Tennessee – Grainger County

Grainger County, TN:

File:Tngrainger.png

FamilySearch Wiki site: https://www.familysearch.org/wiki/en/Grainger_County,_Tennessee_Genealogy

FamilySearch Catalogue site: https://www.familysearch.org/search/catalog/results?count=20&query=%2Bsubject%3ATennessee%20%2Bsubject%3AGrainger

Deed Bk Index – Gs: https://www.familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:1:3Q9M-CSHM-V3WV-L?i=67&cat=203625

Deed Books for Grainger County, TN:   https://www.familysearch.org/search/catalog/203625?availability=Family%20History%20Library

1809 Daniel Goin to Chesley Jamayns bk B, p 249
1810 Daniel Goins fr Martin Stubblefield bk B, p 351
1810 Daniel Goins fr Enoch Windes, bk B, p 175
1830 John Gowin to Thomas Howell bk F, p 206
1831 Sallie Gowin fr Moses Smith bk F, p 352
1834 Prior L Goins to Edward Hawkins bk G, p 27
1838 S Gowins to John Helton bk G, p 562
1844 John M Goans to Saml aand Milton Shields bk H, p 303
1841 William Goans to Saml and Milton Shields bk H, p 334
1842 Daniel Goans to Hamilton B Goans bk H, p 496
1842 Daniel Goans to Jermiah Jarnagin bk H, p 498
1842 Pryor L Goans to Hamilton B Goans bk H, p 623
1842 Hamilton B Goans to Saml and Milton Shield bk H, p 624
1842 JR Goans to Saml and Milton Shield bk H, p 626
1842 Samuel C Goans to Jermiah Jarnagin bk J, p 9
1842 H B Goans to Saml & Milton Shields bk J, p 25
1842 Hamilton B Goans to Jermiah Jarnagin bk J, p 27
1843 Luke L Goans to Jermiah Jarnagin bk J p 62
1843 James R Goans to Jermiah Jarnagin bk J, p 294
1844 Drewry Goans and wife to Jermiah Jarnagin bk J, p 593

From Gowen Manuscript:  http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~gowenrf/Gowenms111.htm

GRAINGER COUNTY, TENNESSEE

History: 

Grainger County was organized April 22, 1796 with land from Hawkins and Knox counties. It was named for Mary Grainger, maiden name of the wife of William Blount, according to Pollyanna Creekmore, pre-eminent historian of Tennessee. Land was taken from Grainger when Anderson and Claiborne were created in 1801. Additional territory was given up when Union County was created in 1850. A final slice was removed when Hamblen County was created in 1870.

Virginia Easley DeMarse, Foundation researcher, compiled a list of the early taxpayers of Grainger County of interest to Gowen chroniclers. Her account read:

“By the provisions of the Act of 1797, the justices were authorized to take lists of taxable property and polls in various captains’ companies of the militia. White polls were “all free males and male servants, between the age of twenty-one and fifty years;” slaves, “all slaves male and female, between the age oftwelve and fifty years.”

On Monday, November 3, 1809, the Grainger County Court ordered ten justices to take the list of taxable property and make their returns at the next court session. The returns were made February 19, 20, 21, 1810. The amount of tax was omitted on the copy I abstracted from.

The headers for the following list are:
1) on each 100 acres, 12.5 cents
2) each town lot, 25 cents
3) each free poll, 12.5 cents
4) each black poll, 25 cents 5)
5) each retail store, $5.00.
The acreage is listed after item 1.

Polls and Taxable property in Captain William Mayses Company of Militia returned by Moses Hodge included:

John Goan, 90 acres North Holston, Young’s Creek, no polls.

Claiborne Goan, 100 acres North Holston, Young’s Creek , 1 free poll.

James Goan, 1 free poll.

List of polls and taxable property in the bounds of Captain Elisha Williamson’s Company returned by Henry Boatman included:

William Goan, 1 free poll.
Shaderick Goan, 1 free poll.

List of polls and taxable property in the bounds of Captain John Bull’s Company, returned by John Moffet included:

Caleb Gowin, 1 free poll.

List of Polls and Taxable Property returned by William Clay in the bounds of Captain Richard Cotses’ Company included:

Samuel Bunch, 180 acres at Richland, 1 free poll.
Samuel Bunch for John Spencer, 2.
John Bunch, Senr. 187 acres R. C, 2 polls (black?).
John Bunch, Senr. 200 acres R. Knobbs, 6 (black?) polls, 4 other polls.

Captain Samuel Richardson’s Company returned by David Tate, included:

William Guynn, 200 acres, 1 free poll.

Captain Thomas Sharp’s Company returned by Mathew Campbell included:

Daniel Goan, 338 acres R. Creek, 1 free poll.
Robert Gains, 150 acres R. L. McNabbs, 1 free poll.

Captain George Gifford’s Company returned by Charles McAnally included:

Griffee Collins, 1 free poll.
Thomas Collins, 1 free poll.
Thomas Collins, 1 free poll.
Joseph Collins, 1 free poll.
Dowell Collins, 1 free poll.
Conley Collins, 1 free poll.”

A portion of the 1810 census of Grainger, long believed to have been lost, surfaced during the 1980s in the McClung Historical Collection.

The total population of the county in 1810 stood at 6,397. The breakdown was as follows:

Free White Males
45 & over 315
26-45 438
16-26 548
10-16 478
0-10 1,115

Free White Females
45 & over 270
26-45 462
16-26 542
10-16 481
0-10 270

All other free persons,
except Indians not Taxed 182
Slaves 637

Total 6,397

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Melungeon Researchers:  

Several heads of households were listed in the 1830 census of Grainger County that were of interest to Melungeon researchers and Gowen chroniclers:

Edmund Bolen (fc) Ezekel, Bolen (fc)
Shadrach Bolen (fc) Clabourn Bolen (fc)
Edmund Bolen ( fc ) Moses Collins ( fc)
David Goan (fc) Gondly Collins (fc)
Thomas Goan (fc) Dowell Collins (fc )

Nancy Goan (fc) Lewis Collins (fc)
Preston Goan (fc) Encey Collins (fc
Fanny Goan (fc) Hardin Collins(fc)
Joseph Collins (fc) Andrew Collins (fc)
Griffin Collins (fc) Allen Collins (fc)
Levi Collins (fc) Lavinia Lafes(fc)

“fc” indicates “Free Colored”

Info re Granville Goins:

Ethel Louise Goins Dunn of Crandall, Georgia wrote in the July 1997 Foundation Newsletter, “Granville Goins, my g-g-grandfather, was born about 1810 in Grainger County, Tennessee of parents unknown, according to the affidavit of Matilda Goins of Dayton, Tennessee in the Court of Claims June 24, 1908.”

He joined the exodus of some of the Melungeon Goins families who removed to Hamilton County, Tennessee. Prominent in this group was David Smith Goins, Revolutionary soldier who moved about 1832 and his younger brother, Laban Goins who had preceded him in the move about 1829. They were sons of Shadrach Goins of Hanover, Halifax and Patrick Counties, Virginia.

E. Raymond Evans, an anthropologist, made a study of the mysterious Melungeons and wrote a report of his findings in “Tennessee Anthropologist,” Spring 1979. He wrote:

“Located approximately 30 miles north of Chattanooga, the community of Graysville, Tennessee contains one of the most stable Melungeon settlements in the state.

No people in Tennessee have been subjected to more romantic speculation than have the so‑called ‘Melungeons.’ These dark‑skinned people, living in a white world, have attempted to explain their color by saying they were of Portuguese descent, according to Swan Burnett in 1889 in ‘The American Anthropologist.’ Popular writers, including Thurston L. Willis in ‘The Chesapiean’ in 1941 and Leo Zuber in ‘The Melungeons’ in 1941, have elaborated on this theme They have been claimed to be descendants of the ‘lost’ tribes of Israel as reported by Jean Patterson Bible writing in 1975 in ‘Melungeons Yesterday and Today.’ and ‘old world Gypsies,’ ‘Welsh Indians,’ and Arabs by others.

Others have attempted to link their origin with established historical events. Raleigh’s ‘Lost Colony’ and the De Soto expedition are two examples suggested by Mozon Peters writing in 1970 in the ‘Chattanooga Times.’

The most common surname among the Graysville Melungeons is Goins, being so prevalent that the whites in the surrounding area call all the Graysville Melungeons ‘Goinses,’ rather than Melungeons. In fact, the term ‘Melungeon’ is rarely used anywhere in lower East Tennessee. The Goins families are so well known in Rhea County that any dark skinned person, not regarded as a black, is said to ‘look like a Goins.”

In the 1830 census, Hamilton County reported less than 400 families. Four of them were headed by “Laban Gowan, Roland Gowin, Sandford Gowin and Dodson Gowin.” Each of these families listed colored members [total of 13] and three of them listed white members [total of 6]. All were listed on Page 75 and were located just south of Graysville, Tennessee. Since Granville Goins did not appear as a householder in 1830, he may have been a son of Laban Goins.

 

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Marriages: 

==O==
Polly Goan [Goin?] was married May 20, 1812 to William Whitecotton, according to “Grainger County, Tennessee Marriages, 1796-1850.”
==O==
Pryor Goan [Goin] was married to Martha Moore March 2, 1831, according to “Grainger County, Tennessee Mar­riages, 1796-1850.” Children born to Pryor Goan and Martha Moore Goan are unknown.
==O==
Ann Goin was married December 19, 1850, according to “Grainger County, Tennessee Marriages, 1796-1850.”
==O==
Caleb Goin was married June 10, 1820 to Polly Dunkin, according to “Grainger County, Tennessee Marriages, 1796-1850.” Of Caleb Goin and Polly Dunkin Goin nothing more is known.
==O==
David Goin was married March 8, 1820 to Nancy Dunkin, according to “Grainger County, Tennessee Marriages, 1796-1850.” Children born to David Goin and Nancy Dunkin Goin are unknown.
==O==
Dicy Goin was married November 19, 1848 to Walker Jackson, according to “Grainger County, Tennessee Marriages, 1796-1850.”
==O==
Drury Goin [Goans?] was married August 23, 1817 to Mary Goin [Goans], according to “Grainger County, Tennessee Marriages, 1796-1850.” Of David Goin and Mary Goin Going nothiug more is known.

Elizabeth Goin was married August 18, 1829 to John Davis, according to “Grainger County, Tennessee Marriages, 1796-1850.”
==O==
Isabella Goin was married January 6, 1813 to Thomas Harriss, according to “Grainger County, Tennessee Marriages, 1796-1850.”
==O==
James R. Goin was married to Mariah Jarnagin August 19, 1849, according to “Grainger County, Tennessee Mar­riages, 1796-1850.” Children born to James R. Goin and Mariah Jarnagin Goin are unknown.
==O==
Jane Goin was married to Abram Bell December 3, 1841, according to “Grainger County, Tennessee Marriages, 1796-1850.”
==O==
Jeremiah Goin was married February 28, 1829 to Levenia Renfro, according to “Grainger County, Tennessee Marriages, 1796-1850.” Children born to Jeremiah R. Goin and Levenia Renfro Goin are unknown.
==O==
John Goin was married January 10, 1845 to Martha Jane Goin, according to “Grainger County, Tennessee Marriages, 1796-1850.” of John Goin and Martha Jane Goin Goin nothing more is known.
==O==
Levi Goin was married to Nancy Dickson December 8, 1825, according to “Grainger County, Tennessee Marriages, 1796-1850.” Children born to Levi Goin and Nancy Dickson Goin are unknown.
==O==
Mahala Goin was married October 22, 1846 to James H. Perrin, according to “Grainger County, Tennessee Marriages, 1796-1850.”
==O==
Martha Goin was married January 31, 1825 to Henry Wysnor, according to “Grainger County, Tennessee Marriages, 1796-1850.”
==O==
Nancy Goin was married November 22, 1802 to James Ran­dolph, according to “Grainger County, Tennessee Mar­riages, 1796-1850.”
==O==
Nancy Goin was married December 2, 1824 to Ezekiel Bowling, according to “Grainger County, Tennessee Marriages, 1796-1850.”
==O==
Peter Goin was married December 4, 1837 to Katherine Petty, according to “Grainger County, Tennessee Marriages, 1796-1850.” Children born to Peter Goin and Katherine Petty Goin are unknown.
==O==
Preston Goin was married December 9, 1829 to Betsy Goin, according to “Grainger County, Tennessee Marriages, 1796-1850.” Children born to Preston Goin and Betsy Goin Goin are unknown.

Rebecca Goin was married December 22, 1812 to Philip Den­ham [Derehorn?] according to “Grainger County, Ten­nessee Marriages, 1796-1850.”
==O==
Sally Goin was married to Edmund Boling January 3, 1824, according to “Grainger County, Tennessee Marriages, 1796-1850.”
==O==

Elizabeth Goins was married August 19, 1829 to John Davis, according to “Grainger County, Tennessee Marriages, 1796-1850.” Justice of the Peace Henry Alsup performed the ceremony.

==O==

David Goins, age 76″ was listed as Revolutionary War Pensioner S3406 in Hamilton County in 1834, according to “Twenty Four Hundred Tennessee Pensioners” by Zella Armstrong. David Smith Goins died in 1840 in Hamilton County, “his pension then being paid to his children” [unnamed], according to pension records. He did not appear in the 1840 census of Hamilton County.

==O==

Granville Goins was married about 1831, wife’s name Mary “Polly,” probably in Graysville, located just across the county line in Rhea County.

Twelve households of the family were enumerated in the 1840 census of Hamilton County: Sanford Gowin, page 150; Thomas Gowin, page 150; George Gowin, page 150; William Gowin, page 150; John Gowin, page 150; Martin Gowin, page 150; G.[ranville] Gowin, page 150; P. Gowin, page 150; John Gowan page 175; Pryor Gowen, page 175, Carter Gowin, page 177 and Preston Gowen, page 178. All except the last four were recorded as “free colored.”

Granville Goins was enumerated as the head of a household No. 1339 in the 1850 census of Hamilton County. The family was recorded October 21, 1850 as:

Goins, Granvill 40, farmer, born in Tennessee
Mary 33, born in Tennessee
Mahaley 18, born in Tennessee
Rachel 14, born in Tennessee
Noah 12, born in Tennessee
Roland 10, born in Tennessee
Dopson 8, born in Tennessee
James 6, born in Tennessee
Nancy 4, born in Tennessee
William 8/12, born in Tennessee”

Adjoining the household of Granville Goins was that of Nancy Goins. The household, No. 1340, was recorded on Page 925 as: “Goins, Nancy, 45, born in Tennessee; Elizabeth, 29, born in Tennessee and Fanney, 10, born in Tennessee.”

Granville and Polly Goins” were mentioned in an affidavit signed in 1908 by J. P. Talley of Chattanooga, according to “Cherokee by Blood: Records of Eastern Cherokee Ancestry in the U.S. Court of Claims, 1906-1910” by Jerry Wright Jordon. In the hope of compensation, several Melungeon families claimed Cherokee ancestry. Talley stated:

“I [affirm] that I am 80 years of age and lived in James County, Tennessee [later absorbed]. I knew Polly and Granville Goins. They lived in Hamilton County, but I think they were born in upper Tennessee, probably Grainger County. Polly and Granville were a little older than myself. They have been dead 12 or 15 years. They were never on any Indian rolls that I know of.”

J. P. Talley
June 18, 1908 Chattanooga, Tenn.”

At the same time, W. T. Irvin of Chattanooga, grandson-in-law of Granville Goins, and former husband of Mary Jane Goins Irvin who died in 1897, made an affidavit about the family:

“I affirm that I live in Marion County, Tennessee [adjoining Hamilton County]. I am 49 years of age. I make claim for my children. My first wife has been dead 11 years. She was about 30 or 32 when she died. Her parents were Alfred Goins and Halie [Mahala?]Goins. She claims Indian descent on her father’s side and her mother’s side. Her grandparents on her mother’s side were Granville and Polly Goins. On her father’s side they were Thomas and Betsy Goins. They come by the same name because they were probably related. She was always recognized as an Indian in the community in which she lived. Her parents and grandparents lived in what is now James County. Her grandparents originated in Grainger County. She claimed to be a full-blood Cherokee. Her grandparents lived in Hamilton County in 1835.
W. T. Irvin
June 18, 1908 Chattanooga, Tenn”

Granville Goins and Mary “Polly” Goins died about 1914. Children born to them are believed to include:

Mahala “Halie” Goins born about 1832
Betsy Jane Goins born about 1834
Rachel Goins born about 1836
Mary Goins born about 1837
Noah Goins born about 1838
Roland Goins born about 1840
Dodson Goins born about 1842
Martha Goins born about 1843
James L. Goins born about 1844
Nancy Goins born about 1846
John Goins born about 1847
William Goins born about 1849
Francis Marion Goins born about 1853

Dodson Goins, above, was the subject of an article in the Newsletter, January 1997.

Mahala “Halie” Goins, daughter of Granville Goins and Mary “Polly” Goins, was born in Hamilton County about 1832. She appeared as an 18-year-old in the 1850 census of her parents household. She was married about 1850 to Alfred Goins, a cousin. He was a son of Thomas Goins and Betsy Goins.

Children born to Alfred Goins and Mahala “Halie” Going Goins include a daughter, Mary Jane Goins, born about 1865. The daughter was married about 1882 to W. T. Irvin of Chatanooga. She died in 1897 at about age 31, according to an affidavit furnished by Irvin, according to “Cherokee by Blood.”

Betsy Jane Goins, daughter of Granville Goins and Mary “Polly” Goins, was born in Hamilton County about 1834, according to the research of Ethel Louise Goins Dunn of Crandall, Georgia. She did not appear in the 1850 census of her parents’ household.

Rachel Goins, daughter of Granville Goins and Mary “Polly” Goins, was born in Hamilton County about 1836. She appeared as a 14-year-old in the 1850 census of the household of her parents.

Mary Goins, daughter of Granville Goins and Mary “Polly” Goins, was born in Hamilton County about 1837, according to Ethel Louise Goins Dunn. She did not appear in the 1850 census.

Noah Goins, son of Granville Goins and Mary “Polly” Goins, was born in Hamilton County about 1838. He appeared in the 1850 census of his father’s household at age 12.
==O==
Rev. Leonard Goins had the distinction of conducting the funeral service Gertrude Janeway, the last surviving widow of a Union soldier from the Civil War:

“Last Recognized Civil War Widow Dies
Sunday, January 19, 2003
By Duncan Mansfield
Associated Press Writer

Blaine, Tennessee – Gertrude Janeway, the last widow of a Union veteran from the Civil War, has died in the three-room log cabin where she lived most of her life. She was 93.

Bedridden for years, she died Friday, more than six decades after the passing of the man she called the love of her life, John Janeway, who married her when he was 81 and she was barely 18.

“She was a special person,” said the Rev. Leonard Goins, who officiated at her funeral Sunday.

“Gertie, as she was called, had a vision beyond that [cabin] that kept her going. She never had any wavering or doubt in her salvation. She was strong in that,” he said.

She was to be buried Monday near her husband’s slender military tombstone at tiny New Corinth Church cemetery.

An honorary member of the Daughters of Union Veterans of the Civil War, Mrs. Janeway was the last recognized Union widow. She received a $70 check each month from the Veterans Administration.

Still alive is Confederate widow Alberta Martin, 95, of Elba, Ala. Mrs. Janeway, who lived her whole life in Blaine, about 30 miles north of Knoxville, was born 44 years after the Civil War ended.

In a 1998 interview, she said her husband rarely spoke about the war. “He says the nighest he ever got to gettin’ killed was when they shot a hole through his hat brim,” she said, but he never told her where that happened.

Her husband was a 19-year-old Grainger County farm boy who ran away to enlist in 1864 after being encouraged by a group of Union horse soldiers that he met on his way to a Blount County grist mill.

He sent his horse home and signed up under the surname January because “he was afraid his people would come and claim him,” Mrs. Janeway said.

Two months later, he was captured by Confederates near Athens, Georgia. He was later released and rejoined his unit, the 14th Illinois Cavalry Regiment. After the war, he spent many years in California before returning home to Tennessee and meeting then 16-year-old Gertrude.

Mrs. Janeway said her mother refused to sign papers to let her marry him before she turned 18. “So my man says, ‘Well, I will wait for her until you won’t have to,'” she recalled. “We sparked for three years.”

She remembered getting married in the middle of a dirt road in 1927 with family and friends gathered around. He bought her the cabin in 1932, and it was there that he died in 1937, at 91, from pneumonia.

“After he died, why it just seemed like a part of me went down under the ground with him,” she said in the 1998 interview. “He is the only one I ever had. There wasn’t anybody else.”
==O==
An article describing the life of the last surviving Confederate widow was written by Matthew Linton Chancey, an Alabama free lance writer:

Mrs. Alberta Martin, The Last Known Living Widow of a Confederate Veteran

Mrs. Alberta Martin, The Old Man’s Darling

By Matthew Linton Chancey

Crouching in a muddy Virginia trench, Pvt. William Jasper Martin, hot, wet and far from home, shivered with fever and contemplated his prospects. The backwoods 18 year-old boy represented the shattered remnants of an army that had captivated the world. The Army of Northern Virginia had started with a few local militias in fancy uniforms and smoothbore muskets, and within two years had earned an everlasting legacy of valor which would fill thousands of books and millions of hearts the world over.

They came from all over the South: from the well-bred, tidewater Virginia Cavilier to the ruddy Scottish Presbyterian of the Southern Highlands. These men represented the South united and the hope of the young confederation of American States which had banded together—as their fathers and grandfathers had—to form a government of their own. Now in the summer of 1864, the South’s greatest army was slowly sinking into the mire around Petersburg and into history.

Today, the American Civil War is considered by most to be ancient history. Aside from your core group of history buffs, many Americans have trouble placing the War Between the States within the right century, let alone understanding the significance of why it was fought.

However, The War Between the States did not take place that long ago. It is true that the technological wonders of the 20th century have created a seemingly insurmountable wall between the Old South and the New. But the Old South is not that old. There are people still living today whose grandfathers fought in America’s greatest and most devastating war. There are even those living who had fathers marching under Robert E. Lee and “Stonewall” Jackson. But there is one individual connected to the Old South in a way in which none other can boast. Pvt. William Jasper Martin’s wife still lives. Mrs. Alberta Martin, age 92 is the last known living widow of a Confederate veteran.

If you want to visit “Miz” Alberta, you will not find her living on a plantation estate in Natchez, Mississippi, or Savannah, Georgia, but in a small assisted living facility in Elba, Alabama. Miz Alberta has been called “the last link to Dixie” because to meet her is to meet history face-to-face. Although she never lived in the 19th century, her connection to Pvt. W. J. Martin and the Confederacy is special and unique. Since 1996, Miz Alberta has received the “Alabama State Pension for the Widows of Confederate Soldiers, Sailors, and Marines.”

Her story is one of two centuries, two worlds, two societies, two political philosophies and two nations all intersecting.
==O==
“Goins Family Intermarried With Indian Neighbors”

This is one of the families included in the book “Early Hamilton Settlers” by John Wilson.

In the days when the Cherokee Indians occupied the Chattanooga region, members of the Goins family were their neighbors and intermarried with them. Some of the Goins clan were of the mysterious dark-skinned Mel-ungeon race.

The Goins pioneers made their way from Virginia to Grainger and Claiborne counties and on to Hamilton in the 1820s. Sanford Goins, Roland Goins, Laban Goins, Dodson Goins and John Goins were here at the time of the 1830 census. Roland Goins paid George Irwin $50 for 160 acres in 1845. Dodson Goins was among those going out from Ross’s Landing in the Second Seminole War in 1837.

The Goins family was allied with the Dodsons in Grainger County, Tennessee. Laban Goins was born in Hanover County, Virginia in 1764, and he had an older brother, David Smith Goins, who was born in 1757. David Smith Goins volunteered for the Revolution in Halifax County, Virginia under Col. William Terry. He had several terms of service, including a march to join Gen. George Washington’s army at Portsmouth, Virginia about two months before the surrender of Lord Cornwallis.

David Smith Goins lived in Grayson County, Virginia, then in Wythe County, Virginia before moving to Grainger County, Tennessee. He arrived in Hamilton County on the last day of February 1833 and drew a Revolutionary pension of $32 per year. Laban Goins resided on property at Sale Creek that is now the David Gray Sanctuary of the Audubon Society. Laban Goins’ son, Carter Goins, was born in Virginia, and his children included Harbance Goins, Charles Goins and Carter Goins, Jr. Carter Goins, Jr. was married to Cynthia A. McGill.

Children of Harbance Goins included Laban Goins, William Goins, Duncan Goins and Jane Goins. Carter Goins, Jr. and Cynthia A. McGill Goins had William Goins, Francis Marion Goins, James Goins, Elizabeth Goins who was married to Pleasant Bowling, Jefferson Goins who was married to Sarah Mooneyham, Vandola Goins and Minerva goins who was married to James Goins and Francis Marion Goins, who was born in the removal year.

Francis Marion Goins was married to Sarah Neely and then to Margaret J. Murphy. He and Jefferson Goins were in the Union’s First Light Artillery, and Francis Marion Goins was injured in the Battle of Cumberland Gap.

His children included James M. Goins, William J. Goins, Samuel Ulysses S. Grant Goins, Charles Goins, Andrew Goins and Lavada Goins. By his second wife he had James Robert Goins, Ida Jane Goins and Maria Elizabeth Goins. Francis Marion Goins died at Burt, Tennessee in Cannon County in 1895.

Samuel Ulysses. S. Grant Goins returned to the Graysville area after marrying Mrs. Amanda Mooneyham Barrett in Cannon County. Her first husband was Albert Barrett of Cannon County. Samuel Ulysses S.Grant Goins died in 1947, and Amanda Mooneyham Barrett Goins died in 1944. Their children were John Wiley Goins who was married to Dovie Mae Bedwell, Levada Goins, Emiline Goins who was married to Charles Albert Leffew, Andrew Jackson Goins, Amie Marshall Goins who was married to Floyd Martin Larmon, and Charles W. Goins who was married to Beatrice Goins. Andrew Jackson Goins, who was unmarried, for many years had an ice cream cart in Chattanooga, Tennessee..

Another early settler was Pryor L. Goins who acquired 82 acres from William Reed for $80 in 1841. Price Goins and Martha Goins also were here along with Tillman Goins and Dinah Goins.

Price Goins had Andrew Jackson Goins who was married to Mary Selvidge, Rachael Goins, Joseph Goins, Preston Goins, Priscilla Goins, Thomas Goins and Mary Goins.

Tillman Goins died in the late 1850s. His children included Julia Ann Goins, Spencer Goins, James Goins, Pleasant Goins, Eliza Goins, William Goins, Carter Goins, Jackson Goins and Isabella Goins.

Preston Goins, who was born about 1804, was here [Hamilton County] prior to the war with his wife, Mary Goins. Their son was Jarrett Goins, who married Rebecca and had William Goins, James Goins and Sarah Goins.

The John Goins family was allied with the Fields family, which had a Cherokee background. John’s children included Sandell Goins, Polly Goins, John Goins, Jr, Sanford Goins, Martin Goins, Thomas Goins and Nathan Goins. Sandell Goins was first married to George Fields, a Cherokee who went to Arkansas on the Trail of Tears, but returned to Hamilton County a few years later and died about 1841. Sandell Goins Fields then married George Still. Nathan Goins was married to Mary Fields. Another member of the family, Nancy Goins, was married to John Fields.

Granville Goins and his wife, Polly Goins, also lived among the Cherokees in Hamilton County. It was said that Granville Goins knew the Cherokee language and had an Indian name. Granville Goins, who was a carpenter, started on the Trail of Tears, but was among those turning back to Tennessee.

Children of Granville Goins included Mahala Goins, Rachael Goins, Noah Goins, Roland Goins, Dodson Goins, Barnes Goins, Nancy Goins and William Goins.

One of the best known of the family was Oscar Claiborne Goins who was born in Grainger County February 24, 1830. His parents moved to Hamilton County when he was three. His father died when he was 11 and the mother, Nancy Biby Goins, was married in 1846 to a kinsman, Levi Goins. The other children were Pleasant Goins, William Goins, George W. Goins and Sarah Jane Goins who was married to James K. Cornell, a carpenter.

Oscar Claiborne Goins and his family “settled on a farm among the Cherokee Indians.” He took over the farm’s management after his father’s death, then he began clerking in a store at Chattanooga when he was 16. He married Nancy Florence Potter, daughter of Moses Potter and Ellen Potter, in 1853. They separated after they had a son, William Preston Goins.

John C. Potter, who was married to Tennessee Iles, may be another son of Nancy Potter Goins. William Preston Goins lived with his Potter grandparents during the Civil War.

William Preston Goins moved to Greene County, Arkansas. He was married to Lydia Elizabeth Lafferty, a descendant of the wealthy Rockefeller family.

In 1858, Oscar Claiborne Goins was married to Esther Reynolds, daughter of Anderson Reynolds and and Maria Reynolds.

Oscar Claiborne Goins was operating a grocery and supply house at Chattanooga when the Civil War broke out. He enlisted on the Confederate side in the 19th Tennessee Infantry. He first saw action at Fishing Creek, then was in the fighting at Shiloh. He was detailed to bring wounded soldiers to Chattanooga, then he helped raise the Lookout Mountain Battery. He was with this unit at Mobile, then was at Vicksburg before he finally had to leave the service because of poor health. He was a traveling salesman after the war, and he moved his family near Spring Place, Georgia in 1873, when he acquired the three-story Joe Vann mansion. The Goins family lived on this fine plantation the next 22 years. Oscar C. Goins was in Bradley County when he died in 1903.

William A. Goins also enlisted from Hamilton County with the Confederacy. He was captured at Grand Gulf, Mississippi May 18, 1863, and taken to a prison at Alton, Illinois. William Goins was sent for exchange on June 12, 1863, but he objected to the terms of the oath of allegiance and was returned to the Alton prison. He died there July 2, 1864.

A Goins family at Graysville near the Rhea County line had a Melungeon background. Asa “Acy” Goins was married to Sara Bolden and they had a large family in the Brown Rock section. Acy Goins was one of the sons of Jackson Goins and Jennie Goins, who moved to Hamilton County from Georgia about 1843. Others were Richard Goins, William Goins, Henry Goins, Nathaniel Goins, Bradford Goins, George Goins and Robert Goins. Daughters were Sarah J. Goins, Nancy Goins, Caroline Goins, Viola Goins, Lydia Goins and Jane Goins.

Also living near the Jackson Goins family were Alfred Goins and Mahala Goins and Francis M. Goins and Sarah Goins. Acy’s Goins youngest child was Alvin Goins, who was born in 1903. He was kicked in the head by a mule when he was five, and he never learned to read and write. But he could “perform a Goins remarkable feat of computation in his head that would baffle a math professor. Given the day, month and year of someone’s birth, in a few seconds Alvin could estimate the exact number of days that elapsed since then.” Tested on this by an author doing a book on Melungeons, “his figures were found to be correct down to the last digit.” It was said when he worked at a sawmill, he could accurately compute a load of logs and tell how many slabs to cut off. Some contractors building a brick building asked his advice on how many bricks to order. He made the computation in a few minutes. After the project, three bricks were left over.

John C. Goins was born near Apison in 1896. His grandfathers fought on different sides in the war. His father was Daniel Alexander Goins and the grandfather was John Goins, who married Amanda Jane Hughes in 1852 and lived in Bradley County. John Goins, who was a native of Blount County, fought for the Confederacy with Co. D of Thomas’ Legion. There were 12 children, including Daniel Alexander Goins who was born in Bradley County in 1869. He married Mary Alta Johnson. Daniel A. Goins was killed near his home at Apison in 1939 when he was hit by a bus. John C. and his younger brother, Charles Daniel Goins, were Chattanooga lawyers, and John C. Goins became a judge in Hamilton County Circuit Court. John C. Goins was also president of the Chattanooga Bar Association in 1934 and the Tennessee Bar Association in 1941-42. He was also a member of the American Bar Association House of Delegates in 1953-56. He married Wilda Swick, but she died a few hours after their son, John C. Goins Jr., was born. His second wife was Martha Raulston of Marion County, and their son, Landon Haynes Goins, is a lawyer here. His first name came from his father’s longtime law partner, Landon Gammon. John C. Goins Jr. is a biologist in Missouri.

Caroline Goins, daughter of John C. Goins, married attorney Keith Harber. Bess Goins, sister of John C. Goins, was a teacher at Tyner High School and she married the school’s principal, Paul Morris.

John C. Goins also had brothers Thomas M. Goins and James Goins. Thomas M. Goins was an attorney in Pennsylvania.
==O==
Humble Beginnings

Miz Alberta was born Alberta Stewart on December 4, 1906, down in a little hollow by a sawmill at a place called Dannely’s Crossroads in Coffee County, Alabama. Today, although the sawmill is long gone, Dannely’s Crossroads looks much like it did in 1906—a simple intersection surrounded by cotton and peanut fields. An old filling station sits on the corner, representing the only commercial establishment in the community; and scattered here and there are a few house trailers and the remains of old barns and sharecropper homes.

Miz Alberta’s parents, like many folks in the rural South at that time, were sharecroppers who spent their lives moving from field to field, planting and picking under the steamy southern sky. “Back then times was hard,” comments Miz Alberta, “Back in the olden times, we lived poor. Everything was cheap, but you had no money. It don’t seem like nothin’s like it use to be. Seems like ever’thing has got modern.”

Folks alive today who grew up as sharecroppers will tell you that the arrangement usually resulted in farmer and field hand getting the essentials of life, but not much more. The better the soil in a particular field, the better the crop yield—which translated into greater profits for the sharecropper. Consequently, the Stewarts moved nearly every year, sometimes just across the street to work in an adjacent field.

Although modern family portraits usually picture family members neatly groomed and in comfortable living quarters, the only known picture of the Stewart family shows everyone in a cotton field—little cotton sacks hanging around the tiny bodies of the children. “Before we were old enough to pick, they would put us in a cotton basket and take us out to the field with ‘em. They would hang 24-pound flour sacks around our necks. I started pickin’ cotton just as soon as I could wear that sack. When we’d get that little ol’ cotton sack full, we emptied it into our mama or daddy’s sack. We shook peanuts, stacked peanuts, hoed peanuts, hoed cotton and picked up roots where they’d clear a patch for plantin’ next year. It was hard work.”

Even though the Stewarts and most of their neighbors were dirt poor, Miz Alberta still remembers some of the good times they had down on the farm. Every 4th of July, ol’ Doc Donaldson, who owned many of the fields in the area, would have a big Independence Day dinner where all his hands and anybody else who wanted to come could spend the day eating and playing games. Mr. Stewart loved to dance, and, according to Miz Alberta, “He could play the fiddle right smart.” He decided to throw a party one day for all the neighbors. So they cleared the furniture and beds out of one room and had a big dance. Miz Alberta remembers that the guests spit tobacco juice all over the floor, and her daddy promised never to host another indoor dance again. Such was life on the red dirt roads in Curtis, Alabama.

With the good times came some bad as well. When Alberta was 11 years old, her mother died after a long, painful battle with cancer. In 1918, Alberta’s brother, A. J. went off to war in France for Uncle Sam. Shortly after A. J. shipped out, so did the rest of the Stewarts. Mr. Stewart decided to move his family to a place that might have been as distant as Europe as far as the children were concerned—Tallassee, Alabama [around 100 miles from Curtis].

It was in Tallassee that Alberta married her first husband, Howard Farrow, in a little church on a street corner. Mr. Farrow made his living driving a taxi cab. While she was pregnant with their first child, Miz Alberta worked 12 hours a day in a cotton mill until her clothes could no longer hide her condition. Shortly before their son, Harold, was born, Mr. Farrow abandoned his young, pregnant wife.

Matters only worsened. When Harold was only six months old, his father burned to death in a violent car accident. After Howard’s death, Alberta and her father moved back south, this time outside of Opp, Alabama, in Covington County. They moved in with Alberta’s half-brother and his family. Living conditions were cramped in the little house, and Miz Alberta would periodically take Harold out for some fresh air in the front yard. The house was surrounded by a picket fence, and it was at this fence line that Miz Alberta remembers seeing an old man frequently passing by on his way to town.

Unbeknownst to her, this particular old man had passed the house for reasons other than to meet some old war buddies at the corner store for a game of dominoes.

Mr. Martin Little is known of the early history of Pvt. W. J. Martin. He was born in Macon County, Georgia in December 1845, but spent most of his life in the Covington County area. W. J. Martin joined the Confederate army in May, 1864. He fell in with Company K of the 4th Alabama Infantry Regiment, which at the time was involved in the siege of Petersburg and action around Richmond. As for the rest of his War record, confusion abounds, since there were three or four “W. Martins” in the 4th Alabama Infantry, including two in company K. It appears that several records have also been commingled.

What happened after Pvt. Martin arrived in Petersburg is sketchy. He took part in the Howlett’s House skirmish near Richmond and was eventually hospitalized with Rubella. Some records list a William Martin as a deserter, but that William Martin was recorded as being born in Alabama. William Jasper Martin was born in Georgia. The William Martin who was listed as a deserter joined the Army when he was 16. William Jasper Martin joined when he was 18. To add to the confusion, when W. J. was in the hospital, some of his comrades reported him dead.

Despite the ambiguity of the official record, Pvt. Martin later convinced the State of Alabama that he was eligible for the Confederate veterans’ pension through the production of witnesses testifying to his military service. Additionally, the War Department could find no evidence in 1920 that William Jasper Martin was a deserter. Mr. Martin, like so many other Alabama Confederate veterans, applied for a pension late in life—as one’s net worth had to be $400.00 or less to be eligible.

We may never know for sure whether W. J. was a deserter or not, but we do know that veteran Pvt. Martin was a true Confederate at heart. Miz Alberta remembers that he made an effort to attend every annual reunion of the United Confederate Veterans in Montgomery. “Mr. Martin,” as Alberta called him, had changed considerably since his military days—at least physically. The sounds of battle long since faded, the old warrior was in his eighties now. But his elderly frame hid a youthful spirit.

Their courtship was brief—just a few conversations over the fence rail. He asked; she consented. Mr. Martin then had to ask Mr. Stewart for his daughter’s hand. Mr. Stewart gave his consent. Although it was an unusual match, he had little of which to complain. Mr. Martin was a sober man, and his generous pension of $50.00 a month would give Alberta and Harold a good life.

The wedding was scheduled for Saturday, December 10, 1927. W. J. was nearly 82; Miz Alberta had just turned 21. It may be safe to assume that never had the town of Opp heard such a story. This was to be a most abnormal marriage, and the gossip flowed freely. Mrs. Martin went to town and bought herself a blue dress with a floral design in front extending from the neckline down to the hem. Mr. Martin wore a dress shirt and sport coat. They were married at the courthouse in Andalusia, the Covington County seat. When asked if she loved him, Miz Alberta stated that her marriage to W. J. was not based on the type of love found between two young people, but on mutual respect and need. Both wanted companionship and support—a young widow with a baby to look after, and an old man who needed someone to take care of him.

The uneventful wedding concluded, Mr. Martin took his new bride home to meet the family. Mr. Martin lived with one of his sons [from an earlier marriage] and his family. Thus the peculiar wedding gave way to a very peculiar honeymoon when the new Mr. and Mrs. Martin spent their first night together in the same bedroom with four other family members. Needless to say, Miz Alberta remembers that ” after that first weekend, we got out of that place and found us our own home in town.”

No sooner had the gossip died down in Opp when it was announced that Mrs. Martin would be expecting her second child. Ten months after the marriage, Willie was born. Mr. Martin was very proud of his little boy. He would periodically take him into town, carrying the lad on his shoulders to show off his prize.

Remembering the War Mr. Martin never talked very much to his young wife about his service with the 4th Alabama. One of the few things she remembers is his complaining about how hungry he was and how on passing a field, he would dig frantically to find a potato or something left from the harvest. The grim memories of trench warfare also were related. Mr. Martin told Alberta about how he and his messmates would constantly throw firewood, blankets, and anything else on the floor of the trench in order to stay out of the mud. He also confided to Miz Alberta that Union men had tried to get him to enlist and serve Abe Lincoln’s army—a proposition he flatly refused.

Mr. and Mrs. Martin’s marriage was brief, lasting only 4 ½ years. During the 1920s and ‘30s, Pvt. Martin and his Confederate comrades began slipping into eternity at an ever-increasing rate. His funeral was very simple and without pageantry. Today, beneath a large cedar tree in the Cool Springs Primitive Baptist Church Cemetery in Opp, Alabama, a simple VA marker identifies his grave. Today, when asked why she married a man so much older than herself, Miz Alberta just smiles and says, “It’s better to be an old man’s darlin’ than a young man’s slave!”

Two months after Mr. Martin’s death, Alberta married again, this time to Mr. Charlie Martin. Charlie was the grandson of W. J. Martin from his first marriage, which had taken place over 50 years earlier. By this time, the folks in Opp had seen just about everything. At first, the local clergy were not sure how to handle the marriage, so Charlie and Alberta were temporarily estranged from their church. But upon further study of the Scripture, it was agreed that the Martins were not committing sin, and the couple was welcomed back into fellowship.

In 1936 the Martins moved to Elba, where they spent most of their life together. The two were married for over 50 years until Mr. Martin’s death in 1983. After Charlie died, Miz Alberta settled down for permanent widowhood. She led a quiet life, playing bingo at the local Senior Citizens Center and attending church with her friends. Every now and again someone would ask her about her Confederate husband, but for the most part Miz Alberta’s past remained largely unknown. That is until Daisy Wilson Cave, supposedly the “last known living Confederate widow” died around 1990.

The overlooked widow. In the Spring of 1996 when the Pvt. William Rufus Painter Camp # 1719 realized who they had in their back yard, Dr. Ken Chancey, a visiting SCV member from the Col. William C. Oates Camp #809, Dothan, Alabama, volunteered to visit Miz. Alberta and see if the SCV could offer any assistance to her.

After driving around Elba trying to find the right street, he finally received a police escort to her house. Miz Alberta was pleased as always to have visitors and listened intently as Dr. Chancey asked her questions about her needs. She made two requests to the doctor: One was that he help her receive the recognition to which she believed she was entitled for marrying into history. She modestly stated that she had never done anything all that important in her life, but she was the last Confederate widow. The second request was that the SCV look into her eligibility for a Confederate pension. After receiving assurance from Dr. Chancey that he would do his best, the two said their good-byes.

On to Richmond!

In 1996, the SCV held its 100th anniversary convention in Richmond, Virginia, at the majestic Jefferson Hotel. Men from all over the country gathered for the opening session of the Convention. SCV members could be easily identified—their Sunday suits glittered with heritage metals and Bonnie Blue lapel pins. The convention promised to be the one of the most memorable in SCV history.

In the main ballroom the 5th Alabama Infantry Band played Southern music with passion, and the stage was draped with a huge Confederate Battle Flag. After the ceremonies began, the Commander-in-Chief of the SCV announced that they had a special guest among them.

“Men, can you believe it? We still have one with us!” He then introduced Alberta Martin as the last known living widow of a Confederate veteran, and the brand new recipient of the “Alabama State Pension for the Widows of Confederate Soldiers, Sailors, and Marines.” Mrs. Martin was slowly wheeled down the aisle by Dr. Chancey. As she passed, whispers could be heard, “That’s the widow…that’s her, boys.” The men burst into a rousing ovation while Miz Alberta, with both hands, began throwing kisses.

This provoked the men to more intense applause and some were observed weeping, as they no doubt realized the special connection this 89-year-old woman had to their own Confederate heritage.

With the applause and rebel yells continuing, Miz Alberta was asked if she would like to say anything. She told the men that she loved them and thanked them for all they had done for her. With that, the ovations and rebel yells started up again. This was the largest and warmest reception Mrs. Martin had ever received in her life.

Miz Alberta has since been to numerous reenactments, Confederate grave dedications, a funeral for an unknown Gettysburg casualty, a meeting with a Union veteran’s widow, dedication of the Jefferson Davis Presidential Library, several more SCV annual conventions, and the recent Confederate Flag rally in Columbia, S.C. Who would have thought that Fate would have it that a little old woman, who grew up dirt poor in southeast Alabama, would become the most unique direct link to an old civilization that has endeared the hearts of millions?

Alberta Martin’s life is a silent reminder to us not to get so caught up in “progress” that we forget the important lessons and experiences from the past.

The seeds of her unique legacy have apparently fallen on fertile ground, for in the last ten years, Confederate heritage groups have mushroomed in the North and South. Never since the end of Reconstruction has there been such a renewed interest in what it means to be Southern and a descendant of a Confederate soldier, sailor, or marine. With this movement is developing a common icon—not of a masculine reenactor in his dress grays, or a suave politician speaking on State’s Rights—but of a little old widow from Elba, Alabama, waving a Confederate Battle Flag and blowing kisses to descendents of men who fought along with her late husband for the cause of Southern independence.

Ol’ times there are not forgotten…

Matthew Linton Chancey is an Alabama-born freelance writer currently living in the Shenandoah Valley of Virginia.
==O==
Roland Goins, son of parents unknown, was born about 1810. He was married about 1833, wife’s name Elizabeth. He was reported at age 40 in the 1850 census of Hamilton County, Civil District 27, Household 662-830:

” Goins, Rolin 40, born in TN
Elizabeth 35,
John 15,
Dotson 13,
Harrison 10″

The family reappeared in the 1860 census of adjoining Roane County, Civil District 6, Household 927-1064:

“Goen, Rowlen 45, born in TN
Betsy 35
Wm. D. 23
Harrison 19”

“Betsy Goen” is regarded as the second wife of Rolin Goins. Children born to Roland Goins and Betsy Goins are unknown.

Children born to Roland Goins and Elizabeth Goins include:

John Goins born about 1835
William Dotson Gowins born about 1837
Jesse Harrison Goins born about 1840

John Goins, son of Roland Goins and Elizabeth Goins, was born about 1835, probably in Hamilton County. He appeared as a 15-year-old in the 1850 census in the household of his father.

William Dotson Gowins, son of Roland Goins and Elizabeth Goins, was born about 1836, probably in Hamilton County, Tennessee. He appeared at age 23 in his father’s household in the 1860 census of Roane County.

He was married to Sarah E. Morris in Roane County March 20, 1861, according to Roane County marriage records. They were members of the Prospect Baptist Church there [now Loudon County] along with several Morris families.

He enlisted in the Forty-third Tennessee Infantry Regiment, Company F, in 1861, along with his brother, Jesse Harrison Goins. He participated in the Battle of Vicksburg and died during the battle or shortly afterwards, according to Mary Ruth McKinney, a descendant of Dallas, Texas. His widow was remarried to Robert E. Redpath and removed to Illinois about 1868, according to research of Mary Ruth McKenney.
Wife #2 was Sarah [Morris] Gowen, gr grandmother of my husband, Kenneth Reeves. Robert and first wife were on the 1860 Allegheny Co PA census. I found that on an index, but have not seen the actual census. By 1870, Robert, age 50 b PA, was in Marion Co IL with 2nd wife, Sarah 27 b TN. The children listed were Wilbur, 19 PA, Alice 17 PA, Emma 13 PA, Robert 9 PA and Flora B. 1 IL. Flora was evidently from 2nd marriage to Sarah.
In 1880 Marion Co IL, Robert 60 PA, Sarah 40 TN, Emma K 24 PA, Robert E 19 PA, Charles N 12 IL, Frank W 9 IL, Schulyer E 6 IL and William 4 IL. In 1900, Sarah was living in Lawrence Co MO, age 57, born Apr 1843. Her youngest son, John Bert born Dec 1880, was also residing there.
All that was known by the family is the marriage of Sarah Gowen to a Mr Redpath, and that they had a son Bert (John Bert). None of the other
siblings were ever mentioned to the grandchildren of Jesse Gowen, older son of Sarah [Morris] Gowen Redpath.
Earlier today, I found the marriage record for Charles N Redpath to Arlie Schooley, Cook Co IL 20 May 1893. I believe this was Charles, s/o
Robert, but there is no proof of that.
John Bert Redpath married a lady named Rachel, born in KS. He died July 1973 in Tulsa, Tulsa Co OK.
I hope someone knows of these Redpaths. They have certainly remained a mystery as far as this branch of the family is concerned.
Joyce House-Reeves

Children born to William Dotson Gowin and Sarah E. Morris Gowin include:

Jesse Harrison Gowin born July 28, 1862

Jesse Harrison Gowin, son of William Dotson Gowin and Sarah E. Morris Gowin, was born July 28, 1862 in Loudon, Tennessee. He was married in 1887 to Sallie Ann Robertson in Seymore, Missouri. Children born to Jesse Harrison Gowin and Sallie Ann Robertson Gowin are unknown.

Jesse Harrison Goins, son of Roland Goins and Elizabeth Goins, was born about 1840. He appeared as a 10-year-old in the 1850 census of Hamilton County in his father’s household. He was enumerated at age 19 in the 1860 census of Hamilton County as “Harrison Goen.” He and his brother William Dotson Gowin enlisted in 1861 in Company F, 43rd Tennessee Infantry Regiment and participated in the Battle of Vicksburg.

Dodson Goins, son of Granville Goins and Mary “Polly” Goins, was born in Hamilton County about 1842. He was recorded as an eight-year-old in the 1850 census of Hamilton County. He was married about 1864 to Erelda Goins, daughter of Nathan Goins and Sarah Elizabeth McGill Goins, according to Dunn research.

“Dodson Goin” was listed as the head of a household in the 1880 census of Cannon County, Enumeration District 24, page 25, Civil District 9, enumerated as:

“Goin, Dodson 36, born in TN
Erilday 35, born in TN
Noah 15, born in TN
William 13, born in TN
Psalmist 9, born in TN, son
Mahala 7, born in TN
Lotta 6, born in TN
De A. 1, born in TN, son”

The full name of the third son of Dodson Goin and Erilday Goin is believed to be “Psalmist David Goin.” Later he would be known as “Sam D. Goin.” [Samuel David Goins] He was born in Tennessee in January 1870, according to the census.

Dodson Goin died in 1887, according to Dunn research, and his widow was remarried to Joshua Columbus Goins, unidentified. Erelda Goins Goins Goins was still living in 1905 in Cannon County.

Children born to Dodson Goins and Erelda Goins Goins in­clude:

Noah Goins born about 1865
William Granville Goins born about 1866
Psalmist David Goins born January 1870
Mahala Goins born about 1873
Lottie Bell Goins born about 1874
De Amold Goins born about 1878
Jacob Benjamin Goins born about 1883

Noah Goins, son of Dodson Goin and Erelda Goins Goins, was born about 1865 in Hamilton County. He appeared as a 15-year-old in the 1880 census of his father’s household. He was married about 1888, wife’s name Jane. Children born to Noah Goins and Jane Goins are unknown.

William Granville Goins, son of Dodson Goin and Erelda Goins Goins, was born about 1866 in James County, Tennessee. He appeared as a 13-year-old in the 1880 census of Cannon County. He was married about 1889, wife’s name unknown.

Children born to them include:

Ida Goins born January 4, 1891
Claud Goins born October 11, 1895
Irene Goins born December 9, 1901

Psalmist David Goins, son of Dodson Goin and Erelda Goins Goins, was born in January 1870. He was enumerated at age 9 in the 1880 census.

“Sam D. Goin” was married about 1897 to Mary Clark, de­scribed as a “caucasian.” He filed suit in 1905 in Franklin County, Tennessee seeking to have his son Henry E. [or Harry E.] Goins reinstated in school from which he had been expelled for “being a Negro.”

In a deposition taken December 22, 1905 in Winchester, Tennessee, Sam D. Goin advised that he would be “35 next month” and that he was the father of Harry E. Goin who was born July 19, 1898. He stated that “Harry E. Goin, his oldest living child” was enrolled in school in the Ninth Civil District of Franklin County in July 1904 at age six. He was dismissed by the teacher, J. B. Smith on the suspicion of being a Negro.

“Sam D. Goin” testified that he was “Cherokee and Irish” and had no Negro blood. He stated that he went to white schools in Cannon and Wilson Counties.

In the hearing Mary Clark Goin deposed that she was “born and raised in Franklin County and that she did not know if her husband had any Negro blood.”

“Mrs. Erilday Goin, mother of Sam D. Goin, age 73” [most likely 60], testified that her son was a “little darker than white people.” The deposition record gives no hint as to the final result of the hearing.

Children born to Psalmist David Goins and Mary Clark Goins include:

Harry E. Goins born July 19, 1898

Harry [Henry] E. Goins, son of Psalmist David Goins and Mary Clark Goins, was born July 19, 1898. He was the subject of a school controversy in 1905 in Franklin County, Tennessee.

Mahala Goins, daughter of Dodson Goin and Erelda Goins Goins, was born about 1873. She was recorded at age seven in the 1880 census of Cannon County. She died in 1884, ac­cording to Dunn research.

Lottie Belle Goins, daughter of Dodson Goin and Erelda Goins Goins, was born about 1874. She was enumerated at age six in the 1880 census. She died in 1893, according to Dunn research.

De Amold Goins, son of Dodson Goin and Erelda Goins Goins, was born about 1879. He was recorded as a one-year-old in the 1880 census of his father’s household. He died in 1884, according to Dunn research.

Jacob Benjamin Goins, son of Dodson Goin and Erelda Goins Goins, was born about 1883. He died in 1891, according to Dunn research.

Martha Goins, daughter of Granville Goins and Mary “Polly” Goins, was born in Hamilton County about 1843, according to Ethel Louise Goins Dunn. She did not appear in the 1850 census of her father’s household..

James L. Goins, son of Granville Goins and Mary “Polly Goins, was born in Hamilton County about 1844. He ap­peared as a six-year-old in the 1850 census. He was married about 1870 to a cousin, Melvina Goins, daughter of Martin Goins and Susan Goins. James L. Goins died August 20, 1897.

According to the research of Ethel Louise Goins Dunn, children born to James L. Goins and Melvina Goins Goins include:

Mary Goins born about 1871
Elijah Goins born June 7, 1873
Archibald Goins born September 8, 1874
Charles Goins born February 10, 1876
Albert Goins born about 1878
Mattie Goins born about 1879
Thomas Goins born about 1880
John Goins born about 1883

Mary Goins, daughter of James L. Goins and Melvina Goins Goins, was born about 1871. She was married about 1890, husband’s name Erwin, according to Dunn research.

Elijah Goins, son of James L. Goins and Melvina Goins Goins, was born June 7, 1873 in James County, Tennessee. He was married about 1896, wife’s name Dora. Children born to Elijah Goins and Dora Goins are unknown.

Archibald Goins, son of James L. Goins and Melvina Goins Goins, was born September 8, 1874 in James Gounty. He was married about 1897, wife’s name Florence.

Children born to Archibald Goins and Florence Goins include:

Eliza Goins born about 1900

Eliza Goins, daughter of Archibald Goins and Florence Goins, was born about 1900, according to John Harrison, a grandson.

Charles Goins, son of James L. Goins and Melvina Goins Goins, was born February 10, 1876. He was married about 1899, wife’s name Nancy. Of Charles Goins and Nancy Goins nothing more is known.

Albert Goins, son of James L. Goins and Melvina Goins Goins, was born about 1878.

Children born to Albert Goins include:

James Goins born about 1918

Mattie Goins, daughter of James L. Goins and Melvina Goins Goins, was born about 1879. She died in 1898, according to Dunn research.

Thomas Goins, son of James L. Goins and Melvina Goins Goins, was born about 1880. He died in 1906, according to Dunn research.

John Goins, son of James L. Goins and Melvina Goins Goins, was born about 1886. He died in 1906, according to Dunn research.

Nancy Goins, daughter of Granville Goins and Mary “Polly” Goins, was born in Hamilton County about 1846. She appeared as a four-year-old in the 1850 census.

John Goins, son of Granville Goins and Mary “Polly” Goins, was born in Hamilton County about 1847, according to Ethel Louise Goins Dunn. He did not appear in the 1850 census of his father’s household.

William Goins, son of Granville Goins and Mary “Polly” Goins, was born in Hamilton County about 1849. He was enumerated at “eight months” in the 1850 census of his par­ents’ household.

Francis Marion Goins, son of Granville Goins and Mary “Polly” Goins, was born in Hamilton County about 1853, according to Ethel Louise Goins Dunn..
==O==
Isabella Goins was married January 6, 1813 to Thomas Har­riss, according to “Grainger County, Tennessee Marriages, 1796-1850.”
==O==
Joseph Anderson Goins was born about 1820, possibly in Grainger County, according to a letter written by Doris Ann Goins Ketner of Clinton, Tennessee. He was married about 1843, and the bride is believed to be Martha Lipscomb.

Children born to Joseph Anderson Goins and Martha Lip­scomb Goins include:

Joseph Anderson Goins, Jr. born August 15, 1848

Joseph Anderson Goins, Jr, son of Joseph Anderson Goins and Martha Lipscomb Goins, was born August 15, 1848 probably in Greene County, Tennessee. He was married in 1868 to Su­san Perkey. They and their 12 children removed to Anderson­ville, Tennessee about 1886. Children born to Joseph Ander­son Goins and Susan Perkey Goins are unidentified.
==O==
Lloyd P. Goins, son of Charlie Goins and Nancy Goins, was born November 3, 1906 in Dayton, Tennessee, according to the research of Roberta E. Horton, Foundation Member of Concord, California. He was married about 1934 to Cora Mae Thrailkill who was born January 24, 1908 to Naomi Swafford Thrailkill. In 1946 they were living in Los Angeles, Califor­nia.

Lloyd P. Goins died in May 1991 in Chattanooga, and his wife died December 13, 1995 in San Diego, California.

Children born to Lloyd P. Goins and Cora Mae Thrailkill Goins include:

Betty June Goins born about 1936
Martha Imogene Goins born about 1938
Lloyd Dewayne Goins born about 1941
Barbara Yvonne Goins born about 1944
Treva Ladoyn Goins born October 18, 1946
==O==
Malinda Goins was enumerated in the 1870 census of Grainger County living in Household No. 37 headed by James Dotson in Thornhill District:

Dotson, James 32, farmer
Prior 38, farmer
Goins Malinda 27, domestic servant
Mary 6”
==O==
Nancy Bibee Goins and her husband, name unknown, removed from Grainger County in 1833 “and settled among the Cherokees” in Hamilton County, Tennessee, according to “Memoirs of Georgia” published in 1895 in Atlanta by Southern Historical Association.

Nancy Bibee Goins was remarried to Levi Goins after the death of her first husband in 1841, according to this volume. This statement has not been documented by Tennessee county records. If this statement is not correct, then Levi Goins, in­stead of being a kinsman of her first husband, was her first husband. Levi Goins appeared as the head of a household in the 1850 census of Hamilton County, Household 318, page 782:

“Goins, Levi 50, born in Tennessee
Nancy 40, born in Tennessee
Oscar 22, born in Tennessee
Jane 20, born in Tennessee
Pleasant 16, born in Tennessee
William 14, born in Tennessee
George 11, born in Tennessee”

“Levi Goins,” age 38, was convicted of larceny in Hamilton County and was sentenced to serve time in the state penitentiary at Nashville, Tennessee, according to “Convicts in the Tennessee State Penitentiary, 1831-1850.”

Children born to Nancy Bibee Goins and her first husband included:

Oscar Claiborne “Roscoe” Goins
born February 24, 1830
Sarah Jane Goins born about 1831
Pleasant Goins born about 1833
William A. Goins born about 1835
George Goins born about 1838

Oscar Claiborne “Roscoe” Goins, son of Nancy Goins, was born in Grainger County February 24, 1830, [1829?], according to “Memoirs of Georgia.”

“The father of Mr. Goins, a native of Wythe County, Virginia, was born during the early part of this century. He moved to Cocke County, Tennessee with his parents. Later he settled in Hamilton County where he was married Miss Nancy Biby of Cocke County. They had five children, four sons and one daughter, Oscar C, William W, Pleasant W, George W. and Sarah Jane. She was married to James K. Connell of Virginia and now resides in Birmingham, Alabama. The others are now deceased, Oscar C. being the survivor.”
In 1833 the family of Oscar Claiborne “Roscoe” Goins re­moved to Hamilton County where he had the opportunity of getting well acquainted with the Cherokee Indians. His father farmed there until he died in 1841. His mother was remarried in 1846 to Levi Goins, suggested as a kinsman to her first husband. Oscar Claiborne “Roscoe” Goins left home shortly afterward and went to Chattanooga when he found a job as a “clerk in a mercantile house.”

“He remained there for 13 years where he acquired an extensive and practical knowledge of mercantile affairs which has since proven to be of infinite value to him,” according to “Memoirs of Georgia.”

He was married about 1853 to Nancy Florence Potter who was born in Alabama in 1832. She appeared as a 22-year-old unmarried female living in her father’s household in the 1850 census of Hamilton enumerated October 3, 1850. A son, their only child was born to them May 11, 1855. It is assumed that they were divorced about 1856.

He was remarried there in 1858 to Esther C. Reynolds, daughter of Anderson Reynolds of Chattanooga. Immediately after his marriage he went into the grocery business which he operated until the beginning of the Civil War.

The family was enumerated in the 1860 census of Hamilton County as:

“Goins, O. C. 30, born in TN
Ester 21, born in TN
Reynolds, Mary 15, born in TN”

Anderson Reynolds wrote his will July 17, 1860 including the names of Sarah Crabtree and Ester Reynolds Goins among his heirs.

Nancy Florence Potter Goins was enumerated in the household of her parents in the 1860 census of Hamilton County:

“Potter, Moses 60, born in TN, farmer,
$240 real estate
Ellander 56, born in SC
Nancy 28, born in AL
Elizabeth 26, born in TN
McKelvey 13, born in TN
James H. 8, born in TN
*Wm. Preston 6, born in TN”

The household of Moses Potter reappeared in the 1870 census of Hamilton County, No. 93-93 in Civil District 12:

“Potter, Moses 70, born in TN, farm laborer
Ellen 66, born in SC
Nancy 40, born in AL
Elizabeth 38, born in TN
John 16, born in TN
*Preston 15, born in TN
George W. 6, born in TN

William Preston Goins was enumerated as William Preston Potter in 1860 and 1870. His grandfather Moses Potter lived to be 104, according to the research of Louise Goins Richardson.

William Preston Goins enlisted in Company B, Nineteenth Tennessee Infantry Regiment commanded by Col. J. C. Cummins. Shortly afterward he was commissioned a second lieutenant in command of his company. His first engagement was in the Battle of Fishing Creek, Kentucky. Afterward his regiment participated in the two-day Battle of Shiloh, Tennessee.

Following this battle, he was ordered to bring the wounded to Chattanooga by way of Mobile and Montgomery and Atlanta. Upon completing this assignment, he assisted in the raising of Lookout Mountain Battery under the command of Capt. R. L. Barry. Later Barry’s Light Artillery was transferred to Knoxville, then to West Point, Mississippi and finally to Pollard, Alabama near Alabama. The battery was stationed there for 12 months, serving to protect the railroad junction there.

When the battle for Vicksburg intensified, the battery was moved northward to Jackson, Mississippi. It participated in the Battle of Baker’s Creek and then moved to Yazoo City in an attempt to repel the Union gunboats on the Mississippi under the command of Gen. Joseph E. Johnston. After the fall of Vicksburg July 4, 1863, the battery was pulled back to Jackson.

According to “Tennessee Soldiers in the Civil War,” John Goins, Levi Goins and Rosco Goins served as privates in Company C, Thirty-seventh Infantry Regiment, C.S.A. Henry Goins served in Company G in the Thirty-seventh as a cook. Pvt. Oscar C[laiborne] Goins was shown as a member of Barry’s Light Artillery.

“Pvt. Rosco Goengs” and Pvt. John Goins were members of Co. C, Thirty-seventh Tennessee Infantry Regiment in 1862, according to “Confederate Veteran,” Volume 28, [1920]. The regiment was organized in Morristown, Tennessee in May 1861.

After the war, he returned to Chattanooga broken in spirit, broken in health and broken in finances. He, like many Confederate veterans, had to attempt to rebuild his life. For the next 13 years he became a traveling salesman, and gradually regained his finances.

Anderson Reynolds, former father-in-law of Oscar Claiborne “Roscoe” Goins, died about 1866, and Goins, joined by John Crabtree and Sarah Crabtree, appeared in court to contest the will. They were unsuccessful.

In 1873 they removed to Spring Place, Georgia in Murray County, just across the state line. There he bought a plantation with a large two-story mansion which had been originally built Chief Joe Vann of the Cherokees. From its earliest days, it was a historic landmark, and in recent years has been registered by the State of Georgia as a historic site.

Dr. Kemp Mabry of Statesboro, Georgia wrote an account of the history of the Vann House:

Among historic sites still open to the public is the magnificent Chief Vann House at Spring Place, between Dalton and Chatsworth. Built in 1804 by James Vann, a minor Cherokee chief, its equal was never seen in the Cherokee Nation.

“James Vann, son of a Scot trader, Clement Vann and Wawli, a Cherokee princess, owned property and businesses throughout Cherokee Indian Territory. He was responsible for construction of Jellico Road, now U. S. 76, which the mansion faces.

He had two wives, a fierce temper and a bad drinking problem. However, in 1801, he offered land to Moravian missionaries of New Salem, N. C., for a school. His family embraced Christianity, but he called it a fable.

The James Vann family moved into the three-story brick mansion on March 24, 1005. Envisioned by Vanns for several generations, James lived there only five years. He had killed several men‑‑white, Indian and Black slaves. After he killed his brother‑in‑law, that death was avenged in a tavern in what is now Forsyth County.

James’ son, Joseph, inherited the house, amassed great wealth and gained the nickname of “Rich Joe.” Pres. James Monroe visited in 1819. In 1834, “Rich Joe: hired a white overseer but was evicted by Georgia Home Guards. Gold had been discovered near Dahlonega, a land lottery held, and white Georgians were to take over Cherokee lands.

John Howard Payne, who wrote “Home, Sweet Home,” was incarcerated in a slave cabin on the Vann planta­tion because of had Cherokee sympathies. Joseph Vann and his family fled to Tennessee, but by 1838, most of the Cherokees were herded toward Oklahoma. More than 4,000 died along the infamous “Trail of Tears.”

“Rich Joe” Vann built a replica of the mansion at Web­bers Falls, Oklahoma. Northern troops destroyed it during the War Between the States. “Rich Joe” died in an explosion of a steamboat he was racing on the Ohio River October 23, 1844.

The Chief Vann House was built of native Murray County materials except for windows brought from Savannah. Interior decorations mimic colors of nature–blue [sky], green [trees], red [clay soil] and yellow [ripened grain].

The hall stairway is the oldest cantilevered construction in Georgia, with no semblance of support under the landing platform. Third floor coffin-shaped bedrooms had thousands of sightseers names written on their walls by 1930. There had been 15 different owners since “Rich Joe’s” eviction in 1834, and the mansion was sadly dilapidated.

In the 1950s, the Chief Vann House was renovated and fully restored to its original splendor, dedicated by Gov. Marvin Griffin in 1958. Will Rogers, humorist and movie star, was the most famous Vann descendant, 42 of whom attended the dedication.”

Oscar Claiborne “Roscoe” Goins was enumerated in the 1880 census of Murray County:

“Goins, O. C. 51, born in Tennessee
Ester C. 45, born in Tennessee”

About 1895, he returned to Chattanooga to live, perhaps shortly after the death of Esther C. Reynolds Goins who died in that year, according to Myra Peeples Steed, a niece. He sold the Chief Vann home in that year. The deed was prepared and notarized in Hamilton County. He was described as a widower in a deed dated October 5, 1897. He was remarried about 1898 to Mary E. Mitchell.

He died there December 5, 1903 and was buried in Flint Springs Cumberland Presbyterian Cemetery. He was buried about one mile from his farm, 244 acres located nine miles south of Cleveland, Tennessee. Lois Goins Richardson, a great-granddaughter wrote, ” I have been to his grave, cleaned his tombstone and made prints of it. The stone is very nice, made of white marble with black marble inlay in it.”

Mary E. Mitchell Goins was appointed administratrix of the estate by Bradley County Probate Court September 5, 1904. She returned to the court April 3, 1905 an inventory of the sale of the estate of Oscar Claiborne “Roscoe” Goins:

“Cultivator $ 8.00
Disk Harrow 5.00
Mowing Machine .50
Turning Plow .50
Turning Plow .30
One-half interest in Binder 26.50
Brace & Bits .75
Double foot plow .30
Box of tools .30
Set of Trace Chains .45
Hoe & Plow .35
Hoe .15
Cross-cut Saw .45
Watch 1.00
====.===
Total $ 45.20

No children born to Oscar Claiborne “Roscoe” Goins, Esther C. Reynolds Goins and Mary E. Mitchell Goins. Mary E. Mitchell Goins was survived by Ruth Mitchell Austin, a great niece, who in 1993 continued to own part of the Goins farm.

One son was born to Oscar Claiborne “Roscoe” Goins and Nancy Florence Potter Goins:

William Preston Goins born December 6, 1902

William Preston Goins, only child of Oscar Claiborne “Roscoe” Goins and Nancy Florence Potter Goins, was born May 11, 1855 in Hamilton County. It is believed that he lived with his Potter grandparents, Moses Potter and Ellander Potter when his father went away to serve the Confederacy. He had a cousin by the name of John Potter.

Just prior to the Battle of Chickamauga the Potters found themselves situated in the path of the Union Army of the Cumberland under the command of Gen. William Starkie Rosencrans. Before engaging the Confederate army, Gen. Rosencrans halted his army in the fertile valley near Chat­tanooga and sent out foraging parties. They stripped the surrounding farms of their cattle and hogs and plundered their barns for provender.

The book, “Battle of Chickamauga” describes how the Union soldiers covered the valleys like a swarm of locusts. Gen. Rosencrans even held his troops there in the summer of 1863 until the corn crop ripened and then had his soldiers harvest the entire crop for the use of his army. After the corn was gathered, they turned their horses in on the fields for any remaining grain and fodder. After the men and animals were well rested, they pushed forward to the next battle line, carrying all of the plunder with them.

Louise Richardson Goins wrote:

“Grandpa said nearly all of their food was devoured, crops destroyed, animals taken and their wells were pumped dry, leaving them destitute. Grandpa’s Grandpa had him hide the pigs in the woods so they would have something to eat at the Union troops had gone. But the Yankees found the pigs and butchered all of them except one poor old sow. Since there was nothing to feed the sow, the family butchered her as soon as the troops pulled out.

Since the Union soldiers took their salt supply, Grandpa and his grandmother tore the floor out of the smokehouse and shoveled up the dirt underneath. Some salt had collected there from the curing process. They sifted out the salt content and purified it by boiling the brine solution.

As a young boy, Grandpa had learned to play the fiddle and it was one his most prized possessions. The night before the Union troops pulled out, they asked him to play for them. He obliged them, and at the end of the evening hung up his fiddle and the bow.

The next morning when he got out of bed, he discovered that not only were the Yankees gone, but his beloved fiddle as well. Grandpa dashed after the troops, found the thief who took his fiddle and demanded it back. The soldier refused to give up his plunder, and Grandpa went to the company com­mander who ordered the fiddle returned to the boy. The fiddle is still a treasured possession in the family and is now owned by my brother, David Goins of Paragould.

About 1870 he removed to Martinsville, Illinois in Clark County. He was married there October 20, 1878 to Lydia Elizabeth Lafferty, daughter of Parmenas Lafferty and Mary Jane McClure Lafferty. She was born in Clark County August 13, 1852.

Louise Goins Richardson wrote:

“My grandpa was a good fiddle player and was hired by the Laffertys to play at Lydia’s party to announce her en-gagement to another young man there. However, when grandpa saw her, he fell in love with her and knew that he couldn’t let her marry the other man who was financially well off, and Grandpa was broke at the time. It was love at first sight for both of them. He started making plans to marry her. I recall how he used to say, ‘I wooed her, and I won her.'”

They lived in adjoining Coles County in 1880-81-82, and in 1883 were back in Clark County. In 1884 they removed to Beech Grove, Arkansas in Greene County. They travel-led in three covered wagons, taking three weeks to make the trip. Upon arrival in Greene County, they purchased 40 acres of land in Section 3, Township 16, Range 3.

While living in Illinois, three of their children were born to the couple. Ross Coe, the oldest, was born in 1879. He was named for his grandfather whose nickname was ‘Ros-coe.’ I have an old letter to Grandpa and Grandma from Great Grandpa in 1881 and postmarked Spring Place, Georgia. It was in reply to a letter that he had received from my grandparents about naming their first born, Ross Coe after him. He verified that ‘Roscoe’ was his nickname and that his real name was ‘Oscar Claiborne.’ Charles Al-bert was born in 1881 and Lewis Edward in 1883. There were eight other children born in Arkansas.”

In 1895, Paragould, Arkansas became a boomtown because of the coming of the railroad and the jobs it created. At the time Grandpa purchased a $10 butcher’s license and open-ed a shop on Pruett Street. Business was good, and he ex-tended credit to the railroad men upon request. Credit was his undoing, according to the journal of the butcher shop, still retained by his granddaughter, Inez Clark, along with his butcher’s license. When his beef cattle were gone, so was his business.

In 1897 Grandpa and Grandma homesteaded 160 acres on the ‘Cache Bottoms,’ swampy land that was not very de-sirable for farming. They obtained this land under Arkan-sas’ Donation Act; the land was free if they lived on the land, improved it and paid taxes on it.

Grandpa set about to drain the water from the land by con­structing a series of ditches. He hired neighbors to bring their teams and equipment to dig the laterals, and he con-tracted with dredgeboat operators to open the main chan-nels. In time the work converted a swamp into valuable farmland. This property remains in the Goins family to-day.

Grandpa had seen his grandparents suffer during the Civil War when the Yankees came through the country foraging for food. They took everything they wanted, without com-pensation, often leaving the civilians in destitute circum-stances. Consequently Grandpa was always sympathetic with people in need and was very generous in helping them.

Once Grandpa noticed that corn was disappearing from his bins. Since he had lots of experience at trapping animals, he decided one night to set a trap for the thief. Later that night he heard the trap spring, however he decided to leave the “ani-mal” in the trap until daylight. The next morning, sure enough, he had caught the thief, but instead of scolding or prosecuting him, he had the fellow come in and have breakfast with him. Grandpa never had trouble with corn missing again.

This story was told many times by members of our family, but nobody ever knew who the thief was. Neither Grandpa or Grandma would ever reveal his identity.

In addition to farming, our grandparents had a number of occupations and endeavors. Grandpa made the best knives to use in the kitchen and around the farm. He also made Grandma’s crochet hooks with bones.

He owned a large sawmill where they cut and sold lumber and timber. Neighbors frequently came to his woodwork-ing shop to request a casket be made for a funeral. Grand-pa would heat the wood so that it would bend to form the contour of the casket. Grandma, with the help of Aunt Roxie Schamb, would line the casket with satin for the adults and white flannelette for children. Grandpa or Uncle Dee Morrow would build a pine box for the casket.

Grandpa was an excellent woodcarver. Once he carved his own portrait on a beech tree in the woods with the aid of a mirror. My brother, David Goins was squirrel hunting recently and came up on the portrait. Grandpa had signed it when he finished–just like an artist. The tree and the por-trait are still there, in a secluded spot in the woods and in good condition.

A number of men were always employed by Grandpa working at the sawmill, on the farm or opening ditches. In 1912 he purchased a thresher which he took all over the country threshing wheat for the farmers. It took a big crew of men to operate this business.

Additionally Grandpa had a blacksmith shop and was a good farrier. He was a good metal worker and taught his son how to shoe horses. He built farm implements and in 1892 received Patent No. 479,269 for corn-planting attachment which he invented. In 1915 he invented a locking device for a multiple mailbox system. His locking device must have attracted lots of attention. In his correspondence file we found offers on it from several firms, including: Scully Pattern & Model Works of Kansas City, Missouri; American Investment Company of Washington, D.C; New World Manufacturing Company of Cincinnati, Ohio and Gerding Manufacturing Company of Cincinnati.

He did carpentry work and also bought and sold cattle, horses and mules. Once he bought an expensive Red Polled bull from Kentucky. I still have the papers on this purchase.

Perhaps the most memorable enterprise that I remember during my early years living on a farm adjoining them was the large orchard which contained many kinds of fruit and pecan trees, strawberries and Concord grape vines. The orchard was also home to 150 honeybee stands. It was amazing to our how Grandpa could work around the bees, extracting honey and beeswax for sale in town, without getting stung by them.

In 1920, Grandpa and several neighbors bought carbide lighting systems from a traveling salesman who came through Greene County. There was a pipe to carry the carbide gas to each room in the house with a valve in each room to control the flame. Carbide was fairly inexpensive, and the neighbors were envious of those who could afford to install the system. After all the initial systems were installed, the supplier raised the price of carbide so high that hardly anyone could afford it.

Rural telephones came about the same time. For as long as I can remember, our family had a telephone. It ran off bat-teries, and we had connections to my grandmother’s house and to Aunt Pearl Morrow’s house.

When electricity came to the area, the carbide gas pipes were removed and replaced with electrical wiring. I recall that our home was one of the first in the area to receive electricity.

Gypsies came through our area and people were suspicious of them. We kept an eye on our chickenhouses when they were around. They always had a group of bad horses to trade to people who did not know horseflesh. On trading day, they would feed their poor horses lots of salt so they drink a lot of water and looked fat and sleek. Grandpa knew all of the tricks of the trade, however and he always looked at their teeth to determine their condition. He could tell exactly how old a horse was by checking his teeth.

My grandparents were baptized into the Church of Christ August 24, 1915 at Evening Shade, Arkansas. He was 62 at that time. Their daughter, Pearl Goins had been baptized two days earlier in the revival meeting. The family took a very active part in the church.

Grandma’s diary recorded that on October 15, 1915, Grandpa cut and hauled lumber to Commissary, Arkansas where he began to build a new church building. He served as the church treasurer after the congregation was organized. They remained faithful members of the church until their deaths, setting a good example for their descendants.

Following a stroke, my grandparents moved to Paragould along with their daughter Mary Goins who was a registered nurse at Dixon Memorial Hospital. Grandma died there April 10, 1947 and was buried in the Morrow Cemetery which was located on a him overlooking the farm where she and Grandpa had spent so many happy years.

After Grandma died, Grandpa want to return to live on the farm, and his children acceded to his wishes. In his older years, it was difficult for him to get around over the farm, but his son John Goins would take him in the car anytime he want to go for a ride. His favorite Saturday afternoon pastime was to sit in the car parked on the Paragould square where he could visit with his friends as they walked by.

On a cold, icy day, December 7, 1950 Grandpa died at the age of 97 years and six months. He was buried beside Grandma in the Morrow Cemetery

Mrs. Elizabeth Thorpe Rockefeller was my Grandma Goins’ grandmother. While my grandparents were visiting in Minnesota, some of the Rockefeller family came to Uncle Ross’ home to gather information for the family record. “The Transactions of the Rockefeller Family Association for 1915-1925″ was published in 1926. My grandparents met with the Rockefellers and gave them our family information which was published in their book. Grandmother and her two sisters Ginny Lafferty Knopp and Molly Lafferty Potter were invited many times to the Rockefeller family reunions, however it was very expensive to travel to the reunion site by train, and they chose not to go. We still have some of the invitations to the Rockefeller reunions today. After John D. Rockefeller died, these annual reunions ceased.”

William Preston Goins was mentioned in a newspaper article published May 2, 1930 in Greene County:

“Large Gathering of Aged People Guest of Bud Ryan

Bud Ryan popular owner of the Ryan Cafe, put the big pot in the little one so to speak in his royal, big entertainment of the aged people of Greene county at his well known place of business at noon today when he served his guests a sumptous chicken din-ner. A total of 137 guests, who have attained or passed the age of 75 years, shared in his hospitality by sitting at his festal board. The large diningroom of the cafe was filled to overflowing when the guests filed in and were seated. Tables were ex-tended from one end of the room to the other, symbolical of Bud’s smile which extended from ear to ear, as he gave to each of the guests the glad hand and expressions of a cordial welcome, he as happy as the happiest guest present – and all were happy.

Following the feast at the cafe, the aged guests were ushered to the Capitol Theater where John Collins, the manager of that poplar playhouse, entertained them in the presentation of “Paramount on Parade” a very interesting all-talking picture.

It was a great feast , and it was a great time, a big occasion that will stand out in the memory of the aged guests and their host of friends , through the years to come. Each of the aged guests registered his or her name with Miss Mary Ida Ryan , giving age, date of birth and place of residence. The reg-ister showed a total of 137 names, all of those who had either reached or passed the 75th anniversary of their birth.

Register of the Grand Event

Guest Date Born Age Etc.

J. H. Kitchens May 4, 1852 77 yrs. 11 mo. M.D.
J. M. Bowlin 75 . born in SC.
T . M. T. Brewer 1851 79 born in Benton Co, TN
Laurie Dennis 86
Walcott, Butler Blackwood 81
Walcott, Mrs. Sorina Rogers 78
John Jonas 77
T.M. Wesley 75
W. B. Todd 78
Adam Sheffield 86
W. A. Oden Nov. 17, 1852 81 born in Morgan Co. Ala
J. P. Odell 77 born in Greene Co.
J. D. Breckenridge 76
W. M. Langton Jan. 3, 1841 89 born in Canada
J. W. Walls May 31, 1853 79 born in Gibson
Co. West Tenn.
W. W. Berryhil Sept. 9, 1849 80 Macklenburg
Co., N. Carolina
J. Newberry June 14, 1851 79 Cherokee Co., Ala
E. Roark May 1, 1852 78 born in Old Clarksburg, Tenn.
R. A. Evans June 1, 1852 77 born in Perry Co., Tenn.
W. F.Brewer July 27, 1849 80 Carrol Co.,West Tenn.
G. H. Brewer Aug. 3, 1854 75 born in Carrol Co. Tenn
S.L. Meadows Apr.8,1850 80 born in Southern Ill.
E. M. Johkins Feb. 4, 1845 85 born in Weatly Co. , Tenn
D. B. Withrow Jan. 15, 1842 88 born in Indiana
Pressly Cothrew Feb. 11, 1850 80 born in Spartanburg District,South Carolina
A. B. Harvey Sep. 3, 1851 78 born in Carroll Co., Tenn
G. F. Miller Oct.13, 1853 76 born in Giles Co. Tenn
J. N. Meredith July 27, 1847 82 Greene Co.
C. L. Harvey Mar. 1, 1847 83 born in Tenn.
“Uncle” Jake Lambert Feb 22, 1847 77 born in Tenn
M. E. Winn Nov 10,1845 84 born in Craighead Co.
W. D. Hester Sept 12, 1849 80 born in N.Carolina
J.D. Norton July 18,1850 79 born in Georgia came here in 1865
K.W. Nesmith Feb 6, 1847 83 born in Lawrence Co. Ala
J.C. Toler Oct 10,1850 79 born in Ill
L.B. Rogers Mar 12,1847 83 born in Ky
Mrs. Evelyn Dunaway Oct 1853 born in Obion Co. Tenn
Z.T. Fletcher Oct 18, 1848 81 born in Gibson Co. Tenn been here since 1866
Lawrence Newberry June 18, 1853 76 born in Mississippi
J. H. Cole Nov 2, 1854 75 born in Tenn
S. J. Troxel July 6, 1844 85 born in Terre Haute , Indiana
John Good Sept 10, 1854 75 born in Hamilton Co. , Indiana
Mrs. Martha Carter Apr 29, 1853 76 born in Tenn
Mrs.Eliza Dacus Oct 18, 1854 75 born in Mississippi
J. T. Hester Apr 2, 1848 82 born in N. Carolina
John Garland Sept 12, 1850 79 born in Tenn
Mrs. Mary Elizabeth
Garland Feb 14, 1851 79

Theo. C. Schwamb Nov 5, 1851 78 born in Ripley co., Indiana
B.F. Smith Mar 14, 1855 75 born in Jasper Co. Ill
Mrs.M.A. Robinson Apr 26,1853 76 born in Benton Co.,Tenn
I. H. Trevtharn July 29, 1853 76 born in W. Tenn been here 75 yrs.
“Aunt” Annie Tyner Apr 15, 1851 79 born in Benton Co. Tenn
John Harrison Mar 4, 1854 75 born in Ohio
J.J. Underwood Feb 4, 1853 76 born in Indiana
W.B. Edwards June 2, 1848 81 born in Kentucky
Mrs. Elizabeth Hyde Dec 1, 1843 86 born in Tenn
Mrs. Mary Jane Hyde Dec 21, 1847 83 born in N.Carolina
Dan Meriwether Dec 31, 1850 79 born in Kirksville, Mo
H.D. Lacy Sept 28,1853 76 born in Christian Co. Kentucky
P.S. Black June 21, 1852 77 born in Indiana
G.T. Ware Oct 27, 1842 85 born in Wilson Co. Tenn
Mrs. Iola LaFont June 30, 1853 75 born in Metropolis, Ill
Mrs. Malinda Dollins Dec 17, 1839 90 born in Middle Tenn Lincoln co.
Mrs. N.S. Lawrence Apr 30, 1847 83 born in Ky
Mrs. Sarah Garner Mar 18, 1842 88 born in Tenn
Mrs. Mary Roe July 11, 1854 75 born in Walker Co. Ga.
W.A. Overall Sept 12,1854 75
A.M. Robinson Jan 30,1849 81 born in Ardell Co. N.C.
Mrs. Lucinda Stuart Oct 28, 1852 77 born in Craighead co.
J.W. Batten Apr 21, 1850 80 born in Tenn
Aaron Thompson Jan 24, 1845 85 born in W.Tenn Henry Co.
Mrs. Martha Holigan Apr 15, 1854 75 born in Ga.
Mrs. M. C. Murphy July 17, 1841 88 born in Ga.
W.B. Montgomery Jan 1, 1854 75 born in East Tenn Bedford Co.
J.W. Hart July 20, 1851 79 born in England crossed Atlantic ocean to America at age of 6 yrs old
T.R. Walker Dec 13,1850 79 born in Gibson Co. Tenn
G.W. Gibson Sept 23,1840 89 born in Henry Co. Tenn
Mrs. M. J. Dodson Mar 17,1854 75 born in Miss
J.M. Lytle Jan 5, 1847 84 born in N.C.
B.F. Justice Mar 26, 1855 75 born in St.Francis Co,Mo.
A.J. Bishop Dec 25,1839 90 born in Bibb Co. Ala
G.P. Panel Oct 6, 1851 80 born in Ala
Mrs. Emma Vanover Jan 18,1854 76 born in Ky
H.S. Trice Nov 9, 1851 76 born in Craighead Co. Ar
Mrs. Rosa Worthan Mar 75 born in Indiana
W.E. Bush Feb 2,1855 75 born in W. Tenn near Paris been here twenty yrs.
W.P. Goins May 11,1853 76 born in E.Tenn
R.W. Rogers Sept 5,1852 77 born in Graves Co. Ky. been here 40 yrs
Mrs. Susan Hunter Feb 14,1853 75 born in Middle Tenn , Gallerton
S.N. Felty May 4, 1854 76 born in White Co. Ill
Mrs. Fannie S.
Hammond Jan 27, 1852 78 born in Ill
A.A. McKinney Feb 22,1851 79 born in Ind.
“Granny” Harris July 23, 1850 79 born in Ky
H.L. Tripod Mar 29,1853 77 born in Higland, Ill
Henry Fesler Aug 4,1850 79 born in Ill
Mrs.Mildred Murdock Jan 22, 1853 75 born in Tenn
W.R. Bennett July 23, 1847 82 born in Fulton Co. Ky
Mrs. A. Turley Sept 9,1853 75 born in St.Francis Co. Mo
H.M. Williford Feb 28,1856 76 born in Tenn
W.B. Morgan Sept 2,1852 79 born in Miss
J.O. Nash Nov 23, 1840 89 born in Penn
“Uncle ” Bill McDonald Feb 19, 1850 80 born in Ga.
V.F. Norton Aug 30,1854 75 born in Tenn
M.R. Coffman Dec 4,1840 89
G.W. Lloyd Oct 9,1852 80 born in Ark
Mrs. G.W. Lloyd Mar 12,1853 77 born in Tenn
D.L. Ligon July 7,1847 82 born in Tenn
J.L. Raines July 26,1848 81 born in Henry Co. Tenn
Mrs. V.A. Wadley Jan 10,1854 76 born in Fayette Co. Miss
J.R. Elkins Aug.4,1852 77 born in Summer Co. Tenn
L.F. Kenney May 23,1849 80 born in Mo.
P.G. Ellington June 11,1854 76 born in W.Tenn
M.C. Stevenson July 26,1853 76 born in S.Carolina
Mrs. Virginia Thompson 1846 83 born in St.Francis Co.
J.Hotchkiss Apr 21,1849 81 born in Independence co. Ar
J.V. Landrum Aug 18,1853 76 born in Weekley co.Tenn
A.B. Hays Jan 22, 1842 89 born in Hickman Co. Ky
Mrs. W.J. McDonald Apr 1854 76 born in Tenn
Joe A. White Dec 7, 1854 81 born in W.
Miss G.H. Walker June 4, 1848 81 born in Ala
J.W. Stalcup Sept 15,1852 76 born in Weakley Co. Tenn
G.N. Wadley Dec 8,1854 75 born in middle Tenn
G.J. Pierce Feb 5,1853 77 born in Logansville Clinton Co. Pa
W.C. Swain Jan 14,1852 78 born in Russelville , Ky
S.E. Batey Aug 8,1852 77 born in North Ga.
W.H. May July 21,1850 79 born in Va.
Mrs. Katie Higgins Jan 3,1852 78 born in Miss
A.Martin Sept 5, 1854 75 born in Germany
George Zollner Dec 2, 1853 77 born in Germany
Mrs. Mary Jane Worsham June 10, 1853 76 born in Ala
Mrs. C.A. Dover Oct 29,1855 75 born in Benton Co. Tenn
F.M. Barnett Oct 12,1847 82 born in Ill

Eleven children were born to William Preston Goins and Lydia Elizabeth Lafferty Goins:

Ross Coe Goins born in 1879
Albert Goins born in 1881
Lewis Earsalee Goins born in 1883
Mary Irene Goins born in 1886
Jimmie Goins born in 1889
Edna Alice Goins born in 1890
George Chester Goins born in 1891
Jessie Attee Goins born in 1894
Alma Pearl Goins born in 1898
William Joe Goins born in 1900
John Leon Goins born December 6, 1902

Ross Coe Goins, son of William Preston Goins and Lydia Elizabeth Lafferty Goins, was born in 1879 in Clark County, Illinois. He did not live with his parents after they moved to the Donation Grant. He had contracted the “chills” [now called malaria] which was caused by mosquito bites. The doctor advised Uncle Ross that if he wanted to maintain his health, he would have to move away from the swamps, so he went to Martinsville, Illinois and lived with his Grandmother Mary Jane Lafferty. Later he removed to International Falls, Minnesota where he married Suave Reuter, raised a family and died.

Through the years, Uncle Ross kept in close touch with his parents, writing many letters to them. His mother kept every letter, and they were passed down to Aunt Pearl Morrow. At her death, the box of letters were found in her attic.

Albert Goins, son of William Preston Goins and Lydia Elizabeth Lafferty Goins, was born in 1881 in Clark County.

Lewis Earsalee Goins, son of William Preston Goins and Lydia Elizabeth Lafferty Goins, was born in Clark County in 1883.

Mary Irene Goins, daughter of William Preston Goins and Lydia Elizabeth Lafferty Goins, was born in Greene County, Arkansas in 1886.

Jimmie Goins, son of William Preston Goins and Lydia Elizabeth Lafferty Goins, was born in 1889 in Greene County.

Edna Alice Goins, daughter of William Preston Goins and Lydia Elizabeth Lafferty Goins, was born in Greene County in 1890.

George Chester Goins, son of William Preston Goins and Lydia Elizabeth Lafferty Goins, was born in Greene County in 1891. He attended school in Walcott, Arkansas, riding “Old Gray.” After graduation at Walcott, he enrolled in an electrical engineering correspondence course. He was married about 1914, wife’s name unknown. He died of a ruptured appendix December 8, 1916, leaving his widow and a small baby, name unknown.

Jessie Attee Goins, son of William Preston Goins and Lydia Elizabeth Lafferty Goins, was born in Greene County in 1894.

Alma Pearl Goins, daughter of William Preston Goins and Ly­dia Elizabeth Lafferty Goins, was born in 1898 in Greene County.

William Joe Goins, son of William Preston Goins and Lydia Elizabeth Lafferty Goins, was born in Greene County in 1900.

John Leon Goins, son of William Preston Goins and Lydia Elizabeth Lafferty Goins, was born in Greene County Decem­ber 2, 1902. He was married there about 1925 to Cora C. Smith, daughter of Logan H. Roots Smith and Mary Alice Burkeen Smith. Cora C. Smith Goins died November 18, 1994.

Children born to John Leon Goins and Cora C. Smith Goins include:

Louise Goins born January 11, 1935

Louise Goins, daughter of John Leon Goins and Cora C. Smith Goins, was born in Greene County January 11, 1935. She was married August 24, 1949 to William F. Richardson. Following a divorce, she lived in Paragould, Arkansas in 1993. She a member of Gowen Research Foundation’s Editorial Board, was active in the research of her family history and contributed much of the material for this section of the manuscript.

Sarah Jane Goins, daughter of Nancy Goins, was born in Grainger County about 1831. Her parents brought her to Hamilton County about 1833. She was enumerated as a 20-year-old in the 1850 census of Hamilton County.

She was married shortly afterward to James K. Connell. They and their two children were enumerated in the 1860 census of Hamilton County. In 1895 they lived in Birmingham, Al­abama, according to “Memoirs of Georgia.”

Pleasant Goins, son of Nancy Bibee Goins, was born about 1833 in Hamilton County. He appeared there in the 1850 cen­sus as a 16-year-old. He was deceased by 1895, according to “Memoirs of Georgia.”

William A[ttle?] Goins, son of Nancy Bibee Goins, was born about 1835 in Hamilton County. He was enumerated there as a 14-year-old in the 1850 census.

“William A. Goins” was taken prisoner May 3, 1863 near Grand Gulf, in the Vicksburg campaign, according his prisoner of war record. He was transported upriver to a prisoner-of-war camp at Alton, Illinois. Hospital records there show that he was hospitalized for pneumonia December 24 and was discharged December 30. He died of chronic diarrhea July 2, 1864. He was buried there.

It was noted in his record jacket that “Prisoner states that he was conscripted and objects to being exchanged; desires to take the Oath of Allegiance without reservation or evasion.” It was also noted, “Prisoner sent to City Point for exchange June 12, 1863.”

Oscar Claiborne “Roscoe” Goins appeared in Hamilton County Court June 3, 1867 and “suggested the death” of William A. Goins and was made administrator of his estate.

Anderson Goen, Charles Goen, Dotson Goen, John Goen and William A. Goins believed to be Hamilton County men all served in the Forty-Third Tennessee Infantry Regiment, ac­cording to “Tennessee Soldiers in the Civil War.” All served in C Company except Charles Goen who served in K Company.

Louise Goins Richardson wrote, “I went to the Confederate Cemetery in Alton, Illinois. There are no individual markers for the 1,346 Confederate soldiers who died in one year there. However, there is a huge monument with all of the names of the soldiers who died there embossed in bronze. William A. Goins, Company C, 43rd Tennessee Infantry Regiment ap­pears on it.”

George Goins, son of Nancy Bibee Goins, was born about 1838 in Hamilton County. He was recorded there as an 11-year-old in the 1850 census. He died prior to 1895, according to “Memoirs of Georgia.”
==O==
Caleb Goan headed a “free colored” household of six individu­als in the 1810 census of Grainger County. “Caleb Gowin” was recorded as “one poll” in Capt. John Bull’s Company in the 1810 tax list of Grainger County.
==O==
Claibourn Goan was enumerated in the 1810 census of Grainger County as the head of a household of eight free col­ored. “Claibourne Goan” was assessed taxes in 1810 one 100 acres at 12.5 cents and one poll at 12.5 cents.

“Claborn Goins” was enumerated as the head of a household in the 1850 census of Grainger County, Household 154-20:

“Goins, Claborn 76, born in Virginia
Dolly 35, born in Tennessee
Levi 16
Perry 13
Polly 13
John 9
Nancy 7
Roscoe D. 6
Susan 4”
==O==
A household headed by James Goan enumerated in the 1810 census of Grainger County was composed of three “free col­ored and one “white female 16-26.” James Goan paid 12.5 tax on one poll, according to the 1810 tax list.
==O==
John Goan headed a “free colored” household composed of nine individuals, according to the 1810 census of Grainger County. He was assessed taxes on 90 acres in the 1810 tax list.
==O==
“Shaderick Goan” was recorded in November 1809 for the 1810 tax list as “1 poll.” William Goan was recorded in a consecu­tive entry as “1 white poll.”

Shadrach Goan, “free colored” with five members in his house­hold was enumerated in the 1810 census of Grainger County in a cluster of “free colored” households headed by Martha Ivy, James Reynolds, Sarah Mournin, Elizabeth Den­son, Gooden Scott, Dennis Scott and Jesse Scott.
==O==
Caleb Goin was married June 10, 1820 to Polly Dunkin, ac­cording to Grainger County marriage records. Claiborne Goin was the bondsman. Children born to Caleb Goin and Polly Dunkin are unknown.
==O==
In 1810 Daniel Goin paid tax on 338 acres and “one white poll” in Capt. Thomas Sharp’s Company.

Daniel Goin was enumerated as the head of a household in the 1810 census of Grainger County:

“Goin, Daniel white male 26-45
white female 26-45
white female 10-16
white female 10-16
white male 0-10
white male 0-10
white male 0-10
white male 0-10
white female 0-10”

Daniel Goin owned one slave in 1810. “Daniel Goins” re­ceived a land grant No. 16468 in Grainger County July 13, 1830.

==O==

Levi Goin was born in 1795 in North Carolina. He was mar­ried about 1816, wife’s name unknown, probably in North Carolina. He was enumerated as the head of a household in the 1850 census of Grainger County:

“Goin, Levi 55, born in North Carolina
Esther A. 28, born in North Carolina
William J. M. 15
Falany P. 12
Levi M. 10
Manervy A. 7
Lunda M. 5”

Levi Goin, Jr, was born between 1800 and 1810, probably in Claiborne County. He was married between 1820 and 1825.

His household was enumerated in the 1830 census of Clai­borne County adjoining the household of “Levi Goin, Sr, page 131.” It is not believed that “Levi Goin, Jr.” was a son of Levi Goin, Sr.” because Levi Goin, Sr. would only be 15 years at that time. It is possible that the Jr. and Sr. were assigned by the census taker merely to distinguish between the two.

The household of Levi Goin, Jr. appeared in the 1830 census as:

“Levi Goin, Jr. white male 20-30
white female 20-30
white female 5-10
white male 0-5”

The household of Levi Goin, Jr. reappeared in the 1840 census of Claiborne County, page 216, still nearby to the residence of Levi Goin, Sr. as:

“Levi Goin, Jr. white male 20-30
white female 30-40
white female 10-15
white male 5-10
white female 5-10
white male 0-5
white male 0-5”
==O==
Uriah Goin appeared in the 1840 census of Claiborne County, still adjoining his brother, Levi Goin. He family appeared as:

“Goin, Uriah white male 40-50
white female 40-50
white female 15-20
white female 5-10”

==O==

Baylis E. Goines was born in Tennessee in 1810. He was married about 1830, wife’s name Rhoda. She was born in North Carolina in 1812.

The household of Baylis E. Goines was enumerated as House­hold 783-810, Civil District 8, Grainger County in the 1850 census:

“Goines, Baylis E. 40, born in Tennessee, farmer,
$800 real estate
Rhoda 38, born in North Carolina,
illiterate
Martha S. 19, born in Tennessee
Nancy 16, born in Tennessee
James M. 14, born in Tennessee
Mary E. 9, born in Tennessee
William 8, born in Tennessee
Rhoda 4, born in Tennessee
Samuel S. 2, born in Tennessee”
“Goines, Prior A. 22, born in Tennessee”

==O==

Anny Goins was named as head of a household in the 1900 Grainger County, Enumeration District 26, page 2:

“Goins, Anny 67, born in NC, February 1833
Thomas 28, born in TN, February 1872, son
John 11, born in TN, Apr. 1889, grandson”

==O==

David Goins was married March 8, 1820 to Nancy Dunkin, ac­cording to Grainger County marriage records. William McGill was their bondsman. Children born to David Goins and Nancy Dunkin Goins are unknown.

==O==

Davis Goins was enumerated as the head of Household 936-126 the 1850 census of Grainger County:

“Goins, Davis 70, born in Tennessee
Jane 43, born in Tennessee
Calvin 16,
Alsy E. 7,
David 6,
Juliat A.C. 5
Abner B. F. 2
Lucy A. 5/12
Dyer, Eliza 22”

==O==

Drury Goins was married August 23, 1817 to Mary Goin, ac­cording to “Grainger County, Tennessee Marriages, 1796-1850.” Edward Riggs was their bondsman. Drury Goins ap­peared as the head of a household in the 1830 and 1840 census returns of Grainger County. Children born to Drury Goins and Mary Goin Goins are unknown.

==O==

Gabriel Goins was born in Virginia in 1810. He was married about 1840, wife’s name, Betsy, she was born in Virginia in 1816. The household of Gabriel Goins, an illiterate laborer was enumerated as No. 186-190, Civil District 2, in the census of the 1850 of Grainger County:

“Goins, Gabriel 40, born in VA, laborer, illiterate
Betsy 34, born in Virginia
Mahaly E. 12, born in Tennessee
Andrew 10, born in Tennessee
William R. 8, born in Tennessee”

==O==

Granville Goins was born in Grainger County about 1810, ac­cording to the affidavit of Matilda Goins of Dayton, Tennessee in the Court of Claims June 24, 1908. He was married about 1833, wife’s name Mary “Polly.” By 1837 they were located in Hamilton County, Tennessee

Granville Goins was enumerated as the head of a household No. 1339 in the 1850 census of Hamilton County. The family was recorded October 21, 1850 as:

“Goins, Granvill 40, farmer, born in Tennessee
Mary 33, born in Tennessee
Mahaley 18, born in Tennessee
Rachel 14, born in Tennessee
Noah 12, born in Tennessee
Roland 10, born in Tennessee
Dopson 8, born in Tennessee
James 6, born in Tennessee
Nancy 4, born in Tennessee
William 8/12, born in Tennessee”

Adjoining the household of Granville Goins was that of Nancy Goins. The household, No. 1340, was recorded on Page 925 as:

“Goins, Nancy 45, born in Tennessee
Elizabeth 29, born in Tennessee
Fanney 10, born in Tennessee”

“Granville and Polly Goins” were mentioned in an affidavit signed in 1908 by J. P. Talley of Chattanooga, according to “Cherokee by Blood: Records of Eastern Cherokee Ances­try in the U. S. Court of Claims, 1906-1910” by Jerry Wright Jordon.

“[I affirm] that I am 80 years of age and lived in James County, Tennessee. I was just partially acquainted with Mary Jane Irwin and know W. V. Goins quite well. May Jane Irwin is the second cousin of W. V. Goins. I knew Polly and Granville Goins. They lived in Hamil­ton County, but I think they were born in upper East Tennessee, probably Grainger County. Alfred and Halie, I think, were born in Hamilton County. Alfred, I think, was most too young to live with the Indians. They lived around where there were Indians, in the same neighborhood and country, and whether they ever took a part in the tribal councils as recognized Indians, I don’t know. Polly and Granville Goins were a little older than myself. They have been dead about 12 or 15 years. They were never on any Indian rolls that I know of. They were always called Indians, Cherokees. I was ac­quainted with Nathan and Marila Goins. They lived in Hamilton County, but I think they were born some­where else. The parents and grandparents of W. V. Goins were recognized as having Cherokee Indian blood in them. Don’t know that they were on any rolls. It’s been 50-odd years ago since I first got acquainted with them, and ever since I knew them, they have lived in Hamilton County. I know of nothing further to give in aid of ei­ther of said claims.
J. P. Talley
Chattanooga, Tenn, June 18, 1908”

At the same time W. T. Irwin of Chattanooga, former husband of Mary Jane Goins Irwin who died in 1897, made an affidavit about the family:

“I affirm that I live in Marion County, Tennessee. I am 49 years of age. I make claim for my children. My first wife has been dead 11 years. She was about 30 or 32 when she died. Her parents names were Alfred and Halie Goins. She claims Indian descent on her father’s and mother’s side. Her grandparents on her mother’s side were Granville and Polly Goins. On her father’s side they were Thomas and Betsy Goins. They come by the same name because they were probably related. She was always recognized as an Indian in the commu­nity in which she lived. Her parents and grandparents lived in what is now James County [?]. Her grandpar­ents origi­nated from Grainger County. She claimed to be a full blood Cherokee. Her grandparents lived in Hamilton County in 1835. She had only two brothers, those men­tioned in the application. The children of Granville and Polly Goins are Halie, Jim, Dodson or Dotson and Nancy. I have heard that my wife’s parents and grand­parents were on some roll, but I don’t know what roll. I have nothing further to add to what I have already said.

W. T. Irwin
Chattanooga, Tenn, June 18, 1908”
==O==
Gutre Goins, a Virginian, was recorded as the head of a house­hold in the 1850 census of Grainger County, Household 197-26:

“Goins, Gutre 40, born in Virginia
Betsy 31, born in Virginia
Mahaly E. 12
Andrew 10
William K. 8”
==O==
James Goins was born in Tennessee in 1821. He was mar­ried in 1850, wife’s name Myra I. She was born in Tennessee in 1832. He was a tailor and illiterate. They had no children.
==O==
James Goins appeared as the head of a household in the census of 1840:

Goins, James white male 20-30
white female 20-30
==O==
John Goins was enumerated as the head of Household 152-20 in the 1850 census of Grainger County:

“Goins, John 30, born in Tennessee
Martha F. 22, born in Tennessee
George W. A. 4
Joseph 1”

Robert C. Goins, was born in Tennessee in 1812. He was mar­ried about 1835 wife’s name Sele. The household of Robert C. Goins, No. 727-758, was enumerated in the 1850 census of Grainger County, Civil District 10:

“Goins, Robert C. 38, born in Tennessee, farmer
Sele 26, born in Tennessee,
illiterate
Thomas E. 14, born in Tennessee
Rhode I. 13, born in Tennessee
Robert K. 10, born in Tennessee
Sarah E. 7, born in Tennessee
Richard H. 6, born in Tennessee
Susan 4, born in Tennessee”
==O==
Sally Goins was shown as the head of a household in the 1850 census of Grainger County, 10th Civil District, Household No. 1317-1374. She was born in North Carolina in 1816. The 95-year old Sally Goins was possibly her mother-in-law. The household was enumerated as:

“Goins, Sally 34, born in North Carolina
Henry 18, born in Tennessee
Jane 12, born in Tennessee
James 7, born in Tennessee
Goins, Sally 95, born in North Carolina,
illiterate”
==O==
Samuel C. Goins was enumerated as the head of Household 893-120 in the 1850 census of Grainger County:

“Goins, Samuel C. 42, born in Tennessee
Mahala 29, born in Tennessee
William P. 5
Mary E. 4
Joseph N. 2”
==O==
Sarah Goins was born in Tennessee in 1820. She appeared in the 1850 census of Grainger County, as the head of Household No. 1103-1151, Civil District 10:

“Goins, Sarah 30, born in TN, illiterate
Nelson [Wilson?] 10, born in TN”
Mansfield, John 40
Camper Martha 30″
==O==
Thomas Goins was born in North Carolina in 1796. He moved to Tennessee about 1840. He appeared as the head of household No. 1300-1357, Civil District 11, Grainger County, in the 1850 census as:

“Goins, Thomas 54, born in NC, farmer, $150
real estate
Catherine 55, born in NC, illiterate
Henry 13, born in NC
George W. 10, born in NC
John G. W. 9, born in TN”

Thomas Goins, received Land Grant No. 25208 in Grainger County September 20, 1844. “Thomas Goans” received from the State of Tennessee Land Grant No. 30327 in Grainger County December 20, 1859.

Children born to Thomas Goins and Catherine Goins include:

George W. Goins born in 1834
Henry Goins born about 1836
John G. W. Goins born about 1841

George W. Goins, suggested as a son of Thomas Goins and Catherine Goins was born in 1834 in North Carolina according to his Confederate pension application. He was brought to Grainger County about 1840. In 1907 he stated that he had lived in Tennessee for 67 years.

George W. Goins, “colored” of Idol, Tennessee in Grainger County, stated on his Confederate pension application dated January 14, 1907 that he was born in North Carolina in 1834.

In reply to a pension board questionnaire dated January 14, 1907, he stated, “I enlisted in Company D, Twenty-sixth Infantry Regiment, CSA under Capt. William McConnal and Col. Leland. I was not in any battle. I was left to guard the wagon train. I was at the Ft. Donelson fight, but did not engage in the fight; I was with the wagons.”

He stated that the nature of his wound was “head diseased.” No doctor treated him, but “Les Talines waited on me.

When asked to explain how he got out of the army, he ex­plained, “I was left at Cumberland City with the sick and while there, my command was captured. The sick was sent to Knoxville and Morristown, and I —– —– —– —– —– —– home and reenlisted under Capt. L. J. Jennings in Grainger County, Tennessee and he furloughed me to my house, and I have since lost my furlough.”

He stated that he had lived in Tennessee for 67 years, that he had a wife and two sons, ages 38 and 35 living with him. He did a “little farming” on 50 acres of land he owned which he valued at $100 to $200. He owned “about $20” worth of personal property. He claimed that he was no longer able to work and that his sons could not support him.

Grainger County marriage records show that G. W. Goins was married to Jane Goins March 6, 1863 by L. H. Lowe, minister of the gospel.

Dr. J. H. Campbell attached an affidavit stating that the appli­cant had “disabilities from disease of liver, kidneys and gastri­tis of the stomach and in a bad state of health, unable to per­form manual labor.”

Capt. L. J. Jennings of Greenville County, South Carolina sub­mitted an notarized affidavit September 10, 1906 stating, “I was captain of Company D, Twelfth Battalion, Tennessee Cav­alry in the Confederate Army and George Goins was a mem­ber of my company.”

In April George W. Goins wrote the following letter to the pen­sion board:

April 22, 1907
Mr. F. A. Moses
Nashville, Tennessee

Dear Sir: I am in receipt of your letter of inquiry. I was in Company C, 12th Tennessee Battalion and was fur­lough home in July 1862 on account of sickness to re­main until called for the army dispersed, and I was not called for which left me at home and remained there. I am an invalid and have never been well since.

G. W. Goins”

Six months after completing the questionnaire, George W. Goins wrote concerning his application:

July 20, 1907
Mr. Frank A. Moses, S. E.
Nashville, Tennessee

Dear Sir: As I have not heard anything concerning my pension for some time, I desire to know whether it was allowed or whether you want more proof. Now my po­sition in the army was to cook for 8 men which I did. If the board is satisfied with the proof and my service in the army demands or entitles me to a pension, I would like to know as I need help.
George W. Goins”

On June 25, 1910 Joseph H. Goins, suggested as a kinsman of George W. Goins wrote:

“Mr. Frank A. Moses, S.E.
Nashville, Tennessee

Dear Sir: G. W. Goins of Idol, Tenn. died the 6th of this month of a disease contracted during service in the army for which you have the proof at your option. He leaves a widow 68 years old who is in need of help. If you need any more proof concerning his pension on file, please notify me or her. Someone told me that if she out lived her husband that she would get a pension. So please write me concerning it.

Yours respectfully,
Jos. Goins
P. S. Her name is Jane Goins, col, Idol, Tenn. Please notify either soon for she is very feeble. Or you can write to R. L. Mc, Idol, Tenn. as he is a magistrat and does business of that kind.”

Joseph H. Goins was still trying to obtain the pension in the following year:

Tate, Tenn.
July 2, 1911
Mr. F. A. Moses, S. E.
Nashville, Tenn.

Dear Sir: I am deeply interested in the case of G. W. Goins, deceased, #8686 for I know that no one needs a pension any worse that his widow or is any more entitled to one than was her husband. He was a free-born man and allowed to enlist wherever he chose. He was with the army some time before he enlisted not know­ing any better, but finally enlisted some time before the army was disbanded. As I have not mo­lested you any for a year, I appeal to your conscience to present her claim before the board again. Please respond.
Yours truly,
J. H. Goins
P.S. His widow’s name and address is Jane Goins, Idol, Tenn.

On July 11, 1911, Liddie Jane Goins filed a formal applica­tion for a widow’s pension. She supplied answers to a printed questionnaire.

She stated that she was born in Grainger County in 1838 and was married to George W. Goins by Lannie Lowe. She men­tioned that they were the parents of seven children –all boys. The oldest was about 50 and the youngest about 30 For prop­erty she mentioned that she had a life interest in a little moun­tainland worth about $75 and one milkcow. She declared that a son, age 39 and a grandson, age 10 presently lived with her.

On June 30, 1912, Joseph H. Goins made another attempt:

Tate, Tenn.
June 30, 1912
Mr. Frank A. Moses, Spec. Exmr.
Nashville, Tenn.

Dear Sir: In regard to the case of G. W. Goins, Case #8686, Col. We as col. people of Tate Springs would like to know why the pension of G. W. Goins has not been allowed, knowing that all the proof you have asked for has been made and backed up by the best of­ficials of Grainger County. His widow, Jane Goins is 73 years old and needs assistance. I will ask you for the last time to consider her case. Now this is election year, and we want to know something. You will please present this to the board next Tuesday and write her at Idol or write me at Tate. We do not know whether he merited a pension or not, but his comrades say he did. I know that his widow needs a pension or some help. So please consider this letter and let us hear from you.
Yours sincerely,
J. H. Goins

On July 30, 1912, Frank A. Moses, special examiner for the Tennessee Board of Pension Examiners, wrote Capt. L. J. Jen­nings in Greenville:

“Dear Sir,

The widow of G. W. Goins is an applicant for pension. It is claimed that Goins was a member of your com­pany. Our information is that at one time he was a cook for your company, but it appears that he did not remain until the close of the war. In fact, in his own application, made in 1907 he said that Capt. Jennings furloughed him home and he remained there. I was a Confederate soldier myself [captain] and never heard of the enlistment of a negro until the last few months of the war, when Gen. Lee advised the enlistment of ne­groes with the promise of their freedom at the end of the war. I believe a very few enlisted within a short time before the war closed. Please write me what you can to assist me in the consideration of this case.

Frank A. Moses”

Lyddie Jane Goins wrote Capt. Moses a final letter:

“Idol, Tenn.
October 1, 1912
Mr. Frank A. Moses
Nashville, Tenn.

I have your letter of July 3, that was written to my son J. H. Goins at Tate, Tennessee in regard to my pension. You stated that you were writing Capt. Jennings for information. Hope you have heard from him by now, and if may husband was due a pension, I would be thankful for it, for I am 73 years old and very feeble, and if I could get it, it would be of great value to me.

Yours truly,
Liddie J. Goins

On October 7, 1912 Captain Moses wrote a final letter to Lyddie Jane Goins:

“I have your letter of October 1. I wrote Capt. Jen­nings in July and have his reply. He tells me that the statements made by your husband in his application are true, but the trouble in your case is that your husband was a servant and not an enlisted soldier.

The Confederate States enlisted very few colored man and none until long after your husband left Capt. Jennings’ command and went home. Even if he had been enlisted, the fact that he did not stay until the close of the war would prevent us from giving a pension in this case. I do not think that it is worth your while to expect anything in the way of a pension.”
==O==
Amy Gowen was married March 11, 1846 to Isaac Shoemaker, according to “Grainger County, Tennessee Marriages, 1796-1850.”

==O==

James Gowen appeared as the head of a household in the 1840 census of Grainger County. His household appeared on a farm as:

“Gowen, James white male 40-50
white female 40-50
white male 20-30
white female 20-30
white male 15-20
white male 15-20
white male 10-15
white male 5-10
white male 5-10
white male 0-5
white male 0-5
white female 60-70”
==O==
Nancy Gowen, Jr. was eight years old when she was “bound to Joshua Hicky until she attain the age of 18” February 18, 1822, according to Grainger County Court Minute Book 5, page 3.
==O==
Caleb Gowin was recorded as “one white poll” in Capt. John Bull’s Company in the 1810 tax list of Grainger County.
==O==
Albert Gowing appeared as the head of a household in the 1850 census of Grainger County, household 518-425, Civil District 5. The family was enumerated as:

“Gowing, Albert 23, born in TN, farmer, illiterate
Nancy 20, born in Tennessee, illiterate
Deliora E. 2, born in Tennessee”
==O==
Joseph Guin was enumerated as the head of a household in the 1810 census of Grainger County:

“Guin, Joseph white male 26-45
white female 16-26
white male 0-10
white female 0-10”

Researcher Descendants:

Louise Goins Richardson, 2207 E. Lake Street, Paragould, AR, 72450
L. R. Williams, Jr, 6400 Middle Ridge Lane, Chattanooga, Tennessee, 37343,
615/842-7285.
Kenny Ann Gibson Wood, 8718 S. 68th E. Avenue, Tulsa, OK, 918/481-1661

LIST OF U.S. STATES:

Alabama, Alaska, Arizona, Arkansas, California, Colorado, Connecticut, Delaware, Florida, Georgia, Hawaii,Idaho, Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Kansas, Kentucky, Louisiana, Maine, Maryland, Massachusetts, Michigan,Minnesota, Mississippi, Missouri, Montana, Nebraska, Nevada, New Hampshire, New Jersey, New Mexico,New York, North Carolina, North Dakota, Ohio, Oklahoma, Oregon, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island, South Carolina, South Dakota, Tennessee, Texas, Utah, Vermont, Virginia, Washington, West Virginia, Wisconsin,Wyoming

 

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