1755 James Goyne b. in SC, moved to Mississippi (Y1)

James Goyne b. 1755

(Y1) YDNA Group

Parents:

John Gowen b. 1710 and Mary Keith (not confirmed – presumed based on location and Y-DNA results)

Children born to James Goyne and Mary Goyne include:

John Goyne                                                        born July 5, 1776
Sarah Goyne                                                      born about 1789

Children born to James Goyne and Heather O’Brien Goyne are believed to include:

James Goins                                                     born about 1793
Wiley Williamson Goynes                           born December 2, 1799

Siblings:

John Gowen Jr. b. 1730 m. Elizabeth (confirmed child of John Gowing b. 1704)
Susannah Gowen Hubbard b. 1731 (confirmed child of John Gowing b. 1704)
Thomas Gowen b. 1729 (not confirmed as child)
William Goyne b. 1732 (confirmed as child of John Gowing b. 1704)
Amos Goyen b. 1744 (not confirmed as child)
Daniel Going b. 1748 (not confirmed as child)
Drury Goyen b. 1749 (not confirmed as child)
James Goyne b. 1755 (not confirmed as child)
Henry Going b. 1758 (not confirmed as child)

FACTS:

Gowen Manuscript info:  http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~gowenrf/nl199010.pdf

Gowen Research Foundation Newsletter Volume 2, No. 2 October 1990

James Goyne Served the Revolution in Carolina

James Goyne, son of Mary Goyne, was born May 30, 1755 in Mecklenburg County, Virginia, according to the research of Velma S. Brassell Beuerle, a descendant of Flint, Michigan. (Note:  The Revolutionary War application actually says “Mulenburg” which does not exist.  It may have meant Lunenburg, or Mecklenburg, but since Mecklenburg wasn’t created until 1764 (out of Lunenburg) it must mean “Lunenburg” – see original at bottom of page). 

Other members of the Goyne family appeared in Mecklenburg County at the same time. Bryan Goyne, believed to be a son of Mary Goyne and a brother to James Goyne, was born about 1757, probably in Mecklenburg County also.  (Note: Lunenburg is correct county for time – Mecklenburg not created until 1764 . . . out of Lunenburg).

(Below are different Going, Goyen, Gowen related sources for those people were in the Virginia, North Carolina, or South Carolina areas in the early 1700’s to early 1800’s)

Map of North Carolina and Virginia border area and locations of families living in those areas (click to enlarge)

The descendants of Mary Goyne spelled the name in various ways. Generally, in Mississippi the surname became “Guynes.” In Louisiana, “Goins” predominated, while in Virginia and Kentucky, “Gowan” was generally adopted.

James Goyne removed to Camden District, South Carolina and served there as a Revolutionary soldier in a militia company commanded by Capt. John Smith in the regiment of Col. John Winn, according to “Genealogical Abstracts of Revolutionary War Pension Files” abstracted by Virgil D. White.

James Goyne was married about 1775 to Heather O’Brien, according to the research of Margaret Frances Goynes Olson, a descendant of Corpus Christi, Texas.

After independence, James Goyne moved to Georgia, living successively in Burke, Warren and Washington counties.

Following his Georgia residence, he apparently lived in Tennessee in 1803. He removed to Louisiana and lived at Calcasieu in 1810. He received a land grant there in neutral territory which later became Vernon Parish.

In 1817 James Goyne was living in Hinds [later Copiah] County, Mississippi, according to “Mississippi Revolutionary Soldiers.” He continued to live there in 1823 and 1825 and appeared in Kemper County, Mississippi in 1834, according to Mrs. Beuerle. She is a “double descendant” of James Goyne, having two of his sons, John Goyne and James Goins, as her ancestors.

James Goyne made a declaration regarding his Revolutionary service in Kemper County May 18, 1836:

“On this 18th day of May, 1836, personally appeared before me, George Coatter, Judge of Circuit Court (the same being a court of record) now sitting in and for said county, James Goyne, a resident of said county of Kemper and state of Mississippi. Aged about eighty-one years. Who being first duly sworn according to law doth on his oath make the following Declaration in order to obtain the benefit of the Act of Congress passed June 7, 1832.

That he entered the service of the United States under the following named officers and served as herein often stated. That he lived in Camden District, state of South Carolina, at which place some time in June, 1776 when he was drafted to go to Charleston in order to intercept the British Fleet that was expected to land there under Col. John Wynn in Capt. John Smith’s Company of militia, Lt. William Daugherty. And rendezvoused at Winnsborough in said state at the time last above mentioned and marched to Charleston and was stationed there together with said company to guard the town and after being there about a month he was marched back and dismissed about the last of July, 1776 having served about six weeks but received no written discharge–and that afterward on the last of January–as near as he can recollect– he was again drafted under the same officers as above in Camden District, South Carolina where he then resided and rendezvoused at Winnsborough.

At the same time and was moved immediately to Charleston where he was stationed some time when said company joined General Ash from North Carolina and was then marched to Pluresburgh (?) near Savannah at which place he was stationed about eight days. When he was again dismissed or discharged and returned home about the last of February, 1779–having served about one month during which service he was in no engagement nor did he receive any written discharge–and that after remaining at home about four days he again entered the service of the U, S. as a drafted soldier under Col. John Wynn in Captain Francis Gedwells Company of Militia Lieutenant William Daugherty and rendezvoused at Winnsborough about the first of March 1779 near which place this declarent then resided and from where he was marched to Savannah then near Augusta at which place he volunteered to go to Georgia to fight the Indians and put himself under Captain John Nixon and Col. Hamarm (?) and was marched to Nightsborough (?) and from there to Falsom Fort on Abuchy (?) river and from which place the Indians retreated and were pursued by said company and overtaken and a skirmish ensued in which seventeen Indians and two white men were killed and Major Ross was killed in the part of the re______ (?) .

From there he was marched to Augusta and crossing the river they Joined their former companions– at which place they remained some time from where he was marched to Augusta together with the rest of the forces and joined General Lincoln about four miles below that plain– and marched down the river and crossing at Lummertins (?) ferry marched to Bains Bridge (?) near the head of Ashley river where they remained some time–and there to stones (?) at the big rice fields to meet the British who were encamped there–at which place he remained some time–and when his term of service expired he was discharged some time in June, 1779–but received no written discharge having served at this time three months and some days–from where he returned to Camden District where he continued to live until some time in June the precise time he cannot recollect–at which time he volunteered to go to the assistance of General Greene at the siege of Ninety-Six put himself under Captain Charles Reeves in Col. Edward Lacys Lieut. Col. Patrick McGreffe and Major John O’Lears regiment of volunteers we met together on the road about fourteen miles from Winnsborough at the time last mentioned we then marched to Congaree River there we rested and endeavored to intercept Lord Rawdon on his march from Ninety-Six to Charleston. He retreated to Orangeburg and encamped there we had joined General Greene’s army before we got to Orangeburg.

We then marched to the Eutaw Springs. We then (joined) General Sumters Army and marched to a church about thirty miles from Charleston at which place we were attacked by a British troop of horse (?). We had a skirmish in which they were defeated we killed one and took seven prisoners who that night set fire to the church and fled we pursued them to —–(?). We there had a fight in which we lost about forty killed and wounded.

They retained possession of the houses we were not able to dislodge them. We then marched to Santee, crossed and then to Sumters ponds. We lay there some time and were then discharged about the first of September, 1781. He got no written discharge. He served at that time months and a half. He continued to live at the same place till about the first of June, 1782. at time he was drafted to keep the Tories in Edisto in subjection. They met at Owensborough at the time last mentioned he was under the command of Lieut. Charles Picket and Major O’Dear. They then marched to Edisto at Youngs Compound and were there stationed. They took some Tory women and sent them to Charleston. They lay there one month and was there discharged.

He got no written discharge. He served in the whole nine months and ten days for which he claims pension. He has no testamentary evidence and he knows of no person whose testimony he can procure who can testify to his service. He knows no clergyman whose testimony he can procure who could testify to the report of his service. He hereby relinquishes every claim to a pension or annuity except the present and declared that his name is not on the pension roll of agency of any state.

He was born in (Note: document says “Mulenburg” – see original below.  Must have been Lunenburg since Mecklenburg did not exist until 1764 . . . created out of Lunenburg) Mecklenburgh County, Virginia, on the 30th of May 1755. He has a record of his age at home in his bible. He has lived since the Revolutionary War in the following places. He lived in Camden District till about 1784 and then moved to Burke County, Georgia, lived there about five years then to Warren County, Georgia, lived there about two years then to Washington County, Georgia, lived there about five years then to Hancock County, lived there about three years, moved to Louisiana in St. Helena parish, lived there about five years then to Lawrence lived there about two years and from there to Copiah County, Mississippi where he resided until December, 1834 when he removed to Kemper County aforesaid where he now resides–

He was called into service in the name of the aforesaid and never served as a substitute. He was acquainted with Col Bratens Regiment of Militia, Col. Wade Hamptons troop of Cavalry, also with Major Boykins Troops of Cavalry and with Col. Lee and Washingtons Troops of Cavalry that he never received a commission or written discharge during the Revolutionary war. He also states that there is no clergyman in his neighborhood to whom he is known but that Hugh McDonald, William Herbert, William Brister and Ridings Sessums are well acquainted with him in his present neighborhood and can testify as to his reputation and character for truth. Sworn to and subscribed in open Court May 18, 1836. Lewis Stovall, Clerk James Goyne (signature)

Also, Hugh McDonald, William Herbert, Ridings Sessums and William Brister, residents of County of Kemper and State of Mississippi hereby certify that we are well acquainted with James Goyne who has subscribed and sworn to the above Declaration that we believe him to be 80 years of age that he is reputed and believed in the neighborhood where he resides to have been a soldier of the Revolution and that we concur in that opinion. Subscribed in open court May 18, 1836. Hugh McDonald William Herbert William Brister

And the said George Coatter declares it as his opinion after the investigation of the matter and after putting the interrogations prescribed by the War Department that the above named applicant was a revolutionary soldier and served as he states and said court further certifies that it appears to him that Hugh McDonald, William Herbert and William Brister who are signed to the foregoing certificate are residents of the said county and that they are credible persons and that these statements are entitled to credit. George Coatter now presiding in the sixth Judicial District Mississippi including the County of Kemper.”

The foregoing was copied from a reproduction of the original with little or no changes of spelling, punctuation, phrasing, etc. James Goyne received a Revolutionary War pension, No. 30770 July 22, 1836. An abstract of his pension record appeared in “Mississippi Genealogical Exchange,” Volume 3, published in 1959.

Children born to him include:
John Goyne born July 5, 1776
Sarah Goyne born about 1789
James Goins born about 1790
Wiley Williamson Goynes born December 2, 1799

John Goyne, son of James Goyne, was born July 5, 1776, according to “Mississippi Revolutionary Soldiers.” His birth was in Camden District. He was married, probably in Georgia, December 8, 1800 to Matilda Hall who was born August 12, 1783 in North Carolina, according to Velma S. Brassell Beuerle. She was the daughter of Henry Hall and Mary Jane Ross Hall. It is believed that John Goyne and Matilda Hall Goyne accompanied his father in a move to Tennessee about 1803 and then to Calcasieu Parish where they were located in 1810.

John Goyne was commissioned a captain in the Louisiana militia during the War of 1812 which ended with the Battle of New Orleans January 8, 1815. In 1817 they were living in Hinds County, Mississippi. “John Goynes” appeared in the Copiah County tax list of 1823, the first year of the county’s existence, it having been carved from Hinds County in that year. He paid $2.25 tax on “one poll and two slaves.” The family farm was located seven miles east of Hazelhurst, Mississippi.

“Briant Goynes,” his son and Ancous [Angus?] Goynes also appeared in the tax list, each paying 75c for “one poll.” Also appearing in the 1823 tax list of Copiah County was “Wiley W. Goynes,” brother to John Goyne. “Wiley Goynes” appeared as the head of a household in the 1830 census of adjoining Lawrence County: “Goynes, Wiley white male 20-40 white female 20-40 white male 0-10 white male 0-10 white female 0-10 white female over 60” Wiley W. Goynes had removed from Lawrence County to Kemper District, Mississippi on the Alabama state line by the time of the 1840 census. Four members of the family were engaged in agriculture. In that year his household was listed on page 6 as: “Goynes, Wiley white male 40-50 white female 30-40 white male 10-15 white male 10-15 white female 10-15 white male 5-10 white female 5-10 white male 0-5 white male 0-5 white female 0-5” During the Civil War “Wiley W. Goynes, Co. B, First Louisiana Infantry Regiment,” perhaps a son of the householder above was killed in a battle near Lynchburg, Virginia. He was buried in Lynchburg Cemetery, according to “Behind the Old Brick Wall” by Evelyn Lee Moore.

Generally, the family name was changed to “Guynes” in 1833, according to “Guynes Family History” written by John A. Sands who gave no reason for the surname change. John Guynes died August 15, 1840. Matilda Hall Guynes was enumerated as the head of a household in the 1840 census of Copiah County, page 116. She was the owner of 10 slaves, five of whom where engaged in agriculture: “Guynes, Matilda white female 50-60 white male 15-20 white female 10-15” Matilda Guynes died January 26, 1865. They were buried near Georgetown, Mississippi in Copiah County.

Children born to John Goyne and Matilda Hall Goyne are believed to include:

Bryant W. Goyne born November 23, 1801
Henry Hall Goyne born April 18, 1803
James Goyne born July 25, 1805
Mary “Polly” Goyne born February 28, 1807
Priscilla Goyne born about 1808
Wyatt Goyne born March 22, 1809
George Ross[?] Goyne born about 1810
Elbert Goyne born about 1811
Sarah Goyne born about 1814
John Goyne, Jr. born February 26, 1813
Nancy Goyne born about 1817
Harmon Goyne born about 1820
Matilda Goyne born about 1823
Alzada Goyne born about 1826

Gowen Manuscript Info on James Goyne, part 2:  http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~gowenrf/gowenms005.htm

LUNENBURG COUNTY, VIRGINIA, Part B

James Goyne, son of Mary Goyne, was born May 30, 1755 in Lunenburg County, Virginia, according to the research of Velma S. Brassell Beuerle, a descendant of Flint, Michigan.  In his pension application written May 18, 1836 in Kemper County, Mississippi, James Goyne stated that he was born in 1755 in “Mulenburg County, Virginia,” according to the copy made by the court clerk.  Col. Carroll Heard Goyne, Editorial Boardmember of Shreveport, Louisiana, wrote in July 1995:

“This spelling is suggestive of either Mecklenburg or Lunenburg County.  Since Mecklenburg was formed from Lunenburg County in 1765, it would appear that James was born in the part of Lunenburg that became Mecklenburg County.  In 1748 this area of Lunenburg County was the tax district of Capt. Lewis Delony.  In 1749 it was the tax district of Capt. William Howard.  In 1751 and 1752 it was the tax district of Capt. Field Jefferson.  From these tax lists it appears the senior Going/Goin/Gowin in this district was named John.  Other names appearing on these tax lists beginning in 1751 were William; and in 1752 Joseph, according to “Sunlight on the Southside” by Landon C. Bell.”

Other members of the Goyne family appeared in Lunenburg County at the same time.  Bryan Goyne, regarded as a son of Mary Goyne and a brother to James Goyne, was born about 1757, probably in Lunenburg County also.  Several members of the Gowen family of the Northern Neck of Virginia migrated southward in 1747 to Lunenburg County also.  The southern part of Lunenburg County which lay below the Meherrin River was organized in 1764 as Mecklenburg County.

The descendants of Mary Goyne spelled the name in various ways.  Generally, in Mississippi the surname became “Guynes.” In Louisiana, “Goins” predominated, while in Vir­ginia and Kentucky, “Gowan” was generally adopted.

James Goyne removed to Camden District, South Carolina and served there as a Revolutionary soldier in a militia company commanded by Capt. John Smith in the regiment of Col. John Winn, according to “Genealogical Abstracts of Revolution­ary War Pension Files” abstracted by Virgil D. White.

Col. Goyne wrote:

“In his Revolutionary War Pension Application, James Goyne stated that he served in the militia of Camden District, South Carolina.  James stated that his militia unit rendezvoused at Winnsboro, near which place he resided.  He stated that he served under Col. John Winn.  This proves that James lived in Fairfield County, South Carolina.

James Goyne told where he lived prior to his arrival in Kemper County, Mississippi.  He left Camden District, South Carolina about 1784, and went to live in Burke County, Georgia where he lived for about five years [left in 1789]; then to Warren County, Georgia where he lived for about two years [left in 1791]; then to Washington County, Georgia for about five years [left in 1796]; then to Hancock County, Georgia for about three years [left in 1799]; then moved to St. Elena [Helena] Parish, Louisiana for about five years [left in 1804]; then to Lawrence County, Mississippi for about two years [left in 1806]; then to Copiah County, Mis­sissippi where he resided until December 1834; then moved to Kemper County, Mississippi.

Following James’ guidance, one can find him in the records of Georgia.  In 1791 and 1792 he was listed in Capt. Simmon’s District of Wilkes County.  He was listed in the inventory of the estate of William Minor, Jr. [undated, but between 1794 and 1804] in Hancock County.  The 1802 tax returns of Hancock County list James and John Goyn in Capt. Williams’ District, according to the research of Frank Parker Hudson of Atlanta.

James can be found in the land records of Louisiana.  He received land “by settlement” in the Florida Parishes [St. Helena Parish] of Louisiana in 1810, according to “American State Papers.”  James Goyne signed his pension application in an unsteady, yet clear, hand.”

James Goyne was married about 1775, wife’s name believed to be Mary.  After independence, James Goyne moved to Georgia, living successively in Burke, Warren and Washington counties.  Warren County was formed in 1793 with land from Wilkes, Columbia and Richmond Counties.

It is believed that James Goyne and Mary Goyne became estranged about 1791 and that he was remarried to Heather O’Brien.  Mary Goyne apparently went to live with her son, John Goyne.

Wilkes County was the early residence of William Goyne, “Moses & Agnes Going” and “Jesse Going.”  They appeared on the tax rolls of Warren County in 1793, the first year of the county’s existence.  “Moses Going,” a Revolutionary soldier from Virginia declared on oath that he had also “served as a soldier under Capt. James Gunn in Col. Byrd’s regiment in 1760,” according to “Virginia Historical Magazine.”

Details of the lives of these individuals and descendants can be found in the Wilkes County, Georgia section of the manuscript.

Following his Georgia residence, James Goyne apparently lived in Tennessee in 1803.  He removed to Louisiana and lived in Calcasieu Parish in 1810.  He received a land grant there in neutral territory which later became Vernon Parish.  James Goyne “claimed improvement on the east side of the Amite River, about three miles below the line of demarcation.  He settled there in 1810 and has cultivated the land continually,” according to “Calendar of State Papers, Crosby.”

In 1817 James Goyne was living in Hinds [later Copiah] County, Mississippi, according to “Mississippi Revolution­ary Soldiers.”  He continued to live there in 1823 and 1825 and appeared in Kemper County, Mississippi in 1834, ac­cording to Mrs. Beuerle.  She is a “double descendant” of James Goyne, having two of his sons, John Goyne and James Goins, as her ancestors.

James Goyne made a declaration regarding his Revolutionary service in Kemper County May 18, 1836:

“On this 18th day of May, 1836, personally appeared before me, George Coatter, Judge of Circuit Court [the same being a court of record] now sitting in and for said county, James Goyne, a resident of said county of Kemper and state of Mississippi.  Aged about eighty-one years. Who being first duly sworn according to law doth on his oath make the following Declaration in order to obtain the benefit of the Act of Congress passed June 7, 1832.

That he entered the service of the United States under the following named officers and served as herein often stated.  That he lived in Camden District, state of South Carolina, at which place some time in June, 1776 when he was drafted to go to Charleston in order to intercept the British Fleet that was expected to land there under Col. John Wynn in Capt. John Smith’s Company of militia, Lt. William Daugherty.  And rendezvoused at Winnsborough in said state at the time last above men­tioned and marched to Charleston and was stationed there together with said company to guard the town and after being there about a month he was marched back and dismissed about the last of July, 1776 having served about six weeks but received no written discharge–and that afterward on the last of January–as near as he can recollect–he was again drafted under the same officers as above in Camden District, South Car­olina where he then resided and rendezvoused at Winnsborough at the same time and was moved immediately to Charleston where he was stationed some time when said company joined General Ash [John Ashe] from North Carolina and was then marched to Pluresburgh [Plainsburgh?] near Savannah at which place he was stationed about eight days. He was again dismissed or discharged and returned home about the last of February, 1779–having served about one month during which service he was in no engagement nor did he receive any written discharge.

After remaining at home about four days he again en­tered the service of the U, S. as a drafted soldier under Col. John Wynn in Capt. Francis Tedwells Company of Militia Lt. William Daugherty and rendezvoused at Winnsborough about the first of March 1779 near which place this declarent then resided and from where he was marched to Savannah then near Augusta at which place he volunteered to go to Georgia to fight the Indians and put himself under Capt. John Nixon and Col. Hamarm (?) and was marched to Nightsborough (?) and from there to Falsom Fort on Abuchy (?) River and from which place the Indians re­treated and were pursued by said company and over­taken and a skirmish ensued in which seventeen Indians and two white men were killed and Maj. Ross was killed in the part of the re______ (?).

From there he was marched to Augusta and crossing the river they joined their former companions–at which place they remained some time.  From there he was marched to Augusta together with the rest of the forces and joined Gen. Lincoln [Benjamin Lincoln] about four miles below that plain–and marched down the [Savannah] River and crossing at Lummertins (?) [Lumberton] ferry marched to Bains Bridge (?) near the head of Ashley River where they remained some time–and there to stones (?) at the big rice fields to meet the British who were encamped there–at which place he remained some time–and when his term of service expired he was discharged some time in June, 1779–but received no written discharge having served at this time three months and some days–from where he returned to Camden District where he continued to live until some time in June the precise time he cannot recollect–at which time he volunteered to go to the assistance of General Greene at the siege of Ninety-Six put himself under Capt. Charles Reeves in Col. Edward Lacys Lieut. Col. Patrick McGreffe and Maj. John O’Lears regiment of volunteers.

We met together on the road about fourteen miles from Winnsborough at the time last mentioned we then marched to Congaree River there we rested and endeavored to intercept [Francis] Lord Rawdon on his march from Ninety-Six to Charleston.  He retreated to Orangeburg and encamped there.  We had joined General Greene’s army before we got to Orangeburg.  We then marched to the Eutaw Springs. We then [joined] General Sumters Army [Thomas “Gamecock” Sumter] and marched to a church about thirty miles from Charleston at which place we were attacked by a British troop of horse [?].  We had a skirmish in which they were defeated; we killed one and took seven prisoners who that night set fire to the church and fled; we pursued them to —–(?).  We there had a fight in which we lost about forty killed and wounded.  They retained possession of the houses; we were not able to dislodge them.

We then marched to Santee, crossed and then to Sumters ponds.  We lay there some time and were then discharged about the first of September, 1781.  He got no written discharge.  He served at that time ___ months and a half.  He continued to live at the same place till about the first of June, 1782 at which time he was drafted to keep the Tories in Edisto in subjection.  They met at Owensborough at the time last mentioned; he was under the command of Lieut. Charles Picket and Maj. O’Dear.  They then marched to Edisto at Youngs Cowpens and were there stationed.  They took some Tory women and sent them to Charleston.  They lay there one month and was there discharged.  He got no written discharge.  He served at that time one month.

He served in the whole nine months and ten days for which he claims pension.  He has no testamentary evi­dence, and he knows of no person whose testimony he can procure who can testify to his service.  He knows no clergyman whose testimony he can procure who could testify to the report of his service.  He hereby relinquishes every claim to a pension or annuity except the present and declared that his name is not on the pension roll of the agency of any state.  He was born in Mecklenburgh County, Virginia, on the 30th of May 1755. He has a record of his age at home in his bible.  He has lived since the Revolutionary War in the following places.  He lived in Camden District till about 1784 and then moved to Burke County, Georgia, lived there about five years then to Warren County, Georgia, lived there about two years then to Wash­ington County, Georgia, lived there about five years then to Hancock County, lived there about three years, moved to Louisiana in St. Helena parish, lived there about five years then to Lawrence lived there about two years and from there to Copiah County, Mississippi where he resided until December, 1824 when he removed to Kemper County aforesaid where he now resides.

He was called into service in the name of the aforesaid and never served as a substitute.  He was acquainted with Col. Bratens Regiment of Militia, Col. Wade Hamptons troop of Cavalry, also with Maj. Boykins Troops of Cavalry and with Col. Lee and Washingtons Troops of Cavalry that he never received a commission or written discharge during the Revolutionary war.  He also states that there is no clergyman in his neighborhood to whom he is known but that Hugh Mc­Donald, William Herbert, William Brister and Ridings Sessums are well acquainted with him in his present neighborhood and can testify as to his reputation and character for truth.

Sworn to and subscribed in open Court May 18, 1836.

Lewis Stovall, Clerk

James Goyne [signature]

Also, Hugh McDonald, William Herbert, Ridings Ses­sums and William Brister, residents of County of Kem­per and State of Mississippi hereby certify that we are well acquainted with James Goyne who has subscribed and sworn to the above Declaration that we believe him to be 80 years of age that he is reputed and believed in the neighborhood where he resides to have been a sol­dier of the Revolution and that we concur in that opin­ion.

Subscribed in open court May 18, 1836.

Hugh McDonald, William Herbert, William Brister

And the said George Coatter declares it as his opinion after the investigation of the matter and after putting the interrogations prescribed by the War Department that the above named applicant was a revolutionary soldier and served as he states and said court further certifies that it appears to him that Hugh McDonald, William Herbert and William Brister who are signed to the foregoing certificate are residents of the said county and that they are credible persons and that these statements are entitled to credit.

George Coatter

now presiding in the sixth Judicial District Mississippi including the County of Kemper.”

The foregoing was copied from a reproduction of the original with little or no changes of spelling, punctuation, phrasing, etc.

James Goyne received a Revolutionary War pension, No. 30770 July 22, 1836.  An abstract of his pension record ap­peared in “Mississippi Genealogical Exchange,” Volume 3, published in 1959.

An interview was held in 1905 with Susan Goynes Dickerson of Live Oak County, Texas at age 80.  She was a great-granddaughter of John Goyne.  In the newspaper account she stated that she knew her great-grandfather and that he and his four brothers had served in the Revolutionary War.

Children born to James Goyne and Mary Goyne include:

John Goyne                                                        born July 5, 1776

Sarah Goyne                                                      born about 1789

Children born to James Goyne and Heather O’Brien Goyne are believed to include:

James Goins                                                     born about 1793

Wiley Williamson Goynes                              born December 2, 1799

See News Article:

News Article about Susan Goynes Dickerson

In 1905 her photograph was printed in connection with a newspaper article about her life:

“The above is a likeness of Mrs. Susan Dickerson of La Para, Texas who has had relatives in every war in which the United States have been involved, and what is more remarkable, she has seen every one of them.  Mrs. Dickerson is now in her eightieth year.

In the Revolutionary War her grandfather, James Goynes and his four brothers served.  In the War of 1812 her uncle, John Goynes and her mother’s brother, Zidiah Brister served.

In the Texas Revolution two of her uncles, Dan and William Brister served.  In the Mexican War she had a husband, James Augustus Tindol and a brother Daniel Goynes.

In the Civil War she had a husband John S. Dickerson who was wounded at Vicksburg, which subsequently caused his death and a son, Ben F. Tindol and six of her brothers.

In the Spanish-American War she had a nephew W. W. Goynes, Jr.

She was born in Lawrence County, Mississippi February 3, 1825; moved with her father W. W. Goynes, Sr. to Kemper County in 1833; married James Augustus Tindol in 1839 and moved to Louisiana in 1849.  Tindol died the year they went to Louisiana.  In 1852, she was married to F. A. Bolgiano; was divorced from him in 1859 and married J. S. Dickerson in 1860.  She moved to Texas in 1856 and back to Louisiana in 1858 and back to Texas in 1865 where she has resided ever since.

By James Augustus Tindol she had three sons, Ben F. Tindol, Dick Tindol and G. W. Tindol.  By Francis A. Bolgiano she had two daughters, Mrs. S. E. Ferrell and Mrs. Mattie C. Brister.  By J. S. Dickerson she had a son, J. J. Dickerson and a daughter, Mrs. Dollie Maxwell.

She has twenty-five grandchildren and seven great-grandchildren.  She has been a member of the Baptist Church for forty-five years.  She now lives at La Para in Live Oak County with Mrs. C. W. Maxwell, her youngest daughter.  She now draws a Confederate pen­sion of $2.16 per month.”

Margaret Frances Goynes Olson wrote March 17, 2001 to report some errors in the newspaper account

“I am writing to explain some of the typographical errors in the newspaper article about Susan Goynes Tindol Dickerson.

She was born in 1825, so, she could not have meant “her” brothers served in the Revolutionary War, but it should have been the brothers of James Goyne, her grandfather.

Also, the newspaper spelled her maiden name as Gay-nes, but it has always been spelled Goynes along with every person who descended from Wiley Williamson Goynes.  His father’s spelling was Goyne, but, it ap-pears to me that every one of the men, up to that time, changed the spelling of their name in some way, when-ever they were married.  The “A” should be “O”.

My Grandmother, Ellen E. McMurray-Goynes death record is listed in the Texas State Archives as Gaynes, but, that is the only place I have found it misspelled.  Her husband’s tombstone is Goynes.

The Tindol name was also misspelled in the article.  George Washington Tindol is the correct spelling.

When she listed her daughters as Mrs. S. E. Ferrell, she was using the initials of her daughters maiden name, Sarah Ella Bolgiano-Ferrell, not C. Bynum Ferrell who she married last.  Then Mrs. Mattie C. Brister was Mat-tie C. Bolgiano Brister, wife of Yancy G. Brister.  Mat-tie and Yancy were cousins.”

(Below is a copy of the article:

Susan Goynes Dickerson complete article

The Houston Post. (Houston, Tex.), Vol. 20, No. 54, Ed. 1 Sunday, May 29, 1904, newspaper, May 29, 1904; Houston, Texas. (texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth602907/m1/28/?q=%22Houston%20Post%22: accessed March 25, 2017), University of North Texas Libraries, The Portal to Texas History, texashistory.unt.edu; .
https://texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth602907/m1/28/?q=%22Houston%20Post%22

Susan Goynes Tindol Bolgiano Dickerson died after 1905.

http://mv.ancestry.com/viewer/ce79a99a-9956-4734-9ea3-24b2703a86aa/69705632/34229170814?_phsrc=WLx45&usePUBJs=true

Revolutionary War Pension app 1 Revolutionary War Pension app 2 Revolutionary War Pension app 3 Revolutionary War Pension app 4 Revolutionary War Pension app 5 Revolutionary War Pension app 6 Revolutionary War Pension app 7 Revolutionary War Pension app 8 Revolutionary War Pension app 9 Revolutionary War Pension app 10 Revolutionary War Pension app 11 Revolutionary War Pension app 12 Revolutionary War Pension app 13 Revolutionary War Pension app 14

http://interactive.ancestry.com/1995/MIUSA1775D_135684-00748?pid=24498&backurl=http://search.ancestry.com//cgi-bin/sse.dll?indiv%3D1%26dbid%3D1995%26h%3D24498%26tid%3D69705632%26pid%3D34229170814%26hid%3D63037953884%26usePUB%3Dtrue%26_phsrc%3DWLx43%26_phstart%3Ddefault%26usePUBJs%3Dtrue&treeid=69705632&personid=34229170814&hintid=63037953884&usePUB=true&_phsrc=WLx43&_phstart=default#?imageId=MIUSA1775D_135684-00748

From GRF Newsletter Nov 1995:

James Goyne Served in South Carolina Militia During
Revolutionary War (part 2)

By Carroll Heard Goyne, Jr.
Editorial Boardmember
10019 Canterbury Drive, Shreveport, Louisiana, 71106

Part 2:

My purpose in writing this paper is to fit as many members of
the family as possible into their proper niches. Then, those
left after this effort should be easier to place. Migration
patterns may tell us something about which branch a person
belongs to. Given names may also provide a clue. The
migration patterns of some individualsÄÄseemingly not
closely relatedÄÄindicates that they may have been
corresponding with each other, as they converged on a
particular area and lived as neighbors. An example is Kemper
County, Mississippi, where persons descending from several
[?] different older generations lived. Also, there is more to be
learned about the Goynes who stated that they were born in
Tennessee. In this regard, we must remember that Tennessee
was formed from North Carolina in 1796. At least one Goyne
[Benjamin of Jefferson County, Alabama] stated that he was
born in North Carolina, but was actually born in an area that
became TennesseeÄÄaccording to his son.

This paper is being written at the conclusion of a June 1995
research trip. Our research on this trip was conducted in
Mississippi, Alabama, South Carolina and North Carolina. In
recent years we have researched several counties in Georgia
and in the Georgia Archives. We have previously researched
in north Louisiana and south Arkansas. Over the years I have
corresponded with several Goyne researchers around the
United States, and overseas. Thus, since our collection of
Goyne data may have reached a plateau, for a while at least, it
is my intention at this time to present a summary of
information on what I consider “my” branch of the Goynes.

A Starting Point I have long felt that William Goyne,
[Newsletter, May 1990] who made his will in 1816 in Warren
County, Georgia, and James Goyne, who was born in 1755 in
Lunenburg County, Virginia, were brothers. As a starting
point, I have evaluated the Pension Application for
Revolutionary War Service of James Goyne, made on 18 May
1836, in Kemper County, Mississippi.15 In his application,
James Goyne [Newsletter, October 1990] stated that he was
born in 1755 in “Mulenburg” County, Virginia. [This is the
spelling used by the court clerk.] This spelling is suggestive
of either Mecklenburg or Lunenburg County. Since
Mecklenburg was formed from Lunenburg County in 1765, it
would appear that James was born in the part of Lunenburg
that became Mecklenburg County. In 1748 this area of
Lunenburg County was the tax district of Capt. Lewis Delony.

In 1749 it was the tax district of Capt. William Howard. In
1751 and 1752 it was the tax district of Capt. Field Jefferson.
From these tax lists it appears the senior Going/Goin/Gowin in
this district was named John. Other names appearing on these
tax lists beginning in 1751 were William; and in 1752
Joseph.16

In his Revolutionary War Pension Application, James Goyne
stated that he served in the militia of Camden District, South
Carolina. James stated that his militia unit rendezvoused at
Winnsboro, near which place he resided. He stated that he
served under Col. John Winn. This proves that James lived in
Fairfield County, South Carolina.

James Goyne told where he lived prior to his arrival in
Kemper County, Mississippi. He left Camden District, South
Carolina about 1784, and went to live in Burke County,
Georgia where he lived for about five years [left in 1789]; then
to Warren County, Georgia where he lived for about two years
[left in 1791]; then to Washington County, Georgia for about
five years [left in 1796]; then to Hancock County, Georgia for
about three years [left in 1799]; then moved to St. Elena
[Helena] Parish, Louisiana for about five years [left in 1804];
then to Lawrence County, Mississippi for about two years [left
in 1806]; then to Copiah County, Mississippi where he resided
until December 1834; then moved to Kemper County,
Mississippi.

Following James’ guidance, one can find him in the records of
Georgia. In 1791 and 1792 he was listed in Capt. Simmon’s
District of Wilkes County. He was listed in the inventory of
the estate of William Minor, Jr. [undated, but between 1794
and 1804] in Hancock County. The 1802 tax returns of
Hancock County list James and John Goyn in Capt. Williams’
District.17

James can be found in the land records of Louisiana. He received
land “by settlement” in the Florida Parishes [St. Helena
Parish] of Louisiana in 1810.18 James Goyne signed his
pension application in an unsteady, yet clear, hand.

Two of James Goyne’s sons have been identified, as well as
many of his progeny. James’ son John Goyne [born 1776]
married Matilda Hall, daughter of Henry W. Hall, in 1800 in
Washington County, Georgia. John and Matilda lived for a
time in Tennessee, then moved to the Florida Parishes of
Louisiana, where Matilda’s father had already settled in St.
Helena Parish in 1803.19 For an unknown reason, John and
many of his descendants adopted the surname Guynes.

Persons of this surname are numerous in the records of
Louisiana and Mississippi.

James’ son, Wiley Williamson Goyne [born 1799], lived in
Louisiana and Mississippi where he was married to Martha
Brister. They later lived in Live Oak County, Texas where
they died. This line adopted an “S” at the end of the name.

The 23Äyear difference in the ages of John and Wiley
Williamson Goyne, leaves room for James to have had several
additional children. They have not yet been identified.

Another document of help in researching the family of James
Goyne is a newspaper clipping of an interview conducted in
1905 with Susan Goynes Dickerson of Live Oak County,
Texas. Susan Dickerson was the daughter of Wiley
Williamson Goyne, and the granddaughter of James Goyne. In
her interview, 80Äyear old Susan Goynes Dickerson stated
that she knew her grandfather, James Goyne, and that he and
his four brothers had served in the Revolutionary War.20

Current Research With our attention thus directed to Fairfield
County, South Carolina, we made a research trip to that area in
June 1995. Our research was conducted in the South
Caroliniana Library of the University of South Carolina; the
North Carolina and South Carolina Archives; the county
courthouses and county libraries of Chester and Fairfield
Counties, South Carolina, and of Rutherford County, North
Carolina. A very pleasant surprise was the Genealogy Room
at the Fairfield County Museum in Winnsboro, South
Carolina. From this research trip we can conclude that a
group of Goynes did in fact reside in the area of Chester and
Fairfield Counties, and just across the state line in Rutherford
County, North Carolina during the Revolutionary War. Some
of the names in this group are: Alexander, Amos, Daniel,
Drury, Henry, John, and William.

Some of these same names are included in a 1773 petition by
residents of the northern part of Orange County, North
Carolina to Governor Martin of North Carolina. This petition
asked for a partition of Orange County. Among the persons
signing this petition were: Alexr Gowin, John Gowen, Danel
Gowen, Emas [Amos] Gowen, and Alexr Gowen Senr.21 A
study of these names, before and after their arrival along the
Broad River of South Carolina and North Carolina, may cast
some light on this family.

Alexander Goyne The name Alexander is pervasive in the
Goyne family, both as a given name and as a middle name.
However, we must discount its use among the descendants of
Hiram Davis and Tyra A. Goyne, both sons of William and
Agnes “Nancy” [Stroder] Goyne of Warren County, Georgia,
since their maternal grandfather was named Alexander
Stroder. Some name sightings are as follows:

In September 1753, Alexander Going was witness to a deed in
Orange County, North Carolina.22 On 10 February 1757,
Alexander Gowin was a chainÄcarrier on a land survey in
Orange County, North Carolina.23 Alexander Going’s name
appeared on several other documents in Orange County, North
Carolina between 14 January 1758 and 13 May 1766.24 In
1773, a petition for the partition of Orange County, North
Carolina was signed by Alexr Gowen, Senr and Alexr
Gowen.25 Alexander Going was listed in the 1782 tax list of
Capt. Whitesides’ District in Rutherford County, North
Carolina. He was taxed on no land.26

Listed in North Carolina Revolutionary War Accounts, is a
clothing ticket for oe2 paid to Alexander Gowin on 22 August
1782.27 Alexander Goyne appeared in the records of Fairfield
County, South Carolina on 5 Nov. 1784 when he made a purchase
at the estate sale of the widow Barber.28 On 17 August
1786, in Fairfield County, South Carolina [in State vs Daniel
Goyen], Daniel Goyen, as principal, and Alexander Goyen, his
security, forfeited their Recognizance.29

Alexander Going was enumerated in the 1790 United States
Census of Fairfield County, South Carolina. wcAlexander
Going [age 45+] was enumerated in the 1800 United States
Census of Rutherford County, North Carolina, along with a
younger John Going [age 16 & under 26]. Alexander Going
[age 45+] was enumerated in the 1810 United States Census of
Rutherford County, North Carolina.

Alexander Goyen/Goyer filed on land in the District of Ouachita,
Louisiana on 1 January 1836, and again on 10 Mar.
1837.30 Alexander Goyen/Goyer [age 50Ä60] was enumerated
in the 1840 United States Census of Union Parish,
Louisiana. [Note: Union Parish was formed from Ouachita
Parish in 1839.] On 8 October 1842, Alexander Goyen/Goyer
sold his land in Union Parish, Louisiana.31

(To Be Continued)

14. Davis, George Arthur. Davis and Fifty Allied Colonial Families of New England, 1956.
15. Revolutionary War Pension No. SÄ30442, National Archives, Washington, DC.
16. Bell, Landon C. Sunlight on the Southside, Lists of Tithes, Lunenburg Co., Virginia, 17481783, Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Co, Inc, 1974
17. GA tax information provided by Frank Parker Hudson, Atlanta, GA.
18. American State Papers, Vol. III, Public Lands, Gales & Seaton, 1834 [Southern Historical Press, 1994]
19. Hall information is from a paper on Henry W. Hall by Prentiss E. Hall, Jr, provided by Evelyn S. Hall, a GRF member, of Shreveport, Louisiana.
20. Most of the information on Wiley Williamson Goynes, including the 1905 newspaper clipping, was provided by
Margaret Goynes Olson, a GRF member of Kingsville, TX.
21. Saunders, William L., Secy of State. The Colonial Records of NC, Vol. 9, 1771Ä1775, Raleigh, 1890, page 809.
22. Haun, Weynette Parks. Orange Co., NC Court Minutes, 1752Ä1761, Book 1, 1991.
23. Hofman, Margaret M. The Granville District of NC, 1748Ä1763, Abstracts of Land Grants, Vol. II, The Roanoke News Co., 1987.
24. See note 23, and Weeks, Eva B. Register of Deeds, Orange Co., NC, 1752Ä1768 & 1793, Heritage Papers, 1984.
25. See note 21.
26. Holcomb, Brent H. 1782 Tax List of Rutherford Co., NC, NC Archives.
27. NC Revolutionary War Accounts, Microfilm DÄ50, NC Archives.
28. Early Wills of Camden District, SC, pages 285Ä287, as seen in The SC Magazine of Ancestral Research, Vol. IV, Spring 1976, page 88.
29. Holcomb, Brent H. Fairfield Co., SC Minutes of the County Court 1785Ä1799, 1981.
30. Entry Book East, District of Ouachita, LA. Copy in Union Parish, LA Courthouse. As written, this name could be either “Goyer or Goyen.” I include it here for consideration.
31. Union Parish, LA Conveyance Record Book A, page 233.

From GRF Newsletter Sept 2002:

JAMES GOYNE, REVOLUTIONARY SOLDIER FROM VIRGINIA SERVED IN SOUTH CAROLINA MILITIA

James Goyne, son of Mary Goyne, was born May 30, 1755 in Lunen-
burg County, Virginia, according to the research of Velma S.
Brassell Beuerle, a descendant of Flint, Michigan. In his pen-
sion application written May 18, 1836 in Kemper County, Missis-
sippi, James Goyne stated that he was born in 1755 in “Mulen-
burg County, Virginia,” according to the copy made by the court
clerk.

Col. Carroll Heard Goyne, Editorial Boardmember of Shreveport,
Louisiana, wrote in July 1995:

“This spelling is suggestive of either Mecklenburg or Lunenburg
County. Since Mecklenburg was formed from Lunenburg County in
1765, it would appear that James was born in the part of Lunen-
burg that became Mecklenburg County. In 1748 this area of Lun-
enburg County was the tax district of Capt. Lewis Delony. In
1749 it was the tax district of Capt. William Howard. In 1751
and 1752 it was the tax district of Capt. Field Jefferson. From
these tax lists it appears the senior Going/Goin/Gowin in this
district was named John. Other names appearing on these tax
lists beginning in 1751 were William; and in 1752 Joseph, ac-
cording to “Sunlight on the Southside” by Landon C. Bell.”

Other members of the Goyne family appeared in Lunenburg County
at the same time. Bryan Goyne, regarded as a son of Mary Goyne
and a brother to James Goyne, was born about 1757, probably in
Lunenburg County also. Several members of the Gowen family of
the Northern Neck of Virginia migrated southward in 1747 to Lun-
enburg County also. The southern part of Lunenburg County which
lay below the Meherrin River was organized in 1764 as Mecklen-
burg County.

The descendants of Mary Goyne spelled the name in various ways.
Generally, in Mississippi the surname became “Guynes.” In Lou-
isiana, “Goins” predominated, while in Virginia and Kentucky,
“Gowan” was generally adopted.

James Goyne removed to Camden District, South Carolina and ser-
ved there as a Revolutionary soldier in a militia company com-
manded by Capt. John Smith in the regiment of Col. John Winn,
according to “Genealogical Abstracts of Revolutionary War Pen-
sion Files” abstracted by Virgil D. White.

Col. Goyne wrote:

“In his Revolutionary War Pension Application, James Goyne sta-
ted that he served in the militia of Camden District, South Car-
olina. James stated that his militia unit rendezvoused at Winns-
boro, near which place he resided. He stated that he served un-
der Col. John Winn. This proves that James lived in Fairfield
County, South Carolina.

James Goyne told where he lived prior to his arrival in Kemper
County, Mississippi. He left Camden District, South Carolina
about 1784, and went to live in Burke County, Georgia where he
lived for about five years [left in 1789]; then to Warren Coun-
ty, Georgia where he lived for about two years [left in 1791];
then to Washington County, Georgia for about five years [left
in 1796]; then to Hancock County, Georgia for about three years
[left in 1799]; then moved to St. Elena [Helena] Parish, Louis-
iana for about five years [left in 1804]; then to Lawrence Coun-
ty, Mississippi for about two years [left in 1806]; then to Co-
piah County, Mississippi where he resided until December 1834;
then moved to Kemper County, Mississippi.

Following James’ guidance, one can find him in the records of
Georgia. In 1791 and 1792 he was listed in Capt. Simmon’s Dis-
trict of Wilkes County. He was listed in the inventory of the
estate of William Minor, Jr. [undated, but between 1794 and
1804] in Hancock County. The 1802 tax returns of Hancock Coun-
ty list James and John Goyn in Capt. Williams’ District, ac-
cording to the research of Frank Parker Hudson of Atlanta.

James can be found in the land records of Louisiana. He re-
ceived land “by settlement” in the Florida Parishes [St. Hel-
ena Parish] of Louisiana in 1810, according to “American
State Papers.” James Goyne signed his pension application in
an unsteady, yet clear, hand.”

James Goyne was married about 1775, wife’s name believed to be
Mary. After independence, James Goyne moved to Georgia, liv-
ing successively in Burke, Warren and Washington counties.
Warren County was formed in 1793 with land from Wilkes, Colum-
bia and Richmond Counties.

It is believed that James Goyne and Mary Goyne became estran-
ged about 1791 and that he was remarried to Heather O’Brien.
Mary Goyne apparently went to live with her son, John Goyne.

Following his Georgia residence, James Goyne apparently lived
in Tennessee in 1803. He removed to Louisiana and lived in
Calcasieu Parish in 1810. He received a land grant there in
neutral territory which later became Vernon Parish.

In 1817 James Goyne was living in Hinds [later Copiah] Coun-
ty, Mississippi, according to “Mississippi Revolutionary Sol-
diers.” He continued to live there in 1823 and 1825 and ap-
peared in Kemper County, Mississippi in 1834, according to
Mrs. Beuerle. She was a “double descendant” of James Goyne,
having two of his sons, John Goyne and James Goins, as her
ancestors.

James Goyne made a declaration regarding his Revolutionary
service in Kemper County May 18, 1836:

“On this 18th day of May, 1836, personally appeared before
me, George Coatter, Judge of Circuit Court [the same being
a court of record] now sitting in and for said county, James,
a resident of said county of Kemper and state of Mississippi.
Aged about eighty-one years. Who being first duly sworn accord-
ing to law doth on his oath make the following Declaration in
order to obtain the benefit of the Act of Congress passed June
7, 1832.

That he entered the service of the United States under the fol-
lowing named officers and served as herein often stated. That
he lived in Camden District, state of South Carolina, at which
place some time in June, 1776 when he was drafted to go to Char-
leston in order to intercept the British Fleet that was expected
to land there under Col. John Wynn in Capt. John Smith’s Company
of militia, Lt. William Daugherty. And rendezvoused at Winns-
borough in said state at the time last above mentioned and
marched to Charleston and was stationed there together with said
company to guard the town and after being there about a month he
was marched back and dismissed about the last of July, 1776 hav-
ing served about six weeks but received no written discharge–
and that afterward on the last of January–as near as he can re-
collect–he was again drafted under the same officers as above
in Camden District, South Carolina where he then resided and ren-
dezvoused at Winnsborough at the same time and was moved immedi-
ately to Charleston where he was stationed some time when said
company joined General Ash [John Ashe] from North Carolina and
was then marched to Pluresburgh [Plainsburgh?] near Savannah at
which place he was stationed about eight days.

He was again dismissed or discharged and returned home about the
last of February, 1779–having served about one month during
which service he was in no engagement nor did he receive any
written discharge.

After remaining at home about four days he again entered the
service of the U, S. as a drafted soldier under Col. John Wynn
in Capt. Francis Tedwells Company of Militia Lt. William Daugh-
erty and rendezvoused at Winnsborough about the first of March
1779 near which place this declarent then resided and from where
he was marched to Savannah then near Augusta at which place he
volunteered to go to Georgia to fight the Indians and put him-
self under Capt. John Nixon and Col. Hamarm (?) and was marched
to Nightsborough[?] and from there to Falsom Fort on Abuchy[?]
River and from which place the Indians retreated and were pur-
sued by said company and overtaken and a skirmish ensued in
which seventeen Indians and two white men were killed and Maj.
Ross was killed in the part of the re______ (?).

From there he was marched to Augusta and crossing the river
they joined their former companions–at which place they re-
mained some time. From there he was marched to Augusta together
with the rest of the forces and joined Gen. Lincoln [Benjamin
Lincoln] about four miles below that plain–and marched down the
[Savannah] River and crossing at Lummertins (?) [Lumberton] fer-
ry marched to Bains Bridge[?] near the head of Ashley River
where they remained some time–and there to stones (?) at the
big rice fields to meet the British who were encamped there–at
which place he remained some time–and when his term of service
expired he was discharged some time in June, 1779–but received
no written discharge having served at this time three months and
some days–from where he returned to Camden District where he con-
tinued to live until some time in June the precise time he cannot
recollect–at which time he volunteered to go to the assistance of
General Greene at the siege of Ninety-Six put himself under Capt.
Charles Reeves in Col. Edward Lacy’s Lieut. Col. Patrick McGreffe
and Maj. John O’Lears regiment of volunteers.

We met together on the road about fourteen miles from Winnsborough
at the time last mentioned we then marched to Congaree River there
we rested and endeavored to intercept [Francis] Lord Rawdon on his
march from Ninety-Six to Charleston. He retreated to Orangeburg
and encamped there. We had joined General Greene’s army before we
got to Orangeburg. We then marched to the Eutaw Springs. We then
[joined] General Sumters Army [Thomas “Gamecock” Sumter] and march-
ed to a church about thirty miles from Charleston at which place we
were attacked by a British troop of horse. We had a skirmish in
which they were defeated; we killed one and took seven prisoners
who that night set fire to the church and fled; we pursued them to
—–(?). We there had a fight in which we lost about forty killed
and wounded. They retained possession of the houses; we were not
able to dislodge them.

We then marched to Santee, crossed and then to Sumters ponds. We
lay there some time and were then discharged about the first of
September, 1781. He got no written discharge. He served at that
time ___ months and a half. He continued to live at the same place
till about the first of June, 1782 at which time he was drafted to
keep the Tories in Edisto in subjection. They met at Owensborough
at the time last mentioned; he was under the command of Lieut.
Charles Picket and Maj. O’Dear. They then marched to Edisto at
Youngs Cowpens and were there stationed. They took some Tory women
and sent them to Charleston. They lay there one month and was there
discharged. He got no written discharge. He served at that time
one month.

He served in the whole nine months and ten days for which he claims
pension. He has no testamentary evidence, and he knows of no person
whose testimony he can procure who can testify to his service. He
knows no clergyman whose testimony he can procure who could testify
to the report of his service. He hereby relinquishes every claim to
a pension or annuity except the present and declared that his name
is not on the pension roll of the agency of any state. He was born
in Mecklenburgh County, Virginia, on the 30th of May 1755. He has a
record of his age at home in his bible. He has lived since the Rev-
olutionary War in the following places. He lived in Camden District
till about 1784 and then moved to Burke County, Georgia, lived there
about five years then to Warren County, Georgia, lived there about
two years then to Washington County, Georgia, lived there about five
years then to Hancock County, lived there about three years, moved
to Louisiana in St. Helena parish, lived there about five years then
to Lawrence lived there about two years and from there to Copiah
County, Mississippi where he resided until December, 1824 when he
removed to Kemper County aforesaid where he now resides.

He was called into service in the name of the aforesaid and never
served as a substitute. He was acquainted with Col. Bratens Regi-
ment of Militia, Col. Wade Hamptons troop of Cavalry, also with Maj.
Boykins Troops of Cavalry and with Col. Lee and Washingtons Troops
of Cavalry that he never received a commission or written discharge
during the Revolutionary war. He also states that there is no
clergyman in his neighborhood to whom he is known but that Hugh Mc-
Donald, William Herbert, William Brister and Ridings Sessums are
well acquainted with him in his present neighborhood and can tes-
tify as to his reputation and character for truth.

Sworn to and subscribed in open Court May 18, 1836.

Lewis Stovall, Clerk
James Goyne [signature]

Also, Hugh McDonald, William Herbert, Ridings Sessums and Wil-
liam Brister, residents of County of Kemper and State of Mis-
sissippi hereby certify that we are well acquainted with James
Goyne who has subscribed and sworn to the above Declaration
that we believe him to be 80 years of age that he is reputed
and believed in the neighborhood where he resides to have been
a soldier of the Revolution and that we concur in that opinion.

Subscribed in open court May 18, 1836.

Hugh McDonald
William Herbert
William Brister

And the said George Coatter declares it as his opinion after
the investigation of the matter and after putting the interro-
gations prescribed by the War Department that the above named
applicant was a revolutionary soldier and served as he states
and said court further certifies that it appears to him that
Hugh McDonald, William Herbert and William Brister who are
signed to the foregoing certificate are residents of the said
county and that they are credible persons and that these state-
ments are entitled to credit.
George Coatter now presiding in the sixth Judicial District Mississippi in-
cluding the County of Kemper.”

James Goyne received a Revolutionary War pension, No. 30770
July 22, 1836. An abstract of his pension record appeared in
“Mississippi Genealogical Exchange,” Volume 3, published in
1959.

An interview was held in 1905 with Susan Goynes Dickerson of
Live Oak County, Texas at age 80. She was a great-granddaugh-
ter of John Goyne. In the newspaper account she stated that
she knew her great-grandfather and that he and his four bro-
thers had served in the Revolutionary War.

Children born to James Goyne and Mary Goyne include:

John Goyne born July 5, 1776
Sarah Goyne born about 1789

Children born to James Goyne and Heather O’Brien Goyne are
believed to include:

James Goins born about 1793
Wiley Williamson Goynes born December 2, 1799

1 Response to 1755 James Goyne b. in SC, moved to Mississippi (Y1)

  1. Pingback: Goyen Going Gowen Goyne Goin, etc, family information – Y-DNA results | Goyen Family Tree

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