State – West Virginia

1805A Hardy Co Va
Goings, widow 1 horse [frame 437]
Henry Goings 1 tithe 1 horse
http://www.freeafricanamericans.com/Hardy.htm

1807 Hardy Co Va
Henry Going and mother 1 tithe 2 horses [frame 8]
http://www.freeafricanamericans.com/Hardy.htm

1810A Hardy Co Va
Henry Goings 1 tithe 1 horse [frame 66]
Michael Goings 1 tithe 1 horse
http://www.freeafricanamericans.com/Hardy.htm

1811 B East District by Jonathan Branson, Hardy County
Goings, Henry 1 tithe 2 horses [frame 114]
Goings, widow 2 horses
http://www.freeafricanamericans.com/virginiatax.htm

1812 A East District by Jonathan Branson, Hardy County
Goings, Henry 1 tithe 3 horses [frame 139]
Goings, Michael 1 tithe 1 horse
Goings, Mary 1 tithe 1 horse
http://www.freeafricanamericans.com/virginiatax.htm

1813 B by Jonathan Branson, Hardy County
Goings, Henry 2 tithes, 2 horses [frame 195]
Goings, Michael 1 tithe 1 horse
http://www.freeafricanamericans.com/virginiatax.htm

1814 A East District by Jonathan Branson, Hardy County
Goings, Henry 3 tithes 2 horses [frame 223]
http://www.freeafricanamericans.com/virginiatax.htm

1815 by John Craigen (free male negroes above 16 years old = column 15), Hardy County
Goings, Henry 2 white tithes [frame 287]
http://www.freeafricanamericans.com/virginiatax.htm

1816 East District by Craigens
Goings, Shaderick 1 tithe 1 horse [frame 310]
Goings, Henry 1 tithe
Goings, Michael 1 tithe
http://www.freeafricanamericans.com/virginiatax.htm

1817 A West District by Jones Green, Hardy County
Goings, Michel 1 tithe, 1 horse [frame 348]
http://www.freeafricanamericans.com/virginiatax.htm

1817 B East District by Geo. S. Graigen, Hardy County
Goings, Shadrack 2 tithes 1 horse [frame 373]
Goings, Henry 2 tithes
Goings, Jonas 1 tithe
http://www.freeafricanamericans.com/virginiatax.htm

1818 A East District by George Craigen
Goings, Jonas 1 tithe [frame 395]
Goings, Henry 1 tithe
Goings, Michal 1 tithe
http://www.freeafricanamericans.com/virginiatax.htm

1818 B West District by Jones Green, Hardy County
Goings, Shadreck 2 tithes 1 horse
http://www.freeafricanamericans.com/virginiatax.htm

1819 A West District by Jones Green, Hardy County
Goings, Fredrick 1 tithe 1 horse
http://www.freeafricanamericans.com/virginiatax.htm

1819 B East District by Christian Simon, Hardy County
Goings, Henry 1 tithe [frame 444]
Goings, Michael 1 tithe
http://www.freeafricanamericans.com/virginiatax.htm

 

From Gowen Manuscript:  http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~gowenrf/Gowenms142.htm

 

HARDY COUNTY, VIRGINIA
[Later West Virginia]

Hardy County was organized in 1785 from Hampshire County. In 1861 it became Hardy County, West Virgi‑nia when Vir­ginia went with the Confederacy and the western portion of the state elected to stay with the Union.

Jonas Goings was about 1789 of parents of unknown. He is reported to have 12 brothers, all named for biblical characters, according to Annette Miner, a descendant of McAllen, Texas. She regards Jonas Goings as a brother to Shadrack Going who was born in Virginia about 1796 and who operated a ferry across the south branch of the Potomac River during the Civil War.

Jonas Goings was married about 1811 to Temperance Scott Howie who was born about 1793 in Scotland or Northern Ireland to James Howie and Temperance Scott Howie. The family, including brothers, James Howie and Mike Howie, emigrated to Philadelphia. Annette Miner has a report that Temperance Scott Howie [Jr.] had been married previously, husband’s name also Goings.

Jonas Goings died in 1863 in Illinois, and Temperance Scott Howie Goings died about 1875.

Children born to Jonas Goings and Temperance Scott Howie Goings include:

John Wesley Goings born about 1813
Mary Goings born about 1815
Sarah Mandy Goings born about 1820
Charles Goings born about 1823
Catherine Anne Goings born about 1825
Elizabeth Almira Goings born November 4, 1828
William Goings [twin] born about 1830
Caroline Goings [twin] born about 1830
James Goings born about 1832
Granville Goings born about 1835

John Wesley Goings, son of Jonas Goings and Temperance Scott Howie Goings, was born about 1813, according to Annette Miner, a descendant. She is also a descendant, through the marriage of cousins, of Elizabeth Almira Goings, sister to John Wesley Goings. John Wesley Goings was married about 1836 to Margaret Cox, an only child of her parents. Children born to John Wesley Goings and Margaret Cox Goings are unknown.

Mary Goings, daughter of Jonas Goings and Temperance Scott Howie Goings, was born about 1815. She died about 1825.

Sarah Mandy Goings, of Jonas Goings and Temperance Scott Howie Goings, was born about 1820.

Charles Goings, son of Jonas Goings and Temperance Scott Howie Goings, was born about 1823.

Catherine Anne, daughter of Jonas Goings and Temperance Scott Howie Goings, was born about 1825.

Elizabeth Almira Goings, daughter of Jonas Goings and Temperance Scott Howie Goings, was born November 4, 1828 “on the south branch of the Potomac River” in Hardy County, according to Annette Miner, a descendant. She was married February 28, 1845 to James Riley Knapp [1821-1892]. Elizabeth Almira Goings Knapp died October 31, 1921 in Winchester, Illinois and was buried there in Young Cemetery. She provided most of the information on Jonas Goings and descendants in a note written in 1897. Children born to James Riley Knapp and Elizabeth Almire Goings Knapp are unknown.

William Goings, twin son of Jonas Goings and Temperance Scott Howie Goings, was born about 1830. He died about 1ge 19 “on the Plains on the way to the California gold rush,” according to Annette Miner.

Caroline Goings, twin daughter of Jonas Goings and Temperance Scott Howie Goings, was born about 1830. She died in 1884.

James Goings, son of Jonas Goings and Temperance Scott Howie Goings, was born about 1832.

Granville Goings, son of Jonas Goings and Temperance Scott Howie Goings, was born about 1835. He served in the Civil War, probably in Union service. Annette Miner retains a daguerrotype of him in his uniform.
==O==

HARRISON COUNTY, VIRGINIA

John Goowin was listed as the head of a household of three people in the 1785 census of Harrison County which was cre­ated in 1784. In 1861 it became part of West Virginia.

From Gowen Manuscript:  http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~gowenrf/Gowenms145.htm

HARRISON COUNTY, VIRGINIA

John Goowin was listed as the head of a household of three people in the 1785 census of Harrison County which was cre­ated in 1784. In 1861 it became part of West Virginia.

From Gowen Manuscript:  http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~gowenrf/Gowenms146.htm

JEFFERSON COUNTY, VIRGINIA [Later West Virginia]

Joseph Goens, “free colored”, appeared as the head of a house­hold in the 1820 census of Jefferson County, page 91A. He was listed as a farmer. The household consisted of:

“Goens, Joseph free colored male over 45″
free colored male 14‑26
free colored female 14‑26
free colored male 0‑14
free colored female 0‑14
free colored male 0‑14”

He reappeared in the 1830 census of Jefferson County, page 121, as the head of a household composed of:

“Goings, Joseph free colored male 55‑100
free colored female 10‑24
free colored female 0‑10”
==O==
Some Goings children were enumerated in the 1850 census of Jefferson County, Virginia, Civil District 28, Household 806-818:

“Goings, Mary 10, born in VA
Charles 6, born in VA
Joseph 4, born in VA
Nancy 3, born in VA
Sally 1, born in VA”
==O==
Some black Goings were enumerated July 12, 1850 in the cen-sus of Jefferson County, 28th Civil District, Household 857-869:

“Goings, Thomas 50, black, born in VA
Lucretia 50 black, born in VA
William 18, black, laborer, born in VA
George 15, black, laborer, born in VA
Mary 13, black, born in VA
John 11, black, born in VA
Arthur 9, black, born in VA
Betsey 7, black, born in VA
Ann M. 5, black, born in VA
Charles 3, black, born in VA”
==O==
Lawson Goens was born in 1807. He was married about 1830 to Sarah “Sallie” Hart who was born April 1, 1810. They raised their family in Jefferson County in the Kabletown area, according to the research of Shelley Murphy.

They were enumerated there as mulattos, living adjacent to the household of Ann Scott, No. 805, in the 1850 census of 28th Civil District on July 8, 1850. His household was shown as No. 806:

“Scott Ann 40, Female, White, born in PA
Goings Mary 13, Female, Black, born in VA

“Goings Lawson 48 Male, Mulatto, Boatman, born in VA
Sally 40 Female, Mullato, born in VA
John 16 Male, Mulatto, born in VA
William 14 Male, Mulatto, born in VA
Stephen 13 Male, Mulatto, born in VA
Fanny 11 Female, Mulatto, born in VA”

He died in Jefferson County, and Sarah Hart Goens moved in with their youngest daughter, Nancy Elizabeth Goens Johnson.

“The Farmers Advocate,” reported Lawson Goens’ obituary in a July 1874 edition. His obituary stated that he worked for the Shannondale Ferry.

Shelley Murphy, a descendant, provided much of the information on the family of Lawson Goens and Sarah Hart Goens which came from the bible of “Sarah Hart Goen” [with no “s.” ]

Children born to Lawson Goens and Sarah Hart Goens include:

Martha Elizabeth Goens born June 16, 1831
John Francis Goens born August 4, 1832
William Alexander Goens born March 4, 1834
Stephen Goens born February 28, 1836
Frances Virginia Goens born December 28, 1837
Mary Catherine Goens born April 18, 1840
Charles Henry Goens born March 16, 1844
Josiah [Joseph] Goens born August 17, 1846
Nancy Elizabeth Goens born March 24, 1848
Sarah Ann Goens born August 9, 1849
Richard Peyton Goens born April 28, 1852

Martha Elizabeth Goens, daughter of Lawson Goens and Sarah Hart Goens, was born June 16, 1831 in Jefferson County. She died in 1834.

John Francis Goens, son of Lawson Goens and Sarah Hart Goens, was born August 4, 1832 in Jefferson County. He and his wife lived on Mt. Gillian in a log cabin. He built caskets.

William Alexander Goens, son of Lawson Goens and Sarah Hart Goens, was born March 4, 1834 in Jefferson County. He was married about 1857 to Martha Johnson, daughter of Kitty Johnson. Children born to William Alexander Goens and Martha Johnson Goens are unknown.

Stephen Goens, son of Lawson Goens and Sarah Hart Goens, was born February 28, 1838 in Jefferson County. He lived with his brother John Francis Goens on Mt. Gillian. Later he removed to Pittsburgh, Pennsylvnia. He died April 4, 1890.

Frances Virginia Goens, daughter of Lawson Goens and Sarah Hart Goens, was born December 28, 1837 in Jefferson County. She was married June 14, 1860 to James Douglas Roper.

Children born to them include:

Mary Virginia Roper born November 7, 1860
George William Roper born May 13, 1864
Martha E. Roper born November 10, 1875
Nancy Clara Roper born about 1880

Mary Catherine Goens, daughter of Lawson Goens and Sarah Hart Goens, was born April 18, 1840 in Jefferson County. She was married about 1857 to George Marsh, a slave. After the Civil War, they removed to Michigan.

Charles Henry Goens, son of Lawson Goens and Sarah Hart Goens, was born March 16, 1844 in Jefferson County. He was married about 1867 to Louisa Victoria Roper. They lived on Mt. Gillian for 27 years.

Children born to Charles Henry Goens and Louisa Victoria Roper Goens include:

James Douglas Goens born about 1869
Rosie Goens born about 1870
Fanny Goens born about 1874
Mabel Goens born about 1877
Florence Goens born about 1879
Alice Sophy Goens born about 1882
Eliza Goens born about 1884
Annie E. Goens born about 1886
Charles Goens born about 1888
Neva Elrita Goens born about 1891

Josiah [Joseph] Goens, son of Lawson Goens and Sarah Hart Goens, was born August 17, 1846 in Jefferson County. He was married about 1869 to Lucy Sims, daughter of Eliza Sims.

Children born to Josiah [Joseph] Goens and Lucy Sims Goens include:

Arwilda M. Goens born about 1871
Lawson Goens born about 1873
Charles Austin Goens born about 1875
Lucy Goens born about 1878

Nancy Elizabeth Goens, daughter of Lawson Goens and Sarah Hart Goens, was born March 24, 1848 in Jefferson County. She was married about 1868 to Emanuel Johnson.

Children born to them include:

Eugene Johnson born about 1868
Margaret Johnson born about 1870
Mary Johnson born about 1872
Henry Johnson born about 1875
John Johnson born about 1878

Sarah Ann Goens, daughter of Lawson Goens and Sarah Hart Goens, was born August 9, 1849. She was married to William Henry Roper July 17, 1873. It is suggested that they removed to Frederick County, Maryland.

Children born to them include:

Lethea Roper born about 1875
Huston Roper born about 1877
Leonard Roper born about 1879
Glady Roper born about 1882

Richard Peyton Goens, of Lawson Goens and Sarah Hart Goens, was born April 28, 1852 in Jefferson County.
==O==
Harriet Goings was married to Joseph Hill January 30, 1886, according to “Jefferson County, Virginia Marriages, 1801-1850.”
==O==
Jason Goens, “free colored” was born about 1760 in Virginia, according to his 1850 census enumeration. “Jason Going” paid a tax on “1 poll” in Loudoun County, according to “Virginia Taxpayers, 1782-1787.”

“Jason Gowings” was listed as the head of a household in the 1810 census of Jefferson County, Virginia [later West Virginia], according to “Index to 1810 census of Virginia” by Madeline W. Crickard.

He appeared in the tax records of nearby Monongalia County from 1816 to 1828. A daughter, Sophia Goens was married there in 1816. Other taxpayers during this time included Joel W. Goens, John Wesley Goens and George W. Goens, ac­cording to Bernard Mayhle, a descendant of Spokane, Wash­ington in an E-mail message dated July 21, 1997. He appeared in the 1820 census of Monongalia County, page 87, as the head of a household.

About 1827 “Jason Goings and his son, Joel W. Goings” re­moved to Ohio, locating in Guernsey County. Before 1850, the family removed to Shelby County, Ohio and lived in the Rumley Settlement there, according to the research of Douglas S. Harger.

Jason Goens appeared in the 1850 census of Guernsey County at age 90, living the household of his son-in-law and daughter, Benjamin Simpson and Mary Goens Simpson. Benjamin Simpson was her second husband.

Children born to Jason Goens are regarded as:

Joel W. Goens born about 1785
George W. Goens born about 1787
John Wesley Goens born about 1789
Sophia Goens born about 1798
Sarah Goens born about 180
Mary Goens born about 1804
Luke Goens born about 1818

Joel W. Goings, son of Jason Goings, was born about 1794, probably in Loudoun County. He was married about 1818, wife’s name unknown.

“Joel Goens, “free colored” appeared in the 1820 census of Monongalia County as the head of a household. He accompanied his father in a move to Guernsey County, Ohio about 1827.

Joel W. Goings was married there November 15, 1831 to Elizabeth Cole. She was perhaps his second wife. They removed to Shelby County, Ohio about 1850. Ten children, names unknown, were born to Joel W. Goings and Elizabeth Cole Goings in Guernsey County. An eleventh child was born in Shelby County. Joel W. Goings and two of his sons are crediting with establishing the town of Rumly, Ohio, according to Mary Downing, a descendant.

Children born to Joel W. Goings and his first wife include:

Joel Goings born about 1818

Children born to Joel W. Goens and Elizabeth Cole Goens, ac­cording to Denise McLennan, a descendant of Linwood, Michi­gan, include:
Edna Jane Goings born about 1832
Doctor Craig Goings born May 19, 1839
Luke Goings born about 1844

Edna Jane Goings, daughter of James Goings, was born about 1832. She was married about 1859 in Shelby County, Ohio to William Hill.

Joel Goings, son of Joel W. Goings and his first wife, was born about 1818. “Joel Gowin” was married about 1842 to Anna Gramm, according to the research of Donna Schoolfield.

Children born to Joel Gowin and Anna Gramm Gowin include:

Nora Alcinda Gowin born March 24, 1882
Dora Lucinda Gowin born March 24, 1882

Nora Alcinda Gowin, twin daughter of Joel Gowin and Anna Gramm Gowin, was born March 24, 1882, probably in Mason County, West Virginia. She was married about 1900 to Samuel Henry Garvin who was born November 6, 1869 to Joel Garvin and Elizabeth Garvin. They lived in Pliny, West Virginia in Putnam County.

Children born to them include:

Ethel Pearl Garvin born March 24, 1902
Ada Mae Garvin born August 31, 1904
Rose Marie Garvin born November 17, 1906
William David Garvin born May 23, 1909
Sylvia Louise Garvin born August 4, 1911

Ethel Pearl Garvin, daughter of Samuel Henry Garvin and Nora Alcinda Gowin Garvin, was born March 24, 1902, according to Donnie Johnson. She was married to Arthur C. Johnson about 1918. Ethel Pearl Garvin died October 2, 1981.

Ada Mae Garvin, daughter of Samuel Henry Garvin and Nora Alcinda Gowin Garvin, was born August 31, 1904. She was married to Jesse Chapman about 1920. She died April 6, 1991.

Rose Marie Garvin, daughter of Samuel Henry Garvin and Nora Alcinda Gowin Garvin, was born November 17, 1906. She was married to Bernard Collins about 1922. She died April 12, 1990.

William David Garvin, son of Samuel Henry Garvin and Nora Alcinda Gowin Garvin, was born May 23, 1909. He died January 20, 1979.

Sylvia Louise Garvin, daughter of Samuel Henry Garvin and Nora Alcinda Gowin Garvin, was born August 4, 1911.

Dora Lucinda Gowin, twin daughter of Joel Gowin and Anna Gramm Gowin, was born March 24, 1882 at Point Pleasant, West Virginia in Mason County on the Ohio River. She was married about 1899 to Jubal McPherson Harless, according to Donna Schoolfield who owns a photograph of them.

Doctor Craig Goings, son of Joel W. Goens and Elizabeth Cole Goins, was born May 19, 1839. He was married about 1866 to Rebecca Fox, according to Denise McLennan. They lived in Paulding, Ohio, according to Laura Zebi-Land, a descendant.

Children born to Doctor Craig Goings and Rebecca Fox Goings include:

Joseph Goings born about 1868
Wesley Goings born about 1870
Craig Bock Goings born about 1871
Charles Goings born about 1874
Luella Jane Goings born about 1876
Levenia Goings born about 1879
Julia Goings born about 1882
Isabella Goings born about 1886

Joseph Goings, son of Doctor Craig Goings and Rebecca Fox Goings, was born about 1868.

Wesley Goings, son of Doctor Craig Goings and Rebecca Fox Goings, was born about 1870.

Craig Bock Goings, son of Doctor Craig Goings and Rebecca Fox Goings, was born about 1871.

Charles Goings, son of Doctor Craig Goings and Rebecca Fox Goings, was born about 1874.

Luella Jane Goings, daughter of Doctor Craig Goings and Re­becca Fox Goings, was born about 1876. She was married about 1893 to Charles Williams, according to Leslie N. Tucker, a descendant and Foundation member of Lima, Ohio. .

Levenia Goings, daughter of Doctor Craig Goings and Rebecca Fox Goings, was born about 1879. She was married about 1897 to Joseph B. Hamilton.

Julia Goings, daughter of Doctor Craig Goings and Rebecca Fox Goings, was born about 1883.

Isabella Goings, daughter of Doctor Craig Goings and Rebecca Fox Goings, was born about 1886. She was deceased before 1892.

Luke Goings, son of Jason W. Goings, was born about 1844. He was the father of:

James Goings born about 1867

James Goings, son of Luke Goings, was born about 1867.

George W. Goings, son of Jason Goings, was born about 1794 in Virginia, probably Loudoun County. He was listed as the head of a household in the 1820 census of Monongalia County.

George Goings appeared in the 1830 census of Jefferson County, Virginia, page 122, as the head of a household com­posed of:

“Goings, George free colored male 36‑55
free colored female 24‑36
free colored male 10‑24
free colored female 0‑10
free colored male 0‑10”

George W. Goings later moved to join his father in Guernsey County, Ohio.

John Wesley Goens, regarded as a son of Jason Goens, was born about 1796 in Virginia. He was listed as a taxpayer in Monongalia County in the 1820s.

Sophia Goens, daughter of Jason Goens, was born about 1798 in Virginia. She was married in Monangahela County November 25, 1816 to Warner “Hen” Pritchard who was born about 1795, according to Jon Grimes, a descendant of Sophia Goens and her sister, Sarah Goens, as well. Dee Randall advised by E-mail that Warner “Hen” Pritchard died in 1850.

Sarah Goens, daughter of Jason Goens, was born about 1800 in Virginia. She was married, perhaps in Mononahela County. in about 1817 to Joseph Hill, according to the research of Jon Grimes, a descendant.

Mary Goens, daughter of Jason Goens, was born in Virginia about 1804 in Virginia. She was married about 1821, probably in Monangahela County, husband’s name unknown. She was remarried to Benjamin Simpson. In 1850 they were enumerated in Guernsey County, Ohio. Her father, age 90, was living with them.

From Gowen Manuscript:  http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~gowenrf/Gowenms148.htm

MONONGALIA COUNTY, VIRGINIA
[Later West Virginia]

1816, List of Charles Byrn, Monongalia County
frame 788, Jacent Goins a man of color 1 tithe 1 horse
Joel Goins 1 tithe
http://www.freeafricanamericans.com/virginiatax.htm

1817, Charles Byrn, Monongalia County
frame 810, Jacent Goins of color 1 tithe
Joel Goins of color 1 tithe 1 horse
http://www.freeafricanamericans.com/virginiatax.htm

1818, List of Rawley Martin
frame 856 Jacob Goens of color 1 tithe 1 horse
George Goens of color 1 tithe 1 horse
frame 857, Jason Goens of color 1 tithe
http://www.freeafricanamericans.com/virginiatax.htm

1819, List of Thos Haymond, Monongalia County
frame 898, List of Free negroes & Mulattoes
Westly Gowings 1 tithe 1 horse
George Gowings 1 tithe 1 horse
Jason Gowings 1 tithe
Joel Gowings 1 tithe 1 horse
http://www.freeafricanamericans.com/virginiatax.htm

1820, List of T. S. Haymond, Monongalia County
frame 916, Names of free Negroes & Mulattoes chargeable with the tax (with their profession)
Jason Gowings Stone Mason 1 tithe
George Gowings do 1 tithe 1 horse
John Westly Gowings do 1 tithe 1 horse
Joel Gowings do 1 tithe 1 horse
http://www.freeafricanamericans.com/virginiatax.htm

1821, List of John Barns
frame 976, free negroes and Mulattoes
George Gowings 2 tithes 2 horses Stone Mason
http://www.freeafricanamericans.com/virginiatax.htm

John T. Gowin was married to Sarah Stanneart January 6, 1852, according to “Tuscarawas County, Ohio Marriages, 1808-1895.”

Rebecca Lynn “Becky” Chaney Farvour, Goins researcher, wrote July 15, 1997 that children born to Sarah Stanart Goins, possibly a kinsman of Jason Goens, include:

William Goins born about 1840
Anne Goins born about 1842
Joel Goins born about 1843
Lydia Goins born about 1845
Samuel Goins born about 1850
Elizabeth Ellen “Lizzie” Goins born August 24, 1854

William Goins, son of Sarah Stanart Goins, was born about 1840.

Anne Goins, daughter of Sarah Stanart Goins, was born about 1842.

Joel Goins, son of Sarah Stanart Goins, was born about 1843.

Lydia, daughter of Sarah Stanart Goins, was born about 1845.

Samuel Goins, son of Sarah Stanart Goins, was born about 1850 and died in infancy.

Elizabeth Ellen “Lizzie” Goins, daughter of Sarah Stanart Goins, was born August 24, 1854 in Indiana. She was married about 1872 to James Atkinson who was born in 1844. He was the son of John Atkinson and Margaret Glover Atkinson. He served as a Union soldier in the Civil War. His siblings were Harry, Jean, Hezz, Joel, James, William, John and Missouri, according to Rebecca Lynn “Becky” Chaney Farvour.

In 1880, James Atkinson was living in Astubula, Kansas where a son was born.

Rebecca Lynn “Becky” Chaney Farvour, quoting Sarah Atkinson Presher and Dora Baker Groth, wrote:

“In 1883, Lizzy & John Atkinson loaded up their belongings and headed west over the Oregon Trail in one of the last wagon trains of the Great Western Migration. At that time the family consisted of Lizzy and John, Daniel, Charles, Frank, Eugene, and their half-sister Molly. Molly was the product of an earlier marriage between John and Mary Ann Stevens, she would later marry a man named Edwards.

After their arrival in Oregon the family settled at Tillamook on the north-central Oregon coast. Soon after Dot And Joel came along, the family moved again, about 20 miles south of Tillamook to a community called Sandlake. This would have before 1890, and the only transportation in such a remote area was by horse and wagon, so though only 20 miles, the move took two days.

Today Sandlake would barely qualify for ‘community’ status, but then it was even smaller. The Atkinsons built a log house and a barn, far removed from their neighbors in that area of virgin fir forest. The next step was to clear land for farming. Their new home was about two miles from the Pacific Ocean, at the end of a small bay, and families were connected only by dirt roads.

In the winter of 1890, a lumber schooner bound for Australia was wrecked during a storm off Cape Lookout, the northern boundary of Sandlake. The Atkinson family joined their neighbors in driving their wagons over a difficult trail the four or five miles to where much lumber had washed ashore. From this bounty would come a sturdy new home.

The senior Atkinsons sold their farm and dairy to their son, Eugene or “Chub” who would live there with his wife and family for the remainder of his life. They continued with the dairy, but Chub also raised cranberries, one of the first in Oregon to do so.

James Atkinson moved back to Tillamook where he died about 1920. She died March 26, 1943 and was buried in the IOOF Cemetery at Tillamook.

Children born to James Atkinson and Elizabeth Ellen “Lizzie” Goins Atkinson include:

Daniel Atkinson born about 1876
Frank Atkinson born about 1877
Charles Atkinson born about 1878
[Asa?] Eugene “Chub” Atkinson born in 1880
Joel Atkinson born about 1884
Sarah Estella Atkinson born about 18884

Eugene “Chub” Atkinson, son of James Atkinson and Elizabeth Ellen “Lizzie” Goins, was born about 1880, according to Rebecca Lynn “Becky” Chaney Farvour, a granddaughter. She wrote,

“On July 21, 1912 “Chub” was married to Elva Susan Baker at Forest Grove, Oregon. Elva was the daughter of Daniel Baker [1845-1929] and Mary Ann Darland Baker [1845-1928] who had come across the Oregon Trail with their respective families in 1865. The youngsters must have noticed each other somewhere along the trail, for they married three years later. The new Baker family settled at Cedar Canyon, near Forest Grove, Oregon where they lived their own pioneer life. Some of their stories were later written down by the baby of the family, Dora Baker Groth and are quoted here.

The Baker children were all born at Cedar Canyon, and all died in Oregon or Washington, except for Dan and Elva who died in California. The children were Joseph Flint [1868-1871], Harry Caswell [1870-1952], Albert Francis [1871-1953], Laura Belle Sears [1872-1961], Lewis Herbert [1874-1960], Effie Adella Scoffeld [1875-1952], Sylva Leona Reed [1876-1974], Arthur Delmer [1878-1879], Incy Ann [1880-1954, never married], Elva Susan Atkinson [1882-1956], Daniel Miller [1883-1969], Dora Esther Groth [1885-1979].”

At their farm in Sandlake, Chub Atkinson and Elva Baker Atkinson had five daughters:

Dora Dell Atkinson born about 1914
Mary Elizabeth Atkinson born February 9, 1916
Sarah Adelle Atkinson born December 17, 1918
Elva Louise Atkinson born June 6, 1923
Grace Eugenia Atkinson born September 21, 1926

Dora Dell Atkinson, daughter of Eugene “Chub” Atkinson and Elva Baker Anderson, was born about 1914 at Sandlake. She died in infancy and was buried in a small private cemetery there.

Mary Elizabeth Atkinson, daughter of Eugene “Chub” Atkinson and Elva Baker Anderson, was born February 9, 1916 at Sandlake. She was married about 1935 to Robert Matheny. They lived at Tillamook and Eugene, Oregon. Following a divorce, she removed to Alexandria, Virginia about 1950. There she was remarried to O’Dell Cooper.

Children born to Robert Matheny and Mary Elizabeth Atkinson Matheny include:

Norman Matheny born about 1937
Elizabeth Matheny born about 1940
Marvin Matheny born about 1944

Children born to O’Dell Cooper and Mary Elizabeth Atkinson Matheny Cooper include:

Daniel O’Dell born about 1951
Laura Sue O’Dell born about 1953

Rebecca Lynn “Becky” Chaney Farvour wrote of the children of her aunt:

“Norman Matheney married a girl from the Tillamook area, and after serving in WWII they settled in Boston where he was a staff photographer for the ‘Christian Science Monitor’ for many years, retiring in about 1996 or ’97. They had two children, Brian and Dale, who currently live on the east coast. Both receiving college degrees, they work in the computer field.

Elizabeth Matheney, or ‘Betsy’ as she was known, would have two children, Marsha and Robin Perry. Betsy married Jim Perry, and they lived in Eugene, Oregon many years before moving to the Seattle area, probably during the late 1960s. Jim brought Betsy’s step-daughters Dianne and Debbi Perry, to the marriage with him. He retired from railroad work about 1995. In 1997, both Marsha and Robin both have children of their own . Marsha lives in the Eugene area, while Robin and her husband live closer to her folks near Seattle.

Marvin Matheny married Vicki, and they had three children, Marci, Mindy, and Scott. Marvin and Vicki live in Shelton, Washington in 1997. They are near Vicki’s folks and have a lovely home in the woods. The kids are pretty much grown and gone now, with at least one grandchild in the fold.

Daniel O’Dell in 1997 lived in the Eugene area.

Laura Sue O’Dell was married to Harold Nicholson who worked for the government, and they would travel and live in many exotic places around the world. They had three children, Jeremi, Astralina, or Star, and one more. Laura and James were divorced about 1983.”

Sarah Adelle Atkinson, daughter of Eugene “Chub” Atkinson and Elva Baker Anderson, was born December 17, 1918 at Sandlake. Of her aunt Sarah, Rebecca Lynn “Becky” Chaney Farvour wrote:

“She went to Santa Barbara, California to obtain her credentials to teach kindergarten, which she accomplished in 1942. She would teach in the Oakland area until her retirement about 1967. In 1961 she went to England as an exchange teacher for a year.

Her letters from England to her family from that period have been submitted to the Foundation. In 1967 she was married to Ralph Presher. He died in 1971, but they enjoyed their brief time together as he was a dear sweet man, much like Sarah herself. In 1988, she moved to Scotts Valley, California, where she experienced at close hand the earthquake of 1989. In 1992, she moved to Birmingham, Alabama to live near her sister, Louise. No children were born to her.”

Elva Louise Atkinson, daughter of Eugene “Chub” Atkinson and Elva Baker Anderson, was born June 6, 1923 at Sandlake. Her niece, Rebecca Lynn “Becky” Chaney Farvour wrote of her life:

“Louise Atkinson was adventuresome. During WWII she worked at a military base in Alaska. She was married to a southern boy, Pelham Woffard, and they lived in Birmingham, even after Pelham’s death. Pelham was a railroad worker, and his work frequently took him away from home. The couple never had any children, though Pelham did have some from a previous marriage.”

Grace Eugenia Atkinson, daughter of Eugene “Chub” Atkinson and Elva Baker Anderson, was born September 21, 1926 at Sandlake. Rebecca Lynn “Becky” Chaney Farvour wrote of her parents:

“Grace Atkinson, while in high school, went to live with her sister Sarah in Ontario and again when Sarah moved to Oakland. While there Grace met a handsome sailor from Longview, Washington named Francis Earl Chaney. Grace quit school, and they were married in Ontario on Valentine Day, 1944. With their first child on the way, Francis and Grace moved to Kelso, Washington. Here, just across the river from Longview where Francis grew up, the pregnant Grace would go back to complete high school. She eventually graduated from Kelso High, the same school that several of her grandchildren would graduate from in later years.

Francis Chaney was born in Kansas on New Year’s Eve, 1924. He was the son of David Earl Chaney (1904-1974) and Susan Jane Goodfellow Chaney (NY, 1904-1990). His grandparents were and Jacob Chaney and Rachel Ann Chaney. Earlier ancestors were Charles Ulysses Chaney and Rosa Flicker Chaney. Betty Chaney, sister to Francis Chaney, while researching the history of the Chaney family, discovered that the actor, Lon Chaney, Jr. was a kinsman.”

David Earl Chaney and Susan Jane Goodfellow Chaney were the parents of six children: Francis Earl, Erma Jean Morgan, Rose LaVonne ‘Bonnie’ Easley, Betty Skidmore, Carole ‘Teddy’ Webb, and Beverly Farvour.

During the course of their marriage Francis and Grace Chaney lived where the Navy took them–San Pedro, California, and Seattle, Washington mainly. Francis would eventually make a career of the Navy, but did a few stints on the outside, during these times the family lived in Longview and Winlock, Washington. In Winlock they worked for a chicken farmer while Ginny started kindergarten. While Francis was stationed overseas, serving in WWII, Korea, and eventually Vietnam, Grace came ‘home’ to Sandlake to live.

Four children were born to David Earl Chaney and Grace Eugenia Atkinson Chaney:

Virginia Lee “Ginny” Chaney born September 2, 1946
Richard Earl Chaney born February 2, 1948
Rebecca Lynn “Becky” Chaney born February 21, 1954
Susan Adelle Chaney born December 31, 1961

Virginia Lee “Ginny Chaney, daughter of David Earl Chaney and Grace Eugenia Atkinson Chaney, was born September 2, 1946 at Tillamook. She was married about 1964 to Ivan Gist.
She achieved fame in the family by going on a tandem skydive at the age of 51. In 1997 they lived in Kelso, Washington.

Children born to them include:

Jeffrey Gail born in 1966
Eric Allen Gist born in 1969

Richard Earl Chaney, son of David Earl Chaney and Grace Eugenia Atkinson Chaney, was born February 2, 1948 at Tillamook. Of his family, his sister Rebecca Lynn “Becky” Chaney Farvour wrote:

“Richard Chaney also went the Navy way, in fact his wife, Debra Diestler from Wisconsin, was a WAVE when they met. They were married in April 1973. Since then he has been medically discharged from the Navy, yet has been active in the National Guard, achieving Warrant Officer status about 1995. In the course of their marriage they have lived in Corvallis, Oregon, where all the girls were born and where Rich earned his BA and MA from Oregon State University.

From there they ended up in Rolla, Missouri, where they have lived since the late 1980’s-early 1990s. Their eldest, Heather, graduated in 1996 and plans to enter the Navy specializing in the nuclear field.”

Children born to Richard Earl Chaney and Debra Diestler Chaney include:

Heather Novelle Chaney born in 1978
Bethany Brooke Chaney born in 1982
Tami Jane Chaney born in 1986

Rebecca Lynn “Becky” Chaney, daughter of David Earl Chaney and Grace Eugenia Atkinson Chaney, was born February 21, 1954 at the naval hospital in Seattle. Of her life, she wrote:

“Following in her mother’s footsteps, Becky Chaney moved away from home in her senior year to live with a cousin in Longview, Washington. There she met the brother-in-law of her aunt, Bev Chaney Farvour. Becky was married to Albert E. Farvour, Jr. in 1974. He was born July 2, 1947 to Albert E. Farvour and Edna Mae Bolden Farvour. His father was born in 1916 in Iowa, and his mother was born in 1920 in West Virginia.

Edna and Al Farvour were married in 1940 and had the following children as they migrated west to Washington: John Everett Farvour, born 1941; JoAnn Farvour, born in 1945; Al, Jr; Linda Jean Farvour, born 1949, Robert Delano Farvour, born in 1950 and Richard Lee Farvour, born in 1951.

Albert E. Farvour worked as a coal miner in Virginia and West Virginia. His parents were John Everett Farvour [1882-1947] and Greta ‘Mary’ Becker Farvour who died in Washington in 1972.

Edna Mae Bolden Farvour was the daughter of Everett Bolden and Bessie Sexton Farvour. It is believed that Edna may be of Melungeon descent; her brother, Doug, was once told when inquiring about his Bolden heritage that the family was, “Dutch, German, and none of your business!”

About the time of their marriage, Albert E. Farvour, Jr. began working at Reynolds Metals in Longview, where he has remained ever since. Becky began college, but it was interrupted by the birth of their first son. It took 10 years but she finally achieved her AA degree in 1985, then went on for her BA degree from Evergreen College in 1987, teaching credentials from Portland State University in 1990, and MALS degree from Reed College in Portland in 1993. She currently works as a substitute teacher for the Kelso School District. They have lived in Kelso, on the same spot as Al’s folks originally lived when they came to Washington, since early in their marriage.

Rebecca Lynn “Becky” Chaney Farvour, a member of the Foundation, has intensive research on the Goins family and has supplied much of the material on the descendants of Jason Goins of Monongalia County.

Children born to Albert E. Farvour and Rebecca Lynn “Becky” Chaney Farvour include:

David Eugene Farvour born February 1977
Matthew Robert Farvour born in June 1979
Daniel Stuart Farvour born in April 1983

Susan Adele Chaney, daughter of David Earl Chaney and Grace Eugenia Atkinson Chaney, was born December 31, 1961 at Tillamook. She was married about 1980 to Jack Buel. Following a divorce about 1989, she was remarried to Jeff Owens. In 1997, they lived at Hebo, Oregon.

Children born to Jack Buel and Susan Adele Chaney include:

Bryan George Buel born in 1982
Kei Michelle Buel born in 1985
Stephen Christopher Buel born in in 1987
==O==
Samuel G. Gowen appeared as the head of a household in the 1820 census of Monongalia County, page 69:

“Gowen, Samuel G. white male over 45
white female 0-10”

Samuel G. Gowen did not reappear there in the 1830 census.

Descendant Researchers:

G. Barnett, E-mail: GBarnett@ee.net
Rosemary Dunne, Box 687, Amherst, VA, 24521, E-mail:rosemars@juno.com
Rebecca L. Farvour, 504 Hawthorne, Kelso, WA, 98628-1506, E-mail: rfarvour@aol.com
Jonnie Grimes, E-mail: jonnieg@loop.com
Bernard Mayhle, 1517 N. Regal St, Spokane, WA, 99207, E-mail: male@ipeg.com

From Gowen Manuscript:  http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~gowenrf/Gowenms155.htm

PENDLETON COUNTY, VIRGINIA (West Virginia)

Sarah Goings was married to Adam Waggoner January 2, 1810, according to “Pendleton County Marriages, 1797-1850.”

From Gowen Manuscript:  http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~gowenrf/gowenms158.htm

WEST VIRGINIA

Bill Gowan was married July 30, 1947 at Green Bank, West Virginia, wife’s name Audrea. They continued in West Virginia until 1957 when they moved to Chillicothe, Ohio where he was employed by the Federal Prison Service. He was later transferred to Florida and then to Leavenworth, Kansas where he was retired October 31, 1979, having been with the Federal Prison Service for 21 years. In 1982 they removed to Tullahoma, Tennessee. They observed their 50th wedding anniversary there at the United Methodist Church, according to the “Tullahoma News & Guardian” in its edition of August 27, 1997.

Children born to Bill Gowan and Audrea Gowan include:

Loretta Gowan born about 1950

Loretta Gowan, daughter of Bill Gowan and Audrea Gowan, was born about 1950 in West Virginia. She was married about 1970 to Jim Smith. In 1997, they lived in Riverview, Florida.

BARBOUR COUNTY, WEST VIRGINIA

This article concerning the Guineas and Melungeons appeared in the “Pittsburgh Post-Gazette” December 31, 1984.

“Philippi, W. Va.–To the outside world, the people of Chestnut Ridge are still wrapped in folk tales and old wives tales; some say they’re descended from a mixture of Indians and survivors of Walter Raleigh’s lost colony: some maintain they’re the mutants left over from a mad scientist’s miscegenation experiment or that they came about because of the Rockefellers’ need to develop cheap coal-mine labor during the depression. The worst thing you can call them is “the Guineas,” but that is the pejorative name by which they’re known.

Some say it refers back to the Italians brought here for mine work long ago; others say it is short for “guinea pigs” from the alleged racial experiment; others say it is verbal short form of Allegheny. Some of them have distinctly Indian and black features, but blue eyes and light skin. Others are blond and look almost Scandinavian. From an estimated peak of about 4,000 in the 1930s, there are only about 1,500 of them left now, tucked away high in the West Virginia Appalachians, about 190 miles from Pittsburgh. They live in Barbour, Taylor and Harrison Counties near the towns of Grafton, and Philippi.

They’ve been living in these same hill for more than 200 years-at least a century longer than most of the white people who ostra­cize them. The confusion of outsiders is not surprising. The Guineas themselves differ widely and sometimes vociferously about their own origins. Since the first census of 1790, they have been variously identified as white, black, red, mulatto, col­ored, free colored, dark, American Guinea, red African and In­dian, among other things.

The likeliest explanation of the origin of the Guineas is that they are of combined Indian-white-black ancestry. As such, they are one of the few remaining groups in the United States. A similar group called the Melungeons still survive in the hills of Ken­tucky and Tennessee. In present-day Chestnut Ridge some of the people are white-Indian some white-black, some black-In­dian, some white-black-Indian-but most appear to be in the first group. Some have distinctly darker skin but blue eyes. Others appear almost oriental. But many have brown or blond hair.

The main social feature of the Chestnut Ridge people today is their familial cohesion. All 1,500 of them bear one of less than a dozen surnames. A 1977 survey of obituaries in the “Barbour County Democrat” showed that 135 of the 163 ridge people ridge people, 83 percent, were married to people having the last names of Mayle, Norris, Croston, Prichard, Collins, Adams and Kennedy. Today of the 67 Mayles who have listed telephones, all but three live on the ridges.

There are hundreds of Mayles in the area, and one of them is tall, sandy-haired Douglas Gary Mayles, 15. Asked if he is related to the Rev. Okey Mayle, the most famous resident of the ridge, Douglas thinks a minute and answers, “I don’t know.”

A few vestiges of the old customs survive up on the ridge. Most of the authentic Indian dishes are fading away, but corn is still a favorite food, stuff for parching and ash boiling, [the ashes make the corn sweeter.] Also eaten, though less widely, are poke greens, plantain, cooked black berry tops and white milkweed. Some still contort a hot drink from dried sycamore bark, and others use such herbal remedies as dogwood tea for upset stom­achs.

Where there are folk remedies there are folk tales, and the Chestnut Ridge people like to tell their stories of the days when panthers jumped out at you at night, and of “Chicken Sam” Mayle, who lay on a grave in the cemetery one night, waiting for some kids and then frightening them out of their wits. “Scaring white folks used to be a favorite pastime up on the ridge,” said one of the Mayles.

Nowadays, many of the men work in the coal mines or as state road maintenance workers, when they can get jobs. The women often work as domestics. But unemployment is very high, at least 50 percent.

‘A lot of hospital workers like my grandson get laid off,’ said one elderly ridge man. ‘A lot of us are retirees. We get by on Social Security or welfare.’ I got a son who’s 51, he’s a me­chanic, but he gets hold of a bottle and he don’t care whether he gets paid or not.’ A clergy who preaches every week on the ridge says it’s easier to count the number of people who have jobs, especially since Badger Coal Company closed down under Reagan. Indeed, the rusting machinery of the once proud Badger Coal Company dominates the ridge’s landscape.

Bootleg whiskey used to be profitable cottage industry, “but now there’s only one or two moonshine rigs left on the ridge,” said an old-timer of the Mayle clan. “In the twenties you’d see smoke blowing all the time up here from the stills.” His neigh­bor, an unrelated Mayle is approached for directions to Grafton. He is a very short, Mediterranean-looking man with a dark reddish face, flatnose, blue eyes and straight black hair.

Although most of the Chestnut Ridge folks are friendly, they make it clear they are not fond of anthropologists or journalists who threaten their privacy. The land of the “Guineas,” curiously enough, is at the same river that was a crucial part of Pittsburgh : the Monogahelia. Chestnut Ridge is as beautiful as it is isolated. So scenic are its hills and vistas that one would think those native refugees had specifically searched for it, rather than stumbled upon it in flight.

Its steep hills and valleys were carved out by now-extinct streams that emptied into the Ohio River and concealed millions of tons of bituminous coal below. The ridge overlooks Philippi, population 3,500, home of the liberal arts school, Alderson-Broaddus College, about 40 miles south of Morgantown. Both the town and the county were named in honor of an early settler, Judge Phillip Barbour. In Philippi itself the main attraction is the covered bridge, constructed in 1852, across which Yankee and rebel troops passed during the Civil War. In fact, it is the site of one of the first battles of the Civil War. According to a bronze plaque there, it is the site of the first amputation.

Outside Philippi city limits, you enter a different world as you drive northeast, up Chestnut Hill Road behind Philippi into coal country. Many of the homes are neat little bungalows, but some are tumbledown shacks with dirt floors. “Its not quite Deliverance,” said a former Alderson-Broaddus student now living in Pittsburgh. “When you went riding up there, you’d see these strange looking people, sitting on the hills and staring at you, real high foreheads and cheekbones. Twenty years ago, when I was going to school there, I saw about 20 of them living in an old school bus, without any health care.”

The white perception problem is a major one. The women hold firm to the “mad scientist” theory. “Its an old story,” said one of the ridge ministers. “The college kids were warned never to come up here. The boys were told they’d be beaten, and the girls raped.” The townsfolk attitudes are a source of deep irritation to people on the ridge. “We do things the old ways, but why should people think less of us for that?” asked 19-year-old Tim Mayle, a powerfully built young man who speaks fondly of his close knit community and can name every occupant of every house up and down the Ridge Road. “Some of the A-B frat guys used to come up here.” “If people want to come up here and play pranks, forget it. We don’t need that. They think we’re not civilized up here.”

Tim Mayle wants to get into computers or the legal profession one day, when he gets the money. Right now he’s helping take care of his widowed mother, younger siblings and the land that’s been in his family for generations. “When I was in school, there were few problems,” he says, talking gingerly around discrimination, but its eased out. If I can do anything to improve our hill, I want to do it.”

Later in the courthouse square, Philippi native Willy Carpenter recalls only one visit to the ridge in his 67 years. “I went up there once,” said Carpenter.” It was in the winter, and I gave two “Guineas” a lift. I remember the time when you’d be walk­ing down the sidewalk, and if one of them was coming towards you, he’d step off the sidewalk to let you pass. Half-breed is what we call ’em. They made pretty good moonshine up there.”

What is known about the history of the group is that long before the American Revolution, an Englishman named Norris married the daughter of a Cherokee Indian and slave. Their son Sam born up on the ridge in 1750. He married a Delaware Indian woman named Pretty Hair. Eight children and a strong family line family line resulted. The Mayle family, descended from a British admiral who also married an Indian. In a three-year survey, 1973-75, not a single “Guinea” engagement or wedding was reported in the “Barbour County Democrat,” nor has that changed today.

Old Dellet Crostan, ridge historian, sees prejudice these days as “about the same” as it used to be, though he allows “some of the younger people have outgrowed it.” Okey Mayle, 81, says, “Most people in Philippi was always down on us. It’s gettin’ a little better now, but used to be, whites would talk to you as if they were doin’ you a favor.” It was absurd, he said “because some of us, down to this time were always blonde. They’d refuse a blonde boy service in the soda shop because they knew his name was Mayle.”

Aside from discrimination, the ridge people also suffer from “many instances of profoundly retarded children and a high rate of infant mortality, due to the interbreeding,” according to one minister who asked not to be identified. “I’d say the retardation rate used to be as high as one out of five,” said the clergyman. “Nowadays, its probably more like one out of ten. One woman had four retarded children.”

The Guinea population is meanwhile dwindling, a decline that began 35 years ago with the Great Migration. Between 1950 and 1960 alone, the southern Appalachian region lost a million inhabitants, nearly one-fifth of its entire population. Between 1940 and 1960 more than 400,00 people left West Virginia, in­cluding many “Guineas” who went in steady streams to Zanesville, Akron, and Canton, Ohio, where they had relatives and could pass for white. Some of those people keep in touch, but others, according to Barry J. Ward in the state folklore magazine “Golden Seal,” “have cut off all contact with their families in the West Virginia, in an effort to conceal their origins.”

The 1964 Civil Rights Act and later desecration measures ended formal discrimination against them, but also did away with the primary motivation for their cohesion. The all-Guinea schools on the ridge were closed down and children sent into Philippi.

‘When I came here there were three schools on the ridge, there,’ recalls the Rev. Frank Peoples, a black minister who lives and preaches there. ‘I’m not sure what we gained by consolidated schools. I suppose the community gained in the quality of edu­cation, but lost a lot of its cultural identity.’ As the community’s isolationist core breaks down, its possible that in another few generations, the tri-racial “Guineas” of West Virginia may cease to exist as an identifiable group.

The importance of religion up on the ridge can’t be overesti­mated, and there’s an amazing number of churches for the rather small number of people. Though the biggest congregation is Pentecostal, there are more Methodist than any other. Grafton is the home of Anna Jarvis, founder of Mother’s Day.”

BERKELEY COUNTY, WEST VIRGINIA

The estate of Dr. Joseph Gowan was probated August 26, 1808 in Berkeley County.
==O==
Elizabeth Gowan was enumerated as the head of a household in the 1880 census of Berkeley County, 9th Civil District, page 387.

CABELL COUNTY, WEST VIRGINIA
Francis Goings was married December 18, 1878 to Henry Payne, according to Cabell County marriage records.

CLAY COUNTY, WEST VIRGINIA

Gertrude Cornelia Walker Goins, daughter of John Morgan Walker and Elizabeth Mullins Walker, died in Clay County in 1983, according to Don and Neva Adams.

DODDRIDGE COUNTY, WEST VIRGINIA

Ida E. Goens was married March 18, 1891 to Leonardus Stark, according to Doddridge County marriage records.

HARDY COUNTY, WEST VIRGINIA

JACKSON COUNTY, WEST VIRGINIA

James M. Goins was married to Sarah Ellen Adams August 3, 1892, according to Jackson County marriage records. Children born to James M. Goins and Sarah Ellen Adams Goins are unknown.

JEFFERSON COUNTY, VIRGINIA
[Later West Virginia]

Littleton Goens, Negro, was born April 9, 1894 in Charles Town, West Virginia, according to “Maryland Military Men in the World War, 1917-1919.” He was inducted into the U. S. Army August 5, 1918 from Hagerstown, Maryland. He became a sergeant December 2, 1918 and served in the 154th Depot Brigade. He was honorably discharged July 10, 1919 after serving overseas from October 20, 1918 to July 4, 1919.
==O==
William McGowan was born about 1725 in Ireland and emigrated to Virginia where he was married about 1748.

Children born to William McGowan are believed to include:

John McGowan born about 1770

John McGowan, son of William McGowan, was born about 1770 in Virginia. He appeared in the 1790 and 1810 census returns of Jefferson County, Virginia.

Children born to him include:

Samuel Henry McGowan born about 1828

Samuel Henry McGowan, son of John McGowan, was born about 1800 in Tennessee. He appeared as the head of a household in the 1870 census of Jefferson County, Alabama. He reappeared as the head of a household in the 1880 census of Blount County, Alabama.

Children born to Samuel Henry McGowan include:

Thomas Franklin McGowan born about 1850

Thomas Franklin McGowan, son of Samuel Henry McGowan, was born about 1850.

Children born to Thomas Franklin McGowan include:

Joseph Franklin McGowan born about 1880

KANAWHA COUNTY, WEST VIRGINIA

Cliff Goens was a district materials engineer employed by the state in 1973, living in Kanawha County.
==O==
Dorothy E. Holmes Goins of Charleston died Jan. 6, 1999, at home after a long illness. She was a homemaker and a member of Greenlee United Methodist Church. Surviving: daughters, Carolyn Burdette and Marlena Haynes, both of Charleston; brother, Arlon Holmes of Charleston; sister, Violet Tate of Charleston; 11 grandchildren; 17 great-grandchildren; four great- great-grandchildren. Burial was in Floral Hills Garden of Memories, Pocatalico, West Virginia.
==O==
James Goins was a clerk for the West Virginia Department of Mines in 1973, living at 2915 Fitzwater Drive, Charleston, West Virgnia.
==O==
James A. Goins was a clerk for the West Virginia Library Commission in 1973, living in South Charleston, Virginia.

MASON COUNTY, WEST VIRGNIA

Dora L. Gowin was married December 25, 1898 to Jubal Harless, according to Mason County marriage records.

MC DOWELL COUNTY, WEST VIRGINIA

Jerry Randall Goins was killed by a falling tree March 28, 2000, according to an article in the “Charleston Daily Mail:”

“A McDowell County man has died after a tree collapsed on his all- terrain vehicle. State Police say Jerry Randall Goins, 29, of Roderfield was riding with five friends Sunday in the Coalwood area when wind apparently knocked down a partially rotted tree. Friends stayed with Goins while help was sought. Efforts to revive him failed.

Trooper J. K. Cooper of the Welch detachment said Monday the site was more than six miles from the main road and emergency officials had to use four-wheel drive vehicles to reach Goins. The body has been sent to the state medical examiner for autopsy.”
==O==
Mrs. Lola Mae Goins was the mother of two children born in the McDowell County area, according to Lora McKinney in a message dated June 15, 2000:

Mary Frances Goins born about March 1939
Robert Allen Goins born October 14, 1941

Later Lola Mae Goins was remarried to Charles Parsons who died in 1945.

Children born to Charles Parsons and Lola Mae Goins Parsons include:

Jerry D. Parsons born June 10, 1944

Jerry D. Parsons, son of Charles Parsons and Lola Mae Goins Parsons, was born in McDowell County June 10, 1944. On October 14, 1945, he was adopted by John R. Rose and Josey Mae Rose, and his name was changed to Jerry D. Rose. On June 15, 2000, Jerry D. Rose of Virginia Beach, Virginia was in search of his Goins siblings.

MERCER COUNTY, WEST VIRGINIA

Grover Goins and Lillie Holloway Goins were residents of Mercer County in 1911 and 1913. Children born to them include:

Covie Lee Goins born December 3, 1911
Lucy Ellen Goins born June 22, 1913

Covie Lee Goins, daughter of Grover Goins and Lillie Hol-loway Goins, was born December 3, 1911. She was married September 20, 1926 in Bristol, Virgnia to William Henry Howell who was born to John Merritt Howell August 2, 1904 in Floyd County, Virginia.

William Henry Howell received a head injury in a mining ac-cident. He was not able to function normally after that and de-veloped a mean temper. Covie Lee was unable to live with him afterward. She left, but her four daughters remained with him.

Covie Lee Goins Howell died September 6, 1988 in Princeton, West Virginia in Mercer County. William Henry Howell died November 4, 1933 at Rock, West Virginia. He was buried in Roselawn Memorial Gardens at Princeton.

Lucy Ellen Goins, daughter of Grover Goins and Lillie Hollo-way Goins, was born June 22, 1913. She was married about 1928 to John Henry Howell who was born February 28, 1900 to John Merritt Howell. Later he was remarried to Maggie Bailey. Lucy Ellen Goins Howell was remarried, husband’s name Shrader. She died November 19, 1988 at Princeton.

John Henry Howell died November 30, 1977 in Riverside, California.

Children born to John Henry Howell and Lucy Ellen Goins Howell include:

Juanita Howell born about 1930

John Henry Howell, Jr. born about 1933

RALEIGH COUNTY, WEST VIRGINIA

Thelma Lori Shrewsbury Goan was born December 5, 1916 at Basin, daughter of the late George Washington Shrewsbury and Laura Akers Shrewsbury.

Thelma passed away Friday, January 21, 2000 at her home following a long illness.

Mrs. Goan spent her Childhood at Basin, where she was graduated from Basin High School. She was a member o the Mount Pisgah Church at Basin. A resident of Maryland the past 25 years, she was last employed as the office manager for Goan Brothers Electric in Upper Marlboro, Maryland. Her children will remember her for her independence and courage.

Two sons, Bernard Burlis Goan and Edward F. Goan; two sis-ters, Mabel Meadows and Loma Thompson; and two brothers, Bernard Shrewsbury and Covie Shrewsbury, preceded her in death.

Survivors include a son, Luther “Shorty” Goan of Basin; three daughters, Mary L. Goan Pyles of California, Maryland, Nora A. Goan Bevard and Phyllis P. Goan Nash of Dunkirk, Mary-land; three sisters, Esther Taylor of MacArthur, Irene Hartley of Crab Orchard, and Blakie Bean of Beckley; 10 grandchil-dren and 11 great-grandchildren.

Services were held at 1 p.m. Tuesday at the Melton Mortuary Chapel with the Rev. Samuel Blaylock officiating. Burial fol-lowed in the Shrewsbury Cemetery at Mount Pisgah at Basin.

RITCHIE COUNTY, WEST VIRGINIA

Jennett Gowan was married to David B. White September 26, 1872, according to Ritchie County marriage records.

WISCONSIN

John H. Gowan was listed in the Third Wisconsin Infantry Regiment in the Civil War, according to the Civil War military roster.
==O==
David Gowen was listed in the First Wisconsin Cavalry Regiment in the Civil War, according to the Civil War military roster.
==O==
William H. McGowen was listed in the 50th Wisconsin Infantry Regiment in the Civil War, according to the Civil War military roster.

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