State – Pennsylvania

From Gowen Manuscript:  http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~gowenrf/Gowenms098.htm

US FEDERAL CENSUS 1820

First six columns: Free White males
First column: under 10 yrs of age
Second Column: 10 yrs of age to 16 yrs of age
Third Column: between 16 and 18 yrs of age
Fourth column: 16 to 26 including head of household
Fifth column: between 26 and 45 including head of household
Sixth column:45 yrs and upwards including head of household

Next five columns: Free White females
Seventh column: under 10 yrs of age
Eighth column: 10 yrs of age to 16 yrs of age
Ninth column: 16 to 26 including head of household
Tenth column: between 26 and 45 including head of household
Eleventh column:45 yrs and upwards including head of hsehd

Twelveth column: Foreigners not naturalized
Thirteenth column: number of persons engaged in agriculture
Fourteenth column: number of persons engaged in commerce
Fifteenth column: number of persons engaged in manufacture

Slaves:
Sixteenth column: males under 14 yrs of age
Seventeenth column: males 14 yrs under 26
Eighteenth column: males 26 under 45 yrs of age
Nineteenth column: males 45 yrs and upwards
Twentieth column: females under 14 yrs of age
Twenty-first column: males 14 yrs under 26
Twenty-second column: males 26 under 45 yrs of age
Twenty-third column: males 45 yrs and upwards

Free Colored:
Twenty-fourth column: males under 14 yrs of age
Twenty-fifth column: males 14 yrs under 26
Twenty-sixth column: males 26 under 45 yrs of age
Twenty-seventh column: males 45 yrs and upwards
Twenty-eighth column: females under 14 yrs of age
Twenty-ninth column: females 14 yrs under 26
Thirtieth column: females 26 under 45 yrs of age
Thirty-first column: females 45 yrs and upwards
==O==
Gowen Eddy and Catherine Eddy, his wife, were residents of Pennsylvania in 1827 when a son was born. Children born to them include:

Isaac Eddy born in 1827

Isaac Eddy, son of Gowen Eddy and Catherine Eddy, was born in Pennsylvania in 1827, according to the research of Judy Garner. He was married about 1849 to Eliza Jane Burris in Monroe County, Ohio. Children born to them include:

Catherine Sarah Eddy born in July 1854
==O==
John Goun was described as a “private fourth class” serving in Capt. Phillip Wagoner’s Company in 1777, according to “Soldiers of the American Revolution, Philadelphia City, Pennsylvania” by Richard T. Williams
==O==
Lee Gowan was included in the Pennsylvania Pension List of 1818.
==O==
Lt. Col. James Gowan served with the Eighteenth Pennsyl­vania Cavalry Regiment from 1861-1865.
==O==
Nathaniel P. Gowan was listed in unit 150 of the Pennsylvania Infantry, according to the Civil War military roster.
==O==
Robert Gowan was listed in the 115th Pennsylvania Infantry, according to the Civil War Military roster.
==O==
Timothy Gowan was listed in the 5th Regiment of the Pennsylvania Artillary , according to the Civil War Muster Rolls.
==O==
Private Darius Gowen was listed in the 141st Infantry of Pennsylvania, according to the Civil War military roster.
==O==
Francis Gowen was a soldier from Pennsylvania during the Revolutionary War. At different times he served in the First Pennsylvania Regiment, the Fifth Pennsylvania Regiment and the Ninth Pennsylvania Regiment, according to “The Irish Contribution to America’s Independence” by Thomas Hobbs McGinniss, Jr.

After the war, he received five “final settlement certificates” from the U. S. Government acknowledging money due Francis Gowen.

To assist in financing the Revolution the Continental Congress passed a resolution guaranteeing compensation to soldiers who fought at times without pay. In accordance with the resolution, John Pierce, Paymaster General and Commission of Army Accounts, prepared and delivered to the officers and men of the army over 93,000 certificates showing the indebtedness of the Government to each man.

According to the “Report of Daughters of the American Revolution” it was not practical to consolidate into one cer­tificate all of the amounts due each particular soldier, and sev­eral certificates on account of separate items of indebtedness, in some cases for as small a sum as $1, were issued to the same man. In addition to arrearages of monthly pay and payments on currency depreciation account, there was due to the soldiers in the Continental Army at the close of the war what was known as commutation pay. This arose from a promise made in 1776 providing that the end of the war seven year’s half pay would be granted to officers and $80 to soldiers who served to the end.

This issue of certificates began July 11, 1783 and was practi­cally completed by September 15, 1785. A few additional certificates were issued up to May 1787 and possibly later.

On September 30, 1796 the Register of the Treasury reported that on January 1, 1791 the total amount of Army certificates amounted to $10,967,145.52

The certificates were issued only to officers and soldiers of the Continental Line. It did not include militiaman who were paid by their respective states. Since South Carolina was “at outs” with the federal government at that time, no South Carolinians were included in the “final settlement certificates.”

Three certificates were issued to Francis Gowen and two cer­tificates were issued to “Francis Gowen.” It is possible that there were two different individuals with similar names, particularly since both drew $80 commutation pay. However researchers generally feel that all five certificates went to the same individual.

“Francis Gowan” probably enlisted in the First [Penn-sylvania?] Regiment commanded by Col. D. Brodhead shortly after the beginning of hostilities. He received a “final settle-ment certificate No. 74964, for $40.60 and another for $80.00 commutation pay for his service in the First Regiment.

He received a certificate No. 68249 for $33.30 for services in the Ninth [old] Pennsylvania Regiment to January 1, 1781. He received certificate No. 70434 for services under the command of Col. Butler in the 5th [old] Pa. Regt. for $76.00 and Certificate No. 70460 for commutation pay to January 1, 1783 in the Fifth Pennsylvania Regiment.

Francis Gowen appeared on the roster of Gen. Anthony Wayne’s “Legion of the United States, 1792-1796.”

“Pvt. Francis Gowan” received Bounty Land Warrant 9426 for 100 acres of land. The warrant was issued September 4, 1817 with the notation “no papers.”

On July 20, 1819 he applied for a Revolutionary pension in Wayne County, Michigan Territory, and Pension No. S34902 was granted to him. He remained there in 1821, according to “Genealogical Abstracts of Revolutionary War Pension Files” abstracted by Virgil D. White.
==O==
First Lieutenant George W. Gowen enlisted in the Civil War on September 11, 1861, according to the Civil War military roster.
==O==
Henry Gowen served as a private in the First Regiment of the Pennsylvania Continental Line during the Revolutionary War, according to “The Irish Contribution to America’s Independence.”
==O==
James Gowen enlisted in the Civil War on September 18, 1862, according to the Civil War military roster.
==O==
John Gowen was the recipient of two “final settlement cer­tificates” from the U. S. Government for his services as a Rev­olutionary soldier. He received Certificate No. 73813 for ser­vices in the First [Pennsylvania?] Regiment under Col. Broad­head. Certificate No. 83072 for $22.87 was issued to “John Gowan” for services in the Old Congress Regiment of Pennsylvania for service to July 1, 1871.
==O==
Nathaniel Gowen enlisted in unit 150 of the Pennsylvania Infantry on August 30 1862, according to the Civil War military roster.
==O==
Robert Gowen enlisted in the Civil War on March 6, 1862, according to the Civil War military roster.
==O==
Private Thaddeus T. Gowen was listed in the 127th unit of the Pennsylvania Infantry, according to the Civil War military roster.
==O==
Thomas Gowen, assumed to be from Pennsylvania, received final settlement Certificate No. 32398 for $33.55. This series of certificates were given to “Sappers and miners of the United States, paid to November 4, 1783; C. Bushnell, agent.”
==O==
Private Thomas Gowen was listed in the 69th unit of the Pennsylvania Infantry according to the Civil War military roster.
==O==
The 1810 census of Pennsylvania listed two Gowen families. Andy Gowen was enumerated in Chester County and John Gowing was shown in Philadelphia County.
==O==
Corp. Timothy Gowen was listed in the heavy artillery 5th unit of the
==O==
Capt. George W. Gowen, an engineer in civilian life, had his full-length picture taken shortly after he was commissioned commanding officer of C Company in the 48th Pennsylvania Infantry Regiment during the Civil War. He was resplendent in his new blue uniform with all the gold trim and his sabre at his side. The photograph turned out so well that he had another made on his first leave after the victory in the siege of Ft. Macon, North Carolina.

These two photographs survive today, 133 years after the death of Capt. [later Colonel] Gowen, maintained by U.S. Army preservation specialists in a temperature and humidity controlled, acid-free environment. They are part of a collection of 27,000 photographs of Union Civil War soldiers that have been catalogued and placed online by U.S. Army Military History Institute.

Capt. Gowen was cited October 1, 1963 for outstanding ability in building a military railroad in Kentucky and promoted to major. He was appointed to the staff of Maj-Gen. John G. Parke and moved to Tennessee. He was cited for “conspicuous and gallant conduct” in the Battles of the Wild-erness, Spottsylvania Courthouse, Bethesda Church and Pet-ersburg, Virginia, according to “War Department Series,” Volumes 9, 30, 31, 42, 46 and 51.

He was named Assistant Engineer of the Army of the Ohio and made aide-de-camp to Gen. Parke who commanded the Ninth Army Corps. Lt. Col. Gowen participated in the stand-off Battle of Petersburg August 14, 1864. After his miners tunneled into the Confederate trenches and planted explosives, the stalemate was broken in one tremendous explosion. Gowen was promoted on the field to full colonel.

Three days after Robert E. Lee surrendered to Ulysses S. Grant at Appomattox Courthouse on April 9, 1865, Col. Gowen died [perhaps of wounds] on April 12. A statue of Col. Gowen was erected in Petersburg.

Other soldiers in the photography collection of interest to Foundation chroniclers include Sgt. David Gowen, 7th California Regiment; Pvt. Benjamin C. Gowen, Nevada Volunteer Cavalry, First Battalion; Pvt. Gowen Fowles[r?], Company H, 20th Maine Infantry Regiment and Pvt. Jacques Gowing, Company K, 36th Massachusetts Infantry Regiment, according to the Institute’s website. The portraits, some full length and some head-and-shoulders view, generally were taken by professional photographers and show the soldiers in their uniforms with military insignia and accoutrement.

ADAMS COUNTY, PENNSYLVANIA

George Goyen was recorded as the head of a household in the 1800 census of Adams County, page 475, recorded as:

“Goyen, George white male 26-45
white female 16-26
white male 16-26
white male 0-10
white female 0-10”

ALLEGHENY COUNTY, PENNSYLVANIA

George Gowans Cross was born April 18, 1892 in Amesville, Pennsylvania, according to “Maryland Military Men in the World War, 1917-1919.” While living in Barton, Pennsylvania he was inducted into Company C, 66th Engineers Regiment, U.S. Army. He received an honorable discharge from Ft. Dix July 12, 1919. He served overseas from June 19, 1918 to July 7, 1919.
==O==
Christopher Goin was enumerated as the head of a household in the 1880 census of Allegheny County, Enumeration District 128, page 17. The family, living on Fayette Street in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, was recorded as:

“Goin, Christopher 39, born in England
Hannah 39, born in England
Frank 1/12, born in Pennsylvania
Downing, Allice 16, born in England”
==O==
Joseph Goin was listed as the head of a household in the 1880 census of Allegheny County Enumeration District 51, page 9, Charles Township, enumerated as:

“Goin, Joseph 53, born in Luthernges
Mary A. 39, born in Baden
Annie A. 5, born in Pennsylvania
William H. 4, born in Ohio”
==O==
Evelyn W. Goins of Wilkinsburg, Pennsylvania died May 15, 1999, according to her obituary in the “Pittsburgh Post-Gazette.”
==O==
Genie Goins was occupied as a laborer at 293 Spruce in Pittsburgh, according to the 1890 city directory.
==O==
Helen Goins, 99, died July 14, 1994 according her obituary in the “Pittsburgh Post-Gazette,” page B-6.
==O==
Richard Goins was occupied as a driver at 2933 Spruce in Pittsburgh, according to the 1890 city directory.
==O==
No members of the Gowen family were listed in the 1826 city directory of Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania.
==O==
Alexander Gowans was born in 1890 in Amesville, Pennsylvania. He was enlisted in the U. S. Army November 5, 1917 at age 27. He was promoted to corporal January 10, 1918 while serving in Company H, 313th Infantry Regiment. He was overseas from July 8, 1918 to June 2, 1919 and served in the Meuse-Argonne campaign. He was honorably discharged June 7, 1919.
==O==
Timothy Gowen, age 13, was enumerated in the household of Christopher Weldon, age 60 and Catherine Weldon, age 54 in the 1850 census of Allegheny County, Franklin Township.
==O==
Dr. Ruth Garner Goyne, Sharon Hill, Pennsylvania, was listed in the 1969 edition of the “American Medical Directory.”
==O==
Margaret McGowan, an Irish emigrant, was enumerated as the head of a household in the 1880 census of Elizabeth, Pennsyl-vania in Allegheny County, Page 229-B:

“McGowan, Margaret, 47, white, widow, housekeeper,
born in Ireland, father born in
Ireland, mother born in Ireland
John 20, son, single, coalminer, born
in Scotland, father born in Ireland
mother born in Ireland
Neal 17, son, single, coalminer, born
in Scotland, father born in Ireland
mother born in Ireland
Margaret 13, daughter, born in Scotland,
father born in Ireland, mother
born in Ireland
James 11, son, born in Scotland, father
born in Ireland, mother born in
Ireland
Joseph 7, son, born in Scotland, father
born in Ireland, mother born in
Ireland”
==O==
Samuel McGowan, an Irish emigrant, was enumerated as the head of a family in the 1880 census of Pittsburgh, 2nd Ward, District 3, page 551-B:

“McGowan Samuel 34, laborer, born in Ireland,
parents born in Ireland
Annie 32, wife, born in Ireland, par-ents born in Ireland
Robert 7, son, born in PA, parents
born in Ireland
Samuel 4, son, born in PA, parents
born in Ireland
Jane 11 months, daughter, born
in PA, parents born in
Ireland.”

Robert McGowan, son of Samuel McGowan and Annie McGowan, was born in 1872 in Pittsburgh and appeared as a seven-year-old in the 1880 census of his father’s household. Additional information on him is being sought by Cheryl M. Gray, Orlando, Floria.

ARMSTRONG COUNTY, PENNSYLVANIA

John Gowan was enumerated in the 1800 census of Armstrong County, page 199 as the head of a household composed of:

“Gowan, John white male 26-45
white female 26-45
white female 10-16
white male 10-16
white female 0-10
white female 0-10
white female 0-10
white female 0-19
white female 0-10”

BEANE COUNTY, PENNSYLVANIA

R. James Goins was listed as the head of a household enu­merated in the 1880 census of Beane County, Enumeration District 206, page 3. The family, living in Rochester, Penn­sylvania, was recorded as:

“Goins, R. James 26, born in Ohio
J. Elizabeth 22, born in Pennsylvania
M. Gertie 11/30, born in Pennsylvania”

BEAVER COUNTY, PENNSYLVANIA

George Gowan was an undertaker living in Beaver County in 1912, according to Daniel Burrows.

BERKS COUNTY, PENNSYLVANIA

George Gowen was employed as a puddler [converts pig iron into wrought iron] at 330 Chestnut in Reading, PA, according to the 1889 city directory.

BRADFORD COUNTY, PENNSYLVANIA

Allan Lincoln Gowan and his wife, Millicent Adela Warring Gowan were residents of Bradford County when a son was born:

George Benton Gowan born September 17, 1936

George Benton Gowan, son of Allan Lincoln Gowan and Millicent Adela Warring Gowan, was born September 17, 1936. He was married February 21, 1953 to Beatrice Louise Humphrey. She was born April 18, 1936 in Bradford County.

Children born to them include:

William Allen Gowan born August 17, 1953
Bonnie Sue Gowan born February 23, 1956
Sherry Lynn Gowan born September 9, 1957
Deborah Ann Gowan born February 15, 1959
George Benton Gowan II born September 14, 1960
Wendy Louise Gowan born March 2, 1962

William Allen Gowan, son of George Benton Gowan and Beatrice Louise Humphrey Gowan, was born August 17, 1953 at Sayre, Pennsylvania in Bradford County. He was married May 18, 1974 to Deborah Ann Farnham. He was remarried in December 1982, wife’s name Ann. Children born to William Allen Gowan, Deborah Ann Farnham Gowan and Ann Gowan are unknown.

Bonnie Sue Gowan, daughter of George Benton Gowan and Beatrice Louise Humphrey Gowan, was born February 23, 1956. She was married August 26, 1978 to Donald Gene Miller.

Sherry Lyun Gowan, daughter of George Benton Gowan and Beatrice Louise Humphrey Gowan, was born September 9, 1957. She was married August 12, 1978 to Harry Sewalt. Later she was remarried in 1988, husband’s name Joseph.

Deborah Ann Gowan, daughter of George Benton Gowan and Beatrice Louise Humphrey Gowan, was born February 15, 1959. She was married November 17, 1979 to Allan E. West.

George Benton Gowan II, son of George Benton Gowan and Beatrice Louise Humphrey Gowan, was born September 14, 1960. He was married June 20, 1981, wife’s name Janet. Children born to George Benton Gowan II and Janet Gowan are unknown.

Wendy Louise Gowan, daughter of George Benton Gowan and Beatrice Louise Humphrey Gowan, was born March 2, 1962. She was married April 30, 1983 to Mark Wolcott.
==O==
Donna Marie Gowan was born in 1923 in Athens, Pennsylvania of parents unknown. She died July 8, 1996 in Riverside, California, according to her obituary in the July 10, 1996 edition of the “Riverside Press-Enterprise:”

“Memorial services for Donna Marie Sawyer, 73, will be at 2 p.m. today at Central Community Christian Fellowship in Riverside. She died Sunday of cancer at Alta Vista Healthcare in Riverside. Burial will be private. Arlington Mortuary in Riverside is handling arrangements.

Mrs. Sawyer, who was born in Athens, Pa., lived in Riverside 18 years. She was a homemaker for 50 years. She was a member of the Central Community Christian Fellowship for six years.

She is survived by a daughter, Sandra Pew of Riverside; a son, Richard Wheatley of Meshoppen, Pennsylvania, six grandchildren; five great-grandchildren; a sister, Janet Gowan O’Dell of Athens; and two brothers, James Gowan of Collinsville, Illinois and George Gowan of Sayre, Pennsylvania.”
==O==
Florence Gowin, daughter of Cameron Gowin and Carrie Johnson Gowin, was married in Bradford County to Gerald W. Smith on an unknown date.

BUTLER COUNTY, PENNSYLVANIA

An outline of the family and siblings of George McGowan and his wife Margaret Marshall McGowan of Butler County and Beaver County, Pennsylvania was provided to the Foundation by Iris Wakeling:

2-George McGowan [born c1825]
Sp: Margaret MARSHALL (-)
3-Lyle MC GOWAN (-)
3-Mary Kinney McGowan
3-Annie MC GOWAN (-)
3-William MC GOWAN (-)
3-Elizabeth MC GOWAN (-)
3-Dennis MC GOWAN (-)
3-John M. MC GOWAN (-)
2-Lyle MC GOWAN (abt 1828-)
Sp: Levi FINNEY (-)
3-Anna FINNEY (-)
3-William FINNEY (-)
3-Minerva FINNEY (-)
3-FRANK FINNEY (-)
3-Lizzie FINNEY (-)
3-Jack FINNEY (-)
3-Edward FINNEY (-)
3-Olive FINNEY (-)
3-Pearl FINNEY (-)
3-Harry FINNEY (-)
3-Ike FINNEY (-)
3-Myrt FINNEY (-8 Jan 1930)
2-William MC GOWAN (abt 1830-)
Sp: Amanda SARVER (22 Jan 1847-) Have found marriage for these.
3-Andrew MC GOWAN (-)
2-George MC GOWAN (1837-)
2-Isaac MC GOWAN (1844-)
2-Delilah MC GOWAN (1846-)
2-Catharine Ann MC GOWAN (1847-)
2-Calvin MC GOWAN (1849-)

CAMBRIA COUNTY, PENNSYLVANIA

Louise V. Gowen was born in Gallitin, Pennsylvania July 15, 1926. In 1956 she lived at 2004 Arizona, El Paso, Texas. She was married July 15, 1956 to Joseph R. Suckinos who was born December 6, 1925 at Armsbury, Pennsylvania, accord­ing to Dona Anna County, New Mexico Marriage Certificate 36556. The marriage was preformed in Las Cruses, New Mexico. Joseph R. Suckinos was a member of Battery E, 2nd G.M. Ft. Bliss, Texas.

CHESTER COUNTY, PENNSYLVANIA

Mary Gowan was born about 1720, place and parents unknown. She was married about 1736 in Chester County to John Woody III who was born in 1715, according to a message written January 12, 1998 by Michael A. Woody, a descendant of Yucaipa, California. It is believed that they were Quakers. Mary Gowan Woody apparently died early in their marriage, perhaps in childbirth. Some uncertainty exists as to the date of her death.

John Woody III was remarried December 27, 1738 at St. George Parish, Baltimore County, Maryland to Mary Lindley who was born September 4, 1717 at New Garden Monthly Meeting in Chester County. They were disowned by the Quakers for “marrying out of unity.”

John Woody III bought 60 acres in Baltimore County, Mary-land in 1739 and sold it in 1754. He gave his occupation as “House Carpenter.” Likely he moved to Orange County, North Carolina about that time. He was listed in the Orange County, North Carolina tax list in 1755. His brother-in-law Thomas Lindley had moved there in 1753.

John Woody received a land grant of 374 acres in Orange County from the Earl of Granville on August 15, 1759. The land lay on the south side of the Haw River and provided a ford across the river. He later operated a ferry on the stream during the Revolutionary War. Years later a bridge was con-structed at the site of the ferry. Woody’s Ford was in the vi-cinity of where Mary’s Creek entered the Haw River, placing it three miles south of the Saxapahaw, North Carolina.

The property was surveyed May 12, 1756 by William Chur-ton, surveyor, according to Orange County Patent Book 12, page 52. Thomas Lindley and Francis Jones were the sworn chain carriers, and W. Churton and William Few were wit-nesses, according to Margaret Hofmann in “The Granville District of North Carolina 1748-1763.”

Vivian Woody wrote in “Stream of Time 1638-1975” “The legal description of the land read, ‘Beginning at a hickory at the river and running thence west 40 chains to a white oak, thence south 75 chains to a white oak, thence east 55 chains to a hickory, thence north 26 chains to Haw River thence up the various courses of the said River to the first Station.’”

Helen White DeWaard wrote in “John White of Virginia and North Carolina” “In 1759 John Woody received a grant from the State of North Carolina for 374 acres on the south side of Haw River, just above a confluence of the Mary’s Creek. The south end of a ford was on their land, and John built and operated a ferry there. Present-day location of this land grant is about 20 miles southwest of Hillsboro, North Carolina now known as Saxapahaw.”

Algie I. Newlin wrote in “Friends at the Spring, A History of Spring Monthly Meeting,” “John and Mary Woody and their children were in the second wave of immigrants to reach the limits of what became Spring Monthly Meeting. They ac-quired a tract of land on the south side of Haw River and just above the confluence of Mary’s Creek with that stream. The south end of a ford across Haw River was on their land. It came to be known as Woody’s Ford; Woody’s Ferry was near, and later Woody’s Bridge was built. The remains of the pillars and abutments of the bridge are still visible.”

John Woody III died in 1762 in Orange County. Later Mary Lindley Woody removed to Blount County, Tennessee where she died May 21, 1795. She was buried there at Friendsville Cemetery. Nine children were born to John Woody III and Mary Lindley Woody. Children born to Mary Gowan Woody include:

Joseph Woody born in 1748

Joseph Woody, son of John Woody III and Mary Gowan Woody, was born in 1748, according to Sal Schwartz, a descendant. He died in 1815. Children born to him include:

Samuel Woody born September 12, 1770

Samuel Woody, son of Joseph Woody, was born September 12, 1770. He died in Maury County, Tennesseee in 1855.
==O==
Thomas Gowan was listed as the head of a household in the 1880 census of Chester County, Enumeration District 86, page 27. The family, living on Dayton Street, Phoenixville, Pennsylvania, was recorded as:

“Gowen, Thomas 30, born in Pennsylvania
Bridget 30, born in Pennsylvania
George 2, born in Pennsylvania
Andrew 1, born in Pennsylvania
Joseph 2/12, born in Pennsylvania”
==O==
Andy Gowen was enumerated in the 1810 census of Chester County as the head of a household.
==O==
John Gowen was recorded in the 1800 census of Chester County, page 905 as the head of a household composed of:

“Gowen, John white male over 45
white female over 45
white male 16-26
white female 26-45
white male 16-26
white female 16-26
white female 10-16
white male 0-10
white male 0-10
white male over 45
white male over 45
==O==
Paula Gowen was serving as the clerk of the Register of Wills and clerk of the Orphans’ Court in West Chester, Pennsylvania for Chester County in 2004.

CRAWFORD COUNTY, PENNSYLVANIA

Amelia Gowan was born about 1838 in Centerville, New York, a town that is not found in 2000. She was living in Crawford County about 1858 when she was married to Ira C. Pitcher as his second wife. He was born in 1830 in Cattaruagus, New York to W. S. Pitcher and Jane Ackerman Pitcher.

They lived on a 160-acre farm near Farmington, Pennsylvania. Children born to them include:

Ralph N. Pitcher born about 1860
Frank B. Pitcher born about 1862
Eva M. Pitcher born about 1865
Putnam L. Pitcher born about 1868

CUMBERLAND COUNTY, PENNSYLVANIA

No member if the Gowen family [or spelling variations] were listed in “Tax Lists, Cumberland County Pennsylvania, 1750, 1751, 1752, 1753, 1762, 1763, and 1764” by Merri Lou Scribner Schaumann.
==O==
Gowan Beatty was enumerated as the head of a household in the 1820 census of Crawford County:

“Beatty, Gowan, Free white male 26-45
Free white female 26-45
Free white male 16-26
Free white male 16-18
Free White female 0-10”

DAUPHIN COUNTY, PENNSYLANIA

Williams Goins was listed as a laborer residing at 113 Cowden in the 1887-90 Harrisburg, Pennsylvania city directories.
==O==
The obituary of Mrs. Mary L. Gowen Downs was published in the “Harrisburg Evening News” January 30, 1995:

“Mary L. Downs, 75, of 150 Rodney Lane, Hampden Twp., formerly of Solana Beach, Calif., died Friday at home. She was a Methodist and a former member of Order of the Eastern Star.

Surviving are four sons, Thomas G. of Elizabethtown, William J. of Camp Hill, Patrick of Los Angeles and Timothy M. of Long Beach, Calif; two brothers, Garret Gowan of Laramie, Wyo., and Clarence Gowen of Albuquerque, N.M.; two sisters, Martha Gowen Neale of Kansas City, Mo., and Joyce Gowen Abele of Boonville, Mo.; and four grandchildren.”
==O==
Jim M’Gowen Decks Hangman
In Dauphin County in 1806

“Annals of Harrisburg, Dauphin County, Pennsylvania” by George A. Brooks of Harrisburg, published in 1858, gives an account of James M’Gowen and James Jamison. The author writes:

“We give an account of all the executions at Harrisburg of persons convicted of murder since the establishment of Dauphin County [1785].

Execution of James M’Gowen and James Jamison [page 214]:

James M’Gowen and James Jamison were tried and convicted by the court of Dauphin County for the mur-der of Jacob Eshleman. Monday, the 6th day of De-cember 1806 was the day fixed for their execution at Harrisburg. Jamison, however, effected his escape from durance [imprisonment], and M’Gowen was con-sequently the only one who suffered the extreme penal-ty of the law on the appointed day.

Although the day was excessively cold, a large number of both sexes assembled at an early hour about the jail, with a view to catch a sight of the unhappy culprit. About 12 o’clock, the culprit was brought of the prison, when a lane was formed by the several militia compa-nies which attended on the occasion.

Through this opening he marched with much firmness, behind the cart which contained his coffin, to the gal-lows on the public grounds, near the Arsenal. Here he expressed the desire to address the spectators, and beg-ged a little liquor to exhiliarate his spirits. As he was only thinly clad, and the weather intensely cold, some of the gentlemen on duty offered him a bottle, contain-ing about half a pint, to taste.

This he took, and before any interference could be made, he drained it to the last drop. The effect of this rather changed the tragedy to a farce.

He became enraged at the executioner, tore off part of the mask the latter had put on to conceal himself, and even knocked him down from the cart. Indeed, such was his beheavior in these, his last moments, that in a great degree eradicated that compassion which many felt for him during his confinement.

He was launched into eternity precisely at 1 o’clock p.m. Jamison was subsequntly arrested near Reading, brought to Harrisburg and likewise publicly executed on the public ground, near the Arsenal.”

DELAWARE COUNTY, PENNSYLVANIA

Joseph Gawin came from Ireland on a certificate from Eden­berry Monthly Meeting dated March 10, 1730, according to “Immigration of the Irish” by Albert Cook Myers. He was received into fellowship by Concord Monthly Meeting, Delaware County, Pennsylvania “1st 2nd month, 1731.”

ELK COUNTY, PENNSYLVANIA

Adam Gowen was listed as the head of a household in the 1880 census of Elk County, Enumeration District 136, page 26, Ridgeway Township composed of:

“Gowen, Adam 53, born in Pennsylvania
Elizabeth 49, born in Pennsylvania
Slight, Thomas 5, born in Pennsylvania”

LACKAWANA COUNTY, PENNSYLVANIA

Gowen Funeral Home was located in New Brunswick, Pennsylvnia at 233 Somerset Street in the Year 2000.

LANCASTER COUNTY, PENNSYLVANIA

“Lancaster County, Pennsylvania Deed Abstracts, Books A-M” by R. Thomas Mayhill listed no Gowens [or spelling variations].
==O==
Ludwig Fishburn stated in his Revolutionary pension applica­tion that he served as wagoner in the fall of 1778 under Wag­onmaster John McGowan. They were “engaged in conveying the public arms from Hummelstown to Philadelphia.” Hum­melstown was later located in Dauphin County which was organized from Lancaster County.

LUZERNE COUNTY, PENNSYLVANIA

William Gowan was listed as the head of a household enu­merated in the 1880 census of Luzerne County, Enumeration District 132, page 29, living at Yatesville, Pennsylvania was recorded as:

“Gowan, William 29, born in Pennsylvania
Mary 30, born in Pennsylvania
Charles 2, born in Pennsylvania”

William Gowan, Jr. was mentioned in the February 7, 1890 edition of the “Wilkes-Barre Evening Leader” as a justice of the peace at Yatesville.
==O==
Marion Gowen, a nurse, died February 3, 1935, according to her obituary in the “Hazelton Standard-Courier:”

“Marion Gowen, daughter of Mrs. Victoria Gowen, of 702 East Diamond Avenue, died at Reading at 4:05 p.m. Sunday morning. She was a graduate nurse of the Allentown State Hospital, class of 1929. Surviving are her mother and the following brothers and sisters: Mrs. Joseph Broski, Hazleton; Felix Gowen, state policeman stationed at Reading; Clement Gowen , Newark, N. J.; Anthony Gowen and Leo Gowen at home.

Undertaker Frank H. Bonin removed the body to the home of her mother, from where the funeral will take place at 9 am Wednesday morning. Requeim high mass in Ss. Peter’s and Paul’s Lithuanian Church at 9:30. Interment in the parish cemetery.”
==O==
Pat Gowin was injured in a mine accident June 11, 1885 in Luzerne County, according to a newspaper report.
==O==
John McGowan of Plymouth township received a license for a “quart,” according to the April 28, 1883 edition of the “Plymouth Star.”
==O==
Michael McGowan of 114 William Street, Old Forge, Pennsylvania died April 1, 1936 and was buried in St. Joseph’s Cemetery in Minooka, Pennsylvania.
==O==
Dominick M’Gowen, age 15, received a “non-fatal injury” while working in Coal Brook Tunnel June 24, 1873, according to the Pennsylvania State Miners’ Inspection Record.

LYCOMING COUNTY, PENNSYLVANIA

Joseph Goings, a negro, was listed as the head of a household in the 1880 census of Lycoming County, Enumeration District 68, page 2. The family, living at 103 East Jefferson Street, Williamsport, Pennsylvania was recorded as:

“Goings, Joseph 53, born in Maryland, negro
Annie 36, born in New York
Joseph Jr. 20, born in New York
Amanda 17, born in New York
John 15, born in Pennsylvania
James 13, born in Pennsylvania
Jacob 10, born in Pennsylvania
Joshua 6, born in Pennsylvania
Jefferson 2, born in Pennsylvania”

MC KEAN COUNTY, PENNSYLVANIA

Albert Goings of Bradford, Pennsylvania, received the trans­fer of an oil and gas lease from R. E. Rogers to 640 acres of land in Crockett County, Texas, on June 17, 1919, according to Crockett County Deed Book 19, page 500.

MIFFLIN COUNTY, PENNSYLVANIA

William Goins, an English emigrant, was listed as the head of a household in the 1880 census of Mifflin County, Enumera­tion District 176, page 10, Granville Township. The family was recorded as:

“Goins, William 45, born in England
Charlotte 38, born in Pennsylvania
William 6, born in Pennsylvania
James 1, born in Pennsylvania
Otto, Martha 17, born in Pennsylvania,
step-daugh­ter”

Apparently William Goins was married to Mrs. Charlotte Otto about 1873.

MONTGOMERY COUNTY, PENNSYLVANIA

George Gowen sold 165 acres of land in Montgomery County, Pennsylvania to John Frederick Hillegas on Febru­ary 6, 1783. Montgomery County adjoins Philadelphia County.

NORTHAMPTON COUNTY, PENNSYLVANIA

George Gowen was enumerated as the head of a household in the 1800 census of Northampton County, page 532, recorded as:

“Gowen, George white male 16-26
white female 16-26
white male 0-10
white male 0-10”

NORTHUMBERLAND COUNTY, PENNSYLVANIA

Pvt. Hugh Gowen received five “final settlement certificates from the U. S. Government following his service as a Revo­lutionary soldier.

All five were for services in the Third Pennsylvania Regiment under the command of Col. R. Butler and were paid to November 4, 1783. Bowen & Betty were agents for Hugh Gowen in his application.

He received Certificate No. 71304 for $96,00 as “Hugh Gowan” and the other four as Hugh Gowen. Certificate No. 70937 was for $50.00. Certificate No. 71903 was for $80.00 commutation pay.

Hugh Gowen was listed in the 1790 census of Northumberland County, Pennsylvania as the head of a household composed of one person, himself. He was listed as over 16. A community known as Gowen City existed as late as 2000 in Northumberland County and was probably the site of the residence of Hugh Gowen there.

Northumberland County was created in 1772. At that time it embraced the land now divided into 27 present counties.

“Pvt. Hugh Gowan” received Land Warrant No. 9463 March 14, 1791, according to “Federal Land Series” Volume III. The land, which lay in central Ohio, was granted by the federal government for military service. The notation of “no papers” on the warrant suggest that his application might have been burned by the British. “Hugh Gowan” received Survivor’s Pension No. 46198 from the state of Pennsylvania.

“Hugh Gowans, quartermaster” appeared on the roster of Gen. Anthony Wayne’s “Legion of the United States, 1792-1796.”
==O==

Anyone familiar with Robert KEARNS, a Revolutionary War Sgt? He is
mentioned in Bell’s History of Northumberland and also there is a Sgt.
CAIRNS/CARNS who I believe is the same person, just different spelling,
mentioned in the PA Archives as a Ranger in the Northumberland Militia. He
owned property and a distillery with a John McGowen/Gowan (also a member of
the militia) in the Chillisquaque area until 1797. Robert
KEARNS/CAIRNS/CARNS is not listed in the DAR Index. I would really like to
connect him to Peter KEARNS/KERN/CARNS/CARNIS etc. of Bloom Township,
Northumberland, 1800 census. I have extensive information on him.

Thanks!

Alice Kern

==O==
James Bevan Goyne, physician and medical administrator, was born at Ashland, Pennsylvania April 25, 1911, the son of John G. Goyne and Cora A. Bevan Goyne. He received a B.S. degree from Pennsylvania State University in 1933 and an M.D. degree from Jefferson Medical College in 1937. He was married to Jean Zemaitis August 2, 1950. In 1970 James Bevan Goyne and Jean Zemaitis Goyne lived at Morris Plains, New Jersey.
==O==
William H. Goyne, an English emigrant, was born in England in 1838. He appeared as the head of a household in the 1880 census of Northumberland County, Enumeration District 144, page 91, living in Enterprise, Pennsylvania, which was recorded as:

“Goyne, William H. 42, born in England
Ann 36, born in England
William 17, born in Pennsylvania
Thomas 15, born in Pennsylvania
Frank 13, born in Pennsylvania
James 11, born in Pennsylvania
Ida 8, born in Pennsylvania
Minnie 6, born in Pennsylvania
Mabel 4, born in Pennsylvania
Charles 1, born in Pennsylvania”
==O==
John McGowan, a member of the Pennsylvania militia in the area of Chillisquaque, Pennsylvania, was a partner with Robert Kearns, a Revolutionary War sergeant in the operation of a distillery in Northumberland County, according to the research of Alice Kern.

PHILADELPHIA COUNTY, PENNSYLVANIA

Marilyn Goins attended Henry H. Houston Grade School in Mt. Airy and was graduated from W. B. Saul High School of Agricultural Sciences of Roxborough, Pennsylvania in 1970, according to Dolores Cobb Phifer.
==O==
“Alex Gowan, Mrs. Gowan and James Gowan” appeared on the passenger list of the “Carthaginian” which arrived in the Port of Philadelphia from Glasgow, Scotland on March 6, 1889, according to the research of Susan Sagre.
==O==
James Gowan, an unemployed sailor, was indicted in May 1900 for the murder of his aged mother, according to “Violent Death in the City, Suicide, Accident and Murder in Nineteenth Century Philadelphia, Pennsylvania” by Roger Lane.

The account read:

“It was clear that Sarah Gowan had hanged herself, and the coroner’s jury had so ruled. But James Gowan’s apparent indifference, the general disorder of their joint household, and a history of general ill will combined to make a bad impression, and the District Attorney was moved to charge that he had ‘driven’ the old woman into taking her life.

James Gowan was declared ‘not guilty’ of the murder charge.”
==O==
Francis V. Gowen and his wife, Marguerite H. Gowen, later lived in Philadelphia. Francis V. Gowen died prior to 1963. Marguerite H. Gowen, a columnist for “Catholic Standard & Times” for 30 years, died November 1, 1963 at Philadelphia, according to the “New York Times” in its November 3, 1963 edition. She had retired from writing in 1961.

Dr. George Gowen, a physician, son of Francis V. Gowen and Marguerite H. Gowen, was mentioned in the article as a sur­vivor. Other survivors include seven grandchildren.
==O==
Anne N. Goines, negress, was listed as the head of a house­hold in the 1880 census of Philadelphia County, Enumeration District 143, page 21, living at 1605 Sanson Street, Philadel­phia. The family was recorded as:

“Goines, Anne 64, born in Virginia, negro
William B. 30, born in Pennsylvania
Hellan 26, born in Pennsylvania
William 9, born in Pennsylvania
Joseph 7, born in Pennsylvania
Emily 3, born in Pennsylvania
Goines, W. B. 39, born in Virginia
Stella 39, born in Pennsylvania”
==O==
Bazel N. Goines, negro, of Philadelphia, graduated in 1847 from Lafayette College at Easton, Pennsylvania, according to “The Men of Lafayette” by West. Bazel N. Goines died at Albany, New York about 1870.
==O==
Rocier Goings was listed as the head of a household in the 1880 census of Philadelphia County, Enumeration District 11, page 25. The family, living at 234 Dickenson Street, was recorded as:

“Goings, Rocier 37, born in Virginia
Rachel 27, born in Pennsylvania
Clarence E. 6, born in Pennsylvania
Florence L. 4, born in Pennsylvania
Estella V. 2, born in Pennsylvania
Smith, Rachel 49, born in Maryland,
mother-in-law
Laura 16, born in Pennsylvania,
sister-in-law”

It is believed that Rocier Goings was married to Rachel Smith about 1874, probably in Philadelphia.
==O==
Daniel Gowan was listed as the head of a household in the 1880 census of Philadelphia County, Enumeration District 16, page 23. The family, living at 806 Reed Street, was recorded in Philadelphia as:

“Gowan, Daniel 27, born in Pennsylvania
Hannah 22, born in Pennsylvania
Mary J. 3, born in Pennsylvania
Annie 8/12, born in Pennsylvania”
==O==
Jane Gowan was married to Charles Grugan December 26, 1795 at Swed’s Church in Philadelphia.
==O==
Mac Gowan was listed as the head of a household in the 1880 census of Philadelphia County, Enumeration District 640, page 1. He was apparently a widower living with his two children and a brother. The family, living at 2217 Oxford, Philadelphia, was recorded as:

“Gowan, Mac 31, born in Pennsylvania
John 5, born in Pennsylvania
Bessie 3, born in Pennsylvania
Gravatt 17, born in Pennsylvania”
==O==
Susan Gowan, who was born in England in 1820, was listed as the head of a household in the 1820 census of Philadelphia, Enumeration District 306, page 16. The family. living on Frankford Road, Philadelphia, was recorded as:

“Gowan, Susan 60, born in England
Work, James 25, born in PA, son-in-law
Margaret 28, born in PA, daughter
Anna Mary 2, born in PA, granddaugh­ter”

Apparently Margaret Gowan was married to James Work about 1887.
==O==
Barney Gowen, who was born in Ireland in 1933, was listed as the head of a household in the 1880 census of Philadelphia County, Enumeration District 464, page 12. The family, which lived on Collgeville-Bristol Turnpike, Philadelphia, was recorded as:

“Gowen, Barney 47, born in Ireland
Ann 47, born in Ireland
Elizabeth 17, born in Philadelphia
Michael 12, born in Philadelphia
Mary 5, born in Philadelphia”
==O==
George F. Gowen was born in Philadelphia January 28, 1923. He served in the U. S. Marine Corps from 1943 to 1946 and was discharged as a first lieutenant. He received his B.A. de­gree from the University of Pennsylvania in 1948, and an M. D. degree from Jefferson Medical College in 1952. He was married in 1957 and in that year joined the faculty of Yale University where he remained until 1961. From 1962 through 1964 he was on the faculty of Women’s Medical College. In 1969 he was listed in the “American Medical Directory” as a resident of Philadelphia. In 1973 he was with the Surgery Department of Misercordia Hospital in Philadelphia. Four children were born to George F. Gowen.
==O==
Loretta Agnes Gowen was a senior faculty advisor at Philadelphia Normal School, William Penn High School in Philadelphia June 26, 1929, according to the 1929 graduation program.

Loretta Agnes Gowen wrote “A Study of Pulse Rate and Body Temperature of 75 Philadelphia Normal School Girls” which was published at Philadelphia in 1931. The 103-page book in indexed in National Union Catalogue.
==O==
Mary Gowen, who was born in England in 1828, was listed as the head of a household in the 1880 census of Philadelphia County, Enumeration District 536, page 55. The family, which lived on Collegeville-Bristol Turnpike, Philadelphia, was recorded as:

“Gowen, Mary 52, born in England
Elizabeth 15, born in Pennsylvania
Mary 9, born in Pennsylvania”
==O==
Michael Gowen, who was born in Ireland in 1833, was listed as the head of a household in the 1880 census of Philadelphia County, Enumeration District 390, page 3. The family which lived at 1234 North 12th Street, Philadelphia was recorded as:

“Gowen, Michael 47, born in Ireland
Delaney, Mary 67, born in Ireland
Gowen, Michael M. 21, born in Pennsylvania
Anna S. A. 17, born in Pennsylvania
Catherine E. 14, born in Pennsylvania
Thomas F. 12, born in Pennsylvania
Mary E. 9, born in Pennsylvania
Georgianna M. 3, born in Pennsylvania”

Apparently Michael Gowen arrived in Pennsylvania before 1859. Apparently Mary Gowen, husband’s name Delaney was married about 1830, probably in Ireland.
==O==
Patrick Gowen, who was born in Ireland in 1840, was listed as the head of a household enumerated in the 1880 census of Philadelphia County, Enumeration District 614, page 7. The family which lived at 1610 Sybert Street, Philadelphia, was recorded as:

“Gowen, Patrick 40, born in Ireland
Anna 35, born in Pennsylvania
Margaret 10, born in Pennsylvania
James 8, born in Pennsylvania
Eleanor 6, born in Pennsylvania
Anna 4, born in Pennsylvania
John 2, born in Pennsylvania
Joseph 1/12, born in Pennsylvania”
==O==
The obituary of Thomas Gowen was published in the February 23, 1895 edition of the “Philadelphia Public Ledger.”
==O==
Dr. Henry Lytle Gowens, Jr. was born in 1884. He was grad­uated from Howard University and in 1908 was graduated from Hahnemann Medical College. At his death, at age 69, January 4, 1953 he was chief of the eye department of the Mercy Douglass Hospital, according to the “New York Times.”
==O==
Dr. Jean Gowing resided in Philadelphia in 1969, according to “American Medical Directory.”
==O==
John Gowing was enumerated as the head of a household in the 1810 census of Philadelphia County. John Gowing was appointed as administrator of a will in 1813 in Philadelphia, according to Philadelphia County, Will Book L, page 116. “John Goines” was appointed administrator of a will in 1834, according to Philadelphia County Will Book 10, page 155, file 318. The two administrator appointments were indexed in “Index of Wills and Administrations Records, Philadel­phia, Pennsylvania, 1682-1850” by Richard T. Williams.
==O==
William Gowing was married to Jane McCoy August 6, 1778 at the Third Presbyterian Church in Philadelphia. Of William Gowing and Jane McCoy Gowing nothing more is known.
==O==
Sarah McGowan arrived at the Port of Philadelphia aboard the “Hannah Thornton” June 11, 1850. With her were Samuel Gowan, age 30, Margaret Gowan, age 27, and Mary Jane Gowan age three. It is believed that a Gowan child died during the voyage.

SCHUYLKILL COUNTY, PENNSYLVANIA

Richard Gowen, who was born in 1817 in Wales, was listed as the head of a household in the 1880 census of Schuylkill County, Enumeration District 196, page 13. The family living in Mahony, Pennsylvania, was recorded as:

“Gowen, Richard 63, born in Wales
Mary 59, born in Wales
Thomas W. 39, born in Wales
Richard, Jr. 31, born in Wales
Marion 23, born in Wales, daughter
Maggie 19, born in Pennsylvania
Mary Jane 9, born in Pennsylvania”

Richard Gowen apparently emigrated to Pennsylvania between 1857 and 1863.
==O==
Gowen Post No. 22 of the Grand Army of the Republic had a number of Civil War soldiers who attended a Battle of Gettysburg reunion, according to a front-page newspaper article in the September 26, 1910 edition of the “Pottsville Republican:”

“Soldiers Off for Gettysburg

The following members of Gowen Post, No. 22 G.A.R. accompanied by their wives left this morning for Get-tysburg where they will attend the unveiling of the monument erected by the State tomorrow. The unveil-ing will be marked with appropriate exercises. Those who left today were Capt. John T. Boyle, Hugh Steven-son, Benjamin Jenkins, Arthur Branigan, Ethan Cran-dall, Thomas Williams, David C. Pritchard, George Foltz, John C. Crosland, William McGrone [or McGlone], John McGlone, Henry Groatman, Chas. P. Potts, Penrose Smith, Emanuel Templin, George Hol-der, Francis Shollenberger, Chas. Shelly and Chas. Fisher, David Mellon, Wm. Miller and Robert Thomas.”

This appears to refer to the massive monument on the battlefield that contains the name of every Pennsylvania soldier who participated in the Battle of Gettysburg.
==O==
A. Howard Goyne, son of Arthur H. Goyne and Maude Koepke Goyne, was born in 1910 in Ashland, Pennsylvania. He was married to Marie Evans about 1933. She died in 1986. They had lived in Somerset, New Jersey and in Fountain Springs, Pennsylvania. He died March 4, 2001 at the age of 91, according to his obituary in the “Hazelton Standard-Speaker” of March 6, 2001. He died at St. Peter’s Hospital in New Brunswick, New Jersey. He was buried in Fountain Springs. He was vice-president of Goyne Pump Company in Ashland.

SOMERSET COUNTY, PENNSYLVANIA

Four Goan children are believed to have been orphaned in Somerset County about 1837, according to the research of Caroline Reece Kimsey of Franklin, North Carolina. She re­ports that families by the name of Gohn, Goin and Goon were enumerated in the 1840 census of Somerset County, but there is no evidence to relate the orphans to any of these households in 1840.

The orphans are identified as:

Andrew Goan born about 1826
Peter Goan born January 22, 1832
Emmanuel Goan born about 1834
Ella Goan born about 1836

Andrew Goan was born about 1826, probably in Somerset County. He was probably “bound out” by the Somerset County Court about 1837 to serve an apprenticeship. He was married by 1859, wife’s name, Jane L.

Andrew Goan was listed as the head of a household enu­merated in the 1880 census of Henry County, Iowa, Enumer­ation District 95, page 18, Center Township, living on White Street in Mt. Pleasant, Iowa:

“Goan, Andrew 53, born in Pennsylvania
Jane L. 48, born in Pennsylvania
Lola M. 20, born in Iowa
Rushton 14, born in Iowa
Belmont J. 10, born in Iowa
John T. 5, born in Iowa
Blanch 3, born in Iowa”

Andrew Goan was listed as an intervenor in some suits filed against “Rush A. Goan,” regarded as Rushton A. Goan, son of Andrew Goan, in Henry County, according to a news item in the November 10, 1897 edition of “Mt. Pleasant Weekly News:”

“National State Bank vs. R.A. Goan and Andrew Goan intervenor, attachment. Settled as to intervention of Andrew Goan.

First National Bank, T.L. Beers, Jas. B Hart and Leed-ham & Baugh vs. R.A. Goan and Andrew Goan inter-venor, four attachment cases. Settled as to the petition of the intervention of Andrew Goan. Default against R. A. Goan and attached property ordered sold.

J. H. Sweeney and Mary Bresnahan vs. R.A. Goan, Andrew Goan and J. H. Wallbank, damages. Defend-ants’ demurrer overruled.

Rush A. Goan vs. W. H. Whitney et al, foreclosure. Settled and dismissed.”

Of Andrew Goan, Jane L. Goan and their descendants nothing more is known.

Galen & Goan, Abstractors were mentioned in an article in the February 5, 1896 edition of “Mt. Pleasant Weekly News.” They were also shown as a law firm.

Peter Goan, second of the orphans, was born January 22, 1832 in Somerset County, according to an article written by a son, Orrin Sylvester Goan describing the family’s trip to California in 1864. The article, retained by Caroline Reese Kimzey, mentions that Peter Goan was accompanied on the trip by a brother “Emmanuel Goan” and a younger sister, “Ella Goan” who died during the trek. The obituary of Peter Goan identi­fies him as “an orphan while still a young child and that he served an apprenticeship of nine years.”

At the age of 22, in 1854, Peter Goan removed from Somerset County to Chicago, Illinois. After a brief stay, he arrived in Dubuque County, Iowa in April 1855. He was married there November 1, 1855 to Emily Jane Cain who was born April 16, 1835 in Lafayette, Indiana. She was the daughter of Paul Cain and Anna Maria Price Cain who had also moved to Dubuque.

Paul Cain was a New York native and had married Anna Maria Price in Cincinnati in 1828, according to Marilyn Dale, a Cain researcher. He appeared as the head of a household in the 1836 Territorial Census of Dubuque.

Children born to them include:

Louisa Cain born about 1830
Sarah Elizabeth Cain born about 1833
Emily Jane Cain born April 16, 1835
Thomas Benton Cain born about 1838
Orrin Reese Cain born about 1841
Eugenia Cain born about 1844
Laura Cain born about 1848

In 1860, Peter Goan appeared in the Dubuque city directory and in the federal census of Dubuque County with two chil­dren. In the 1860s, Peter Goan was superintendent of wood­working shops and railroad repair shops in the Dubuque area. In 1864, perhaps at the instance of a younger brother, Peter Goan was influenced to make a trip to California. He was saddened by the unfortunate events on the trek to California and soon returned to Dubuque.

His family reappeared in the 1870 census of Dubuque, and Pe­ter Goan was the subject of a biographical sketch in “History of Dubuque County, Iowa” published in 1880.

Peter Goan was listed as the head of a household in the 1880 census of Dubuque County, Enumeration District 176, page 11, Julian Township, living on Race Street in Dubuque, Iowa:

“Goan, Peter 47, born in Pennsylvania
Emla 44, born in Ohio
Sylvester 21, born in Iowa
Lola 18, born in Iowa
Walter 12, born in Iowa
Nettie 9, born in Iowa
Mabel 4, born in Iowa
Harry 1, born in Iowa”

About 1887, Peter Goan removed to LaGrange, Illinois and built a home there that was still occupied in 1990, according to Caroline Reece Kimsey. In 1887, he was employed by Kennedy Biscuit Works. He retired from the firm in 1902. The couple observed their 50th wedding anniversary in 1905 “with an elegant affair at their home,” according to a newspa­per account of the occasion. Peter Goan died August 22, 1911 and was buried in Bronswood Cemetery in Oak Brook, Illi­nois. Emily Jane Cain Goan died there December 16, 1921 and was buried beside her husband.

Children born to Peter Goan and Emily Jane Cain Goan in­clude:

Emma F. Goan born in 1856
Orrin Sylvester Goan born April 15, 1859
Lola E. Goan born August 24, 1861
Walter U. Goan born about 1867
Nettie M. Goan born in 1871
Mabel M. Goan born about 1875
Harry Goan born in 1879

Emma G. Goan, daughter of Peter Goan and Emily Jane Cain Goan, was born in 1856 in Dubuque. She was married September 12, 1878 to George T. Garth.

Orrin Sylvester Goan, son of Peter Goan and Emily Jane Cain Goan, was born April 15, 1859. He was recorded in the 1880 census as a 21-year-old in his father’s household. He was married December 17, 1884 to Annabell Adams. Children born to Orrin Sylvester Goan and Annabell Adams Goan are unknown.

Lola E. Goan, daughter of Peter Goan and Emily Jane Cain Goan, was born August 24, 1861 in Dubuque. She appeared at age 18 in the 1880 census. She was married November 24, 1880 to James Joseph Lee who was born December 25, 1853. He was a son of Charles Carrolton Lee and Evaline Atwell Merrill Lee. He died in Dubuque February 19, 1934, and she died there February 16, 1946.

Children born to them include:

Norman Leslie Lee born November 3, 1892

Norman Leslie Lee, son of James Joseph Lee and Lola E. Goan Lee, was born November 3, 1892 in Dubuque. He was married there June 5, 1918 to Mary Elizabeth “Mayme” Win­ner who was born May 4, 1895 in Jackson County, Iowa. She was the daughter of Charles Edgar Winner and Ellen “Ella” Belknap Winner. Mary Elizabeth “Mayme” Winner Lee died May 15, 1926 in Lancaster, Wisconsin. Norman Leslie Lee died in Davenport, Iowa December 16, 1952.

Children born to them include:

Lorraine Anita Lee born May 7, 1919

Lorraine Anita Lee, daughter of Norman Leslie Lee and Mary Elizabeth “Mayme” Winner Lee, was born May 7, 1919. She was married December 26, 1934 in Dubuque to Thomas Grady Reece who was born September 5, 1903 in Macon County, North Carolina.

Children born to them include:

Caroline Reece born April 18, 1937

Caroline Reece, daughter of Thomas Grady Reece and Lor­raine Anita Lee Reece, was born April 18, 1937. She was married about 1958, husband’s name Kimsey.

Walter U. Goan, son of Peter Goan and Emily Jane Cain Goan, was born about 1867 in Dubuque. He appeared as a 12-year-old in the 1880 census of his father’s household. He removed to New York City and died there of pneumonia November 14, 1917.

Nettie M. Goan, daughter of Peter Goan and Emily Jane Cain Goan, was born in 1871. She was accidentally killed Septem­ber 16, 1885 and was buried in Dubuque. Later the body was exhumed and reburied in Bronswood Cemetery at Oak Brook, Illinois.

Mabel M. Goan, daughter of Peter Goan and Emily Jane Cain Goan, was born in 1875. She appeared as a four-year-old in the 1880 census. She died March 31, 1894 and was buried in Bronswood Cemetery as well.

Harry Goan, son of Peter Goan and Emily Jane Cain Goan, was born in Dubuque in 1879. He was married about 1904 in Chicago, wife’s name Blanche. He became an executive with National Biscuit Company. It is believed us that Nabisco Pub­lic Relations Department might supply biographical in­formation on him. Children born to Harry Goan and Blanche Goan are unknown.

Emmanuel Goan, one of the orphans, was born about 1834, probably in Somerset County. He was married before 1859. In 1864 they made a trip to California and apparently re­mained there when his brother returned to Dubuque. He re­mained in California until about 1872 when he removed to Oregon.

“E. Goan,” a widower, suggested as Emmanuel Goan, was enumerated as the head of a household in the 1880 census of Linn County, Oregon, Enumeration District 70, page 24 in East Albany:

“Goan, E. 45, born in Pennsylvania
Mary 20, born in Illinois, daughter
A. W. 19, born in Illinois, son
Ida 12, born in California, daughter
H. C. 10, born in California, son
L. S. 8, born in California, son”

SUSQUEHANNA COUNTY, PENNSYLVANIA

Lydia Jane Gow was born April 2, 1845 at Hanford, Pennsyl­vania in Susquehanna County of parents unknown, according to Judith Bixby, a descendant. She was married December 31, 1864 to William Alexander Caruth who was born in Canada while his family was enroute from Ireland to the United States.

WASHINGTON COUNTY, PENNSYLVANIA

Mary Gowan was born in Scotland about 1785 of parents unknown and emigrated to Pennsylvania. She was married there about 1810 to Samuel Black and lived in Monongahela, Pennsylvania. Samuel Black built the first glass works in Washington County and the first flour mill. He also built a distillery for the manufacture of licensed whiskey and became wealthy.

Eight children were born to them including:

Cyrus Black born about 1813
Mary Fletcher Black born about 1820

Cyrus Black, son of Samuel Black and Mary Gowan Black, was born about 1813 at Monangahela. He became a successful surgeon in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania.

Mary Fletcher Black, daughter of Samuel Black and Mary Gowan Black, was born about 1820 at Monangahela. She was married about 1838 to George A. Clarke who was born Aug-ust 7, 1807 at Stoney Creek, Pennsylvania in Somerset Coun-ty. He purchased Kimmel’s Flour Mill there, as well as a grist mill and a woolen mill. Later they removed to Chattanooga, Tennessee.
==O==
James Gowen appeared as the head of a household in the 1800 census of Washington County, page 748. Enumerated were:

“Gowen, James white male over 45
white female over 45
white male 16-26
white female 16-26
white male 10-16
white male 10-16
white female 0-10
white male 0-10
white female 0-10
white female 0-10”
==O==
John Fisher of Washington County applied for a Revolutionary pension in 1832. In his affidavit he stated that “Samuel Gowon and William Gowon can testify to my character” inferring that they were his neighbors.
==O==
James McGowen, with his brothers, Robert McGowen and William McGowen, settled in Washington County about 1790. James McGowen was the youngest of seven children, and in his childhood he was apprenticed to a reed manufacturer. At age 26 James McGowen was married to Abigail Harris. Sev-eral children were born to them, but only one attained adult-hood:

James McGowen born about 1795

James McGowen, son of James McGowen and Abigail Harris McGowen, was born about 1795 in Washington County. He attended Washington College and became a schoolteacher. He was married about 1818 to Mary Hughes, daughter of Daniel Hughes.

James McGowen died March 26, 1871 at the age of 92. In politics he was a Jacksonian Democrat and in religion a member of the Presbyterian Church.

Children born to James McGowen and Mary Hughes McGowen include:

Abigail McGowen born about 1820
James H. McGowen born about 1822
Elizabeth McGowen born about 1825
Mary McGowen born about 1829

Abigail McGowen, daughter of James McGowen and Mary Hughes McGowen, was born about 1820. She was married about 1838 to William Adams.

James H. McGowen, son of James McGowen and Mary Hughes McGowen, was born about 1822.

Elizabeth McGowen, daughter of James McGowen and Mary Hughes McGowen, was born about 1825. She was married about 1845 to Wilson Wiley, according to Jack Heine, a descendant of New Mexico..

Mary McGowen, daughter of James McGowen and Mary Hughes McGowen, was born about 1829.

WESTMORELAND COUNTY, PENNSYLVANIA

YORK COUNTY, PENNSYLVANIA

Phillip Goan was born in 1757 in York County, according to “Genealogical Abstracts of Revolutionary War Pension Files” abstracted by Virgil D. White. He enlisted there in the Pennsylvania Conentinal Line. Phillip Goan appeared in the 1790 census of York County as the head of a household of eight, according to “Heads of Families, Pennsylvania, 1790.”

“Phillip Gohn” applied for a Revolutionary pension May 17, 1834, stating that he had always lived in York County. He re­ceived Pension 6898. He died March 18, 1839.
==O==
Thomas Gowans was married November 26, 1778 to Rachel McClurg “at the Widow McClurg’s house” by Rev. James Clarkson, according to the research of Mamie Way of Fairmont, Oklahoma. The “Widow McClurg” is regarded as the mother of the bride, but could have been the bride herself.

Thomas Gowans and Rachel McClurg Gowans were residents of Hopewell, Pennsylvania in 1799. They lived at Chanceford, Pennsylvania in 1781 and 1784, according to “York County, Pennsylvania Church Records of the Eighteenth Century,” Volume I by Marlene S. Bates and F. Edward Wright.

Apparently Thomas Gowans died or was incapacitated before the end of the decade. “Rachel Gowan” appeared in the 1790 census of York County, Chanceford township, page 269 as the head of a household composed of “one male over 16 [Thomas Gowans?] and four females.”

“Gowan, Rachel white female
white male over 16
white female
white female
white female”

An inspection of the probate records of York County would probably confirm the identity of the “one male over 16.”

Children born to Thomas Gowans and Rachel McClurg Gowans include:

Elizabeth Gowans born August 28, 1779
Katherine Gowans born June 10, 1781
Jean Gowans born April 12, 1784

Elizabeth Gowans, daughter of Thomas Gowans and Rachel McClurg Gowans, was born August 28, 1779 at Hopewell, and was baptized September 19, 1779, according to the records of Guinston [Muddy Creek] Presbyterian Church. Of this individual nothing more is known.

Katherine Gowans, daughter of Thomas Gowans and Rachel McClurg Gowans, was born June 10, 1781 at Chanceford and was baptized at Guinston July 1, 1781, according to the records of the Presbyterian church. Of this individual nothing more is known.

Jean Gowans, daughter of Thomas Gowans and Rachel Mc­Clurg Gowans, was born April 12, 1784 at Chanceford and was baptized at “the Widow McClurg’s house” April 12, 1784 by the Rev. Thomas Beverage, accoridng to Guinston Presbyterian Church records. Of Jean Gowans nothing more is known.
==O==
Robert Gowan was listed as the head of a household in the 1810 census of York County.

LIST OF U.S. STATES:

Alabama, Alaska, Arizona, Arkansas, California, Colorado, Connecticut, Delaware, Florida, Georgia, Hawaii, Idaho, Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Kansas, Kentucky, Louisiana, Maine, Maryland, Massachusetts, Michigan, Minnesota, Mississippi, Missouri, Montana, Nebraska, Nevada, New Hampshire, New Jersey, New Mexico, New York, North Carolina, North Dakota, Ohio, Oklahoma, Oregon, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island, South Carolina, South Dakota, Tennessee, Texas, Utah, Vermont, Virginia, Washington, West Virginia, Wisconsin, Wyoming
Advertisements