Hardware Store was located at 3170 Barron in 1959, according to the Memphis telephone directory.
==O==
Kenneth K. Gowan, Jr. lived at 6009 Farmington Cove, ac­cording to the 1971 Memphis telephone directory.
==O==
Mrs. Maggie Cox Gowan, daughter of S. N. Cox and Margaret Humus Cox, was born in Mississippi March 3, 1885. In 1919 she was a resident of Raleigh, Tennessee. She died September 25, 1919, at age 34 “of carcinoma of breast, liver and stomach,” at Baptist Hospital in Memphis, according to Tennessee BVS Death Certificate No. 50463 signed by Newman Taylor, M.D. She was buried in Egypt, Tennessee, according to I. B. Gowan, informant of Raleigh.
==O==
Move to James Burns Gowen, Goochland Co, VA

Marcus V. Gowan lived at 2143 Shelby Drive, according to the 1959 telephone directory of Memphis. In 1971 he main­tained a real estate office at 1457 Madison, Memphis and continued to live at 2143 Shelby.
==O==
Ottice M. Gowan, Jr. lived at 3493 Mayflower Avenue, ac­cording to the 1959 telephone directory of Memphis.

On January 23, 1961 he was mentioned in the following news­paper story which appeared on the United Press wire:

“Man Builds Penthouse
For `Rooftop’ Cats

Memphis, [UPI] Mrs. O. M. Gowan’s cats live in a penthouse.

“The cats love to scamper about on top of the roof so much that Mrs. Gowan’s husband finally built them a “trash can” house there.”

Ottice M. Gowan in 1971 lived at 4035 Conrad Cove, the ad­dress given by Condred Gowan, according to the telephone di­rectory.
==O==
Mrs. Reba Grant Gowan lived at 3697 Lamar Avenue, ac­cording to the 1971 telephone directory of Memphis.
==O==
C. A. Gowen was a resident of Memphis, 352 Carroll Street, when he corresponded with Marcus Vincent Gowen (G2/9.5) of Lawrenceburg, Tennessee December 12, 1942.
==O==
Frank Gowen of Union Planters Bank of Bartlett, Tennessee is reported to be a descendent of William Gowen.
==O==
The death records of Shelby County indicate that G. H. Gowen, male, age 25, died from typhoid fever October 25, 1853.
==O==
George A. Gowen was president of the Bristol-to-Memphis highway in Tennessee.
==O==
Henry S. Gowen, an extensive land owner, appeared in the Shelby County census [or Davidson County ?] of 1860 as the head of household 802-826. The household was enumerated as:

“Gowen, Henry S. 54, born in North Carolina, $9,000
real estate
Annie G. 40, born in Kentucky
James 11, born in TN
Henry 7, born in TN
Lizzie 9, born in TN”
==O==
Mamie L. Gowen, “10, born in Tennessee in October, 1889” was enumerated as a sister-in-law to James F. Bledsoe, house­holder in the 1880 census of Shelby County, Enumeration Dis­trict 37, page 2, 7th Civil District.

Oby Gowen [perhaps Obadiah Gowen] appeared in the 1860 census of Shelby County as the head of household 694-673. He was born in Pennsylvania, his wife was born in Maryland, and their three-year-old daughter was born in Tennessee, in­dicating that they had moved to Shelby County prior to 1857. The household was rendered as:

“Gowen, Oby 39, born in Pennsylvania
Elizabeth 31, born in Maryland
Marie 3, born in TN”
==O==
Oswalt Thomas Gowen, who in February 1972 resided on Thomas Road in Memphis area was reported to be a descen­dant of William Gowen.
==O==
James Gowens was listed as a laborer residing at 508 Mississippi Avenue in the 1891 Memphis city directory.
==O==
Willie Gown, “25, born in Texas in May 1875” was enumerated in the 1900 census of Shelby County boarding with Mamie Sharp at 10 Johnson Alley in Memphis. The household was recorded in Enumeration District 99, page 33, 14th Civil Dis­trict.
==O==
Meshac Gowing was a taxpayer in Civil District 10 of Shelby County in 1837, paying a tax on “1 poll,” according to the research of Frances Fleming, Foundation member of Carthage, Missouri.

“Meshack Goin” appeared in the 1841 Mississippi state census of Chickasaw County. he was enumerated as:

“Goin, Meshack white male 21-45
white male 0-18”

He appeared on the Chickasaw County tax roll from 1841 through 1845. He also appeared on the “personal roll” for 1845 and the “land roll” in 1845, but did not appear in the deed records.

SMITH COUNTY, TENNESSEE

No Gowens appeared in “Smith County, Tennessee Marriage Records, 1838-1881.”
==O==
Francis Gowen [also rendered as Gowing] was sued August 5, 1800 by Benjamin Ford seeking in Cause 319,192 to recover $20.50 owed to him by Gowen, according to Smith County Court Minute Book 1799-1814, page 40.

State of Tennessee }
Smith County }

Be it remembered that at a Court of Pleas and Quarter Sessions began and held for the County of Smith at the dwelling house of Michael Murphy on the third Monday in September 1800, Robert Price, Esquire, Constable returned to Court the following Original Attachment [ToWit]

State of Tennessee }
Smith County }

Whereas Benjamin Ford hath complained on oath to me, Garrett Fitzgerald, one of the Justices for Said County, Francis Gowen is Justly indebted to him to the amount of twenty dollars and a half, and oath having also made that the Said Francis Gowen hath removed or is about to remove himself out of our County or so absconds or conceals himself that the ordinary process of law cannot be served on him, if the case be so, and the said Gowen having given bond and Security according to the direc­tions of the Act of the General Assembly in such case made and provided, we therefore command you that you attach the Estate of the Said Gowing if to be found in your County or so much thereof replevable on security as shall be of Value sufficient to satisfy the said debt and cost, according to the complaint and such Estate so attached in your hands to secure or so to provide that the same be to further proceedings there­upon to be had at the court to he held for the County of Smith at and on the third Monday in September next so as to Compel the said Gowen to appear and answer the above Complaint of the said Ford, when and where you shall make known to the Said Court how you shall have executed this Writ.

August the 5th day 1800

To any lawful officer to execute & return.
Garrett Fitzgerald

On which Original Attachment Robert Price, Constable made this return the 6th of August 1800.

Levied on one Pot and oven, a bed & furniture, one side saddle, one Sow and four shouts [shoats], one sow & three shouts [shoats], a Brass kettle, two House Pigs, two Heightows, two Piggins and a Churn, a Big whell [wheel] & Check Reel, a Jin [Gin] and Cotton thread.

Levied by me, Robert Price, Constable

To which original attachment the defendant, by his At­torney, George Smith, filed the following Plea in at­tachment [ToWit]

Benjamin Ford }
vs. } Attachment
Francis Gowen

The Defendant in this Suit comes into Court by George Smith his attorney and prays that the above suit may be abated

1st, because there is no affidavit filed with the Attach­ment,

2nd, Because the Sum Sued for comes at the Cognizance of a Single Justice and not within the Jurisdiction of this Court, and therefore the, defendants pray Judgement of the Court

3rd, Because there was no seal to the Attachment
G.S. Atto. for Deft.

Whereupon, on Solemn argument had by Counsel on both sides, it is considered by the Court that the afore­said original attachment be quashed & that the plea of the Defendant be Sustained and that the Defendant re­cover of the Said Plaintiff his cost above his defense in this behalf expended and the said Plaintiff in mercy.
==O==
William Gowen, of Smith County, was a witness to the will of George Cox in 1812, according to Smith County Will Book A, page 157. The will named children Drury Cox, James Cox, Ab­solem Cox, Mary Cox Johnston, Patsy Cox Dameron and Eliz­abeth Cox Moss. The estate was inventoried May 25, 1814, and the will was probated in August, 1814.

STEWART COUNTY, TENNESSEE

Sanford Gowen was married to Nancy McElroy June 1, 1842, according to Stewart County Marriage Records. Of Sanford Gowen and Nancy McElroy Gowen and descendants nothing more is known.

115 Maury Co, TN

MAURY COUNTY, TENNESSEE

Andrew Gowan was married to Lucy Elliott August 2, 1811, according to “Maury County, Tennessee Marriages, 1807-1850.” He was listed on the tax rolls of Maury County in 1813 and 1814.

“Pvt. Andrew Goins” was enlisted in Capt. Andrew Patterson’s Company of Tennessee militia and died January 30, 1815, perhaps following the Battle of New Orleans.

“Lucy Goins, widow of Andrew Goins” was entitled to a “half-pay pension,” according to “Widows and Orphans of the War of 1812.” If a soldier died in the war or died after the war as a result of his wounds, his widow and orphans were entitled to a pension at one-half of the deceased soldier’s pay. Beneficiaries remained on the pension rolls for five years. The pension ceased if the widow remarried during that period.

The estate of “Andrew Goan” was administered by Nathaniel Sims in 1815, according to Maury County Will Book A1, page 182.

On September 6, 1829, William Stratton, “guardian of the heirs of Andrew Gowen,” made a report of their schooling, ac­cording to “Maury County, Tennessee Cousins.”

Children born to Andrew Gowan and Lucy Elliott Gowan are regarded as:

Isaac Mathis Goins born in 1811
Levi Goins born about 1813

Isaac Mathis Goins, regarded as a son of Andrew Gowan and Lucy Elliott Gowan, was born in Tennessee in 1811. Professionally he became a shoemaker. In 1839 he lived in Maury County. Isaac Mathis Goins was married to Mary Lucy “Polly” Adkison July 29, 1841, according to “Maury County, Tennessee Marriages, 1807-1850.” She was born in 1816 in Maury County to Jordan Adkison and Mary Charity Ezell Adkison.

By 1850 they had removed to adjoining Hickman County.

Isaac Mathis Goins was enumerated as the head of Household 712-100 in the 1850 census of Hickman County:

“Goins, Isaac 39, born in Tennessee, shoemaker
Mary 34, born in Tennessee
Jordon 10, born in Tennessee
John 7, born in Tennessee
Ellen 6, born in Tennessee
Lewis 4, born in Tennessee
Isaac 2, born in Tennessee”

Isaac Mathis Goins and Mary Lucy “Polly” Adkison Goins joined her siblings to selling their interest in inherited land in Maury County, according to Audie Adkison who submitted the following Maury County deed dated September 29, 1853:

“We, John Adkison, Steven Elliot and Sarah Elliot his wife, W. A. Cauthen and Elizabeth Cauthen, his wife, Issac M. Goins and Mary Goins, his wife, have this day bargained and sold and do hereby transfer and convey to William Adkison a tract of land on which he now resides for and in consideration of seventy nine dollars to them paid, a tract of land in the State of Tennessee, Maury County and District number one containing by estimation seventy nine acres and ninety-nine poles be the same more or less . . . . .

Witnesses: T. R. Allen
James Ezell
Robert Stevens”

Audie Adkison wrote May 29, 2002:

“William Adkison [born in 1812], John Adkison [born in 1814], Mary Lucy “Polly” Adkison [born in 1816], and Elizabeth Adkison [born in 1819] are the Tennessee-born children of Jordan Adkison and Mary Charity Ezell Adkison. This appears to be a case of an older brother buying out the interest of his brothers and sisters in inherited land.

If this is the case, then what is Sarah’s claim? I have found no reference to her as a daughter, though she could be a child of a previous marriage of either Charity or Jordan. Jordan did have a previous marriage to Martha Robison in Bertie County, North Carolina and possibly at least two children there.

But where did the land come from? I suspect that it came from Charity’s side, though I have no concrete evidence. I don’t know who James Ezell is, but he also earlier sold land to William Adkison. All of that leaves me with questions I have not been able to answer. The connection between Sarah and Charity must be strong, since Charity chose to spend her declining years with Sarah and Steven Elliott [assuming she had a choice.]”

“Isaac M. Goin,” was a justice of the peace in Hickman County in 1853 and 1854, according to “History of Hickman County, Tennessee.”

Mary Lucy “Polly” Adkison Goins died before 1870 in Hickman County.

Children born to Isaac Mathis Goins and Mary Lucy “Polly” Adkison Goins include:

Jordan Reece Goins born January 29, 1839
John Gilford Goins born September 26, 1842
Ellen Goins born in 1844
Louis G. Goins born in 1846
Isaac Mathis Goins, Jr. born November 28, 1848
James Knox Polk Goins born May 3, 1852
Thomas J. Goins born in 1855
Mary P. “Mollie” Goins born in 1856

Jordan Reece Goins, son of Isaac Mathis Goins and Mary Lucy “Polly” Adkison Goins, was born in 1839 in Maury County, according to “Tennessee Confederate Widows and Their Families” abstracted by Edna Weifering. He appeared as a 10-year-old in the household of his father in the 1850 census of Hickman County.

Jordan Reece Goins was enlisted in Company H, 24th Tennessee Infantry Regiment which was organized August 6, 1861, according to “History of Hickman County, Tennessee.” “Jourdon R. Goins” was married January 3, 1869 in Hickman County to Thankful Tilitha Jenkins, according to “Hickman County, Tennessee Marriages, 1813-1896.” The marriage date was February 29, 1868, according to Michael J. Goins of Detroit, Michigan. The bride was born June 12, 1842, according to Michael J. Goins.

Jordan Reece Goins died April 13, 1904 in Hickman County, and Thankful Tilitha Jenkins Goins filed Tennessee Widows Pension Application No. 4300. She died there May 6, 1917, according to the research of Donald Lyvonn Cribbs.

Children born to them include:

Mary E. Goins born December 27, 1869
Sarah Goins born about 1870
Jordan Anderson Goins born May 23, 1873
Rosa “Rosie” Goins born May 19, 1875
Alice Augusta Goins born April 9, 1877
Jennie Goins born August 7, 1881

Mary E. Goins, daughter of Jordan Reece Goins and Thankful Tilitha Jenkins Goins, was born December 27, 1869 in Hickman County. Mary E. Goins, at age 15, was married December 18, 1885 to James D. Baird, according to “Hickman County, Tennessee Marriages, 1813-1896.” She was mentioned in her brother’s obituary in 1924.

Children born to them include:

Beulah Baird born October 6, 1891
Dennis Baird born September 2, 1896

Beulah Baird, daughter of James D. Baird and Mary E. Goins Baird, was born October 6, 1891. She was married about 1918, to B. E. Bains.

Children born to them include:

Evelyn Bains born about 1920
Irene Bains born about 1923

Evelyn Bains, daughter of B. E. Bains and Beulah Baird Bains, was born about 1920. She was married about 1939 to Pat Johnson.

Irene Bains, daughter of B. E. Bains and Beulah Baird Bains, was born about 1923. She was married about 1941, husband’s name Francis.

Dennis Baird, son of James D. Baird and Mary E. Goins Baird, was born September 2, 1896. He was married about 1918, wife’s name Beulah. Children born to Dennis Baird and Beula Baird are unknown.

Sarah Goins, daughter of Jordan Reece Goins and Thankful Tilitha Jenkins Goins, was born about 1870. She was married about 1888, husband believed to be Frizzell. She was not mentioned as a survivor in her brother’s obituary in 1924.

Jordan Anderson Goins, son of Jordan Reece Goins and Thankful Tilitha Jenkins Goins, was born May 23, 1873 in Hickman County. He was married there May 3, 1899 to Sara Ann Overby who was born there May 2, 1876.

“Anderson J. Goins” was recorded as the head of a household in the 1900 census of Hickman County, Enumeration District 41, page 16, Civil District 4:

“Goins, Anderson J. 27, born in May 1873 in TN
Sarah A. 24, born in May 1876 in TN”

He died December 10, 1924 at his home in Hickman County, according to the December 18 edition of the “Hickman County News:”

“Anderson Goins, 51 years of age and a respected citizen of the Fourth District, died at his home on Wednesday night of last week, after several days of illness. Funeral services were in charge of Elder Charles Tidwell of this place, and burial was at Martin’s Cemetery near the late home of the deceased.

Surviving are his wife, Mrs. Sarah Ann Overbey Goins, five children, Maggie Goins, Nessie Goins, Ellis Goins, John T. Goins and Jordan Alex Goins; and three sisters, Mrs. Mary E. Goins Beard, Mrs. Alice Goins Bradley and Mrs. Jennie Toy.

Mr. Goins was an influential citizen of his community, a devoted husband and father, and a man of strict integrity and high ideals of Christian citizenship.”

Sarah Ann Overby Goins died there February 27, 1947. Children born to Jordan Anderson Goins and Sarah Ann Overby Goins include:

Maggie L. Goins born in 1901
Nissie Goins born about 1902
Jordan Alex Goins born June 13, 1903
Ellis Anderson Goins born June 15, 1905
John T. Goins born in 1909
Elisha Goins born in 1912

Maggie L. Goins, daughter of Jordan Anderson Goins and Sarah Ann Overby Goins, was born in 1901 in Hickman County. She did not marry. She was mentioned in the 1924 obituary of her father.

Nissie Goins, daughter of Jordan Anderson Goins and Sarah Ann Overby Goins, was born in 1903 in Hickman County. She was married about 1922 to Henry Russell. She was mentioned in the 1924 obituary of her father.

Jordan Alex Goins, son of Jordan Anderson Goins and Sarah Ann Overby Goins, was born June 13, 1903 in Hickman County. He was married April 13, 1931 to Mary Russell who was born March 15, 1913. He died February 9, 1980.

Children born to Jordan Alex Goins and Mary Russell Goins include:

Bernice Goins born about 1933
Marge Goins born about 1934
Roy Goins born about 1936
Clifford Goins born in 1938

Clifford Goins, son of Jordan Alex Goins and Mary Russell Goins, was born in 1938. He died in 1952.

Ellis Anderson Goins, son of Jordan Anderson Goins and Sarah Ann Overby Goins, was born June 15, 1905 in Hickman County. He was married about 1928 to Dessie Lee Davidson who was born January 4, 1906.

Children born to Ellis Anderson Goins and Dessie Lee Davidson Goins include:

Betty Lois Goins born November 25, 1929
Hazel Goins born about 1932

Betty Lois Goins, daughter of Ellis Anderson Goins and Dessie Lee Davidson Goins, was born November 25, 1929 in Hickman County. She was married December 23, 1949 to James R. Litton who was born there September 8, 1929.

Children born to James R. Litton and Betty Lois Goins Litton include:

Patricia Litton born February 29, 1952

Patricia Litton, daughter of James R. Litton and Betty Lois Goins Litton, was born February 29, 1952 in Dickson County, Tennessee. She was married February 2, 1974 to James Michael Slaughter.

Children born to them include:

Jennifer Nicole Slaughter born Dec. 25, 1976
Jay Michael Slaughter born June 27, 1986
Leeann Litton Slaughter [twin] born Sept. 15, 1987
Lindsey C. Slaughter [twin] born Sept. 15, 1987

Rosa “Rosie” Goins, daughter of Jordan Reece Goins and Thankful Tilitha Jenkins Goins, was born May 19, 1875 in Hickman County. “Rosie Goins” was married February 5, 1891 to John Frizzell, according to “Hickman County, Tennessee Marriages, 1813-1896.” She was not mentioned as a survivor in the 1924 obituary of her brother, Jordan Anderson Goins.

Alice Augusta Goins, daughter of Jordan Reece Goins and Thankful Tilitha Jenkins Goins, was born April 9, 1877 in Hickman County. Alice Goins was married December 27, 1891, at the age of 14, to William Campbell Bradley, according to “Hickman County, Tennessee Marriages, 1813-1896.” He was born in 1867 in Tennessee, according to Christie Carter, a descendant. She was mentioned in the 1924 obituary of her brother, Jordan Anderson Goins. William Campbell Bradley died in 1932.

Children born to them include:

Jordan Clint Bradley born June 6, 1909
Earnest Bradley born about 1911
Elton Bradley born about 1913
Edith Bradley born about 1916
Nettie Bradley born about 1920

Jordan Clint Bradley, son of William Campbell Bradley and Alice Augusta Goins, was born June 6, 1909. He was married July 29, 1929 to Tessie May Pevahouse who was born May 13, 1913 to Robert Allen Pevahouse and Mary Elizabeth “Lizzy” Green. They lived in Trenton, Tennessee for their entire lives. Two sons and a daughter were born to them.

Jennie Goins, daughter of Jordan Reece Goins and Thankful Tilitha Jenkins Goins, was born August 7, 1881 in Hickman County. She was married about 1898 to Lee Toy who was born in April 1873 in Pennsylvania. She was mentioned as a survivor in the 1924 obituary of her brother, Jordan Anderson Goins.

Children born to them include:

Curtis Toy born in 1901
Cudlece Toy born in 1903
Stella Toy born in 1905
Nellie Toy born in 1907

John T. Goins, son of Jordan Anderson Goins and Sarah Ann Overby Goins, was born in 1909 in Hickman County. He was married to Leva Haskins about 1922.

Children born to John T. Goins and Leva Haskins Goins include:

Curtis Goins born about 1924
Freed Goins born about 1926
Nelson Goins born about 1929
Dorothy Goins born about 1933

Elisha Goins, son of Jordan Anderson Goins and Sarah Ann Overby Goins, was born in 1912 in Hickman County. He apparently was deceased by 1924 since he was not mentioned in his father’s obituary.

John Gilford Goins, son of Isaac Mathis Goins and Mary Lucy “Polly” Adkison Goins, was born in Tennessee September 26, 1842, according to the research of Donald Lyvonn Cribbs. He appeared as a seven-year-old in the household of his father in the 1850 census of Hickman County.

He served in Company E, 48th Tennessee Infantry Regiment, according to Michael J. Goins, a great-grandson. He was married about 1866 to Angeline Toney Parker who was born May 5, 1846, according to Michael J. Goins.

John Gilford Goins and Angeline Toney Parker Goins were residents of Wichita County, Texas in 1915. Angeline Toney Parker Goins died January 20, 1915 in Wichita County.

John Gilford Goins received a warranty deed from R. R. Brooks September 28, 1916 to the southwest quarter of Section 51, Block 15, Wilbarger County, for $6,400, according to Wilbarger County Deed Book 62, page 621. John Gilford Goins died there February 21, 1922, according to BVS File 6363. At the time of his death he owned 100 acres of land in Block 29, Red River Valley Lands in Wichita County, valued at $17,500 and the southwest quarter of Section 51, Block 15 in Wilbarger County, Texas, valued at $5,500. Personal property, notes and bonds added an addi­tional $20,000 to the estate.

Children born to John Gilford Goins and Angeline Toney Parker Goins include:

Theodora J. “Dorie” Goins born in 1869
Isaac Chambers Goins born about 1871
J. Clagett Goins born about 1872
George Goins born about 1874
Susan Ann “Susie” Goins born about 1877
Jordan L. Goins born about 1883

Theodora J. “Dorie” Goins, son of John Gilford Goins and Angeline Toney Parker Goins, was born in 1869 in Hickman County. “Dorie Goins” was married May 16, 1886 to Susan Tyler, according to “Hickman County, Tennessee Marriages, 1813-1896.” Later he was remarried, wife’s name Maggie. She was illiterate.

In 1923, Theodora J. “Dorie” Goins and Maggie Goins lived at Big Cabin, Craig County, Oklahoma. On January 16, he sold his interest in the Wilbarger County portion of his father’s estate to his brother, George Goins for $1,200, according to Wilbarger County Deed Book 91, page 96.

Theodora J. “Dorie” Goins died in 1957 in Texas, according to the research of Donald Lyvonn Cribbs.

Children born to Theodora J. “Dorie” Goins, Susan Tyler Goins and Maggie Goins include:

Myrell Goins born about 1890

Isaac Chambers “Chame” Goins, son of John Gilford Goins and Angeline Goins, was born about 1871, probably in Hickman County, Tennessee. He was married about 1893 to Betty Ray and removed to Wichita County, Texas. Betty Ray Goins died about a year later. Isaac Chambers Goins received an early land grant of 80 acres in Wichita County from the state of Texas, according to State Land Commissioner Records. He apparently returned to Tennessee after the death of Betty Ray Goins. He was remarried to Anne Belle Jenkins August 6, 1911 in Hickman County. She was born there March 21, 1887. Anna Belle Jenkins Goins died May 22, 1921 in Hickman County and was buried in Jenkins Cemetery, according to “Hickman County, Tennessee Cemetery Records.”

Buried alongside was his infant son, unnamed, who was “born and died September 12, 1925.” “Chame Goins”, believed to be I. C. Goins, “born 1870, died 1958” was also buried in the family plot. Alongside was Lucy Goins, “born 1895, died 1954,” believed to be his second wife.

On February 24, 1923, he, a widower, sold his inheritance in his father’s Wilbarger County farm to his brother, George Goins, according to Wilbarger County Deed Book 91, page 511.

Isaac Chambers Goins was remarried to Lucy F. Jenkins, regarded as a sister to Anna Belle Jenkins, a few weeks after her death. She was born in 1895. On October 9, 1937, while still a resident of Lyles, Tennessee, Hickman County, he gave a full release on the Wilbarger County farm, according to Wilbarger County Deed Book, page 587.

Lucy F. Jenkins Goins died in 1954, and Isaac Chambers Goins died in 1958 in Hickman County. She was buried alongside her sister. He and an unnamed son, “born and died September 12, 1925” was also buried in the family plot.

Children born to Isaac Chambers Goins and Betty Ray Goins are unknown.

Children born to Isaac Chambers Goins and Anna Belle Jenkins Goins include:

Gertie May Goins born June 19, 1913
James Howard Goins born October 9, 1915
Mary Alma Goins born May 9, 1917
Lester B. Goins born August 15, 1919
[infant] born in May 1921

Children born to Isaac Chambers Goins and Lucy F. Jenkins Goins include:

Hautie Sue Goins born about 1924
[son] born September 12, 1925
John Allen “Lewis” Goins born in 1926
Elizabeth Jane Goins born in 1932

Gertie May Goins, daughter of Isaac Chambers Goins and Anna Belle Jenkins Goins, was born June 19, 1913. She was married September 17, 1932 to Valley Stevens who was born March 3, 1909. She died March 5, 1964, and he died February 2, 1971.

Children born to Valley Stevens and Gertie May Goins Stevens include:

Billy Ray Stevens born October 22, 1934
Norma Joyce Stevens born June 1, 1936
Roy Lynn Stevens born May 2, 1940
Arthur Wayne Stevens born June 22, 1942
Jerry Clifford Stevens born September 2, 1945

Norma Joyce Stevens, daughter of Valley Stevens and Gertie May Stephens, was born June 1, 1936. She was married about 1955 to Austin Chambers. She died May 1, 1990.

James Howard Goins, son of Isaac Chambers Goins and Anna Belle Jenkins Goins, was born October 9, 1915. He was married in March 1946 in Inkster, Michigan to Helen Petro who was born in Ohio August 6, 1912. He died June 8, 1985 in Detroit, Michigan.

Children born to James Howard Goins and Helen Petro Goins include:

Michael James Goins born December 24, 1950

Michael James Goins, son of James Howard Goins and Helen Petro Goins, was born December 24, 1950. He was married June 5, 1971 to Judith Mamie Henderson who was born July 21, 1951. Children born to Michael James Goins and Judith Mamie Henderson Goins are unknown.

Mary Alma Goins, daughter of Isaac Chambers Goins and Anna Belle Jenkins Goins, was born May 9, 1917 in Hickman County. She was married about 1937 to Delmar “Jack” Worley. He died before May 1996.

Children born to them include:

James Orville Worley born October 9, 1938
William Spence Worley born April 11, 1940
Bobby Lee Worley born November 24, 1941
Larry B. Worley born August 25, 1943
Kenneth Darrell Worley born December 14, 1945
Sherry Dale Worley born May 7, 1953

Lester B. Goins, son of Isaac Chambers Goins and Anna Belle Jenkins Goins, was born August 15, 1919. He was married about 1941 to Belva Cochran.

Children born to Lester B. Goins and Belva Cochran Goins include:

Barbara Ann Goins born July 26, 1943

An infant was born to Isaac Chambers Goins and Anna Belle Jenkins Goins in May 1921 and died in infancy.

Hautie Sue Goins, daughter of Isaac Chambers Goins and Lucy F. Jenkins Goins, was born about 1924. She was married about 1942 to Bobby Bryant. Later she was remarried to Monroe Russell.

An infant son was born to Isaac Chambers Goins and Lucy F. Jenkins Goins September 12, 1925 and died the same day.

John Allen “Lewis” Goins, son of Isaac Chambers Goins and Lucy F. Jenkins Goins, was born in 1926 in Hickman County. He died February 7, 1997 in Goodletsville, Tennessee.

Elizabeth Jane Goins, daughter of Isaac Chambers Goins and Lucy F. Jenkins Goins, was born in 1932. She was married about 1953 to Harvel Moss. He died in 1986.

Children born to them include:

Harvel Moss, Jr. born about 1954
Pamela Alise Moss born about 1955
Iris Kay Moss born about 1957
Jerry Randall Moss born about 1959
Terry Wayne Moss born about 1962
Brenda Joy Moss born about 1964
Teena Darlene Moss born about 1967
David Mark Moss born about 1970
Dorcas Jane Moss born about 1972
Larry Ray Moss born about 1975
Timothy Earl Moss born about 1978
Angela Denise Moss born about 1981

J. Claggett Goins, son of John Gilford Goins and Angeline Goins, was born about 1871, probably in Tennessee. He was married about 1898, wife’s name Ida May.

In 1922 J. Claggett Goins and Ida May Goins lived at Burkburnett, Texas. They sold their inheritance in the Wilbarger County farm of John Gilford Goins to his brother, George Goins Septem­ber 11, 1922 for $2,400, according to Wilbarger County Deed Book 91, page 98. “J. C. Goins” died in nearby Montague County September 14, 1932, according to BVS File 39598.

George Goins, son of John Gilford Goins and Angeline Goins, was born August 12, 1874 in Hickman County. He was married to Maggie King about 1899. Maggie King Goins was born at Keller, Texas in 1881. In 1901 George Goins was a farmer located at Iowa Park, Texas.

George Goins and Maggie King Goins, “formerly Maggie King Goins of Archer City, Texas” gave a correction deed to R. G. Cate to 171 acres of land in Tarrant County, Texas “located 11 miles northwest of Ft. Worth, Texas” May 12, 1902, according to Tarrant County Deed Book 165, page 83. Consideration was $193.

It is believed that George Goins and Maggie King Goins were divorced about 1902, and it is thought that George Goins was remarried about 1904. “Maggie Goins,” believed to Maggie King Goins, died August 20, 1938 in Wichita County, Texas, according to BVS File 39696.

A son was born to “George Goins and Susie Goins” February 9, 1905, according to Wichita County Birth Book 1, page 24. At that time they lived eight miles south of Iowa Park, Texas. Of Susie Goins nothing more is known. George Goins was remarried April 17, 1919 to Miss Bertha M. Crisp, according to Wilbarger County Texas Marriage Book 6, page 1. She was born in 1899.

Following the death of his father, George Goins began to pur­chase the interest of the other heirs of a farm in Wilbarger County. By 1923 he had completed the five purchases. Ap­parently he continued to own the farm through out his life­time. George Goins continued to live in Wilbarger County in 1942.

George Goins and Bertha M. Crisp Goins were residents of Fargo, Texas in Wilbarger County in 1949. George Goins died October 11, 1949, at the age of 75, according to Wilbarger County Death Book 3, page 218. Death of the retired farmer was attributed to a cerebral hemorrhage. He was buried in Eastview Cemetery, Vernon, Texas.

Bertha M. Crisp Goins was named administrator of the estate which included the 160-acre farm which was valued at $11,032.88, according to Wilbarger County Probate Book 17, page 448. She received a warranty deed to a lot in Vernon, April 13, 1956, according to Wilbarger County Deed Book 204, page 1.

Bertha M. Crisp Goins gave a warranty deed to her farm to Cecil Clay Goins, believed to be her stepson and his wife, Lillian Lucille Mason Goins, for $32,000, according to Wilbarger County Deed Book 287, page 704. Bertha M. Crisp died in 1977 in Wilbarger County.

It is believed that children born to George Goins and Maggie King Goins include:

Claude Miller Goins born July 30, 1901
Cecil Clay Goins born about 1903
[son] born February 9, 1905

Claude Miller Goins, son of George Goins and Maggie King Goins was born, July 30, 1901 in Wichita County, according to Wichita County Birth Certificate 3625.

He was married June 27, 1925 to Miss Estella Parker, ac­cording to Wilbarger County Marriage Book 8, page 292. Estella Parker was born in Dallas County, Texas in 1907, the daughter of Moses E. Parker and Sarah E. Parker. Moses E. Parker moved to Fargo in 1910, died there in 1920 of cancer and was buried in Fargo Cemetery. He was a farmer and owned 240 acres of land located 12 miles north of Vernon, according to Wilbarger County Deed Book 118, page 514.

Claude Miller Goins and Estella Parker Goins were residents of Wilbarger County in 1931, in 1933 and in 1960. He was a farmer.

Children born to Claude Miller Goins and Estella Parker Goins include:

Jeanette Goins born December 21, 1931
J. Delbert Goins born December 3, 1933

Jeanette Goins, daughter of Claude Miller Goins and Estella Parker Goins, was born December 21, 1931, according to Wilbarger County Birth Book 5, page 381. “Jeanette Alma Goins” was married to Edward Newton Goins April 5, 1953, according to Carson County, Texas Marriage Book 6, page 132.

J. Delbert Goins, son of Claude Miller Goins and Estella Parker Goins was born December 3, 1933, according to Wilbarger County Probate Birth Book 9, page 261.

Cecil Clay Goins, son of George Goins and Maggie King Goins, was born in 1903, at Holliday, Texas in Wichita County. Cecil Clay Goins appeared in the 1922 city directory of Wichita Falls, living at 2011 Elizabeth.

He was married to Miss Lillian Lucille Mason, who was born in 1910 at Fargo, February 11, 1927, according to Wilbarger County Marriage Book 9, page 224.

Cecil Clay Goins and Lillian Lucille Mason Goins, received a warranty deed from C. O. Olive April 24, 1933 to ¼ acre in the Southeast quarter of Section 37, Block 15 for $27.50, ac­cording to Wilbarger County, Texas Deed Book 128, page 119. On December 21, 1933 they received a warranty deed to one acre adjoining from L. F. Suttle for $200, according to Wilbarger County Deed Book 129, page 563. Cecil Clay Goins received a quit claim deed from Stockgrowers Bank, a bankrupt company of Purdin, Missouri July 11, 1939 for 100 acres for $1,637.35, according to Wilbarger County Deed Book 145, page 633.

Cecil Clay Goins and Lillian Lucille Mason Goins gave a warranty Deed to Rubie Lee Crisp October 9, 1939 to one acre of land for $300, according to Wilbarger County Deed Book 146, page 160.

Cecil Clay Goins lived at Route 1, Vernon in 1943-1944. He was the father of “Bill W. Goins,” a freshman engineering student at Texas Technological College, Lubbock, Texas at that time.

Cecil Clay Goins purchased land from Eva L. Richardson October 3, 1944 for $13,200, according to Wilbarger County Deed Book 158, page 411. They sold land to Frank King October 1, 1945, according to Wilbarger County Deed Book 189, page 93.

Cecil Clay Goins was one of the trustees of the Church of Christ at Fargo September 26, 1954, according to Wilbarger County Deed Book 193, page 608.

Cecil Clay Goins and Lillian Lucille Mason Goins received one acre of land from Ada Hutson March 11, 1967, according to Wilbarger County Deed Book 252, page 59.

Children born to Cecil Clay Goins and Lillian Lucille Goins include:

Billy Ray Goins born January 15, 1937
George Allen Goins born June 21, 1939
Cecil Don Goins born November 11, 1948

Billy Ray Goins, son of Cecil Clay Goins and Lillian Lucille Mason Goins, was born January 15, 1937, according to Wilbarger County Birth Book 5, page 561. He was married about 1958 to Charlie Sue Sanders, who was born in 1937 in Corsicana, Texas. They were residents of Vernon in 1960 where he was employed as a bookkeeper.

They received a warranty deed to lots in Mason Subdivision, Vernon from Sands Development Corporation for $11,300, according to Wilbarger County Deed Book 226, page 409. They sold the property to Weldon Brite April 1, 1965, ac­cording to Wilbarger County Deed Book 236, page 527. “Billy Ray Goins” received a deed to land in Montgomery County, Texas in 1969, according to Montgomery County Deed Book 689, page 427.

Apparently Billy Ray Goins and Charlie Sue Sanders Goins were divorced about 1971. Billy Ray Goins was married to Carolyn Ellen Carey December 22, 1973, according to Wilbarger County Marriage Book 27, page 57.

Billy Ray Goins and Carolyn Ellen Carey Goins received a warranty deed from Ivan Dorman July 29, 1974 to one acre of land for $1,110, according to Wilbarger County Deed Book 299, page 540.

Children born to Billy Ray Goins and Charlie Sue Sanders Goins include:

Barry Paul Goins born August 8, 1960

Barry Paul Goins, son of Billy Ray Goins and Charlie Sue Sanders Goins, was born August 8, 1960, according to Wilbarger County Birth Certificate No. 9973. Billy Ray Goins and his brother, Cecil Don Goins, received a warranty deed from their parents to 400 acres of land for $114,250, ac­cording to Wilbarger County Deed Book 307, page 485.

George Allen Goins, son of Cecil Clay Goins and Lillian Lu­cille Mason Goins, was born June 21, 1939, according to City of Vernon Birth Book 9, page 350. George Allen Goins was married June 22, 1957 to Patricia Jane Shores, according to Wilbarger County Marriage Book 20, page 321. Of George Allen Goins and Patricia Jane Shores Goins nothing more is known.

Cecil Don Goins, son of Cecil Clay Goins and Lillian Lucille Mason Goins, was born November 11, 1948, according to Wilbarger County Birth Certificate No. 3701. He was still a single man when he joined his brother, Billy Ray Goins, in purchasing 400 acres of land from his parents, according to Wilbarger County Deed Book 307, page 485.

Susan Ann “Susie” Goins, daughter of John Gilford Goins and Angeline Goins, was born about 1877, probably in Tennessee. She was married October 12, 1905 to Andrew H. Seidlitz, according to Wichita County Marriage Book 2, page 257. In 1922, Andrew H. Seidlitz and Susan Ann “Susie” Goins Seidlitz lived in Wilbarger County. They sold their interest in the farm in Wilbarger County, inherited from her father to her brother, George Goins, January 16, 1923, ac­cording to Wilbarger County Deed Book 91, page 97.

Children born to them include:

Essie Lou Seidlitz born in 1906
Bessie Bee Seidlitz born in 1908
Willis Dollie Seidlitz born in 1910
Gladys Opal Seidlitz born in 1912
Hollice Faye Seidlitz born in 1914
Geneva Seidlitz born in 1916
Mildred Lois Seidlitz born in 1918
Thelda Marie Seidlitz born in 1920
Evelyn Jo Seidlitz born in 1922

Jordan P. Goins, son of of Isaac Chambers Goins and Lucy F. Jenkins Goins, was born about 1883. He was married about 1906 to Ida Brown. He died in 1952. Children born to Jordan P. Goins and Ida Brown Goins are unknown.

Jordan L. Goins, son of John Gilford Goins and Angeline Goins, was born about 1870, probably in Tennessee. He was married January 31, 1907, to Ida Brown, according to Wichita County Marriage Book 3, page 57. He was remarried to Jonnie M. Crowell January 21, 1916, according to Wichita County Marriage Book 5, page 216. Of Ida Brown Goins nothing more is known.

In 1923 Jordan L. Goins and Jonnie M. Crowell Goins lived at Burkburnett, Texas. On September 11, 1922 Jordan L. Goins sold his portion of the Wilbarger inheritance to his brother George Goins for $1,200, according to Wilbarger County Deed Book 91, page 98.

Ellen Goins, daughter of Isaac Mathis Goins and Mary Lucy “Polly” Adkison Goins was born in 1844 in Tennessee. She appeared in the 1850 census of Hickman County as a six-year-old living in the household of her father.

Louis G. Goins, son of Isaac Mathis Goins and Mary Lucy “Polly” Adkison Goins was born in Tennessee in 1846, according to the 1850 census of Hickman County. He was married February 17, 1866 to Elizabeth Elliott. The bride’s name was shown as Elizabeth Garton in the research of Donald Lyvonn Cribbs.

Children born to Louis G. Goins and Elizabeth Elliott Goins include:

Mary Goins born in 1867
William Martin Goins born April 4, 1870
Bell Goins born in 1874
Isaac Goins born in 1875

Mary Goins, daughter of Louis G. Goins and Elizabeth Elliott Goins, was born in 1867 in Hickman County.

William Martin Goins, son of Louis G. Goins and Elizabeth Elliott Goins, was born April 4, 1870 in Hickman County. He was married about 1890 to Mary B “Mollie” Chitwood. She was born December 9, 1871 to William A. Chitwood and Rebecca Caroline Layton Chitwood , according to Michelle Sessions McGregor

In 1895 William Martin Goins and Mary B. “Mollie” Chitwood Goins lived at Iowa Park, Texas. Mary B. “Mollie” Chitwood Goins died prior to 1956. William Martin Goins, a widower, died June 19, 1956 of myocardial infarction, according to Wichita County, Texas Death Certificate No. 14011. He was buried in Burkburnett Cemetery, Burkburnett, Texas, according to Wendell Ray Goins, informant.

Children born to William Martin Goins and Mary B. “Mollie” Chitwood Goins include:

William Estel Goins born May 19, 1895

William Estel Goins, son of William Martin Goins and Mary B. “Mollie” Chitwood Goins, was born May 18, 1895 at Iowa Park. He served in World War I. He was married November 15, 1919 to Ruby Jewel Hennis, according to Wichita County Marriage Book 7, page 307.

William Estel Goins and Ruby Jewel Goins lived in Burk­burnett for the next 50 years. They were listed in the city di­rectory of Wichita Falls from 1943 to 1957 as residents of Burkburnett. He was employed by the post office in Wichita Falls during that period. In 1968 they lived at 218 West 4th Street, Burkburnett. William Estel Goins died April 3, 1968 of “lung trouble”, according to Wichita County, Death Certificate No. 16427. He was buried in Burkburnett Cemetery.

Bell Goins, daughter of Louis G. Goins and Elizabeth Elliott Goins, was born in 1874 in Hickman County.

Isaac Goins, son of Louis G. Goins and Elizabeth Elliott Goins, was born in Hickman County in 1875.

Isaac Mathis Goins, Jr, son of Isaac Mathis Goins and Mary Lucy “Polly” Adkison Goins, was born in Tennessee November 28, 1848. He appeared in the household of his father in the 1850 census of Hickman County as a two-year-old. “I. M. Gowins” was married there December 20, 1875 to Sarah Evelyn Martin who was born there July 20, 1855, according to “Hickman County, Tennessee Marriages, 1813-1896.”

She was the daughter of Jackson S. R. “Jack” Martin and Fatima “Timy” Vaughn Martin, according to Donald Lyvonn Cribbs. He operated a store in Hickman County.

He died July 14, 1930 in Hickman County, and she died there January 31, 1942.

Children born to Isaac Mathis Goins, Jr. and Sarah Evelyn Martin Goins include:

Sarah “Sally” Goins born in 1877
Jordan A. Goins born September 29, 1878
William C. Goins born in 1882
Talitha E. Goins born in 1883
Daniel Fletcher Goins born January 18, 1886
Lucy Maye Goins born July 13, 1888
Silas Lee Goins born in October 1889
James I. Johnson Goins born in October 1898

Sarah “Sally” Goins, daughter of Isaac Mathis Goins, Jr. and Sarah Evelyn Martin Goins, was born in 1877. She was married about 1894 to Allen McCord.

Jordan A. Goins, son of Isaac Mathis Goins, Jr. and Sarah Evelyn Martin Goins, was born September 29, 1878 in Hickman County. He was married in 1900 to Susie A. Litton who was born June 18, 1881. He died February 17, 1947, and she died July 20, 1953.

Children born to Jordan A. Goins and Susie A. Litton Goins include:

John William Isaac “Ike” Goins born in 1902
Elizabeth L. “Lizzie” Goins born in 1905
Sarah L. Goins born in 1906
Daniel A. Goins born in 1908
Ellen F. Goins born in 1911
Ruby E. Goins born in 1914
Frank Goins born October 15, 1915
Elson Goins born in 1917

John William Isaac “Ike” Goins, son of Jordan A. Goins and Susie A. Litton Goins, was born in 1902.

Elizabeth L. “Lizzie” Goings, daughter of Jordan A. Goins and Susie A. Litton Goins, was born in 1905.

Sarah L. Goins, daughter of Jordan A. Goins and Susie A. Litton Goins, was born in 1906. She was married about 1924, husband’s name Jenkins.

Children born to them include:

Vera Jenkins born about 1926
Janie Jenkins born about 1928
Susie Jenkins born about 1930
John Jenkins born about 1933
Dorris Jenkins born about 1936

Daniel A. Goins, son of Jordan A. Goins and Susie A. Litton Goins, was born in 1908.

Ellen F. Goins, daughter of Jordan A. Goins and Susie A. Litton Goins, was born in 1911.

Ruby E. Goins, daughter of Jordan A. Goins and Susie A. Litton Goins, was born in 1914.

Frank Goins, son of Jordan A. Goins and Susie A. Litton Goins, was born in Hickman County October 15, 1915. He died there September 6, 1916.

Elson Goins, son of Jordan A. Goins and Susie A. Litton Goins, was born in 1917.

William C. Goins, son of Isaac Mathis Goins, Jr. and Sarah Evelyn Martin Goins, was born September 29, 1878 in Hickman County. He was married there about 1904 to Mary Emma Lee Beasley. She was born in 1887 to Cicero Beasley and Elizabeth Clark Beasley. He died about 1959 in Florida, and she died there in 1970.

Children born to William C. Goins and Mary Emma Lee Beasley Goins include:

William Alton Goins born in 1905
Leonard A. Goins born in 1906
Evelyn E. Goins born in 1909
James M. Goins born in 1912
Hershel Lee Goins born in 1915
Silus Johnson Goins born in 1917
Mamie Allison Goins born in 1919
Frank Ivan Goins born in 1923
Arnold Lavern Goins born in 1932

William Alton Goins, son of William C. Goins and Mary Emma Lee Beasley Goins, was born in 1905 in Hickman County. He was married about 1928 to Myrtle E. Griffin. No children were born to William Alton Goins and Myrtle E. Griffin Goins.

Leonard A. Goins, son of William C. Goins and Mary Emma Lee Beasley Goins, was born in 1906. He died in 1908.

Evelyn E. Goins, daughter of William C. Goins and Mary Emma Lee Beasley Goins, was born in 1909 in Hickman County. She was married about 1928 to Raymond H. Cribbs who was born November 21, 1902. He died March 25, 1975.

Children born to them include:

Donald Lyvonn Cribbs born in 1931
Marye Carolyn Cribbs born in 1945

Donald Lyvonn Cribbs, son of Raymond H. Cribbs and Evely E. Goins Cribbs, was born in 1931. He was married about 1955 to Carolyn Cooper Shreeve who was born in 1936. In 1997 they lived in New Market, Alabama where he, a Foundation member, was active in the research of his branch of the family.

Children born to Donald Lyvonn Cribbs and Carolyn Cooper Shreeve Cribbs include:

Mary Catherine Cribbs born in 1957
Donald Lyvonn Cribbs, Jr. born in 1959
John Calvin Cribbs born in 1961
Carol Elizabeth Cribbs born in 1962

Mary Catherine Cribbs, daughter of Donald Lyvonn Cribbs and Carolyn Cooper Shreeve Cribbs, was born in 1957. She was married about 1977 to Michael O. Mann who was born in 1957 in Benton County, Mississippi.

Children born to Michael O. Mann and Mary Catherine Cribbs Mann include:

Christae Michelle Mann born in 1979
Catherine A. Mann born in 1982

Donald Lyvonn Cribbs, Jr, son of Donald Lyvonn Cribbs and Carolyn Cooper Shreeve Cribbs, was born in 1959. He was married about 1992 to Kathryn E. Garrison who was born in 1963.

Children born to Donald Lyvonn Cribbs, Jr. and Kathryn E. Garrison Cribbs include:

Raymond Wesley Cribbs born in 1994

John Calvin Cribbs, son of Donald Lyvonn Cribbs and Carolyn Cooper Shreeve Cribbs, was born in 1961.

Carol Elizabeth Cribbs, daughter of of Donald Lyvonn Cribbs and Carolyn Cooper Shreeve Cribbs, was born in 1962. She was married about 1986 to Larry Keith McKinnon.

Children born to them include:

Brianna C. McKinnon [twin] born in 1988
Brian C. McKinnon [twin] born in 1988

Marye Carolyn Cribbs, daughter of Raymond H. Cribbs and Evelyn E. Goins Cribbs, was born in 1945. She was married about 1967 to Robert R. Deadman who was born in 1944.

Children born to Robert R. Deadman and Marye Carolyn Cribbs include:

Scott R. Deadman born in 1969
Ryan Robert Deadman born in 1972

James M. Goins, son of William C. Goins and Mary Emma Lee Beasley Goins, was born in 1912 in Hickman County. He was married about 1935, wife’s name Ruby. He was remarried about 1939 to Mary Helen McBride who was born in 1921.

Children born to James M. Goins and Ruby Goins are unknown. Children born to James M. Goins and Mary Helen McBride Goins include:

William Gerald Goins [twin] born in January 1941
Peggy Joyce Goins [twin] born in January 1941
Richard Lee Goins born in 1945

William Gerald Goins, twin son of James M. Goins and Mary Helen McBride Goins, was born in 1941.

Peggy Joyce Goins, twin daughter of James M. Goins and Mary Helen McBride Goins, was born in 1941. She was married about 1961 to Bedford Leland Dabney who was born in 1942. She was remarried about 1974 to Elmo Wayne Matthews who was born in 1941.

Children born to Bedford Leland Dabney and Peggy Joyce Goins Dabney include:

David Leland Dabney born in 1963
Gregory Scott Dabney born in 1965
Deborah M. Dabney born in 1967

Children born to Elmo Wayne Matthews and Peggy Joyce Goins Dabney Matthews include:

Elmer W. Matthews born in 1976

Richard Lee Goins, son of James M. Goins and Mary Helen McBride Goins, was born in 1945.

Hershel Lee Goins, son of William C. Goins and Mary Emma Lee Beasley Goins, was born in 1915 in Hickman County. He was married about 1940 to Helen Louise McMahan who was born in 1919.

Children born to Hershel Lee Goins and Helen Louise McMahan Goins include:

Sandra Lee Goins born in 1942

Sandra Lee Goins, daughter of Hershel Lee Goins and Helen Louise McMahan Goins, was born in 1942. She was married about 1967 to James Arthur MacLean who was born in 1945.

Children born to them include:

James Arthur MacLean II born in 1969

Silus Johnson Goins, son of William C. Goins and Mary Emma Lee Beasley Goins, was born in 1917 in Hickman County. He was married about 1942 to Ruby Cude. She died about 1994.

Children born to Silus Johnson Goins and Ruby Cude Goins include:

Douglas Goins born about 1944

Douglas Goins, son of Silus Johnson Goins and Ruby Cude Goins, was born about 1944. He died about 1991.

Mamie Allison Goins, daughter of William C. Goins and Mary Emma Lee Beasley Goins, was born in 1919 in Hickman County. She was married about 1946 to Farrell Ward Bassett who was born in 1942.

Children born to them include:

Malcolm Lynn Bassett born in 1950
Melany Sherril Bassett born in 1952
Stephen Farrell Bassett born in 1954
Carroll Craig Bassett born in 1956

Malcoln Lynn Bassett, son of Farrell Ward Bassett and Mamie Allison Goins Bassett, was born in 1950. He was married about 1974 to Mona Diane Golding who was born in 1956.

Children born to them include:

Malcolm Lynn Bassett, Jr. born in 1976
Daphne Allison Bassett born in 1979
Peter Bradley Bassett born in 1987

Melany Sherril Bassett, daughter of of Farrell Ward Bassett and Mamie Allison Goins Bassett, was born in 1952. She was married about 1978 to Mark Nesmith.

Children born to them include:

Jason Nesmith born in 1980
Carrie Nesmith born in 1983

Stephen Farrell Basset, son of Farrell Ward Bassett and Mamie Allison Goins Bassett, was born in 1954. He was married about 1981 to Susan Clark.

Children born to them include:

Heath Clark Bassett born in 1984
Kelly Michelle Bassett born in 1986
Holly Brooke Bassett born in 1989

Carlton Craig Bassett, son of Farrell Ward Bassett and Mamie Allison Goins Bassett, was born in 1956. He was married about 1980 to Elizabeth Ann Simmons who was born in 1960.

Children born to them include:

Jessica Eilene Bassett born in 1982
Craig Dean Bassett born in 1984
Brandon Michael Bassett born in 1990

Frank Ivan Goins, son of William C. Goins and Mary Emma Lee Beasley Goins, was born in 1923. He was married about 1946 to Willie V. Ragan who was born in 1920. No children were born to Frank Ivan Goins and Willie V. Ragan Goins.

Arnold Lavern Goins, son of William C. Goins and Mary Emma Lee Beasley Goins, was born in 1932 in Hickman County. He was married about 1953 to Mary E. Williams who was born in 1934.

Children born to them include:

Arnold David Goins born in 1955
Sherry Elizabeth Goins born in 1956
William Mark Goins born in 1958
Lalani Ann Goins born in 1960
Timothy Lee Goins born in 1962

Arnold David Goins, son of Arnold Lavern Goins and Mary E. Williams Goins, was born in 1955. He was married to Marina Frances Jaramillo about 1974. He died in 1980.

Children born to Arnold David Goins and Marina Frances Jaramillo Goins include:

Angelic Desarae Goins born in 1975

Sherry Elizabeth Goins, daughter of Arnold Lavern Goins and Mary E. Williams Goins, was born in 1956. She was married about 1978 to Jerry Henry Revels III. She was remarried about 1985 to Jose Severo Cifuentes.

Children born to Jerry Henry Revels III and Sherry Elizabeth Goins Revels include:

Mary Elizabeth Revels born in 1980
Jerry Henry Revels IV born in 1982

Children born to Jose Severo Cifuentes and Sherry Elizabeth Goins Revels Cifuentes include:

Krista Ann Cifuentes born in 1987
Jose Serero Cifuentes III born in 1988

William Mark Goins, son of Arnold Lavern Goins and Mary E. Williams Goins, was born in 1958.

Lalani Ann Goins, daughter of Arnold Lavern Goins and Mary E. Williams Goins, was born in 1960. She was married about 1980 to Wallace Dean Cains.

Timothy Lee Goins, son of Arnold Lavern Goins and Mary E. Williams Goins, was born in 1962. He was married about 1989 to Connie Revels who was married in 1958.

Children born to Timothy Lee Goins and Connie Revels Goins include:

Calvin Lee Goins born in 1981

Talitha E. Goins, daughter of Isaac Mathis Goins, Jr. and Sarah Evelyn Martin Goins, was born in August 1883 at Bon Aqua, Tennessee in Hickman County. She was married there April 27, 1902 to Allen Tolbert Overby who was born there September 29, 1877. He died in Hickman County in 1944, and she died there in 1964.

Children born to them include:

John Wilson Overby born June 17, 1903
Jerome Frank Overby born July 16, 1904
Charlie Marvin Overby born September 26, 1905
[son] born June 3, 1907
Ellis G. Overby born August 8, 1911
Mary Frances Overby born September 6, 1913
May Goins born about 1917

Jerome Frank Overby, son of Allen Tolbert Overby and Talith E. Goins Overby, was born July 16, 1904 in Hickman County. He was married about 1930, wife’s name Ruby Jennette

Children born to Jerome Frank Overby and Ruby Jennette Overby include:

Mary Jane Overby born about 1932
Gary Wayne Overby born in 1944

Charlie Marvin Overby, son of Allen Tolbert Overby and Talith E. Goins Overby, was born September 26, 1905 in Hickman County. He was married about 1935 to Zelna Mae Bates. Children born to them are unknown.

A son was born to Allen Tolbert Overby and Talith E. Goins Overby June 3, 1907 and died in the same year.

Ellis G. Overby, son of Allen Tolbert Overby and Talitha E. Goins Overby, was born August 8, 1911. He died there September 5, 1912.

Mary Frances Overby, daughter of Allen Tolbert Overby and Talitha E. Goins Overby, was born September 6, 1913 in Hickman County. She died there October 16, 1914.

Daniel Fletcher “Fletch” Goins, son of Isaac Mathis Goins, Jr. and Sarah Evelyn Martin Goins, was born January 18, 1886 in Hickman County.

Gayle Coberly, a descendant of “Fletcher Goins” wrote August 5, 1998 that he was her great-grandfather. She wrote, “My great-grandmother, Rose Luella Burford, divorced him and moved to Arkansas in 1900 with her family. In 1905 she remarried. They had a daughter named Leona Essie Goins and a son named Jesse Goins.”

Daniel Fletcher “Fletch” Goins was [re?]married about 1909 to Nancy S. Martin, daughter of John J. Martin and Lizzie Martin. She was born in Hickman County August 13, 1888 and died there January 7, 1937. He died there September 10, 1946. They were buried in Martin Cemetery in Hickman County with no marker and no dates, according to “Hickman County, Tennessee Cemetery Records,” by Catherine Griffin Lynn. A son “Fletch” Goins [no marker] was buried beside his parents. Daniel Fletcher “Fletch” Goins and his wife Nancy Martin Goins.

Children born to Daniel Fletcher “Fletch”. Goins and Nancy S. Martin Goins include:

Annie Goins born December 1, 1910
John Henry Goins born about 1911
Alvie Goins born July 10, 1913
Ola Goins born October 4, 1916
Oma Goins born May 11, 1920
Hattie Goins born October 25, 1923
“Fletch” Goins born about 1926

Lucy Mae Goins, daughter of Isaac Mathis Goins, Jr. and Sarah Evelyn Martin Goins, was born July 13, 1888 in Hickman County. She was married to John D. Overby about 1904. He was born there September 1, 1885 and died there September 1, 1957. She died there October 10, 1971. Children born to them are unknown.

Silas Lee Goins, son Isaac Mathis Goins, Jr. and Sarah Evelyn Martin Goins, was born in October 1889 in Hickman County He was married about 1912, wife’s name Rosetta. She died about 1917, and he was soon remarried in Hickman County to Ludie B. Jenkins who was born there June 4, 1902. Silas Lee Goins died there in October 1945, and Ludie B. Jenkins Goins died there October 13, 1959.

Children born to Silas Lee Goins and Rosetta Goins include:

[son] born about 1914
May Goins born about 1916

Children born to Silas Lee Goins and Ludie B. Jenkins Goins include:

Delois Goins born in 1918
William Talbert Goins born August 5, 1920
Edith Christine Goins born in 1923
Vera Goins born in 1925
Floyd Wilson Goins born in July 1927
Lesley Goins born in 1930
Wilma Goins born in 1933
Imogene Goins born in 1935
Charles Silas Goins born in 1943

A son was born to Silas Lee Goins and Rosetta Goins about 1914 and died in infancy.

May Goins, daughter of Silas Lee Goins and Rosetta Goins, was born about 1916. After the death of her mother, she was reared by Allen Tolbert Overby and Talitha E. Goins Overby. She was married to Woodrow Burns about 1933.

Delois Goins, daughter of Silas Lee Goins and Ludie B. Jenkins Goins, was born in 1918. She died October 1, 1928.

William Talbert Goins, son of Silas Lee Goins and Ludie B. Jenkins Goins, was born August 4, 1920

Edith Christine Goins, daughter of Silas Lee Goins and Ludie B. Jenkins Goins, was born in 1923. She was married about 1940, husband’s name Creasy.

Vera Goins, daughter of Silas Lee Goins and Ludie B. Jenkins Goins, was born about 1925. She was married about 1946, husband’s name Law.

Floyd Wilson Goins, son of Silas Lee Goins and Ludie B. Jenkins Goins, was born in July 1927. He died in U.S. Naval service in 1954.

Lesley Goins, son of Silas Lee Goins and Ludie B. Jenkins Goins, was born in 1930.

Wilma Goins, daughter of Silas Lee Goins and Ludie B. Jenkins Goins, was born in 1933. She was married about 1951 to Ray Booker.

Imogene Goins, daughter of Silas Lee Goins and Ludie B. Jenkins Goins, was born in 1935. She was married to John Harrington about 1953.

Charles Silas Goins, son of Silas Lee Goins and Ludie B. Jenkins Goins, was born in 1943.

James I. Johnson Goins, son of Isaac Mathis Goins, Jr. and Sarah Evelyn Martin Goins, was born in October 1898 in Hickman County. He died there in 1950.

James Knox Polk Goins, son of Isaac Mathis Goins and Mary Lucy “Polly” Adkison Goins, was born May 3, 1852 in Hickman County. He was married there September 6, 1876 to Rosanna V. Tyler who was born there in 1858. She is regarded as a sister of Susan Tyler. After her death, he was remarried in 1901 to Emily Mary Oakley [or Cotham], according to Michael J. Goins. Emily Mary Oakley Goins was born July 20, 1852. He died in Hickman County February 8, 1925, and Emily Mary Oakley Goins died there November 26, 1935.

No children were born to James Knox Polk Goins and Emily M. Ggins. Children born to James Knox Polk Goins and Rosanna V. Tyler Goins include:

Etta Mae Goins born February 21, 1879
James Oliver Goins born July 13, 1882

Etta Mae Goins, daughter of James Knox Polk Goins and Rosanna V. Tyler Goins, was born February 21, 1879. She was married July 28, 897 to Johnson S. Richards who was born September 30, 1876. She died December 5, 1905, and he died January 17, 1955.

Children born to them include:

James Arch Richards born July 27, 1898
Lydia Frances Richards born September 16, 1900
Robert L. Richards born November 8, 1902
[infant] born in 1905, died in 1905

James Oliver Goins, son of James Knox Polk Goins and Rosanna V. Tyler Goins, was born July 13, 1882 in Hickman County. He died there September 21, 1972 at age 90.

Thomas J. Goins, son of Isaac Mathis Goins and Mary Lucy “Polly” Adkison Goins, was born in 1855 in Tennessee, probably Hickman County. He was married there December 30, 1873 to Nancy Jane Jenkins, according to “Hickman County, Tennessee Marriages, 1813-1896.” She died before 1925. He was remarried to Nancy Newton December 30, 1873. He was later remarried a third time, wife’s name Lou, according to Michael J. Goins.

Children born to Thomas J. Goins and Nancy Jane Jenkins Goins include:

Low Goins born about 1875
Alice Goins born about 1876
Isaac C. Goins born about 1877
Josh Goins born about 1878

Low Goins, son of Thomas J. Goins and Nancy Jane Jenkins Goins, was born about 1875. He was married about 1898, wife’s name unknown.

Children born to them include:

Clara L. Goins born about 1900
Clark Goins born about 1902
James Goins born about 1905

Alice Goins, daughter of Thomas J. Goins and Nancy Jane Jenkins Goins, was born about 1876 in Hickman County. She was married about 1893, husband’s name believed to be Bradley.

Isaac C. Goins, son of Thomas J. Goins and Nancy Jane Jenkins Goins, was born about 1877 in Hickman County.

Josh Goings, son of Thomas J. Goins and Nancy Jane Jenkins Goins, was born about 1878 in Hickman County.

Mary P. “Mollie” Goins, daughter of Thomas J. Goins and Nancy Jane Jenkins Goins, was born about 1856 in Hickman County. She was married December 23, 1875 to Virgil Andrew Jackson Martin, according to “Hickman County, Tennessee Marriages, 1813-1896.” He was born there in 1852. She died there in 1892, and he died there in 1939.

Children born to them include:

Campbell Martin born about 1874
Amanda L. Martin born February 24, 1882
Henry Martin born November 5, 1885
Lula B. Martin born October 9, 1888

==O==

William L. Going was married December 20, 1868 to Roda Scribner by I. S. Renfro, J.P, according to Maury County marriage records. The county clerk wrote a notation, “Do not publish” on the margin of the license. Children born to William L. Going and Roda Scribner Going are unknown.

==O==

Jane Oakley Goins, who was born July 21, 1849, died November 30, 1935 and was buried at Goshen Methodist Cemetery in Maury County, according to “Maury County, Tennessee Cemeteries.”

==O==

Nelly Gowan, age 80, a farmer born in North Carolina ap­peared in the 1870 census of Maury County.

==O==

Elizabeth Tomlin Gowen, who was born 1909 and died in 1963, was buried at Rose Hill Cemetery at Columbia, Ten­nessee.

==O==

Margaret Gowens was the head of a household which ap­peared in the 1840 census of Maury County as:

“Margaret Gowens white female 30-40

white female 15-20
white male 10-15
white male 10-15
white male 5-10
white female 5-10
white female 5-10
white female 0-5″

==O==

John Gowin, a farmer, age 19, appeared in the 1870 census of Maury County.

==O==

Individuals who lived in Maury County in 1971 included: Mrs. Marvin Gowan, Old Stage Road, Cedar Grove, Ten­nessee; Mrs. Hallie Gowan, Highway 70, Cedar Grove, Fran­cis Gowan, Highway 70 South, Cedar Grove, Cecil Gowan, Terry Road, Cedar Grove.

Descendant Researchers:

Christie Carter, 1256 Briarcliff Rd, Atlanta, GA, 30306, 404/712/9355,

ccarter@generxplus.comhttp://www.generxplus.com
Gayle Coberly, 2704 Whittle Way, Midland, TX, 79707, 915/689-6671,

coberly @apex2000.net
Donald Lyvonn Cribbs, 156 Cranbrook Drive, New Market, AL, 35761-9521, 205/379-

2594, E-mail: xtfn26@prodigy.com
Michael J. Goins, 7695 Beaverland, Detroit, MI, 48239, E-mail: Angels2MK@aol.com

==O==

Thomas Hall, Melungeon/Mulatto/Negro, was a resident of Maury County in 1835 when he gave an affidavit to a Justice of the Peace there concerning his ancestry.

State of Tennessee }
Maury County }

This day personally appeared before me, Jesse L. Crawford, one of the Justices of the peace in and for said county, Thomas Hall and made proof of private testimony that the said Thomas Hall is entitled to all of the privileges of a private citizen. Thomas Hall’s great-grandfather on his father’s sid was a Poutagee and his great-grandfather on his mother’s sid was an Englishman, and Thomas Hall’s grandfather on his father’s sid was of the Poutagee decent, and his grandfather on his mother’s side was an Irishman, and his own father was of the Poutagee desent, and his mother was a white American born woman.

Sworn to and executed before me this the 19th day of September 1835.
James L. Crawford, J.P.
Witnessed by:
Prescott [X] Reprun
Lonny [X] Halls”

Thomas Hall removed to Marion County, Arkansas about 1843, and, perhaps to avoid discrimination due to his “dark complexion,” filed the same affidavit at Yellville, Arkansas. When he removed to Missouri in 1850, he filed the same affidavit at the courthouse in Oregon County, Missouri February 13, 1850 and at the courthouse in Howell County, Missouri May 4, 1890. Thomas Hall died in Howell County December 30, 1888 at South Fork, Missouri.

MC MINN COUNTY, TENNESSEE

William Goin, a Melungeon, was born in East Tennessee about 1830, probably at Athens, Tennessee.

Children born to William Goin include:

Alfred Goin
Charles Goin
George Goin
Sterling Henry Going
Mary Goin
Jasper Goin
Ellen Goin
Sarah Goin

Mrs. Frances Upstead, Jefferson, Oregon, developed a his­tory of this family, according to Roy Lee Goin, a nephew.

Jasper Goin, son of William Goin, was born at Athens about 1863. Later he migrated to Carlton, Oregon and lived there in 1919.

Children born to Jasper Goin include:

Roy Lee Goin born in 1919

Roy Lee Goin, a Melungeon, and son of Jasper Goin, was born at Carlton in 1919. He enlisted in the U. S. Army during World War II. On April 1, 1944 he was married to Dorothy Sue Simpson, according to Taylor County, Texas Marriage Book 20, page 346. In 1945 they lived at Winters, Texas. In 1953 Roy Lee Goin, a warehouseman for Ben E. Keith Company, and Dorothy Sue Simpson Goin, lived on Route 2, Abilene, Texas.

Roy Lee Goin was appointed guardian of his daughter, Leah Susan Goin June 19, 1953 when she inherited $2,000, ac­cording to Taylor County Probate Court File No. 4847.

In 1973 Roy Lee Goin and Dorothy Sue Simpson Goin lived at Clyde, Texas where he was a volunteer fireman. While an­swering a fire call in January 1974, he and three other fire­man attempted to extinguish a fire near a pick-up truck. The truck carried a cargo of nitroglycerin and exploded as the four approached, killing all of them instantly.

Children born to Roy Lee Goin and Dorothy Sue Simpson Goin include:

Leah Susan Goin born February 19, 1945
Gary Goin born about 1947

Leah Susan Goin, daughter of Roy Lee Goin and Dorothy Sue Simpson Goin, was born February 19, 1945 at Winters, Texas, according to Runnells County Birth Book 12, page 287.

About 1967 she was married to Larry Moseley. In 1973 they lived at Grand Prairie, Texas. In May 1974, Leah Susan Goin Moseley, estranged from her husband, lived at Baird, Texas.

Gary Goin, son of Roy Lee Goin any Dorothy Sue Simpson Goin, was born about 1947. In 1974 he lived at Waco, Texas with his wife and family.

==O==

Andrew Goins was enumerated as the head of Household 1516-662 in the 1850 census of McMinn County:

“Goins, Andrew 35, born in Tennessee
Elizabeth 50, born in Tennessee
Thomas 16, born in Tennessee
Jane 12, born in Tennessee”

==O==

Hugh H. Goins was married to Narcissa C. Blackwell September 23. 1865 in McMinn County, according to McMinn County Marriage Book F, page 26. Children born to Hugh H. Goins and Narcissa C. Blackwell Goins are unknown.

==O==

Nancy Ann Goins was married to Matthew Stallion November 17, 1844, according to “McMinn County, Tennessee Marriages, 1820-1850.”

==O==

Stephen Goins died in 1910 in McMinn County according to “Tennessee Deaths,” number 57333.

==O==

William Goins was enumerated as the head of Household 1518-664 in the 1850 census of McMinn County:

“Goins, William 27, born in NC, farmer
Rachel 28, born in Tennessee
Elizabeth 7, born in Tennessee
Stephen 5, born in Tennessee
Hugh 1, born in Tennessee
Vice 11, born in Tennessee”

==O==

Rebecca Gowen appeared in the 1850 census of McMinn County as a 19-year-old living in the household of Daniel K Agnew and his wife, Jane Agnew, Household No. 234-587. Rebecca Gowen was born in 1831 in North Carolina.
MC NAIRY COUNTY, TENNESSEE

Allen Goings died in 1912 in McNairy County according to “Tennessee Deaths,” number 57601.

MONROE COUNTY, TENNESSEE

John Going was married to Nancy Jane Thompson August 2, 1841, according to “Monroe County, Tennessee Marriages, 1838-1850.” Of John Going and Nancy Jane Thompson Going nothing more is known.

==O==

Alexander Goings was married to Sarah Thompson November 15, 1841, according to “Monroe County, Tennessee Marriages, 1838-1850.” Children born to Alexander Goings and Sarah Thompson Goings are unknown.

==O==

Hugh N. Goings was married to Jane Moses March 5, 1871 according to “Tennessee Marriage Records, 1851-1900.” Nothing more is known of Hugh in Goings and Jane Moses Goings.

==O==

Dica “Dicie” Goins was born about 1806, probably in Georgia of parents unkown, according to Shirley Parker, a descendant. She was married there about 1828 to Armiel Worthy. They were enumerated in the 1830 census in Monroe County, Tennessee. The household appeared in the 1840 census of Madison County, Illinois. The family was enumerated in the 1850 census of Calhoun County, Illinois.

Dicie Worthy was recorded in the 1870 census of Jersey County, Illinois living in the home of her son, George Worthy. Apparently Armiel Worthy was deceased. She reappeared in the 1880 census in the home of Absalom Worthy and died about 1885.

Children born to Armiel Worthy and Dica “Dicie” Goins Worthy include:

Absalom Worthy born about 1829
George Worthy born about 1834
Amiel Worthy born about 1838
James Worthy born about 1840

Absalom Worthy, son of Armiel Worthy and Dica “Dicie” Goins Worthy, was born about 1829 in Georgia, according to his 1850 census enumeration. He was enumerated in 1880 in Jersey County, Illinois.

George Worthy, son Armiel Worthy and Dica “Dicie” Goins Worthy, was born about 1834. He was married about 1854, to Elizabeth Sinclair. In 1860 George Worthy was enumerated in Bexar County, Texas with wife Elizabeth and three children: Elizabeth Worthy, Armiel Wesley Worthy and James Frank Worthy.

Amiel Worthy, son of Armiel Worthy and Dica “Dicie” Goins Worthy, was born about 1838. He was married about 1861, wife’s name Sinclair.

James Worthy, son of Armiel Worthy and Dica “Dicie” Goins Worthy, was born about 1840. He was married about 1866, wife’s name Sinclair.

Roda A. Goins was married to James M. Hill December 17, 1868 in Monroe County according to “Tennessee Marriage Records, 1851-1900.”

==O==

Susan Goins was married to Nelson Isabell June 11, 1869 in Monroe County, according to “Monroe County, Tennessee Records” by Reba Bayless Boyer.

==O==

F. E. Goins was married to Calvin Brandon September 4, 1869 in Monroe County, according to “Monroe County, Tennessee Records” by Reba Bayless Boyer.

==O==

John Goins was married to Thena Shoot December 25, 1874 in Monroe County according to “Tennessee Marriage Records, 1851-1900.” Nothing more is known of John Goins and Thena Shoot Goins.

==O==

John Going was married to Nancy Jane Thompson August 2, 1841, according to “Monroe County, Tennessee Records” by Reba Bayless Boyer.

==O==

G. A. Gowan was named executor of the estate of William Cunningham, deceased in Monroe County in September, 1859.

==O==

Robert Gowan was married about 1910 to Murtle Q. Bailey, daughter of James H. Bailey and Sarah Bailey. Murtle Q. Bailey Gowan, a widow, lived on a farm in 1939 19 miles south of Madisonville, Tennessee, where the Graves Family Cemetery is located.

==O==

Dotson Gowing was married to Nancy Moore October 24, 1856, according to Monroe County marriage records. Of Dotson Gowing and Nancy Moore Gowing nothing more is known.
ROANE COUNTY, TENNESSEE

Adaline G. Goins married Tobias Gallimore on October 8, 1863, according to Roan County marriage records. Of Tobias Gallimore and Adaline Goins Gallimore nothing more is known.

==O==

Claiborn Goins married Lydda Underwood on April 22, 1865, according to the Roan County marriage records. Of Claiborn Goins, and Lydda Goins Underwood nothing more is known.

==O==

Edward Goins married Margaret Riddle on September 18, 1897, according to Roan County marriage records.

==O==

Elijah Goins married Margaret D. Alexander on October 24, 1865, according to Roan County marriage records.

==O==

Jincey Goins married Michael Fleming on March 24, 1865, according to Roan County marriage records.

==O==

John Goins married Charlotte Burgis on November 1853, according to Roan County marriage records.

==O==

Newton Goins married Hattie Chestnut on May 24, 1899, according to Roan County marriage records.

==O==

Richard Goins’ obituary was published April 7, 2000 in “The Knoxville News-Sentinel” and reads as such:

“Richard Goins, age 73, of 500 Bazel Rd., Harriman, passed away Wednesday April 5, 2000 at Methodist Medical Center. Retired from Southern Railroad and Harriman Utility Board. Survivors include: wife, Ollie Goins of Morristown, Daughters, Dorothy Eskridge of Rockwood, Lolita Boseman of Morristown, sons, Richard (Tony) Goins of Oliver Springs, James (Jim) Goins of Clinton, devoted friend, Cathy Brooks of Harriman; 26 grandchildren. Funeral 7 p.m. Saturday at Kyker Funeral Home Chapel in Harriman with Rev. Rue Eskride officiating. Interment 10:30 a.m. Sunday at Riggs Chapel Cemetery. The family will receive friends 5-7 p.m. Saturday at Kyker Funeral Home in Harriman.

==O==

William Goins married Mary Staples on March 5, 1874, according to Roan County marriage records.

==O==

William D. Goins married Sarah Fields on November 20, 1894, according to Roan County marriage records.

==O==

George Gowins married Sallie Bazel on March 31, 1887, according to Roan County marriage records.

==O==

Jennie Gowins married Dug Reed on September 23, 1886, according to Roan County marriage records.

==O==

Josie Gowins married Cal Kimbrough on February 20, 1897 according to Roan County marriage records.

==O==

Louisa Gowins married Daniel Bazel on July 24, 1885, according to Roan County marriage records.

==O==

Martha Gowins married Dallas Morrison on November 1895 according to Roan County marriage records.

==O==

Mary Gowins married Thomas Bazel on July 17, 1882 according to Roan County marriage records.

==O==

Paralee Gowins married George Kimbrough on December 2, 1894, according to Roan County marriage records.

==O==

William D. Gowins married Sarah E. Morris on March 20, 1861, according to Roan County marriage records.

116 Sullivan Co, TN

SCOTT COUNTY, TENNESSE

Callie Going married James McMahan on June 04, 1893 in Scott County, according to Tennessee marriage records [1851-1900].
==O==
Martha Going married John J. Barnes on May 4, 1893 in Scott County, according to Tennessee marriage records [1851-1900]

SHELBY COUNTY, TENNESSEE

Virginia Gowing died in 1909 in Shelby County according to “Tennessee Deaths,” Record No. 76271.

SULLIVAN COUNTY, TENNESSEE

The obituary of Angela Jeanne Gentry Goins appeared in the May 2, 2002 edition of the “Johnson City Press:”

Mrs. Angela Jeanne Gentry Goins, 30, 417 Barnette Drive, died Tuesday, April 30, 2002, at her residence. Mrs. Goins was a Sullivan County native and a daughter of Sandra Denton Gentry, Bristol, and the late Kenneth E. Gentry. She was employed by Fairfield Marketing, Johnson City. Mrs. Goins was a member of Cold Spring Presbyterian Church.

Survivors, in addition to her mother, include her husband, Alan L. Goins; one daughter, Stephanie Laken Gentry, of the home; maternal grandparents, Mr. and Mrs. H.M. Denton Sr., Bristol and paternal grandfather, Tom Gentry, Bristol.

Funeral services for Angela J. Goins will be conducted at 6 p.m. Thursday in Weaver Funeral Home chapel with Dr. Errol Rohr and the Rev. Cecil Sturgill officiating. Graveside service will be conducted at 11 a.m. Friday in Shipley Cemetery with Dr. Andrew Spence officiating. Honorary pallbearers will be Marvin Goins, James E. Denton, H.M. Denton Jr., Marty Denton, Kevin Denton, doctors and staff of the ETSU Cancer Center, Dr. Ed Griffin and Johnson City Medical Center Hospice staff. Those desiring may make memorials to breast cancer research fund, c/o American Cancer Society, Johnson City. The family will receive friends following the funeral service in Weaver Funeral Home, Bristol, Tennessee.”
==O==
Nardin Gooin was listed as head of household No. 68 in the 1850 census of Sullivan County, Tennessee. His household was the only Gowen [or spelling variation] in the census. The family was rendered as:

“Gooin, Nardin 24, laborer, born in [unknown]
Joanna 17, born in VA, married within the year”
==O==
Adam Orth received North Carolina Land Grant No. 207 October 10, 1783 to 600 acres in Sullivan County “on the north side of Holston River, known by the name of Gowan’s place on the waters of Big Creek in Carter’s Valley and on William Ingram’s line.”

SUMNER COUNTY, TENNESSEE

Sumner County was organized in 1786 with land taken from Davidson County.
==O==
Joseph Gowen was married March 3, 1822 to Patsey Robinson, according to “Sumner County, Tennessee Marriages, 1787-1850.” Children born to Joseph Gowen and Patsey Robinson Gowen are unknown.

TIPTON COUNTY, TENNESSEE

John Gowan, negro, appeared as the head of a household in the 1880 census of Tipton County, Enumeration District 157, page 29, Civil District 6. The family was recorded as:

“Gowan, John 32, born in Virginia, negro
Nancy 22, born in TN
Sylvia 3/12, born in TN”
==O==
Henry E. Gowen, deceased, was mentioned in the will of Nathaniel Pattes which was written December 7, 1831, according to Tipton County Court Minute Book B, page 157.

UNION COUNTY, TENNESSEE

Elijah Goin was married to Sarah A. Goin March 25, 1872 in Union County according to Tennessee Marriage records (1851-1900).
==O==
Elizabeth Goin was married to Dapney McCarty December 26, 1871 in Union County according to Tennessee Marriage records (1851-1900). Nothing more is known of Dapney McCarty and Elizabeth Goin McCarty.
==O==
Jesse Goin died in 1908 in Union County according to “Tennessee Deaths,” record number 91410.
==O==
Albert Goins was married December 20, 1904 to Lena Rose, according to Union County marriage records. Children born to Albert Goins and Lena Rose Goins are unknown.
==O==
Laura Goins was married to Robert Sauls October 4, 1894 in Union County according to Tenessee Marriage records [1851-1900].
==O==
Martha M. Goins was married to Henry Braden March 17, 1889 in Union County according to Tennessee Marriage records [1851-1900].
==O==
Melvina Jane Gowen was married to Joseph Hughes June 20, 1864 in Union County according to Tennessee Marriage records [1851-1900].

Joseph Hughes and “Melvina J. Goins Hughes” were mentioned as military pensioners in “Abstract Pensions of Claiborne County, Tennessee” The Revolution, War of 1812 and All Wars Prior to 1883,” page 126 and 127, compiled by Annie Walker Burns. The volume suggests that Joseph Hughes was remarried to Susannah Gentry.
==O==
Sarah Goins was married to F. M. Williams March 23, 1887 in Union County according to Tennessee Marriage records [1851-1900]. Nothing more is known of F.M. Williams and Sarah Goins Williams.
==O==
Sarah C. Goins was married to James M. Russell January 28, 1894 in Union County according to Tennessee Marriage records [1851-1900].
==O==
Timothy N. Goins was married in 1867 in Grainger County to Anna Idol, daughter of Chesley Jarnigan Idol and Mary Odell Idol, according to the research of Lynn Rockcastle, a descendant in Illinois. Later they removed to adjoining Hancock County, Tennessee where they lived for a few years.

Timothy N. Goins and Anna Idol Goins were enumerated as the heads of a household in the 1880 census of nearby Union County:

“Goins, Timothy 35, born in TN
Annie 28, born in TN
Chesley P. 11, born in TN
Mary L. 9, born in TN
Ibbie 6, born in TN
Ballard 2, born in TN
Georgia 10/12, born in August in TN”

They removed to adjoining Knox County, Tennessee about 1885. It was there that Anna Idol Goins filed for a divorce from Timothy N. Goins. Lynn Rockcastle wrote, “Apparently Timothy was a wanderer and would leave Annie with the kids to support. He took off to be with another woman.”

Lynn Rockcastle wrote July 29, 2001:

“Pleasant Goin, born c1808 had a son named Timothy Goin, born c1845. Timothy is with Pleasant up to the 1860 Claiborne County, Tennessee census. Sometime after 1860, Timothy, being of age, left home– but where was he? He wasn’t in Tennessee. The name Timothy was not very usual back then, but he still is not showing up anywhere for the 1870 census.

The only Timothy Goin[s] I found for that year was in Patrick County, Virginia. Timothy is listed as mulatto living [married?] with a black woman:

“Goin, Timothy, mulatto
Martha, mulatto
Cornelia, 8, mulatto
Laura, 3, mulatto
Martha 3/12, white”

I did find my Timothy in 1880. He was with the known wife Anna Idol in Union County, Tennessee. Then I lose him again. I believe my Timothy is Pleasant’s son Timothy. On the Claiborne County web site, there is a death date for Timothy of 1864. I can’t find anything to substantiate this death date.”

Anna Idol Goins was enumerated at the head of Household No. 303, in the 1910 census of Knox County, Powell Station, Tennessee, Enumeration District 118, 7th Civil District:

“Goins, Annie 58, widow, born in TN”

Adjoining her in Household No. 302 was her son-in-law and daughter:

“Conner, Pleasant C.
Ibbie 36, born in TN”

On the other side was her son-in-law and daughter in Household 304:

“Anderson, John K.
Georgia 30, born in TN”

Located nearby was another son-in-law and daughter:

“Ammons, John Thomas
Lourinda 39,

Children born to Timothy N. Goins and Anna Idol Goins include:

Chesley P. Goins born about 1869
Mary Lourinda Goins born October 9, 1871
Abbie Arminda Goins born about 1874
William Ballard Goins born May 8, 1876
Georgia Marlene Goins born in August 1879

Chesley P. Goins, son of Timothy N. Goins and Anna Idol Goins, was born in Tennessee about 1869. He appeared in the 1880 census as an 11-year-old.

Mary Lourinda Goins, daughter of Timothy N. Goins and Anna Idol Goins, was born October 9, 1871 in Tennessee. She appeared as a nine-year-old in the 1880 census. She was married in 1892 in Knox County to John Thomas Ammons. They were recorded in the 1910 census of Knox County.

Abbie Arminda “Ibbie” Goins, daughter of Timothy N. Goins and Anna Idol Goins, was born about 1874. She was recorded at age six in the 1880 census. She was married December 7, 1898 to Pleasant C. Conner in Knox County. They were recorded in the 1910 census of Knox County.

William Ballard Goins, son of Timothy N. Goins and Anna Idol Goins, was born May 8, 1876. He was shown as “age 2” in the census of 1880. He was married about 1899 to Minnie Anne Horton. He died June 13, 1934. Children born to William Ballard Goins and Minnie Anne Horton Goins are unknown.

Georgia Marlene Goins, daughter of Timothy N. Goins and Anna Idol Goins, was born in August 1879. She was shown as 10 months old in the 1880 census. She was married in 1898 in Knox County to John Kit Anderson. They were recorded in the 1910 census of Knox County, living at Powell’s Station.

VAN BUREN COUNTY, TENNESSEE

No members of the Gowen family [or spelling variations] ap­peared in the 1850 census of Van Buren County.
==O==
James Gowen appeared as the head of a household in the 1860 census of Van Buren County, Household No. 331-337. The family was listed as:

“Gowen, James 23, born in TN
Sarah 17, born in TN”

WARREN COUNTY, TENNESSEE

Warren County was created with land from White County in 1807. In the following year William Gowen received a land grant of 200 acres there on Warrant No. 1120:

“By virtue of part of Warrant No. 1120 dated the 10th day of July 1784 issued to John Nelson by John Armstrong, Entry officer of claims for the North Carolina Western Lands and entered on the 1st day of July 1808 by No. 511, there is granted by the State of Tennnessee unto William Gowen, assignee of John Nelson a certain tract of land containing Two Hundred Acres lying in Warren County in the Third District and thirty-fourth section–

Beginning at a poplar on the north side of the Barren Fork of Collins River at Polly Black’s ford, Thence north eighy poles to two dogwoods, Thence west forty poles to a black oak on the north bank of the river, Thence north one hundred and twenty poles to a large white oak, then east one hundred and fourteen poles to a stake on the west boundary line of Joseph Colville’s one thousand acres tract, Thense south thirty-one poles to a poplar and a dogwood in the south boundary of said tract, Then east with that line seventy-three poles to a black oak, Thence south one hundred and sixty-nine poles to a white oak, Thence west to the beginning. Surveyed July 26, 1808.

To have and hold the said tract of land with its appurtenances to the said William Gowen and his heirs forever.

John Sevier”
Governor
Knoxville, Tennessee”
==O==
Lucy Goin was married to E.B. Devenport October 22, 1853 in Warren County according to Tennessee Marriage records (1851-1900). Nothing more is known of E.B. Devenport and Lucy Goin Devenport.
==O==
George Goines was married to Sarah Goins April 18, 1877 in Warren County according to Tennessee Marriage records [1851-1900]. He also appeared as “George Goins” in the Warren County records.
==O==
No individuals of interest to Gowen chroniclers appeared in the 1850 census of Warren County.
==O==
William Gowan was recorded June 18, 1880 as the head of a household in the 1880 census of Warren County, Enumeration District 130, page 37, Civil District 1:

“Gowan, William 57, born in TN, father born in VA,
mother born in VA, farmer, illiterate
Susanah 41, born in TN, father born in TN,
mother born in TN, wife, illiterate
S. M. 18, born in TN, father born in TN,
mother born in TN, daughter, illiterate
M. A. 16, born in TN, father born in TN,
mother born in TN, daughter, illiterate
John 13, born in TN, father born in TN,
mother born in TN, son, illiterate
Ellen 11, born in TN, father born in TN,
mother born in TN, daughter, illiterate
James 9, born in TN, father born in TN,
mother born in TN, son
Iellus 4, born in TN, father born in TN
mother born in TN, son
Josephine 7/12, born in Oct. 1879 TN, father
born in TN, mother born in TN, daughter”
==O==
J. W. Gowin, age 9, white male, appeared in the household of G. V. Green and his wife, Margaret Green in the 1880 census of Warren County, Enumeration District 137, page 14. J. W. [or G. W.] Gowin was born in Tennessee of parents who were both born in Tennessee.
==O==
W. D. Gowin appeared June 4, 1880 as the head of a household in the 1880 census of Warren County, Enumeration District 137, page 6, Civil District 14:

“Gowin, W. D. 33, born in TN, father born in TN
mother born in TN, farmer
Emmer 26, born in TN, father born in TN
mother born in TN, wife
Anner 6, born in TN, father born in TN,
mother born in TN, daughter
Herman 3, born in TN, father born in TN
mother born in TN, son”
==O==
William Gowens was enumerated the 1860 census as the head of a household composed of him alone as Household 435-435. He was shown at “age 70, born in North Carolina.”

WASHINGTON COUNTY, TENNESSEE

In 1781 the British were overrunning the Carolinas. Washington County volunteers had long been involved in protecting the south, and now they participated in the Battle of Kings Mountain, what has since been looked upon as a major turning point in the Revolutionary War. Among the volunteers in the campaign were six men who had been purchasers at the first sale of lots in Jonesborough: Nathaniel Evans, Charles, Holloway, David Hughes, Robert Sevier, Christopher Taylor, and Jesse Walton. Robert Sevier, brother of Col. John Sevier, was mortally wounded in the battle and never had a chance to claim his property in the town of Jonesborough.

According to the 1834 “Tennessee Gazetteer,” in 1833 Jonesborough “contained a population of about 500 inhabitants; eleven lawyers, four physicians, two clergymen, two churches, two academies, four schools, one printing office, four carpenters, three cabinet makers, two bricklayers, one blacksmith, four taverns, two hatters, four tailors, four shoemakers, one silversmith, two wagonmakers and one mill.”

The town experienced a boom during the early 1840s when many of the existing Federal style brick structures were built.

The first local post office was established in 1796 with John Waddell as postmaster. Around 1800 a post route was started and mail was carried by horseback twice a week. Increasing demands of passenger travel and mail delivery resulted in more stage lines which increased from once a week in 1825 to three times a week in 1834.

Jonesborough is the oldest town in Tennessee, established in 1779 by the General Assembly of North Carolina as county seat of Washington County, first county west of the mountains. In 1784 the State of Franklin was organized here, with Jonesborough as its first capital.

In 1775 the settlers on both the Watauga and Nolichucky Rivers purchased great acreages of land from the Cherokee Indians, comprising almost all the six upper counties of the present Tennessee [then within North Carolina]. Desiring their own government, these settlers petitioned the Provincial Council of North Carolina to be annexed as an official entity. In 1777 the “County of Washington” was formed.

The first meeting to decide the location of the new courthouse was at the home of Charles Robertson, and it was decided that John Carter, Andrew Greer, William Cobb, Jacob Womack, George Russell, John Sevier and James Stuart would lay out the plans and location of the new courthouse.

One hundred acres was purchased from David Hughes and laid out into lots for the Town of Jonesborough, named after Willie Jones of Halifax, North Carolina. The lots were offered in lottery.
==O==
“Rebekah Gain, widow,” had a real estate transaction August 5 1734, with James Boreing, according to Washington County Deed Book 3BA, page 52.
==O==
John Gain/Goin was married to Dorcas Boreing about 1784 in Maryland. They removed to Washington County, Tennessee

Children born to John Gain/Goin and Dorcas Boreing Goin include:

Thomas Goin born about 1786
Joshua Gain/Goin born about 1787

Thomas Goin, son of John Gain/Goin and Dorcas Boreing Goin, was born about 1786 in Maryland. He accompanied his parents to Washington County, Tennessee. He was killed in the War of 1812.

Joshua Gain/Goin, son of John Gain/Goin and Dorcas Boreing Goin, was born about 1787 in Maryland. He accompanied his parents to Washington County, Tennessee. After marriage, wife’s name unknown, he removed to Monroe County, Tennessee and Taladega County, Alabama. He was enumerated there in the 1850 census.
==O==
Orville R. Goan, Company B, Ninth Tennessee Cavalry Regiment, was buried in Mountain Home National Cemetery, Jonesboro, Tennessee, according to “Washington County Tombstone Inscriptions” by Charles M. Bennett.
==O==
“Henery Goens, one pole” was entered in “A inverty of the taxable property of Capt. John Hendricks District tacken by me Joshue Killey for the yeare 1788.” This document was included in the 1788 tax list of Washington County, [North Carolina.]
==O==
G. Goin was married to Miss S. Kincheloe March 12, 1840, according to “Washington County, Tennessee Marriage Records.” Of G. Goin and Mrs. S. Kincheloe Goin nothing more is known.
==O==
Mary Goin was married to George W. Gibson August 2, 1833, according to “Washington County, Tennessee Marriages, 1780-1840.”
==O==
Thomas Goin, a North Carolina Revolutionary soldier, received a land grant of 225 acres in Washington County, in 1786, “on the waters of the Nolachucky passing a bank of rocks” according to “North Carolina Land Grants in Tennessee, 1778-1791”, page 18, by Lillian Johnson Gardiner and Betty Goff Cartwright. He was a petitioner there in 1786.

On August 18, 1786 an election was held “at the house of Mr. John Rennos where Charles Robeson formerly lived” to elect a “Senator and a Commoner.” “Thomas Goings” was recorded as voting in the election.

Washington County at one time included the whole state of Tennessee. At that time it still included most of the state.

Pvt Thomas Goins assigned his land warrant, No. 756, to Lardner Clark, an attorney who later practiced in Nashville. The grant was located on Cherokee Creek.

“Thomas Going” was recorded as “one white poll” in the “List of Taxable Property in the District of Capt. Joseph Young’s Miltitia” taken by H. Nelson, J.P. “Thomas Going” reappeared in 1779 as “one white poll” in Capt. John Reno’s District.
==O==
Miss Arabella Goins was married to Jesse Duncan November 7, 1839, according to “Washington County, Tennessee Marriage Records.”
==O==
Alice Goins “shot and killed Elbert Brown in Bell’s Store October 10, 1905” at Potlicker Flats, Tennessee.
==O==
Elizabeth Goins was married to William Delaney [Dulaney] August 27, 1812, according to “Washington County, Tennessee Marriage Records” by Norma Rutledge Grammer and Marion Day Mullins. Elizabeth Goins was born in Maryland in 1796, according to Brenda Gaines Gulick, a descendant.

The entry was carried in Washington County Marriage Book O, page 141, according to “Washington County, Tennessee Marriages & Wills,” Volume I, by Ethel Wheeler Smith. Joseph Young, J.P. performed the ceremony, according to Washington County Marriage Book O, page 6..

William Dulaney was born about 1789. He paid a poll tax in 1819, but had no land. His father later gave him a tract. He died in 1825.

“Elizabeth Dulaney, widow” was recorded in the 1850 census of Washington County as the head of a household of three people, including her son William Dulaney and Theodosia Dulaney, unidentified.

Elizabeth Goins Dulaney, age 76 was enumerated with her son Milton Dulaney in 1870.

Children born to William Dulaney and Elizabeth Goins Dulaney include:

Milton Dulaney born about 1814
Louvina Dulaney born about 1817
Eliza Dulaney born about 1821
Josiah Dulaney born about 1823
William Dulaney born about 1825

Milton Dulaney, son of William Dulaney and Elizabeth Goins Dulaney, was born about 1814 in Washington County. He was married there December 4, 1837 to Orpha Fine who was born in 1819. Eight children were born to them.

Louvina Dulaney, daughter of William Dulaney and Elizabeth Goins Dulaney, was born about 1817 in Washington County. She was married about 1833 to David Fine, regarded as a brother to Orpha Fine. They appeared in the 1850 census of Washington County with six children.

Eliza Dulaney, daughter of William Dulaney and Elizabeth Goins Dulaney, was born in Washington County in 1821

Josiah Dulaney, son of William Dulaney and Elizabeth Goins Dulaney, was born in Washington County about 1823 He was married there to Ellenor “Ellen” Maloney. They were enumerated in the 1860 census of Blount County, but returned to Washington County by 1880. Six children were born to them.

William Dulaney, son of William Dulaney and Elizabeth Goins Dulaney, was born in Washington County about 1825. He was enumerated with his mother in the 1850 census of Washington County at age 25.
==O==
Ephriam Goins was married to Elizabeth Parker September 11, 1823, according to “Washington County, Tennessee Mar­riage Records.”

They appeared in the 1830 census of Washington County, page 226, as the head of a household. The family was listed as:

“Goins, Ephriam white male 30-40
white female 20-30
white male 5-10
white female 0-5
white male 0-5”

The household of Ephriam Goins and Elizabeth Parker Goins did not reappear in the 1840 or 1850 census of Tennessee.
==O==
N. Goins was married December 14, 1839 to Miss M. C. Price, according to “Washington County, Tennessee Marriage Records, 1787-1840.” Children born to N. Goins and Mrs. M. C. Price Goins are unknown.
==O==
Charles Guinn, a three-year-old mulatto, was apprenticed by his parents Champion Guinn and Dorcas Guinn to Richard Callaway and Rebekah Hutson May 16, 1791 in Washington County, according to “Burke County, North Carolina Apprentice Bonds and Records, 1784-1873” as published in the May 1997 issue of “North Carolina Genealogical Society Journal.” The contract read:

“This Indenture made the Sixteenth Day of may in the year of our Lord, one thousand Seven hundred and Ninty one Between Champaon Guinn of the Western Teritory and County of Washington farmer of the one Part, and Richard Callaway and Rebekah Hutson of the other Part Witnesseth the Said Champaon Guinn and Darcas his Wife Do Put their Son Charles Guinn melato Boy, an apprintice to Serve the Said Richard Callaway and Rebeka Hutson untill he Shall be of the age of Twenty one years the Said Charles was Born ye 15th Day of Febuary 1788 therefor he, his master and mistres Shall faithfully Serve for the Term of Eighteen years Which Will End ye 15th Day of Febuary 1809 During Which Time, the Said Charles his master and mistres Shall obay their Councels Observe and keep as a faithfull aPrintice aught to Do ‑ he Shall not Embazell his master Good nor Contract marrag Without their Consent and the Said Richard Callaway Shall find the Sd Boy Charles meet Drink Cloathing Washing and Lodging and Every other thing Needfull for an apprintice, and the Richard Callaway Shall Give the Said apprintice one year Scooling; and Larne him the art of Aggriculter and When the Said Boy Come to the age of 21 years the Said Richard Callaway Shall Give him a Good Sute of Cloath (to Wit) a Coat Jacot and Britches Two Shirt a Par of Shoes and Stockins and a hat, a horse Bridle and Sadle In Witness Whereof the Parties to these Present have hereunto Set their their [sic] hand and fixed their Seals the Dat and Day first above Writen ‑‑”
Signers: Champaon [~] Guinn, Dorcas [x] Guinn, Richard [x] Calaway, Rebekah [x] Hutson
Witnesses: William [+] Baird, Ezekiel Baird [Jurat]

WAYNE COUNTY, TENNESSEE

Malissa Goin died in 1911 in Wayne County according to “Tennessee Deaths,” number 93525.

WEAKLEY COUNTY, TENNESSEE

John H. Goen was enumerated as the head of a household in the 1900 census of Weakley County, Enumeration District 133, page 7, 21st Civil District:

“Gown, John H. 69, born in July 1832 in TN
Hettie A. 38, born in November 1861 in TN,
wife
Ethel 5, born in August 1894 in TN,
Daughter

“Mrs. Goen has just had a nice cottage completed south of Hall Moody Institute,” according to the March 20, 1903 edition of the “Dresden Enterprise.”

“Mrs. Goen and Miss Cox were joined in their millinery business by Mrs. Moss,” according to the March 13, 1904 edition of the “Dresden Enterprise.”
==O==
D. D. Goins was enumerated as the head of Household 73-846 in the 1850 census of Weakley County:

“Goins, D. D. 25, born in Tennessee
Louisa 24, born in South Carolina
William 5,
Caroline 3,
Martha 1”
==O==
Martha Gowan was married to G. Cambrul [Campbell?] Februry 19, 1852, according to “Weakley County, Tennessee Marriages, 1843-1863.”
==O==
Amanda Gowen was born about 1855 in Tennessee of parents unknown. She was enumerated in the 1870 census of Weakley County, Civil District 2, June 17, 1870 living in the home of J. M. Taylor, Household No. 51:

“Taylor, J. M. 37, white, farmer, no real estate, 4500 personal property, born in TN
Sophronia 35, white, keeps house, born TN
James R. 14, white, born in TN
Judah 11, white, female, born in TN
Columbus F. 7, white, female, born in TN
John L. 4, white male, born in TN
Adelade 2, white, female, born in TN
Gowen, Amanda 15, white, female, born in TN.”

WHITE COUNTY, TENNESSEE

Thornton Goen appeared as the head of a household in the 1820 census of White County, page 344:

“Goen, Thorton free colored male over 45
free colored female over 45
free colored female 26-45”

He did not reappear in the 1830, or 1850 census returns of Tennessee.
==O==
B. Gowan enlisted in Company H, Ninth Tennessee Infantry Regiment which was organized in May 1861 in White County. The company was commanded by Capt. J. W. Buford. B. Gowan was reported as injured during his service.
==O==
John Gowen appeared as the head of a household, No. 1134-1137, in the 1860 census of White County:

“Gowen, John 64, born in South Carolina
Mary 60, born in South Carolina
Eliza 35, born in South Carolina
J. W. 22, born in TN
Susan W. 20, born in TN”
==O==
Marvin Gowen, white male age 20, born in Tennessee, was listed in the 1920 census of White County as the head of a household. Elma Lee Gowen, white female age 18, born in Tennessee, was listed as his wife.

WILLIAMSON COUNTY, TENNESSEE

William H. Gowen, an early resident of Williamson County, had a large family, and one of his sons was the father of 12. One of his grandsons had 13 sons in addition to a number of daughters. Because of Melungeon characteristics found among his descendants, he is suggested as a kinsman of William Gowen and Sarah Gowen who settled at Ft. Nashborough in 1779.

When a son, William Franklin Gowen, was enumerated in the 1880 census of Shelby County, he stated that both William H. Gowen and his wife were born in North Carolina. A son is reported to have been born in Lincoln County, Tennessee in 1813, so perhaps additional research will place William H. Gowen there before the 1820 census.

William H. Gowen was enumerated as the head of a household in the 1820 census of Williamson County:

His household was enumerated there as:

“Gowen, William H. white male 26-45
white female 26-45
white male 0-10
white female 0-10
white male 0-10
white female 0-10”

Two slaves were recorded in the household.

In September of 1820 William H. Gowen removed to Lincoln County, Tennessee. It is possible that he was enumerated a second time in the 1820 census. A household was enumerated there as:

“Givens, William white male 26-45
white female 26-45”

Again two slaves were recorded in the household. It is possible that this was the household of William H. Gowen whose children had not yet made the move from Williamson County.

On August 13, 1821 William H. Gowen purchased from Daniel F. Moore 10 acres on Bradshaw Creek for $50, according to Lincoln County Deed Book J-1, page 464.

On August 14, 1823 he sold the 100 acres on Richland Creek to Richard Fleming of Giles County, Tennessee, receiving $1,500, according to Lincoln County Deed Book G-1, page 643. On January 16, 1824 he purchased a small tract on Brad­shaw Creek from Wilson Davis for $25, according to Lincoln County Deed Book K1, page 338.

The household of William H. Gowen was recorded in the 1830 census of Lincoln County, page 240 as:

“Gowen, William H. white male 40-50
white female 40-50
white male 15-20
white male 10-15
white female 10-15
white female 10-15
white male 5-10
white male 5-10
white female 0-5”

On February 19, 1834 William H. Gowen sold two small tracts comprising 10 acres to Daniel Bachman, according to Lincoln County Deed Book J1, page 424. On December 1, 1835 he sold 128 acres on the headwaters of Bradshaw Creek to Daniel Bachman also, as recorded in Lincoln County Deed Book J1, page 555. This sale of a rather large plot of land may have signaled his removal to another location, perhaps Fayette County to the west, on the Mississippi border. However, “William H. Gowan” appeared in Henderson County, Tennessee in the 1840 census of that county, page 156:

“Gowan, William H. white male 50-60
white female 50-60
white female 20-30
white male 15-20
white male