Virginia – Hanover County – 1700s to early 1800s

(Below are different Going, Goyen, Gowen related sources for those people were in the Virginia, North Carolina, or South Carolina areas in the early 1700’s to early 1800’s)

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Hanover County, Virginia – INFO
1702 July 4 – “Michael Gowin” and his brother “Phillip Gowin” were serving in the militia in nearby New Kent County. They were serving under Col. John Lightfoot. Created in 1654, New Kent County then encompassed territory included in the present counties of King William, King and Queen, Hanover, and New Kent. Va Miltia – New Kent County.  https://books.google.com/books?id=0RpcjJQBm6AC&pg=PA219&lpg=PA219&dq=James+Gowing,+John+Gowing,+William+Gowing,+dragoons&source=bl&ots=aUYdKZese1&sig=1y0EvkT1Z-TVNYDRCyOxHMcXFQU&hl=en&sa=X&ved=0CB4Q6AEwAGoVChMIz9iSs5GZyQIVhiomCh3KLA1E#v=onepage&q&f=false

1720 July 14 – “Michael Gowing” is mentioned in an entry dated July 14, 1720 in the “Vestry Book of St. Pauls Parish, Hanover County, Virginia, 1706-1786:” “In obedience to an order of New Kent County, July 14, 1720, it is ordered that the precinct whereof Jere: Parker is Surveyor be divided into two precincts and that Peter Harrilson be Surveyor of the lower precinct, beginning at Ash Cake Road, thence up the road to Magirts path and that he have Michael Gowing‘s male tithables, Mrs. Mary Anderson’s tithables at the Quarter adjoining to that, those of George Butler, Henry Taylor and his own tithables to assist him in the clearing & keeping that road in good order.”
Hanover Co, Va http://interactive.ancestry.com/28794/dvm_LocHist012613-00315-1?backurl=http%3a%2f%2fsearch.ancestry.com%2fsearch%2fdb.aspx%3fdbid%3d28794%26path%3d&ssrc=&backlabel=ReturnBrowsing#?imageId=dvm_LocHist012613-00057-1 (pg 93)

1734 June 7 -“John Gowin” leased land from “Shurley Whatley” in St. Martins Parish in adjoining Hanover County, Virginia on June 7, 1734, according to “The Valentine Papers.” Volume 3, page 71. Hanover Co, Va

1737 May 21 – Mr. Michl Going (pd Danl. Patrick Jr., carried to D p. 23) Credits: May 21, 1737 (1 Note as Merryweathers).  Accounts from the Store of Thomas Partridge and Co. Hanover Co, Virginia, 1734-1756.  1737 in Hanover Co a Michael Going owing on a store acct. Hannover Co, Va.   http://interactive.ancestry.com/6131/VGS_1985_01_01_0186/516457658?backurl=&ssrc=&backlabel=ReturnSearchResults&rc=490,1735,620,1768#?imageId=VGS_1985_01_01_0186

http://interactive.ancestry.com/6131/VGS_1985_01_01_0186/516457658?backurl=http%3a%2f%2fsearch.ancestry.com%2fcgi-bin%2fsse.dll%3fdb%3dvgs%26gss%3dsfs28_ms_db%26new%3d1%26rank%3d1%26msT%3d1%26gsln%3dGoing%26gsln_x%3d0%26MSAV%3d0%26uidh%3dm37&ssrc=&backlabel=ReturnSearchResults&rc=490,1735,620,1768#?imageId=VGS_1985_01_01_0186

1738- (nd) (Bal from B 171). 1738 Michael Going in Hanover Co owes on store acct. Hannover Co, Va.
http://interactive.ancestry.com/6131/VGS_1986_01_01_0132/516981892?backurl=&ssrc=&backlabel=ReturnSearchResults&rc=554,551,690,584
http://interactive.ancestry.com/6131/VGS_1986_01_01_0132/516981892?backurl=http%3a%2f%2fsearch.ancestry.com%2fcgi-bin%2fsse.dll%3fdb%3dvgs%26gss%3dsfs28_ms_db%26new%3d1%26rank%3d1%26msT%3d1%26gsln%3dGoing%26gsln_x%3d0%26MSAV%3d0%26uidh%3dm37&ssrc=&backlabel=ReturnSearchResults&rc=554,551,690,584

1743-1744 merchant acct book with Michael Gowing Jr and Michael Gowing Sr, David Gowing, and Edward Gowing in Hanover Co.  A Merchant’s Account Book. Hannover County, Va
http://interactive.ancestry.com/6131/VGS_2002_01_01_0386/525370754?backurl=http%3a%2f%2fsearch.ancestry.com%2fcgi-bin%2fsse.dll%3fdb%3dvgs%26gss%3dsfs28_ms_db%26new%3d1%26rank%3d1%26msT%3d1%26gsln%3dGoin%26gsln_x%3d0%26MSAV%3d1%26uidh%3dm37&ssrc=&backlabel=ReturnSearchResults&rc=510,1721,605,1750#?imageId=VGS_1997_01_01_0349
http://interactive.ancestry.com/6131/VGS_1997_01_01_0349/522749277?backurl=http%3a%2f%2fsearch.ancestry.com%2fcgi-bin%2fsse.dll%3fdb%3dvgs%26gss%3dsfs28_ms_db%26new%3d1%26rank%3d1%26msT%3d1%26gsln%3dGowen%26gsln_x%3d0%26MSAV%3d0%26uidh%3dm37&ssrc=&backlabel=ReturnSearchResults&rc=204,388,351,421;204,438,334,471;204,488,326,521;204,538,350,571#?imageId=VGS_1997_01_01_0349

1744 1745 merch acct book w Michael Gowing Jr and Michael Gowing Sr, David Gowing plus Edward Gowing in Hanover Co. A Merchant’s Account Book. Hannover County, Va
http://interactive.ancestry.com/6131/VGS_2002_01_01_0386/525370754?backurl=http%3a%2f%2fsearch.ancestry.com%2fcgi-bin%2fsse.dll%3fdb%3dvgs%26gss%3dsfs28_ms_db%26new%3d1%26rank%3d1%26msT%3d1%26gsln%3dGoin%26gsln_x%3d0%26MSAV%3d1%26uidh%3dm37&ssrc=&backlabel=ReturnSearchResults&rc=510,1721,605,1750#?imageId=VGS_2000_01_01_0128
http://interactive.ancestry.com/6131/VGS_1998_01_01_0106/523273322?backurl=http%3a%2f%2fsearch.ancestry.com%2fcgi-bin%2fsse.dll%3fdb%3dvgs%26gss%3dsfs28_ms_db%26new%3d1%26rank%3d1%26msT%3d1%26gsln%3dGowen%26gsln_x%3d0%26MSAV%3d0%26uidh%3dm37&ssrc=&backlabel=ReturnSearchResults&rc=259,1844,352,1877;259,1894,350,1927#?imageId=VGS_1998_01_01_0106

1763 – “Philip Going” was taxed in adjoining Hanover County in 1763 on 220 acres. Hanover Co, Va.

1764 Sept – Aaron Going was living in Louisa County on 19 May 1763 when he mortgaged his household goods to Thomas Underwood of Hanover County for 36 pounds currency by deed proved in Goochland County in September 1764 [DB 8:422; Orders 1750-57, 84; 1757-61, 429; 1761-65, 429]. Louisa Co, Va   http://www.freeafricanamericans.com/Gibson_Gowen.htm

1787 Hanover Co Va
Henry Going 1 tithe 2 horses
http://www.freeafricanamericans.com/hanover.htm

1788A Hanover Co Va
Henry Going 1 tithe [p. 201]
http://www.freeafricanamericans.com/hanover.htm

1790A Hanover Co Va
Henry Going 1 tithe 1 horse [p. 240]
http://www.freeafricanamericans.com/hanover.htm

1790B Hanover Co Va
Owin Going (Negro) Exempt 1 slave over 16
http://www.freeafricanamericans.com/hanover.htm

1791 Hanover Co Va
Henry Going 1 tithe 1 horse [p. 275]
http://www.freeafricanamericans.com/hanover.htm

1794 Hanover Co Va
Holding Going (Mulato) 1 tithe [p. 45]
Austin Going 1 tithe [p. 57]
Henry Going 1 tithe 1 horse
http://www.freeafricanamericans.com/hanover.htm

1796 Hanover Co Va
Henry Going 1 tithe 2 horses
David Going 1 tithe
Owen Going (Malato) 1 tithe [p. 95]
http://www.freeafricanamericans.com/hanover.htm

1801 Hanover Co Va
Jacob Going 1 tithe 2 horses [p. 201]
http://www.freeafricanamericans.com/hanover.htm

1802 Hanover Co Va
Olden Going, mulattoe
Jacob Going (f. negro) 1 tithe 3 horses [p. 230]
Henry Going 2 tithes 3 horses
http://www.freeafricanamericans.com/hanover.htm

1803 Hanover Co Va
Jacob Going free negro 1 tithe 3 horses
Henry Going 2 tithes 3 horses
Olden Going free negro
http://www.freeafricanamericans.com/hanover.htm

1804 Hanover Co Va
Henry Going 2 tithes 1 horse
http://www.freeafricanamericans.com/hanover.htm

1805 Hanover Co Va
Henry Going 1 tithe
David Going 1 tithe
http://www.freeafricanamericans.com/hanover.htm

From Gowen Manuscript:  http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~gowenrf/Gowenms142.htm

HANOVER COUNTY, VIRGINIA

Shadrach Going was born about 1725 of parents unknown, probably in Hanover County. The county was formed in 1720 from New Kent County, the residence of Mihil Gowen when he died. Shadrach Going was married about 1748, wife unknown, probably in Hanover County. It is believed that he was married three times.

He continued to live in Hanover County in November 1757 and in 1760 when sons David Smith Going and Laban Going were born. By 1765, he had removed to Halifax County, Virginia. Halifax County was formed in 1752 from Antrim Parish of Lunenburg County.

In the May 1765 Court session “Shadrack Going” & Peter Rickman were indicted by the Halifax County grand jury “for concealing each one Tithable.” In the August 1766 Court term charges against “Shadrack Going” were dismissed by the Grand Jury, according to Minute Book 5, [Part 2], page 358.

Shadrach Going purchased June 3, 1768 from Lewis Jenkins of adjoining Pittsylvania County, Virginia 387 acres of land located on both sides of Polecat Creek for £35, according to Halifax County Deed Book 7, page 223. The land was “bounded by Echols, Robert Walton, Anderson and Main Creek. Witnesses to the deed were Thomas Lovelace, George Combs, Bebajah Parker and William [X] Mays. Shadrack Going had the document recorded August 18, 1768.

On October 4, 1780, in Hali­fax County, “Shadrack Going,” “David Going” and Peter Wil­son witnessed the will of Stephen Wilson. The will was proved June 20, 1782 “by two witnesses [unnamed].” Shadrach Going appeared in the 1782 tax list of Halifax County with 12 in his family. “Shadrack Going,” with 10 members in his household, appeared in the 1785 census of Halifax County, along with John Going, four members and David Going, four members, assumed to be his sons.

On a deed recorded November 17, 1785, “Shadrack Going” sold 451 acres on Pole Cat Creek to Henry Hobson. This may have included the land he purchased from Lewis Jenkins in 1768.

Pittsylvania County, Virginia was formed in 1766 with land from Halifax County. Henry County, Virginia was formed in 1776 with land from Pittsylvania County. Patrick County, Virginia was formed with land from Henry County, Virginia in 1790.

Shadrach Going was first men­tioned in Patrick County, Virginia records when he bought 1,000 acres June 11, 1792 on both sides of the Little Dan River from John Marr for £500 pounds, a lot of money for that time, ac­cording to Donna Gowin Johnston, researcher of Casper, Wyoming.

The plantation of Shadrack Going was the scene of a jury in­quest held to determine the cause of death of Nathan Going, believed to be his son, according to Patrick County Will Book 1, page 53. The inquest was dated November 9, 1793, ac­cording to Lela C. Adams in “Abstracts of Wills, Invento­ries and Accounts, Patrick County, Virginia:”

“Inquisition taken at the plantation of Shadrack Going before Edward Tatum, a commissioner. The body of Nathan Going then and there lying dead. One Robert Hall on Saturday, 21 September last, on the plantation of Jacob Lawson mortally wounded the said Going on the head with a weeding hoe and broke the skull of Going through the rage and passion of Robert Hall.

Jurors: Jonathan Hanby, foreman, Obadiah Hudson, Isaac Pennington, Aaron Rea, Harberd Smith, War­ham Easley, William Easley, Thomas Collings, Wil­liam Collings, Anthony Collings, John Wil­son and Richard Davidson.”

Shadrack Going posted bond and was appointed administra­tor of the estate of Nathan Going December 10, 1793, ac­cording to Will Book 1, page 6. The estate of “Nathan Go­ings” was ap­praised at 25 pounds, 8 shillings and 10 pense” by Obadiah Hudson, John Rea and James Taylor and returned to the court May 23, 1794, according to Will Book 1, page 22. The estate consisted of “4 notes amounting to £24.2.3, ham­mer, gun and rasp, Total: £5.8.10.”

On November 4, 1793 Shadrack Going administered the es­tate of Nathan Going who had been “killed by being struck in the head with the eye of a weeding hoe by Robert Hall on the plantation of Jacob Lawson.” Thomas Ward and Joshua Adams were his bondsmen. Edward Tolman, John Hanby and Nathaniel Smith were appointed to settle the estate.

In 1797, “Shadrach Going, Sr, Joseph Going, John Going, James Going, Zeph Going, Shadrack Going, Jr, David Going, Laban Going, William Going and Isaac Going” appeared as taxpayers in Patrick County, Virginia.

June Smith, Foundation Member transcribed the Going individuals listed in the early tax lists of Patrick County which was formed in 1790 from Henry County.

In 1800, “Shadrach Going, Joseph Going, Isaac Going, Benjamin Going, Labon Going, Caleb Going, William Going, James Going, Martin Going, Obediah Going, Jacob Going and David Going” appeared as taxpayers in Patrick County.

In 1801, “Shadrach Going, John Going, Obediah Going, Caleb Going, Laberne Going, Isaac Going, Johnson Going, David Going, James Going, John Going on the Dan River, Benjamin Going, William Going and Joseph Going” was on the Patrick County tax list.

In 1802, “Shadrach Going, William Going, Benjamin Going, John Going on Dan River and Benjamin Going appeared on the Patrick County tax list.

In 1803, “Shadrach Going, Johnson Going, John Going, William Going, Sr, Laban, Benjamin Going on Dan River” were recorded as taxpayers.

In 1804, “Shadrach Going, William Going, William Going, Jr, James Going, Benjamin Going, John Going, Obediah Going and Johnson Going” were taxpayers in Patrick County.

In 1805, “Shadrach Going, James Going, John Going, John Going, Jr, William, Abidiah Going, Benjamin Going were taxpayers in Patrick County.

In 1806, “William Going, William Going, Jr, John Going, Obadiah Going, Benjamin Going, James Going and Stephen Going appeared on the Patrick County tax rolls.

In 1807, “Hezekiah Gowing, Obediah Going, James Going, William K. Going, Stephen Going and Barbrezel Going” appeared as Patrick County taxpayers.

In November 1803, “Shadrack Goine” sold 48 acres of his 1,000 acres to his grandson, Shadrack Beazley for a “valuable consideration.”

The will of Shadrack Going, dated June 4, 1805, was filed in Patrick County Will Book 1, pages 80-81 and abstracted in “Abstracts of Wills, Invento­ries and Accounts, Patrick County, Virginia:”

“Will of Shadrack Going, being sick and weak . . .

Legatees: to my beloved wife, Hannah one feather bed, furniture, kitchen furniture, ‘youse’ of one sorrell mare and possession of my house and her support out of my plantation during her natural lifetime and at her death her bed, furniture, etc. to be ‘ekwil’ divided between Jerushe & Keziah Go­ing.

The plantation whereon I now live on both sides of Lit­tle Dan River to my beloved son Obediah, also my hackle and one sorrell stud, mare and colt. His mother is to have the use of the mare when she wishes. Also to him bed, furniture, planta­tion working tools, 4 head cattle, all hogs in order to support him­self and mother.

To beloved daughter Keziah Going, 1 rone horse, sad­dle, bridle, 1 cow, bed and furniture.

To Rebecca Going, daughter of Fanny Going, wife of Edmond Bowlin, one cow.

To the following beloved sons, 5 shillings each, to wit: John Going, David Smith Going, James Go­ing, Claborne Going, Solomon Going, Shadrack Going and Caleb Going.

To daughter Fanny Bowlin, wife of Edmund Bowlin, 5 shillings.

To daughter Hannah Beazley, wife of Thomas Beazley, 5 shillings.

My upper plantation on the south side of Little Dan River I have already given to Shadrack Beazley, son of Thomas Beazley, by deed.

Executors: William Carter and William Burge.

Witnesses: David P—-, William Coomer, H— Adams.
Will returned to December Court, 1805.”

On March 27, 1806, William Carter posted bond and received the administration of the estate of Shadrack Going. He made a return to the court in March 1806. In the May 1806 term of the court he returned the inventory of the deceased: “5 books, household items and livestock, Total: $289.13.” Appraisers were Nathaniel Smith, James L. Gaines and Samuel Hanby, Jr.

Quoting from Patrick County Deed Book 3, page 87:

“State of Tennessee}
County of Grainger}

“Whereas Shadrack Gowing, late of the county of Patrick . . . possessed land in said county lying on Lit­tle Dan River, containing 912 acres and also possessed of a considerable personal estate . . . whereas Shadrick Gowing had the following children, Jerusha, John, David Smith, James, Fanny, Claiborne, Leaborne [Laban], Kesiah, Shadrake [Shadrach], Hannah, Obediah, and Caleb. . . . sons John, James, Caleb, Claiborne, Shadrick and Leaborne . . . appoint Henry Howell of the County of Grainger . . . their true and lawful at­torney . . . to sue . . . Obediah Gowing for settling the property unfairly and submitting a will which was not Shadrack Gowing’s will.

July 24, 1806 John Gowing James Gowing
Caleb Gowing Claiborne Gowing
Leaborne Gowing Jerusha Gowing
Witnesses:
J. J. Jack, Leaborne Gowing, Henry Howell”

It is interesting to note that Jerusha Going signed the instru­ment with her brothers, but was not mentioned in the document. “Shadrack Gowing” was mentioned in the document, but did not sign it. “Leaborne [Laban] Gowing, one of the plaintiffs, also signed as a witness.

On March 31, 1808 “Jerusha Gowing and Kesiah Gowing, heirs of Shadrack Gowing, dec’d, gave a quit claim deed to their in­terest in the estate to Gabriel Hanby, Sr. On August “Obediah Going of this county sells to Gabriel Hanby 1,200 acres on the Little Dan River for $1,600 whereon Shadrick Going, deceased lived.” The deed was witnessed by William Carter, Thomas [X] Beasley and John Tatum.

Patrick County Deed Book 3, page 83 records an apparent set­tlement of the dispute dated October 30, 1807:

“I, Henry Howell, attorney for John Going, James Going and Laborne [no last name] have this day by virtue of my power compromised all manner of dis­pute about the will of Shadrack Going, dec’d and so hereby for the above named persons transfer all their right and rights unto a certain tract of land to Gab’l Hanby and for which land a suit was brought in Patrick Court to set aside a second will, as witness my hand and seal.

Witnesses: Henry Howell
Nat’l Claiborne,
Fleming Saunders”

On February 20, 1812, James S. Gains and Obediah Goin, “heir at law of Shadrack Goin, dec’d exchanged land on the west side of the Goin line on Thomas Beazley’s corner,” ac­cording to Patrick County Deed Book 3, page 530. Witnesses were John Tatum, Thomas Beazley and William D. Gaines.

Following is the list compiled by Donna Gowin Johnston of the known children of Shadrack Go­ing/Gowing:

John Going born about 1749
David Smith Going born November 21, 1751
Laban Going born in 1757
Daniel Going born about 1760
Hannah Going born about 1763
Caleb Going born about 1765
James Going born about 1769
Solomon Going born about 1771
Claiborne Going born about 1773
Shadrack Going, Jr. born about 1775
Nathan Going born about 1777
Obadiah Going born about 1779
Fanny Going born about 1781
Rebecca Going born about 1783
Jerusha Going born about 1787
Keziah Going born about 1789

Traces of the descendants of Shadrack Gowing have been found in several counties in Tennessee: Claiborne, Grainger, Hamil­ton, Hancock, Hawkins, Jefferson, Knox, Roane and Wil­son. The 1810 tax list of Grainger County lists six sons and one son-in-law of Shadrack Gowin/Going of Patrick County, Virginia:

“Bolling, Edmund 1 white poll
Goan, John 1 white poll 90 ac. on Young’s Crk
Goan, Claiborne 1 white poll 100 ac. on Young’s Crk
Goan, James 1 white poll
Goan, William 1 white poll
Goan, Shaderick 1 white poll
Goan, Daniel 1 white poll 338 ac, Richland Crk
Gowin, Caleb 1 white poll
*Howell Henry 1 white poll 900 ac. on Young’s Crk
*Attorney for Going brothers in Patrick County lawsuit.

The 1810 census records these families differently:

“Bolen, Edmund 8 free colored 6 children
Goan, John 9 free colored 7 children
Goan, Claibourn 8 free colored 6 children
Goan, James 3 free colored 1 white fem. 16-26
Goan, Shadrach 5 free colored 3 children
Goan, Caleb 6 free colored 4 children”

“Goin, Daniel white male 26-45
white female 26-45
white female 10-16
white female 10-16
white male 0-10
white male 0-10
white male 0-10
white male 0-10
white female 0-10
slave”

“Guin, Joseph white male 26-45
white female 16-26
white male 0-10
white female 0-10”

“Guin, William white male 26-45
white female 26-45
white female 10-16
white female 0-10”

Virginia Easley DeMarse, Foundation researcher, compiled a list of the early taxpayers of Grainger County of interest to Gowen chroniclers. Her account read:

“By the provisions of the Act of 1797, the justices were authorized to take lists of taxable property and polls in various captains’ companies of the militia. White polls were “all free males and male servants, between the age of twenty-one and fifty years;” slaves, “all slaves male and female, between the age oftwelve and fifty years.” On Monday, November 3, 1809, the Grainger County Court ordered ten justices to take the list of taxable property and make their returns at the next court session. The returns were made February 19, 20, 21, 1810. The amount of tax was omitted on the copy I abstracted from.

The headers for the following list are:
1) on each 100 acres, 12.5 cents
2) each town lot, 25 cents
3) each free poll, 12.5 cents
4) each black poll, 25 cents 5)
5) each retail store, $5.00.
The acreage is listed after item 1.

Polls and Taxable property in Captain William Mayses Com­pany of Militia returned by Moses Hodge included:

John Goan, 90 acres North Holston, Young’s Creek, no polls.
Claiborne Goan, 100 acres North Holston, Young’s Creek , 1 free poll.
James Goan, 1 free poll.

List of polls and taxable property in the bounds of Captain Elisha Williamson’s Company returned by Henry Boatman in­cluded:

William Goan, 1 free poll.
Shaderick Goan, 1 free poll.

List of polls and taxable property in the bounds of Captain John Bull’s Company, returned by John Moffet included:

Caleb Gowin, 1 free poll.

List of Polls and Taxable Property returned by William Clay in the bounds of Captain Richard Cotses’ Company included:

Samuel Bunch, 180 acres at Richland, 1 free poll.
Samuel Bunch for John Spencer, 2.
John Bunch, Senr. 187 acres R. C, 2 polls (black?).
John Bunch, Senr. 200 acres R. Knobbs, 6 (black?) polls, 4 other polls.

Captain Samuel Richardson’s Company returned by David Tate, included:

William Guynn, 200 acres, 1 free poll.

Captain Thomas Sharp’s Company returned by Mathew Campbell included:

Daniel Goan, 338 acres R. Creek, 1 free poll.
Robert Gains, 150 acres R. L. McNabbs, 1 free poll.

From tax lists it is apparent that six sons of Shadrack Going spent these years in Grainger County:

John Gowin 1806-1828
James Going 1799-1811
Claiborne Goins 1810-1811
Caleb Gowin 1808-1819
David Smith Goins 1819-1827

Shadrach Go­ing had at least 10 chil­dren born by 1782. The sons in Grainger County at the time of his death in 1805 were at least 18 years old, all born before 1787. Judging from the size of their fami­lies in 1810, they were probably much older.
==O==
John Going, son of Shadrach Going, was born about 1749 in Hanover County, according to the research of Donna Gowin Johnston. He accompanied his father in his moves across Virginia. He appeared on the tax lists of Patrick County in 1797, 1801, 1802, 1803, 1804 and 1805.

David Smith Goins, son of Shadrach Going and regarded as a Melungeon, was born in Hanover County, Virginia Novem­ber 21, 1757, according to his Revo­lutionary War pension ap­plication abstracted in “Tennessee Heroes of the Revolu­tion” by Zella Armstrong.

“David Going of Halifax County” bought 270 acres for £55 from Joseph Tate of Rowan County, North Carolina, according to Halifax County Deed Book 1759-1767, page 440.

Apparently David Smith Goins was married, wife’s name unknown, shortly after his re­turn home. “David Going” was listed in the state census of Virginia of 1782 as the head of a household of two people in Halifax County, according to “Heads of Households, Vir­ginia, 1790,” page 24. He reappeared in the 1785 state cen­sus of Halifax County as the head of a household of “four white souls,” ac­cording to the same volume. In 1787 in Hali­fax County “David Gowin” rendered for taxes “two horses and five head of cattle.” About In the fall of 1787 he removed to Grayson County, Virginia and from there he relocated in adjoining Wythe County about 1791.

“David Going” appeared on the tax lists of Patrick County, Virginia for the years of 1797 and 1800.

The case of “Obadiah Going vs David Going” was tried in Patrick County on July 25-26, 1799, according to Patrick County Order Book 0, pages 217 and 218. Laban Going appeared as a witness on both days.

“David Gowin” was listed as the head of a household in the 1810 census of Wythe County, according to “Index to 1810 Virginia Census” by Madeline W. Crickard. About 1811 he moved again to Grainger County, Tennessee “where he had a brother, La­ban Goin,” according to his pension application.

The 1820 census of Grainger County [and all but 10 counties of Tennessee] was destroyed by a fire in Washington, and no copy remains. “David S. Going, free negro” appeared in the 1821 tax list of Grainger County and paid a tax on “one free poll.” “David Goan” reappeared in the 1830 census of Grainger County, page 359, heading a household of “free col­ored per­sons.” It is believed that David Smith Goins removed to Hamilton County, Tennessee to join his brother Laban Goins, about 1832.

In 1830, the federal census of Grainger County, Tennessee listed him as “David Goan, free colored.” In 1832, he applied for his pension at age 76 in Hamilton County, Tennessee. He died there February 26, 1834. His pension file states in 1840 that his pension was paid to his children [unnamed].

During his life he was sometimes enumerated as “white” and sometimes as “free colored.” His family removed to Halifax County prior to the Revolution. He en­listed there in a militia com­pany commanded by “Capt. Rogers,” ac­cording to his pen­sion application:

“David Goins, a resident of Hamilton County and State of Tennessee, aged 76 years doth appear in open court be­fore the Worshipful Justices of the Court of Pleas & Quarter Sessions of Hamilton County now sitting and on his oath make the following Declaration:

That he entered the service of the United States as a vol­unteer under Capt. Rogers in Halifax County, State of Vir­ginia and was mustered into service under Col. William Terry at Halifax Courthouse, to Williamsburg, from Williamsburg to Norfolk, and from Norfolk to Portsmouth where he was dis­charged, having served three months.

“Six or eight months after his return home, he was drafted, according to his memory under Capt. Bates and joined the regiment at Bibb’s Ferry under Maj. Jones. He was marched from there to Cabbin Point below Peters­burg, Virginia and was stationed there until his term of service expired, having served three months this tour and was dis­charged by Capt. Bates and returned home.

About two years after the last mentioned service, this ap­plicant was again drafted, according to his memory un­der Capt. Pregmore in Halifax County. They marched to join Gen. Washington’s army at Portsmouth where this appli­cant remained about two months before the surrender of Corn Wallis. About three days afterward, his term of ser­vice ex­pired, and he was discharged by Capt. Pregmore and re­turned home, having served three months this tour.

Four or five years after the termination of the Revolution­ary War [October 1781], he moved from Hali­fax County to Grayson County, Virginia where he resided three years. From there he moved to Wythe County, Vir­ginia and resided there for 10 years. From there he moved to Grainger County and resided there for 14 years. From there he moved to Hamilton County, Tennessee and has resided here twelve months the last day of this month and still re­sides here.”

“David Goins, age 76” was listed as Revolutionary War Pen­sioner S3406 in Hamilton County in 1834, ac­cording to “Twenty Four Hundred Tennessee Pensioners” by Zella Arm­strong.

David Smith Goins died in 1840 in Hamilton County, “his pen­sion then being paid to his children” [unnamed], accord­ing to pen­sion records. He did not appear in the 1840 census of Hamilton County.

Children born to David Smith Goins are unknown.

E. Raymond Evans, an anthropologist, made a study of the mysterious Melungeons of Hamilton and Rhea Counties, Tennessee and wrote a report of his findings in “Tennessee Anthropologist,” Spring 1979. He wrote:

“Located approximately 30 miles north of Chattanooga, the com­munity of Graysville, Tennessee contains one of the most stable Melungeon settlements in the state. Field work in the community conducted in conjunction with archival research demonstrates that the Melun­geons, who now com­pose more than half of the local population, came from Hamilton County during the lat­ter half of the nineteenth century.

Census records and other archival sources indicate that prior to coming to Hamilton County they had lived in Virginia and North Carolina. In Graysville, the Melun­geons strongly deny a black heritage and explain their genetic difference by claiming to have had Cherokee grandmothers.

Many of the local whites also claim Cherokee ancestry and appear to accept the Melungeon claim. The racist discrimination common in Hancock County and in most other Melungeon communities is absent in Graysville. Here, the Melungeons interact in all phases of commu­nity life, and exogamy with local whites is a common practice. The group is called after the most common surname pre­sent–Goins–and the term ‘Melungeon’ is not used by the people or by their neighbors.

Recent field observations have led to the conclusion that the culture and social activities of the Graysville Melun­geons differs in no way from that of any small Southern Appalachian community.

No people in Tennessee have been subjected to more romantic speculation than have the so‑called ‘Melungeons.’ These dark‑skinned people, living in a white world, have attempted to explain their color by saying they were of Portuguese descent, according to Swan Burnett in 1889 in ‘The American Anthropolo­gist. Popular writers, including Thurston L. Willis in ‘The Chesapiean’ in 1941 and Leo Zuber in ‘The Melun­geons’ in 1941, have elaborated on this theme They have been claimed to be descendants of the ‘lost’ tribes of Israel as reported by Jean Patterson Bible writ­ing in 1975 in ‘Melungeons Yesterday and Today.’ and ‘old world Gypsies,’ ‘Welsh Indians,’ and Arabs by oth­ers.

Others have attempted to link their origin with estab­lished historical events. Raleigh’s ‘Lost Colony’ and the De Soto expedition are two examples suggested by Mo­zon Peters writing in 1970 in the ‘Chattanooga Times.’ In what is probably the least plausible claim, it is a mat­ter of legal record that the Tennessee courts have ac­cepted ‘proof’ that the Melungeons are descendants of settlers from ancient Carthage propounded by Judge Lewis Shepherd in 1915.

The actual ethnic background of the Melungeons and their place of origin is far less dramatic. Mod­ern genetic studies have demonstrated that Melungeons are a tri‑racial people with Indian, African and European an­cestry.

In Tennessee, public attention has usually focused on the Melungeon Communities of upper East Tennessee. In particular, Hancock and Hawkins counties are usually regarded as the Melungeon homeland. There are, how­ever, well documented Melungeon communities in Vir­ginia and Kentucky as well as in other parts of Ten­nessee. In addition to the well known Hancock-Hawkins county Melungeons, there are established communities such as Oakdale, Morgan County, Tennessee Bazeltown, Roan County, Tennessee; in the Bell’s Bend area of the Cumberland River west of Nashville and in Graysville, Rhea County, Tennessee.

Regarding the Graysville community, Jean Patterson Bible as observed: ‘The Graysville aggregate is probably one of the most stable of all Melungeon communities today.’

The purpose of this paper is not to perpetuate the popu­lar myth of an exotic Melungeon ‘race,’ but rather to provide an ethnographic description of the cultural background and contemporary life of the Graysville Melungeons. The term ‘Melungeon’ is used solely for the purpose of defining the study group and is not in­tended as a negative reflection on the ethnic background of any member of the community. The data presented herein were obtained by the author during an extended study of the community from November 1976 through August 1977, and are based on personal observations, 83 informal interviews with 36 residents of the community and surrounding areas, and a review of available docu­mentary and published materials.

Graysville is a small semi‑urban community similar to the hundreds of other country towns charac­teristic of the Appalachian area. There are no paved streets, and there is no real business district. Sprinkled haphazardly among a the fading frame dwelling houses are two gen­eral purpose ‘grocery’ stores, a TV repair shop, a small community library, a barber shop, three automotive re­pair shops and one service station. The community has a school and eight Protestant churches‑‑four of which are Baptist.

There is no local industry. The economy of the area is geared toward small scale farming, mining, and pulp‑wood cutting, supplemented with sporadic indus­trial employment outside the area.

The community is located in the southern part of Rhea County, Tennessee approximately two miles north of the Hamilton County line and one mile west of U.S. High­way 27. Rugged ridges, typical of the eastern Tennessee Valley surround the town. Lone Mountain in the north and Black Oak Ridge to the east form two sides of a rough triangle in which Graysville is located. The third side of the triangle is formed by Walden’s Ridge on the west. The Cumberland escarpment, which forms the eastern edge of the ridge, is cut by many streams head­ing directly against the rim. One of these, Roaring Creek, flows along the southwestern side of Graysville. The central portion of the commu­nity sprawls between the base of Walden’s Ridge on the west and the tracks of the Cincinnati, New Orleans and Texas Railroad to the east.

The town takes its name from William Gray, one of its earliest and best­known residents, who arrived after the Civil War. The real beginning of the community, how­ever, is marked by the coming of the railroad. It then experienced an influx of population from all points of the compass. The post office was established in 1875 with William Gray as postmaster. In 1884 Henry and William Fox orga­nized the Fox Coal Company, which opened mines in the side of Walden’s Ridge west of the town. In addition to coal, a large deposit of tile clay was also mined from an adjoining range of hills and shipped to markets in other areas. A bank was organized and two hotels were established. In 1835, an additional de­mand for coal was created in the area by the establish­ment the Dayton Coal & Iron Company a few miles to the north. Funded by European investors, the Dayton Coal & Iron Com­pany operated 375 coke ovens in which coke was made from coal to fuel two large blast furnaces with an annual production capacity of 90,000 tons of foundry and forge pigiron. After 1900 the Fox Coal Company at Graysville was acquired and expanded by the Durham Coal & Iron Company, and a large coke oven complex was established near Roaring Creek. Af­ter an initial period of intense prosperity, the industrial development of Graysville entered a decline following World War I and was completely crushed by the eco­nomic depression of the 1930’s.

Most of the mines were closed. The bank was consoli­dated with the Dayton Bank, the hotels were closed, and the people began to leave. The present population is less than one thousand persons.

Ethnically, with the exception of the Melungeon com­ponent, the community is largely composed of persons of Anglo‑Scotch‑Irish descent who have lived in the area for at least three generations. There are no blacks in the community, and most of the residents, including the Melungeons, tend to express strong racist attitudes in their conversation. Social cleavage is along religious rather than ethnic lines in Graysville. In 1891, several families of Seventh Day Adventists settled in Graysville. A year later a religious academy was estab­lished by the group. A sanitarium was also set up and enjoyed a wide patronage. While these facilities were later moved to Collegedale in Hamilton County, many of the people remained in Graysville and still tend to hold themselves apart from the rest of the community.

The most common surname among the Graysville Melungeons is Goins, being so prevalent that the whites in the surrounding area call all the Graysville Melun­geons ‘Goinses,’ rather than Melungeons. In fact, the term ‘Melungeon’ is rarely used anywhere in lower East Tennessee. The Goins families are so well known in Rhea County that any dark skinned person, not regarded as a black, is said to ‘look like a Goins.’

Edward T. Price wrote:

‘The name Goins seems to be a peculiar marker of these mixed‑bloods. It has already been mentioned in connec­tion with the Melungeons and certain strains in North Carolina. It is prominent among the mixed­bloods of Darke County, Ohio, and was associated with the Red­bones in what is now Cal­casieu Parish, Louisiana. It is a minor name among the Croatans and is the chief name among a mixed‑blood group with a special school in Williamsburg County, South Carolina. Further, Goins is an unusual name; though many whites are named Goins.’

It occurred with a much greater frequency among free colored persons in 1830 [2.8 per thousand] than among the population at large in 1790 [0.1 per thousand] in six populous Southern and Middle states. Over a hundred free colored families named Goins were well scattered in 1830 through the South and southern parts of the North­ern border states. The two greatest concentrations oc­curred in the Melungeon area and the North Car­olina‑Virginia Piedmont where so many are found to­day.

Will Alen Dromgoole states that among the Hancock-Hawkins County Melungeons the first was a man named Goins who entered the area shortly after the formation of the state of Tennessee. Early land records indicate that the Goins mentioned came from North Carolina. Both North Carolina and Virginia had several mulattoes named Goins (spelled Gowen or Goin), who were veter­ans of the American Revolution, and it is possible that the individual in question came to Tennessee as the re­cipient of a land grant for his military service.

Colonial records show three men named Gowen serving in a mulatto militia unit in 1754, and land records from 1718 show a Mihil Gowen as a property owner in James City County, Virginia. The same unusual name, Mihil Gowen, was born by a ‘colored servant’ who gained his freedom in 1657.

Both local tradition and documentary sources agree that the Graysville Melungeons entered the community from Hamilton County, Tennessee sometime after 1880. Census records show that prior to 1880 there were no persons with Melungeon surnames living in Rhea County.

There were, however, such persons among the earliest non‑Indian settlers in Hamilton County. In 1830, when Hamilton County reported less than 400 families total in the census records, there were four Goins [spelled Gowan, Gowin, or Goens] families present. Each of these families listed colored members [total of 13] and three of them had white members [total of 6].

The most prominent of these first Melungeon settlers in Hamilton County was David Goens, a vet­eran of the American Revolution. David Goens was born in Hanover County, Virginia. During the war he served in the company commanded by a Capt. Rogers of Halifax County, Virginia. After the close of hostilities, he lived in Wythe and Grayson counties, Virginia, before mov­ing to Grainger County, Tennessee. From Grainger County, he moved to Hamilton County, where he died in 1834. His younger brother, Laban Goens preceded him to Hamilton County by a short time.

Hamilton County census for 1840 listed 13 ‘free colored’ families as residents of the county. eight of which were named Gowin with a total of 53 persons. In 1850, there were 16 ‘mulatto’ families named Goins [spelled Goins, Goinz or Gowens]. Of this group two members were born in Virginia and one in North Carolina. The rest, including some as old as 50, were born in Tennessee.

After the 1850 census the Melungeons in Hamilton County are no longer listed as ‘free‑colored’ or mulattos. A few were regarded as blacks, but most are listed as white. Other Melungeon names pre­sent in the early records are Bolden [Bolin or Bolton] and Collins. Fol­lowing 1880 there is a de­crease in Melungeon names listed for Hamilton County, accompanied by the appear­ance of them on the lists from Rhea County.

With the exception of David and Laban Goins, there is no record of where the individual Melun­geons who moved to Hamilton County originated. It is pro­bable, however, that most of them came from the upper East Tennessee area where Melungeons were numerous by the end of the eighteenth century.

Most of their members entered Tennessee from the Virginia-North Carolina Piedmont area. There is no record that the early Melungeon settlers in Hamilton County formed a separate community or re­garded them­selves as a distinct ethnic group. Many of them settled in the northern end of the county in the Sale Creek area, only about five miles from the present town of Graysville. Here there was some inter‑marriage with the Hicks and Fields families who were a Euro­pean‑Cherokee mixed‑blood group. Today Sale Creek has a few families who call themselves ‘Black Chero­kees,’ but are regarded as blacks by their white neigh­bors. The Graysville Melungeons emphatically deny any relationship with this group, but it is probable that such a relationship does, in fact, exist.

Some of the Hamilton County Melungeons seem to have been regarded as Indian. A newspaper arti­cle. appearing in the ‘Chattanooga Times’ March 31, 1894, relates to a man named William Bowlen described in the sub‑heading as ‘A half‑witted Melungeon,’ and in the text as ‘a half‑witted Indian.’ Further in the text he is re­ferred to as ‘belonging to that peculiar people called the Melungeons.’

Also in Chattanooga, in 1872, there was a widely publi­cized court case in­volving a Melungeon. The case in­volved a lawsuit challenging the inheritance of some property by a girl whose mother had been a Melungeon named Bolton. The contention was that the girl could not legally inherit the land due to the fact that, as a Melungeon, her mother had been part black and since interracial marriage was illegal in Tennessee, the girl was therefore illegitimate. Her attorney, S. L. Shepherd, won the case by convincing the court that Melungeons have no black ancestry, but are rather derived from an­cient Carthaginians who came to North America by way of Portugal.

The first Melungeon to settle in the Graysville commu­nity was George Goins, who has children still living in the area. He was born in Hamilton County around 1865. His wife, Cordie, was born in 1876. Her maiden name and place of birth are not known, but her children recall that she claimed to be Cherokee. The children of George and Cordie Goins, Alvin [also known as ‘Albert’] Goins and Gracie Goins Patton are the oldest Melungeons living in the community today. Alvin was born in 1903, and his sister was born a few years earlier.

A photograph was taken of Alvin Goins preparing roots to be used in a ‘blood tonic.’

In Graysville, the Melungeons are fully accepted and participate fully in all phases of community life. When schools were segregated, their children attended white schools without question. In­termarriage between Melungeon and white non‑Melungeon individuals in the community is a com­mon pattern. A less tolerant attitude was reported by an earlier observer by Edward T. Price who wrote:

‘The Melungeons here are characterized by a single sur­name, Goins, though several others have been acquired, apparently by intermarriage with the Goinses. The group consists mostly of miners and farm laborers and forms 30 or 40 percent of the population of the town. These people are grouped under the general term, ‘the Goins,’ and the better known term Melungeon is applied by the relatively few who link them with the broader group. Some of these people are distinctly dark in skin and claim Cherokee Indian ancestry.

Based on appearance, it appears that the strongest ge­netic factor in the background of the Graysville Melun­geons is northern European. About half of them have very fair skin, with light brown or blond hair. Some have blue eyes. This is particularly true of the younger members of the commu­nity. Some have dark skin, but no more so than many non-Melungeons who spend much of their time out‑of‑doors. There are a few with slight Negroid features such as wide noses, thick lips, etc., and some who have a somewhat similar appearance to Cherokee‑White mixed‑bloods.

The Graysville Melungeons apparently feel no special kinship with other Melungeon groups in the state. When asked directly if they had relatives in the Han­cock-Hawkins County area, most re­sponded that they did not.

From the beginning, the major occupation in the Graysville area has been coal mining. This was espe­cially true while the big iron works were active here and in near‑by Dayton. With the passing of the major in­dustries, some of the Melungeons left the area to seek work elsewhere. Others continued to mine coal for which there is still, even today, a moderate demand as a domestic heating fuel.”
==O==
Laban Goins, son of Shadrach Going and a younger brother of David Smith Goins, was born in 1760 in Hanover County. He lived in Halifax County during the Revolution­ary War, but did not serve in the militia with his brother. He was shown as a taxpayer there, along with “James Goin, Claiborne Goin, Daniel Goin, John Goin and Caleb Goin.”

He was married about 1787 to Ella Duncan, according to testimony of Sarah Goins, a granddaughter, according to the research of Ethel Louise Goins Dunn of Crandall, Georgia.

On July 25 and July 26, 1799, Laban was allowed “one day witness pay in Obadiah Going vs. David Going,” according to Patrick County Order Book O, page 217-218.

He appeared as a taxpayer in Patrick County, Virginia in 1797. “Laberne Going” was taxed there in 1801. “Laban Going” was included among the Going taxpayers in Patrick County for the last time in 1803.

About 1803 Laban Goins removed, appar­ently with sev­eral fam­ilies of rela­tives, to Grainger County, Tennessee. The 1805 tax list of Grainger County included “Laborn Go­ing, Claborn Goins, Daniel Going, Caleb Going, James Goins and John Goins. A second ver­sion of the “Taxable Inhabitants for the Year 1805” listed “Laban Go­ing, Clai­borne Going, Daniel Goin, Shadrack Goin, James Going, John Going and Calib Go­ing.”

Although the spelling varies from the first list to the sec­ond, it is obvious that the two lists refer to the same in­dividuals. Of the second group only Shadrack Goin does not appear in the first list. “Laborn Going” was rendered as “one free poll, ne­gro” in the tax list.

Laban Goins preceded his brother in the move to Hamilton County, arriving there about 1829. He appeared in the 1830 census of that county, page 75, as the head of a “free colored” household. The enumera­tor obviously had no way to prop­erly record a Melungeon house­hold. Although he did not record the “free colored” in­dividuals, he did enu­merate in the household “one white fe­male, 5-10” and “one white female, 0-5.”

In the 1830 census, Hamilton County reported less than 400 families. Four of them were headed by “Laban Gowan, Roland Gowin, Sandford Gowin and Dodson Gowin.” Each of these families listed colored members [total of 13] and three of them listed white members [total of 6]. All were listed on Page 75 and were located in the north part of the county, just south of Graysville, Tennessee.

On February 7, 1834 Laban Goins submitted his affidavit to the Hamilton County Court attesting to his brother’s Revolu­tionary War service.

Laban Goins lived on the land that David Gray, the founder of Graysville, Tennessee, later donated to the Audubon Society.

Ethel Louise Goins Dunn, Gowen Research Foundation mem­ber of Crandall, Georgia, wrote an article on Laban Goins and his descendants for “History of Rhea County, Tennessee.” She wrote:

“Laborn Goins was the first one of the name in this area. He was born in Hanover County, Virginia in 1760. His brother, David. two years his senior, fought with George Washington in the Revolu­tionary War. In 1802-84, both of these brothers were in Grainger and Jefferson coun­ties tax records. The 1830 census shows them living in the northern end of Hamilton County.”

On July 18, 1855, a younger “Laborn Goen” was married to Artine Clark in Cannon County. Of Laborn Goen and Artine Clark Goen noth­ing more is known.

Children born to Laban Goins and Ella Duncan Goins include:

Carter Goins born about 1788
Merilla Goins born about 1790
Shadrach Goins born about 1792
Tilman Goins born about 1795
Thomas Goins born about 1797
Preston Goins born about 1800
Harvard Goins born about 1804

Carter Goins, son of Laban Goins was born about 1788 in Vir­ginia, and died in northern Hamilton County in the Graysville area.

Children born to Carter Goins include:

Carter Goins, Jr. born in 1810

Carter Goins, Jr, son of Carter Goins, was born in 1810 in Grainger or Jefferson County, Tennessee. He was brought to Hamilton County, Tennessee by his father about 1829. Carter Goins, Jr. was married about 1834 to Cynthia McGill of Graysville, Rhea County, Tennessee.

Seven children, four sons and three daughters were born to Carter Goins, Jr. and Cynthia McGill Goins:

William Goins born in 1836
Francis Marion Goins born about 1838
James Goins born about 1840
Elizabeth Goins born in 1842
Jefferson Goins born in 1844
Vandola Goins born in 1848
Minerva Goins born in 1852

William Goins, son of Carter Goins, Jr. and Cynthia McGill Goins, was born in 1836 at Graysville.

Francis Marion Goins, son of Carter Goins, Jr. and Cynthia McGill Goins, was born about 1838 at Graysville. He enlisted in the Union Army and was injured in the Cumberland Gap area for which he re­ceived a pension in his older years.

He was married about 1865 to Sarah Neely who was born in 1843 in Cannon County, Tennessee. They continued to live there until about 1871 and then returned to Graysville. She died there in 1881 and he was remarried to Margaret J. Murphy in Cannon County. Francis Marion Goins died March 2, 1895 at Burt, Tennessee in Cannon County and was buried on his farm there.

Six children, five sons and one daughter, were born to Francis Marion Goins and Sarah Neely Goins:

James M. Goins born in 1867
William J. Goins born in 1870
Samuel Ulysses S. Grant Goins born July 29, 1872
Charley Goins born in 1874
Andrew Goins born in 1876
Lavada Goins born in 1880

Three children were born to Francis Marion Goins and Mar­garet J. Murphy Goins:

James Robert Goins born March 26, 1883
Ida Jane Goins born July 12, 1887
Maria Elizabeth Goins born June 10, 1892

James M. Goins, son of Francis Marion Goins and Sarah Neely Goins, was born in Hamilton County in 1867.

William J. Goins, son of Francis Marion Goins and Sarah Neely Goins, was born in Hamilton County in August 1871. He was married about 1890 to Mrs. Maggie E. Merritt. They were recorded living in Cannon County near his brother, Samuel Ulysses Simpson Grant Goins in 1900.

“William J. Goin, Indian,” was enumerated as the head of a household in the 1900 census of Cannon County, Enumera­tion District 24, page 8, 4th Civil District:

“Goin, William J. 28, born in TN, August 1871
Maggie E. 30, born in TN, March 1870
Sarah F. 9, born in TN, June 1891
Julia A. 3, born in TN, January 1897
[son] 3/12, born in TN, February 1900
Merritt, William F. 15, born TN, Feb. 1885, step-son
Robert C. 10, born TN, June 1889, step-son”

Samuel Ulysses Simpson Grant Goins, son of Francis Marion Goins and Sarah Neely Goins, was born in Cannon County July 29, 1872. He was married there July 17, 1892 to Mrs. Amanda A. Mooneyham Bar­rett. She was born there January 16, 1864 to Robert Mooneyham and Mary M. Manus Mooneyham. She had four children, but only one of the four survived. Her first husband was Albert Barrett of Cannon County.

“Samuel U. G. Goin, Indian,” was enumerated as the head of a household in the 1900 census of Cannon County, Enumeration District 24, page 10, 4th Civil District:

“Goin, Samuel U. G. 26, born in TN, July 1873
Amanda E. 40, born in TN, July 1870
John 4, born in TN, October 1895
Lavada 1, born in TN, August 1898
Barrett, Maggie 14, born in TN, Sept. 1885,
step-daughter”

They removed to Hamilton County and settled at Graysville about 1904. She died in Chattanooga January 21, 1944 and was buried in Lomineck Cemetery there. He died in Cannon County February 21, 1947 and was buried in Cherry Cemetery at Woodbury, Tennessee.

Children were born to Samuel Ulysses Simpson Grant Goins and Amanda A. Mooneyham Barrett Goins:

Maggie Barrett born in September 1885
John Wiley Goins born October 18, 1895
Levada Emiline Goins born August 13, 1897
Andrew Jackson Goins born July 26, 1899
Ammie Marchell Goins born November 2, 1903
Charles W. Goins born July 29, 1908

Maggie Barrett, daughter of Albert Barrett and Amanda A. Mooneyham Barrett, was born in September 1885 in Cannon County. She was married eight or nine times, but had no chil­dren. She died in Dalton, Georgia.

John Wiley Goins, son of Samuel Ulysses Simpsson Grant Goins and Amanda A. Mooneyham Barrett Goins, was born October 18, 1895 at Manchester, Tennessee in Coffee County. He was brought back to Hamilton County about 1904 by his parents. He was married December 29, 1916 to Dovie Mae Bedwell, daughter of Jessie Harrison Bedwell and Sarah Doss Bedwell of McMinn County, Tennessee. They lived on ad­joining farms from 1905 until they were married.

He served in World War I and was buried in the National Cemetery in Chattanooga when he died there Oc­tober 2, 1938. Children born to John Wiley Goins and Dovie Mae Bedwell Goins are unknown.

Levada Emilene Goins, daughter of Samuel Ulysses Simpson Grant Goins and Amanda A. Mooneyham Barrett Goins, was born August 13, 1897 in Hamilton County. She was married about 1918 to Charles Al­bert Leffew who was born at Dayton, Tennessee in 1880. Four sons and three daughters were born to them. She died August 18, 1973 in San Bernandino, California.

Andrew Jackson Goins, son of Samuel Ulysses Simpson Grant Goins and Amanda A. Mooneyham Barrett Goins, was born July 26, 1899 in Cannon County. He served in World War I. He did not marry and for years pushed an ice cream cart around Chattanooga. He died in 1982 and was buried in the National Cemetery there.

Ammie Marshell Goins, daughter of Samuel Ulysses Simpson Grant Goins and Amanda A. Mooneyham Barrett Goins, was born November 2, 1903 in Cannon County. She was married January 13, 1921 to Floyd Martin Larmon who was born in Dalton, Georgia in 1902. In 1991 they lived in Etowah, Ten­nessee. Five children, one son and four daughters, were born to them.

Charles W. Goins, son of Samuel Ulysses Simpson Grant Goins and Amanda A. Mooneyham Barrett Goins, was born July 29, 1908 at Graysville. He was married about 1931 to Beatrice Goins, a second cousin. She was the daughter of James Granville Goins and Ora Goins. James Granville Goins was a first cousin to Samuel Ulysses Simpson Grant Goins.

One son was born to Charles W. Goins and Beatrice Goins Goins:

Charlie Goins born in 1935

Charley Goins, son of Francis Marion Goins and Sarah Neely Goins, was born in Cannon County in 1874.

Andrew Goins, son of Francis Marion Goins and Sarah Neely Goins, was born in 1876 in Cannon County. He was married about 1899, wife’s name Lizzie. Children born to Andrew Goins and Lizzie Goins are un­known.

Lavada Goins, daughter of Francis Marion Goins and Sarah Neely Goins, was born in Cannon County in 1880. She was married about 1898 to William Bolin.

James Goins, son of Carter Goins, Jr. and Cynthia McGill Goins, was born about 1840 at Graysville.

Elizabeth Goins, daughter of Carter Goins, Jr. and Cynthia McGill Goins, was born in 1842 at Graysville. She was mar­ried about 1860 to Pleasant Bowling.

Jefferson Goins, son of Carter Goins, Jr. and Cynthia McGill Goins, was born in 1844 at Graysville. He was married about 1867 to Sarah Mooneyham.

Vandola Goins, daughter of Carter Goins, Jr. and Cynthia McGill Goins, was born in 1848 at Graysville.

Minerva Goins, daughter of Carter Goins, Jr. and Cynthia McGill Goins, was born in 1852 at Graysville. She was mar­ried to James Goins, her second cousin.

Merilla Goins, daughter of Laban Goins and Ella Duncan Goins, was born about 1790 in Patrick County.

Shadrach Goins, son of Laban Goins and Ella Duncan Goins, was born about about 1792, probably in Patrick County.

Tilman Goins, son of Laban Goins and Ella Duncan Goins, was born about 1795, probably in Patrick County. He was married about 1818 and lived in Cherokee County, North Carolina, in the extreme western tip of the state, according to Melton E. Gene” Scott, a descendant of Trenton, Georgia.

Children born to Tilman Goins include:

Julia Ann Goins born about 1820

Julia Ann Goins, daughter of Tilman Goins, was born about 1820 in Cherokee County, North Carolina. She was married about 1836 to John Goins who was born in Bledsoe County, Tennessee, a son of Thomas Goins of Grainger County, according to Melton E. “Gene” Scott, a descendant of Trenton, Georgia.

Children born to John Goins and Julia Ann Goins Goins include:

Sarah Isabelle Goins born 1860

Sarah Isabelle Goins, daughter of John Goins and Julia Ann Goins Goins, was born about 1860. She was married November 28, 1883 to Columbus Scott at Smithville, Tennessee in DeKalb County, according to Melton E. “Gene” Scott, a grandson.

Thomas Goins, son of Laban Goins and Ella Duncan Goins, was born about 1797, probably in Grainger County. He lived in Bledsoe County about 1820 where a son was born.

Children born to him include:

John Goins born about 1824

John Goins, son of Thomas Goins, was born about 1824 in Bledsoe County.

…….

Preston Goins, son of Laban Goins and Ella Duncan Goins, was born about about 1800, probably in Patrick County.

Harvard Goins, son of Laban Goins and Ella Duncan Goins, was born about 1804, probably in Grainger County.

Harvard Goins was enumerated as the head of Household No. 422 in the 1850 census of Hamilton County, Page 796. The family was rendered September 18, 1850 as:

“Goins, Harvard 46, farmer, born in Tennessee
Laborn 16, born in Tennessee, laborer
William 11, born in Tennessee
Duncan 9, born in Tennessee
Jane 7, born in Tennessee”

Charlie Goins was enumerated as the head of Household No. 423-423 adjoining Harvard Goins in the 1850 census of Hamilton County:

“Goins, Charlie 45, born in North Carolina
Nathan 18, born in Tennessee
Rhoda 15, born in Tennessee
Catharin 8, born in Tennessee
Sarah 5, born in Tennessee”

Melton E. “Gene” Scott, Trenton, Georgia wrote December 20, 1993:

“My grandmother was born Sarah Isabelle Goins. Her father was John Goins, born in Bledsoe County, TN. His father was Thomas Goins, born in Grainger County, TN. The mother of Sarah Is­abelle Goins was also a Goins. Julia Ann Goins was her maiden name. She was the daughter of Tilman Goins, born in Cherokee County, North Carolina. His father was Laborn Goins, born in Patrick County, VA. The sister of Tilman Goins, Mar­illa Goins was born in Patrick County also. His brothers were Preston Goins, Harbard Goins and Shadrack Goins.

My grandmother, Sarah Isabelle Goins was married to my grandfather, Columbus Scott November 28, 1883 at Smithville, TN in DeKalb County. His brother, James Scott was his bondsman. I be­lieve that the mother of Columbus and James Scott was a Goins also. Both were listed as Indian in the 1880 census of DeKalb County. My grandmother had cousins in Grainger County by the names of Granville Goins and Sanford Goins.”

Daniel Going, regarded by some researchers as a son of Shadrach Going, was born about 1760, probably in Hanover County and brought to Halifax County by his father.

“Daniel Going, born about 1760,” was enlisted in the Virginia Continental Line in February 1777, according to his pension application. He served in the Battle of Germantown and in the Battle of Brandywine. He was discharged at Valley Forge, Pennsylvania.

Daniel Going appeared on the 1782 tax list of Halifax County with two in the family. He began paying taxes in Bedford County in 1783. He reappeared on the Bedford County tax rolls from 1786 through 1794, according to the research of June A. Smith of Bremerton, Washington.

Daniel Going was one of the men who posted bond when items were sold from the estate of Maryann Franklin in Bedford County November 22, 1794. The bond was “examined by the Bedford County Court September 19, 1797 and returned July 23, 1798,” suggesting that Daniel Going remained there at that time.s

He was not mentioned in the will of Shadrach Going written in 1805. Daniel Going appeared in the 1805 tax list of Grainger County, Tennessee, but did not join the sons of Shadrach in filing suit against their younger brother, Obadiah Goins, executor of the will of Shadrach Goins, for forging the will of Shadrach Goins.

Hannah Going, daughter of Shadrach Going, was born about 1763 in Hanover County. She was married to Thomas Beasley about 1881. She was mentioned in the will of her father written in 1805 as the recipient of “five shillings.”

Caleb Going, son of Shadrach Going, was born about 1765, probably in Hanover County. He appeared as a taxpayer in the 1782 tax list of Halifax County. He was mentioned in the will of his father written in 1805 as the recipient of five shillings.

Caleb Going appeared on the 1805 tax list of Grainger County, Tennessee as “one white poll.” In 1806 he joined his brothers in protesting the administration of his father’s estate by his brother Obadiah Going.

“Caleb Goan” was enumerated in the 1810 census of Grainger County as the head of a household composed of “6 free colored, 4 children.”

James Going, son of Shadrach Going, was born about 1769, probably in Hanover County. “James Goin” appeared as a taxpayer in Halifax County along with “Laban Goin, Claiborne Goin, Daniel Goin, John Goin and Caleb Goin.”

About 1797, James Goin removed, apparently with several fam­ilies of relatives regarded by some re­searchers as Melun­geons, to Grainger County, Tennessee.

On November 27, 1797, James Goin received North Car­olina Land Grant No. 300 for 262 acres on the Tennessee River and 938 acres on the north side of Tennessee River in what is now Grainger County. The 1799 tax list for this county shows “Thomas Goen, James Goen, John Goen, John Gowen, William Gowen and Alexander Gowen,” all listed as “white.” Grainger County was formed from Hawkins and Knox Counties in 1796.

“James Goin, free colored” ap­peared in the 1799 tax list of Grainger County “in Capt. Mc­Kee’s Company.” The 1805 tax list of Grainger County in­cluded “James Goins, Laborn Go­ing, Claborn Goins, Daniel Going, Caleb Going and John Goins. A sec­ond ver­sion of the “Taxable Inhabitants for the Year 1805” listed “James Go­ing, Laban Going, Clai­borne Go­ing, Daniel Goin, Shadrack Goin, John Going and Calib Go­ing.” “James Goin” was shown with “one free poll” in each tax list.

“James Goan” was enumerated as the head of a household in the 1810 census of Grainger County as “three free colored and one white female, 16-26.” Enumerators at that time did not record the age of free colored individuals. A duplicate enumeration for “James Goan” appeared in adjoining Clai­borne County, Ten­nessee in 1810. Claiborne County was or­ganized in 1801 from land taken from Grainger and Hawkins Counties, perhaps explaining the duplication.

“James Goin, Sr.” received a deed from Blain Davison in 1815 to land in Claiborne County for $200, ac­cording to Claiborne County Deed Book H, page 14.

The 1820 enumeration of James Goin did not survive. Most of the individual enumeration sheets of the census of 1820 of the state of Tennessee were destroyed by fire in Washington, D. C. Fragments of the cen­sus for only ten counties and re­caps of others escaped the fire. No enumer­ation sheets were available for Claiborne or Hawkins County. Recap sheets showed 310 “free persons of color” in the 1820 census.

In 1825, “James Goin, Sr.” deeded land in Claiborne County to John Harris for $200, according to Clai­borne County Deed Book H, page 448. It is believed that James Goin died before 1830 because he did not appear in the 1830 census of Ten­nessee.

It is obvious that the census enumerator in 1830 had difficulty in deciding whether to list the seven Goen and Goin fami­lies as “white” or “free colored people.” In the summary sheet 37 families composed of 331 people were recorded as “free col­ored” in 1830. White and “free colored” were listed in con­secutive entries which perhaps indicated adjacent locations.

A possible son of James Goin, Sr. is:

James C. Gowan born June 1, 1795

James C. Gowan, possible son of James Goin, Sr, was born June 1, 1795, probably in Halifax County, ac­cording to Mary Alice Fritch, a descendant of Flat River, Missouri. He en­listed January 8, 1814 in Capt. George Gregory’s company of Ten­nessee militiamen. He was discharged as a private May 17, 1814. He reenlisted September 20, 1814 in preparation for a march to New Orleans with Gen. Andrew Jackson. He was dis­charged May 5, 1815, again a private, according to “War of 1812, Index of Pensioners.”

James C. Gowan was married May 25, 1824 to Lucinda Mar­garet True at Tazewell, Tennessee. She was born in Virginia February 12, 1806, according to a letter written August 26, 1991 by Mary Alice Fritch.

He was enumerated as the head of a household in the 1830 cen­sus of Claiborne County, page 106:

“Goin, James white male 30-40
white female 30-40
white female 0-5
white female 0-5”

Some disabling statutes were installed in 1831, 1832 and 1834 in the Tennessee constitution to prevent free colored from cer­tains rights enjoyed by the white citizens. They could not own land, pay taxes, vote or tes­tify in court in matters in­volving white men. These discouraging statutes caused many Melun­geons and free colored to leave the state. However, the census enumerators mitigated some of the injustice by a liberal inter­pretation of who was white and who was free ne­gro or mulatto.

James C. Gowan did not reappear in the 1840 census of Clai­borne County. It is believed that they had re­moved about 1835 to Harrison County, Indiana, perhaps in the expectation of re­ceiving a bounty land grant. In 1850 James C. Gowan received Bounty Land Grant No. 8904 to 80 acres of land.

He was enumerated in the 1850 census of Harrison County, 45th township, page 398 as the head of a household com­posed of:

“Gowan, James 54, born in Virginia
Lucinda 46, born in Virginia
Jahue 20,
Mary A. 18,
John 16,
James E. 13,
Lucinda 12,
Levina 9,
Rezin 7,
Miriam 5”

The sons of James C. Gowan were stonemasons, carpenters and farmers, and all were in Harrison County in 1850, ac­cording to Mary Alice Fritch.

In 1855, James C. Gowan and Lucinda Margaret True re­moved to Jefferson County, Missouri, just south of St. Louis. James C. Gowan died there July 28, 1874 at age 79 and was buried in the Gowan Cemetery, ac­cording to Mary Alice Fritch. Lucinda Margaret True Gowan died there August 3, 1880 and was buried be­side her husband.

Children born to James C. Gowan and Lucinda Margaret True Gowan include:

Jehu Gowan born about 1830
Mary A. Gowan born about 1832
John Gowan born about 1834
James E. Gowan born August 20, 1836
Lucinda Gowan born about 1838
Levinia Gowan born about 1841
Rezin Gowan born about 1843
Miriam Gowan born about 1845

John Gowan, son of James C. Gowan and Lucinda Margaret True Gowan, was born about 1834 in Clai­borne County. In the 1880 census of Jefferson County “John Gowan” appeared as the head of a household, Enumeration District 190, Vallie town­ship, page 6:

“Gowan, John 49, born in Tennessee
Henry 22, born in Indiana, son
Emma 18, born in Indiana, daughter
Anna 11, born in Indiana, daughter
Eliza L. 9, born in Indiana, daughter
Minnie E. 5, born in Missouri, daughter”

James E. Gowan, son of James C. Gowan and Lucinda Mar­garet True Gowan, was born in Harrison County. He was married in Jefferson County, Missouri December 27, 1864 to Susan Robertson.

They were enumerated as the heads of a household in the 1880 census of Jefferson County, Enumeration District 190, Vallie Township, page 6:

“Gowan, James 43, born in Indiana
Susan 40, born in Missouri
Lenard A. 14, born in Missouri
Sarah 12, born in Missouri
Carry 9, born in Missouri
Maggie 7, born in Missouri
Eugene 3, born in Missouri”

Children born to James E. Gowan and Susan Robertson Gowan include:

Leonard A. Gowan born about 1866
Sarah Jane Gowan born about 1868
Carrie Gowan born about 1871
Margaret “Maggie” Gowan born about 1873
Eugene Gowan [twin] born about 1877
[twin] born about 1877
Irene Anna Gowan born about 1881
Sopha Gowan born about 1884

Irene Anna Gowan, daughter of James E. Gowan and Susan Robertson Gowan, was born about 1881. She was married in October 1899 to John Ruff, according to Mary Alice Fritch.

Rezin Gowan, son of James C. Gowan and Lucinda Mar­garet True Gowan, was born about 1842 in Harri­son County. He was married about 1867, wife’s name Lavonie.

They were enumerated in the 1880 census of Jefferson County, Enumerating District 190, Vallie Township, page 1 as:

“Gowan, Rezin 38, born in Indiana
Lavonie 34, born in Missouri
Richard A. 12, born in Missouri
James T. 6, born in Missouri
Lovenia 6, born in Missouri
Rhoda E. 3, born in Missouri
Nancy 3/12, born in Missouri”

Six other Gowan families were recorded in the 1880 census of Jefferson County.

James Gowan was enumerated as the head of a household in Jefferson County, Enumeration District 190, Vallie Town­ship, page 18:

“Gowan, James 29, born in Illinois
Marthy J. 35, born in Indiana
Henry A. 6, born in Missouri
Arther E. 2, born in Missouri”

John B. Gowan was reported as the head of a household in Jef­ferson County, Enumeration District 190, Vallie township, page 3:

“Gowan, John B. 28, born in Indiana
Perlina E. 22, born in Missouri
William E. 2, born in Missouri”

Edward F. Gowan was recorded as the head of a household in Jefferson County, Enumeration District 190, Vallie town­ship, page 1:

“Gowan, Edward F. 26, born in Illinois
Margery E. 19, born in Missouri
Frazel E. 3, born in Missouri”

Elemael Gowan was enumerated as the head of a household in Jefferson County, Enumeration District 190, Vallie town­ship, page 12:

“Gowan, Elemael 26, born in Missouri
Matilda J. 21, born in Indiana
Malcum L. 5, born in Missouri”

Ervin F. Gowan was reported as the head of a household in Jef­ferson County, Enumeration District 190, Vallie township, page 1:

“Gowan, Ervin F. 24, born in Illinois
Mary J. 19, born in Indiana
George 1/12, born in Missouri”

Benjamin Gowan was recorded as the head of a household on DeSoto, Missouri, Enumeration District 18, page 14:

“Gowan, Benjamin 26, born in Indiana
Kate 24, born in Missouri
Ida 4, born in Missouri
Dora 2, born in Missouri
Benjamin F. 4/12, born in Missouri”

Solomon Going, identified as a son of Shadrach Going by Donna Gowin Johnston, was born about 1771, probably in Halifax County. He was not mentioned in the will of Shadrach Going.

Claiborne Going, son of Shadrach Going, was born about 1773, probably in Halifax County. He was married about 1796, wife’s name Sarah. He was living in Grainger County, Tennessee July 24, 1806 when he joined his brothers in protesting the administration of the estate of his father. The 1810 tax list of Grainger County showed “Claiborne Goan, 1 white poll” assessed taxes on “100 acres on Young’s Creek.” His brother, “John Goan” lived nearby.

The 1810 federal census enumerated “Claibourn Goan, 8 free colored, 6 children.”

Children born to Claiborne Going and Sarah Going are unknown.

Shadrach Going, Jr, son of Shadrach Going, was born about 1775, probably in Halifax County.

Nathan Going, son of Shadrach Going, was born about 1777 in Halifax County. He accompanied his father in the move to Patrick County. He was killed there in 1793 with a hoe by Robert Hall on the plantation of Jacob Lawson. His father administrated his estate which was valued at “£25:8:10.”

Obadiah Going, son of Shadrach, Going, was born about 1779 in Halifax County. On June 25-26, 1799, the case of Obadiah Going vs. David Going” was heard by the Patrick County Court. Laban Going appeared as a witness.

Obadiah Going was named administrator of the estate of his father in 1805 in Patrick County. “Obadiah Gowing” was sued by his brothers in Grainger County, Tennessee in 1806 for settling the property unfairly and submitting a will which was not Shadrack Gowing’s will.”

On August 6, 1808, Obadiah Going of Patrick County sold to Gabriel Hanby 1,200 acres on the Little Dan River for $1,600 whereon Shadrick Going, deceased lived.”

On February 20, 1812, James S. Gains and “Obediah Goin,” “heir at law of Shadrack Goin, dec’d exchanged land on the west side of the Goin line on Thomas Beazley’s corner,” ac­cording to Patrick County Deed Book 3, page 530. Witnesses were John Tatum, Thomas Beazley and William D. Gaines.

Fanny Going, daughter of Shadrach Going, was born about 1781, probably in Halifax County. She was married about 1798 to Edmund Bowlin. She was mentioned in the will of her father written June 4, 1805 as the recipient of a cow and five shillings.

Rebecca Going, daughter of Shadrach Going, was born about 1783 in Halifax County. She received a cow by the terms of the will of Shadrach Going. She was married about 1806 to P. Finley.

Jerusha Going, daughter of Shadrach Going, was born in Halifax County about 1787. “Jerusha Gowing” joined five of her brothers in protesting the administration of Obadiah Going of the estate of Shadrach Going, but was not mentioned in the body of the document. On March 31, 1808 “Jerusha Gowing and Kesiah Gowing, heirs of Shadrack Gowing, dec’d, gave a quit claim deed to their in­terest in the estate to Gabriel Hanby, Sr.

Keziah Going, daughter of Shadrach Going, was born about 1789. She and her sister, Jerusha Going were named in the will of Shadrach Going to receive the household furnishings of his home upon the death of his widow. She was also named to receive “1 rone horse, saddle, bridle, 1 cow, bed & furniture.”
==O==
Henry Going, born before 1761, was on the 1782 tax list for Hanover County with eight in his family, pos­sibly six children born before 1782.

HANOVER COUNTY, VIRGINIA, Miscellaneous

“John Gowen” leased land in Hanover County 7th, 6th month, 1734, ac­cording to “Valentine Papers,” Volume 3. In the same year he was mentioned as adjoining land that was owned by William Hix.

From Gowen Manuscript:  http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~gowenrf/Gowenms145.htm

HANOVER COUNTY, VIRGINIA

Shadrach Going was born about 1725 of parents unknown, probably in Hanover County. Jack Harold Goins wrote, “Shadrack may have been a brother to David Goins, and also my 8th generation grandfather, John Goins, all from the same area of Virginia. Some researchers refer to them as the Grist Mill Goins. John Going was the first person granted permission to build a Grist Mill in Henry County, Virginia and David was soon to follow him.

Hanover County was formed in 1720 from New Kent County, the residence of Mihil Gowen when he died. Shadrach Going was married about 1748, wife unknown, probably in Hanover County. It is believed that he was married three times.

He continued to live in Hanover County in November 1757 and in 1760 when sons David Smith Going and Laban Going were born. By 1765, he had removed to Halifax County, Virginia. Halifax County was formed in 1752 from Antrim Parish of Lunenburg County.

In the May 1765 Court session “Shadrack Going” & Peter Rickman were indicted by the Halifax County grand jury “for concealing each one Tithable.” In the August 1766 Court term charges against “Shadrack Going” were dismissed by the Grand Jury, according to Minute Book 5, [Part 2], page 358.

Shadrach Going purchased June 3, 1768 from Lewis Jenkins of adjoining Pittsylvania County, Virginia 387 acres of land located on both sides of Polecat Creek for £35, according to Halifax County Deed Book 7, page 223. The land was “bounded by Echols, Robert Walton, Anderson and Main Creek. Witnesses to the deed were Thomas Lovelace, George Combs, Bebajah Parker and William [X] Mays. Shadrack Going had the document recorded August 18, 1768.

On October 4, 1780, in Halifax County, “Shadrack Going,” “David Going” and Peter Wilson witnessed the will of Stephen Wilson. The will was proved June 20, 1782 “by two witnesses [unnamed].” Shadrach Going appeared in the 1782 tax list of Halifax County with 12 in his family. “Shadrack Going,” with 10 members in his household, appeared in the 1785 census of Halifax County, along with John Going, four members and David Going, four members, assumed to be his brothers or his sons.

On a deed recorded November 17, 1785, “Shadrack Going” sold 451 acres on Pole Cat Creek to Henry Hobson. This may have included the land he purchased from Lewis Jenkins in 1768.

Pittsylvania County, Virginia was formed in 1766 with land from Halifax County. Henry County, Virginia was formed in 1776 with land from Pittsylvania County. Patrick County, Virginia was formed with land from Henry County, Virginia in 1790.

Shadrach Going was first mentioned in Patrick County, Virginia records when he bought 1,000 acres June 11, 1792 on both sides of the Little Dan River from John Marr for £500 pounds, a lot of money for that time, according to Donna Gowin Johnston, researcher of Casper, Wyoming.

The plantation of Shadrack Going was the scene of a jury in­quest held to determine the cause of death of Nathan Going, believed to be his son, according to Patrick County Will Book 1, page 53. The inquest was dated November 9, 1793, ac­cording to Lela C. Adams in “Abstracts of Wills, Inventories and Accounts, Patrick County, Virginia:”

“Inquisition taken at the plantation of Shadrack Going before Edward Tatum, a commissioner. The body of Nathan Going then and there lying dead. One Robert Hall on Saturday, 21 September last, on the plantation of Jacob Lawson mortally wounded the said Going on the head with a weeding hoe and broke the skull of Going through the rage and passion of Robert Hall.

Jurors: Jonathan Hanby, foreman, Obadiah Hudson, Isaac Pennington, Aaron Rea, Harberd Smith, Warham Easley, William Easley, Thomas Collings, William Collings, Anthony Collings, John Wilson and Richard Davidson.”

Shadrack Going posted bond and was appointed administrator of the estate of Nathan Going December 10, 1793, according to Will Book 1, page 6. The estate of “Nathan Goings” was appraised at £25:8:10 by Obadiah Hudson, John Rea and James Taylor and returned to the court May 23, 1794, according to Will Book 1, page 22. The estate consisted of “4 notes amounting to £24.2.3, hammer, gun and rasp, Total: £25:8:10.”

On November 4, 1793 Shadrack Going administered the estate of Nathan Going who had been “killed by being struck in the head with the eye of a weeding hoe by Robert Hall on the plantation of Jacob Lawson.” Thomas Ward and Joshua Adams were his bondsmen. Edward Tolman, John Hanby and Nathaniel Smith were appointed to settle the estate.

In 1797, “Shadrach Going, Sr, Joseph Going, John Going, James Going, Zeph Going, Shadrack Going, Jr, David Going, Laban Going, William Going and Isaac Going” appeared as taxpayers in Patrick County, Virginia.

June Smith, Foundation Member transcribed the Going individuals listed in the early tax lists of Patrick County which was formed in 1790 from Henry County.

In 1800, “Shadrach Going, Joseph Going, Isaac Going, Benjamin Going, Labon Going, Caleb Going, William Going, James Going, Martin Going, Obediah Going, Jacob Going and David Going” appeared as taxpayers in Patrick County.

In 1801, “Shadrach Going, John Going, Obediah Going, Caleb Going, Laberne Going, Isaac Going, Johnson Going, David Going, James Going, John Going on the Dan River, Benjamin Going, William Going and Joseph Going” were on the Patrick County tax list.

In 1802, “Shadrach Going, William Going, Benjamin Going, John Going on Dan River and Benjamin Going appeared on the Patrick County tax list.

In 1803, “Shadrach Going, Johnson Going, John Going, William Going, Sr, Laban, Benjamin Going on Dan River” were recorded as taxpayers.

In 1804, “Shadrach Going, William Going, William Going, Jr, James Going, Benjamin Going, John Going, Obediah Going and Johnson Going” were taxpayers in Patrick County.

In 1805, “Shadrach Going, James Going, John Going, John Going, Jr, William Going, Abidiah Going, Benjamin Going were taxpayers in Patrick County.

In 1806, “William Going, William Going, Jr, John Going, Obadiah Going, Benjamin Going, James Going and Stephen Going appeared on the Patrick County tax rolls.

In 1807, “Hezekiah Gowing, Obediah Going, James Going, William K. Going, Stephen Going and Barbrezel Going” appeared as Patrick County taxpayers.

In November 1803, “Shadrack Goine” sold 48 acres of his 1,000 acres to his grandson, Shadrack Beazley for a “valuable consideration.”

The will of Shadrack Going, dated June 4, 1805, was filed in Patrick County Will Book 1, pages 80-81 and abstracted in “Abstracts of Wills, Inventories and Accounts, Patrick County, Virginia:”

“Will of Shadrack Going, being sick and weak . . .

Legatees: to my beloved wife, Hannah one feather bed, furniture, kitchen furniture, ‘youse’ of one sorrell mare and possession of my house and her support out of my plantation during her natural lifetime and at her death her bed, furniture, etc. to be ‘ekwil’ divided between Jerushe & Keziah Going.

The plantation whereon I now live on both sides of Little Dan River to my beloved son Obediah, also my hackle and one sorrell stud, mare and colt. His mother is to have the use of the mare when she wishes. Also to him bed, furniture, plantation working tools, 4 head cattle, all hogs in order to support himself and mother.

To beloved daughter Keziah Going, 1 rone horse, saddle, bridle, 1 cow, bed and furniture.

To Rebecca Going, daughter of Fanny Going, wife of Edmond Bowlin, one cow.

To the following beloved sons, 5 shillings each, to wit: John Going, David Smith Going, James Going, Claborne Going, Solomon Going, Shadrack Going and Caleb Going.

To daughter Fanny Bowlin, wife of Edmund Bowlin, 5 shillings.

To daughter Hannah Beazley, wife of Thomas Beazley, 5 shillings.

My upper plantation on the south side of Little Dan River I have already given to Shadrack Beazley, son of Thomas Beazley, by deed.

Executors: William Carter and William Burge.

Witnesses: David P—-, William Coomer, H— Adams.
Will returned to December Court, 1805.”

On March 27, 1806, William Carter posted bond and received the administration of the estate of Shadrack Going. He made a return to the court in March 1806. In the May 1806 term of the court he returned the inventory of the deceased: “5 books, household items and livestock, Total: $289.13.” Appraisers were Nathaniel Smith, James L. Gaines and Samuel Hanby, Jr.

Quoting from Patrick County Deed Book 3, page 87:

“State of Tennessee}
County of Grainger}

“Whereas Shadrack Gowing, late of the county of Patrick . . . possessed land in said county lying on Little Dan River, containing 912 acres and also possessed of a considerable personal estate . . . whereas Shadrick Gowing had the following children, Jerusha, John, David Smith, James, Fanny, Claiborne, Leaborne [Laban], Kesiah, Shadrake [Shadrach], Hannah, Obediah, and Caleb. . . . sons John, James, Caleb, Claiborne, Shadrick and Leaborne . . . appoint Henry Howell of the County of Grainger . . . their true and lawful attorney . . . to sue . . . Obediah Gowing for settling the property unfairly and submitting a will which was not Shadrack Gowing’s will.

July 24, 1806 John Gowing James Gowing
Caleb Gowing Claiborne Gowing
Leaborne Gowing Jerusha Gowing
Witnesses:
J. J. Jack, Leaborne Gowing, Henry Howell”

It is interesting to note that Jerusha Going signed the instru­ment with her brothers, but was not mentioned in the document. “Shadrack Gowing” was mentioned in the document, but did not sign it. “Leaborne [Laban] Gowing, one of the plaintiffs, also signed as a witness.

On March 31, 1808 “Jerusha Gowing and Kesiah Gowing, heirs of Shadrack Gowing, dec’d, gave a quit claim deed to their interest in the estate to Gabriel Hanby, Sr. On August “Obediah Going of this county sells to Gabriel Hanby 1,200 acres on the Little Dan River for $1,600 whereon Shadrick Going, deceased lived.” The deed was witnessed by William Carter, Thomas [X] Beasley and John Tatum.

Patrick County Deed Book 3, page 83 records an apparent set­tlement of the dispute dated October 30, 1807:

“I, Henry Howell, attorney for John Going, James Going and Laborne [no last name] have this day by virtue of my power compromised all manner of dispute about the will of Shadrack Going, dec’d and so hereby for the above named persons transfer all their right and rights unto a certain tract of land to Gab’l Hanby and for which land a suit was brought in Patrick Court to set aside a second will, as witness my hand and seal.

Witnesses: Henry Howell
Nat’l Claiborne,
Fleming Saunders”

On February 20, 1812, James S. Gains and Obediah Goin, “heir at law of Shadrack Goin, dec’d exchanged land on the west side of the Goin line on Thomas Beazley’s corner,” ac­cording to Patrick County Deed Book 3, page 530. Witnesses were John Tatum, Thomas Beazley and William D. Gaines.

Following is the list compiled by Donna Gowin Johnston of the known children of Shadrack Going/Gowing:

John Going born about 1749
David Smith Going born November 21, 1751
Laban Going born in 1757
Daniel Going born about 1760
Hannah Going born about 1763
Caleb Going born about 1765
James Going born about 1769
Solomon Going born about 1771
Claiborne Going born about 1773
Shadrack Going, Jr. born about 1775
Obadiah Going born about 1776
Nathan Going born about 1777
Fanny Going born about 1781
Rebecca Going born about 1783
Jerusha Going born about 1787
Keziah Going born about 1789

Traces of the descendants of Shadrack Going have been found in several counties in Tennessee: Claiborne, Grainger, Hamilton, Hancock, Hawkins, Jefferson, Knox, Roane and Wilson. The 1810 tax list of Grainger County lists six sons and one son-in-law of Shadrack Gowin/Going of Patrick County, Virginia:

“Bolling, Edmund 1 white poll
Goan, John 1 white poll 90 ac. on Young’s Crk
Goan, Claiborne 1 white poll 100 ac. on Young’s
Crk
Goan, James 1 white poll
Goan, William 1 white poll
Goan, Shaderick 1 white poll
Goan, Daniel 1 white poll 338 ac, Richland Crk
Gowin, Caleb 1 white poll
*Howell Henry 1 white poll 900 ac. on Young’s
Crk
*Attorney for Going brothers in Patrick County lawsuit.

The 1810 census records these families differently:

“Bolen, Edmund 8 free colored 6 children
Goan, John 9 free colored 7 children
Goan, Claibourn 8 free colored 6 children
Goan, James 3 free colored 1 white fem. 16-26
Goan, Shadrach 5 free colored 3 children
Goan, Caleb 6 free colored 4 children”

“Goin, Daniel white male 26-45
white female 26-45
white female 10-16
white female 10-16
white male 0-10
white male 0-10
white male 0-10
white male 0-10
white female 0-10
slave”

“Guin, Joseph white male 26-45
white female 16-26
white male 0-10
white female 0-10”

“Guin, William white male 26-45
white female 26-45
white female 10-16
white female 0-10”

Virginia Easley DeMarse, Foundation researcher, compiled a list of the early taxpayers of Grainger County of interest to Gowen chroniclers. Her account read:

“By the provisions of the Act of 1797, the justices were authorized to take lists of taxable property and polls in various captains’ companies of the militia. White polls were “all free males and male servants, between the age of twenty-one and fifty years;” slaves, “all slaves male and female, between the age of twelve and fifty years.” On Monday, November 3, 1809, the Grainger County Court ordered ten justices to take the list of taxable property and make their returns at the next court session. The returns were made February 19, 20, 21, 1810. The amount of tax was omitted on the copy I abstracted from.

The headers for the following list are:
1) on each 100 acres, 12.5 cents
2) each town lot, 25 cents
3) each free poll, 12.5 cents
4) each black poll, 25 cents 5)
5) each retail store, $5.00.
The acreage is listed after item 1.

Polls and Taxable property in 1811 in Captain William Mays’s Company of Militia returned by Moses Hodge included:

John Goan, 90 acres North Holston, Young’s Creek, no polls.
Claiborne Goan, 100 acres North Holston, Young’s Creek , 1 free poll.
James Goan, 1 free poll.

List of polls and taxable property in the bounds of Captain Elisha Williamson’s Company returned by Henry Boatman included:

William Goan, 1 free poll.
Shaderick Goan, 1 free poll.

List of polls and taxable property in the bounds of Captain John Bull’s Company, returned by John Moffet included:

Caleb Gowin, 1 free poll.

List of Polls and Taxable Property returned by William Clay in the bounds of Captain Richard Cotses’ Company included:

Samuel Bunch, 180 acres at Richland, 1 free poll.
Samuel Bunch for John Spencer, 2.
John Bunch, Senr. 187 acres R. C, 2 polls (black?).
John Bunch, Senr. 200 acres R. Knobbs, 6 (black?) polls, 4 other polls.

Captain Samuel Richardson’s Company returned by David Tate, included:

William Guynn, 200 acres, 1 free poll.

Captain Thomas Sharp’s Company returned by Mathew Campbell included:

Daniel Goan, 338 acres R. Creek, 1 free poll.
Robert Gains, 150 acres R. L. McNabbs, 1 free poll.

From tax lists it is apparent that six sons of Shadrack Going spent these years in Grainger County:

John Gowin 1806-1828
James Going 1799-1811
Claiborne Goins 1810-1811
Caleb Gowin 1808-1819
David Smith Goins 1819-1827

Shadrach Going had at least 10 children born by 1782. The sons in Grainger County at the time of his death in 1805 were at least 18 years old, all born before 1787. Judging from the size of their families in 1810, they were probably much older.
==O==
John Going, son of Shadrach Going, was born about 1749 in Hanover County, according to the research of Donna Gowin Johnston. He accompanied his father in his moves across Virginia. John Going was enumerated in the 1785 census of Halifax County, Virginia with four members in his family.

He appeared on the tax lists of Patrick County in 1797. In 1801 he was recorded as a taxpayer “on Dan River.” He rappeared on the Patrick County tax lists of 1802, 1803, 1804, 1805 and 1806.

John Going, “free colored,” was a resident of Patrick County in 1802.

“John Going, Sr.” appeared as the head of a household in 1810, according to “A Supplement to the 1810 Census of Virginia.” He paid tax on two polls and one horse. “John Going, free colored male, 26-45” was enumerated as the head of a household in the 1820 census of Patrick County, page 109-A. Five members of the household were engaged in agriculture. He did not reappear in the 1830 census of Patrick County.

It is believed that children born to John Going include:

John Going, Jr. born about 1776
Obadiah Going born in 1777
William Going born about 1778
Nancy Going born about 1787

John Going, Jr, believed to be a son of John Going, was born about 1776. He was married to Margaret Gregory March 12, 1812, according to “Patrick County, Virginia Marriages, 1791-1850.” John Going was surety, and Eliphaz Shelton was a witness. Eliphaz Shelton was also the surety for the marriage of Isaac Going and Nancy Lizby in 1796.

John Going, Jr. paid tax on one poll in 1810 in Patrick County. According to the tax list he owned no slaves or horses at that time.

John Going, Jr. and Margaret Gregory Going were enumerated in Stokes County, North Carolina in the 1840 and 1850 census returns. She was recorded in the 1870 census of Stokes County as a widow, according to Jean Grider.

Children born to John Going, Jr. and Margaret Gregory Going, according to Jean Grider, include:

[child] born about 1813
[child] born about 1815
[child] born about 1817
[child] born about 1820
Jonathan Henry Going born about 1822
James Going born about 1824
Isham Going born about 1827
[son] born about 1830

Obadiah Going, believed to be a son of John Going, was born in 1777. He was surety for the marriage of his sister, Nancy Going February 24, 1807 when she was married to Stephen Going, according to “Patrick County, Virginia Marriages 1791-1850.”

William Going, son of John Going, was born about 1778, probably in Virginia. William Going, “son of John Going,” was married to Elizabeth Pack, “daughter of Mary Bowman” July 26, 1802, according to “Patrick County, Virginia Marriages, 1791-1850.” John Going was surety for the marriage. William Going was a taxpayer in 1810 on one poll and eight horses, according to the tax list. “William Going, free colored” was enumerated as the head of a household in the 1830 census of Patrick County, page 154. Of William Going and Elizabeth Pack Going nothing more is known.

Nancy Going, believed to be a daughter of John Going, Sr, was born about 1787, probably in Virginia. Family researcher Kevin E. D. Smith of Boones Mill, Virginia suggests that her date of birth was closer to 1779. Nancy Going, “daughter of John Going” was married February 24, 1807 to Stephen Going, according to “Patrick County, Virginia Marriages, 1791-1850.” They are believed to be cousins.

Obadiah Going was surety for the marriage of his sister, Nancy Going when she was married to Stephen Going. David Hanby and William Moore were witnesses. William H. Robertson was the minister.

Stephen Going paid a tax on one horse and one poll in 1810. He owned no slaves at that time. Stephen Going appeared as a farmer and the head of a household in the 1820 census of Patrick County, page 121-A:

“Going, Stephen white male 26-45
white female 26-45
white female 10-16
white male 0-16
white female 0-16
white female 0-16”

Stephen Going, “free colored male” appeared as the head of a household in the 1830 census of Patrick County. The family was rendered as:

“Going, Stephen free colored male 36-55
free colored female 36-55
free colored male 10-24
free colored female 10-24
free colored female 10-24
free colored female 10-24
free colored male 0-10
free colored female 0-10
free colored female 0-0”

Stephen Going, “free black,” appeared on the tax rolls of Patrick County for the years of 1851 and 1858.

Nancy Going Going died in 1860 and Stephen Going died in 1863, according to Kevin E. D. Smith, a descendant.

Children born to them include:

Milly Going born about 1808
Allen Going born about 1810
Zilphy Going born about 1816
Susan Going born about 1819
Enoch Going born about 1822
Lucy Going born about 1823
Sally Going born about 1825

Milly Going, daughter of Stephen Going and Nancy Going Going, was born about 1808 in Patrick County. Of this indi­vidual nothing more is known.

Allen Going, son of Stephen Going and Nancy Going Going, was born about 1810 in Patrick County. He was married about 1835 to Martha Beasley who was born about 1818.

“Allen Going, free black, farmer, age 47” was listed in the 1857 tax roll of Patrick County, southern district. “Henry Going, free black, age 19” was also listed in this tax roll.

Both Allen Going and Martha Beasley Going died in 1880.

Children born to Allen Going and Martha Beasley Going in­clude:

Henry Clay Going born about 1836
Perrian Going born about 1838
Alexander Going born about 1840
Calvany Going born about 1842
Malinda Going born about 1844
Elizabeth Going born about 1848
Harrison Going born about 1849
Floyd Going born about 1855
Coleman Going born about 1858

Henry Clay Going, son of Allen Going and Martha Beasley Going, was born about 1836 in Patrick County. He was listed along with his father in the 1857 tax roll of Patrick County, southern district as “Henry Goin, age 19.” “Henry Goin, free black,” was also listed in the tax rolls of Patrick County for the years 1858, 1859, 1860 and 1861.
==O==
John Going was mentioned in the will of his father written June 4, 1805 as the recipient of “five shillings.” On July 24, 1806 John Going of Grainger County, Tennessee joined some of his brothers in filing suit against their brother, Obadiah Going for mishandling of the administration of their father’s estate.

Quoting from Patrick County Deed Book 3, page 87:

“State of Tennessee}
County of Grainger}

“Whereas Shadrack Gowing, late of the county of Patrick . . . possessed land in said county lying on Little Dan River, containing 912 acres and also possessed of a considerable personal estate . . . whereas Shadrick Gowing had the following children, Jerusha, John, David Smith, James, Fanny, Claiborne, Leaborne [Laban], Kesiah, Shadrake [Shadrach], Hannah, Obediah, and Caleb. . . . sons John, James, Caleb, Claiborne, Shadrick and Leaborne . . . appoint Henry Howell of the County of Grainger . . . their true and lawful attorney . . . to sue . . . Obediah Gowing for settling the property unfairly and submitting a will which was not Shadrack Gowing’s will.

July 24, 1806 John Gowing James Gowing
Caleb Gowing Claiborne Gowing
Leaborne Gowing Jerusha Gowing
Witnesses:
J. J. Jack, Leaborne Gowing, Henry Howell”

“John Goan, one white poll” was assessed as a taxpayer in the 1810 tax list of Grainger County. In the 1810 census of Grainger County “John Goan” was enumerated as the head of a “free colored” household of nine individuals which included seven children.

He shown as the owner of 90 acres located “on Young’s Creek of the North Holston” with “no polls” which suggested that he was regarded as “free colored” at that time.

“John Gowin” appeared in the tax lists of Grainger County from 1806 to 1828. It is assumed that he died there about that time.

Children born to John Going, according to the research of Clara Jean Grider include:

John Going, Jr. born about 1790

John Going, Jr, son of John Going was born about 1790. He was married in 1812 to Margaret Gregory. Eliphaz Shelton who was a witness at their marriage in Patrick County was a bondsman at the marriage of Isaac Going and Nancy Lizby April 12, 1796. Eliphaz Shelton died in 1834 in Lawrence County, Tennessee, and his estate sale was held October 25, 1834 where Frederick Gowen and Samuel Cox made purchases.

They were enumerated in the 1850 census of Stokes County, North Carolina in Household 51-51:

“Going, John, Jr. 60, born in VA
Margaret 60, born in NC
Going, Leroy 15, born in VA, grandson”

Children born to John Going, Jr. and Margaret Gregory Going, according to Clara Jean Grider include:

Jonathan Henry Gowen born about 1822
James Going born about 1825
Lee Going born about 1835

Jonathan Henry Gowen, son of John Going, Jr. and Margaret Gregory Going, was born about 1822, according to the 1850 census. His 1880 enumeration showed his birth year as 1825. In a deposition taken December 13, 1898, he stated his age as 71, indicating that he was born in 1827.

On February 6, 1846, Jonathan Henry Gowen was married to Hannah Beasley, according to “Surry County Marriage Bonds, 1780-1868.”

Jonathan Henry Gowen and Hannah Beasley Gowen were enumerated in the 1850 census of Stokes County, North Carolina in the 1850 census, Household 48-48, according to the research of Clara Jean Grider:

“Going, Jonathon 28, born in VA
Hannah 24, born in VA
Mary F. 2, born in NC
Sarah J. 1, born in NC”

Enumerated in the adjoining household, 49-49, was the family of James Gowen, regarded as the brother of Jonathan Gowen:

Going, James 26, born in VA
Betsy 27, born in NC
Polly 2, born in NC
Lilburn 2, born in NC”

Enumerated in the adjoining household, 50-50, was the family of Thomas Beasley, regarded as a brother of Hannah Beasley:

Beazley, Thomas 36, born in VA
Elizabeth 26, born in NC
Franklin 11, born in VA
Jas. W. 8, born in VA
Sally 8, born in VA
Fanny 7, born in VA
Jonathon 5, born in VA
Isaac 1, born in NC”

Enumerated in the 1850 census of Stokes County in adjoining Household 51-51 were:

“Going, John, Jr. 60, born in VA
Margaret 60, born in NC
Going, Leroy 15, born in VA, grandson”

Ten households away was enumerated the household of Thomas Going, No. 61-61:

“Going, Thomas 55, born in VA
Jane 50, born in VA
Ruthy 30, born in VA
Becca 21, born in VA
Frederick 16, born in NC
Emyette 14, born in VA
Amanda 9, born in NC”

“Deposition:

Case of Jonathan Gowen, Certificate No. 324757

On this 13th day of December 1898 at near Gradyville, County of Adair, State of Kentucky, before me, R. J. Austin, a Special Examiner of the Pension Office, personally appeared the pensioner Jonathan Gowen, who being by me first duly sworn to answer truly all interrogatories propounded to him during this Special Examination to aforesaid pension claim, deposes and says:

My age is 71 years, P.O. Gradyville, Ky, occupation, has been that of a farmer. I am not able to do anything now. I served in Co. G, 37th Ky. Mtd. Inf. from August 1863 until December 1864. This was the only military service I ever saw, and I was never in the Naval Service. I was never in the Confederate Army, except as a prisoner of war. I enlisted from this neighborhood, and had lived here about two years before I en-listed. I came here from North Carolina, Stokes County near Francisco and lived 10 or 12 miles from Mt. Airy in Surry County. I have two brothers living in N.C, James Gowen and Lee Gowen. James’ P.O. was Francisco, and Lee’s P.O. was White Plains, Patrick County, Va, the last I knew. I was a farmer before I left N.C. I hired no one to work for me. Robert Hines, Henderson Dingman and Ira Jessups were my near neighbors and will know as much as anyone else about me. I had an attack of dyspepsia in N.C. is all the sickness I had then. I had no sickness after coming to this county until my enlistment in the above named organization. My intimate friends and associates in Ky, for the two years before my enlistment were James O. Nelson, W. R. Moss, Pyrrhus Nelson and T. J. Kellum. These are all the ones living now who were close neighbors before the war.

Question: Were you a sound, healthy man when you enlisted?
Answer: Yes, sir, I was.

Question: Did you have anything the matter with your legs at any time before your enlistment?
Answer: I did not. I had no sores on my legs until after my enlistment. No, I had no spell of fever before enlistment. We were not stripped & examined at enlistment or M.I. [muster in?], but was just asked a few questions. I wore boots while in the service. No, I didn’t wear shoes. No, I did not tell anyone that I could not wear boots on account of sore legs for I did wear boots all the time while I was in the service. I have often complained since the war that I could not wear boots because my legs were sore, but I never made such a complaint before my service.

I was living on the farm of Elizabeth Kemp [dead] at enlistment and had lived there most all the time after coming from North Carolina. She had two sons, George and Tom. George’s P.O. was Columbia, and I don’t know Tom’s P.O. I did not write any body except my children the two years before enlistment. My daughters’ names are Frances Moore, Sarah J. Pike, P. O. Columbus, Mo, and my son is A. J. Gowen.

Question: Did you have any difficulty with a man named John Wauf at any time?
Answer: Some time after the close of the war, I was riding along the road and John Wauf came along drunk and hit me on the head with a club. It did not hurt me at all, only cut a hole in my hat. No, he did not hit me on the leg at all. No, he did not strike me with a rock on the leg or any place else. My legs began to be sore about two months before I was M.O. [mustered out] of the service. This was at Lexington, Ky. My legs both swelled up while I was in the service, and I could press my thumb on the flesh of my legs, and it would make a dent that I could lay a hen egg in, and then the legs broke out in yellow blisters. Dr. J. G. Taylor [dead] who lived in Columbia examined me before I was mustered out of the service, and he said the condition of my legs was a result of the jaundice which I had in the service while camped at Glasgow, Ky. I got a furlough and came home. No, I did not make a crop while at home, but my wife and children made a crop while I was home. No, my legs were not sore while I was at home that time. No, my legs were never injured in any way before the war. I have hurt my legs often since they got sore, that is, would accidently knock the scab off and make the sore bleed. I recollect that I was at work on the road 15 or 20 years ago, and a piece of rock flew and struck right in the sore on the right leg and made it bleed a good deal. This the worst hurt I have had since my legs became sore.

My bunk mates during the war were Billy Coomer [dead] and Charles Coomer, P.O, Gradyville, Ky. I do not recall any other bunk mates. I was cook for the Captain, Logan Strange, P.O. Burksville, Ky, and our sergt. was Peter Releford, P.O. unknown.”

“On this 14th day of December, 1898 at near Gradyville, County of Adair, State of Kentucky, before me, R. J. Austin, a special examiner of the Bureau of Pensions, personally appeared Mary F. Moore who being my me first duly sworn to answer truly all interrogatories propounded to her during this special examination of aforesaid claim for pension deposes and says:

I am 54 years of age, my post-office is as above, occupation, housekeeper. I am the wife of Nathan J. Moore, a farmer. I am a daughter of Jonathan Gowen. I lived with my father till my marriage in 1866. I was 13 or 14 yrs. old when we came from NC to Ky. It was three or four years after he came to Kentucky until he enlisted. If there was any thing the matter with him before his enlistment, I don’t know about it. If we had any thing the matter with his legs, I know nothing about it. He had no sickness before his enlistment. He was at home sick during the war, that is during his service. He was home on furlough. He had the yaller jaundice and like to have died. If his legs were sore at any time while he was in the service, I don’t know it. I recollect that his legs were swelled shortly after he came out of the service, can’t say how long. I don’t think it was as much as a year after he came out of the service until his legs swelled. Oh, yes, I saw his legs at that time, and they were swelled, both legs. It seems like he was bloated while he was sick during the war. I think it was some time after he came from the war until he had sores on his legs—about a year or maybe less.

If he ever got his legs or either of them hurt before or since the war, I never heard it. If he was hurt while plowing, I know nothing about it. I recollect that he put up a chimney for Mr. James Compton, but if he hurt his leg by dropping a stone on it or in any other way, I never heard of it.

If he had any trouble with John Wauf, I know nothing about it. His legs have been sore ever since they first became sore. His health was not good when he came out of the war. He has had some sickness during the last few years, but his legs became sore to my knowledge shortly after the war.

When my father was at home sick during the war, he did no work at all and wasn’t able. We thought for a good while that he would die. My mother [dead] and brother Jack and I made the crop. He was yellow when sick and complained of his stomach, head and back.

I am a daughter. I have no pecuniary interest. I hear this read, and it is correct.
Mary F. [X] Moore
Attest:
S. A. Hatfiel
John N. Moore”

deponent before signing.
R. J. Austin
Special Examiner”

Deposition, Case of Jonathan Gowen, No. 324757

On this 13th day of December, 1898 at near Gradyville, County of Adair, State of Kentucky, before me, R. J. Austin, a special examiner of the Bureau of Pensions, personally appeared A. J. Gowen, who, being by me first duly sworn to answer truly all interrogatories propounded to him during this special examination of aforesaid claim for pension, deposes and says:

I am 47 years of age, my post-office is Gradyville, Ky, occupation, farmer and merchant. I am a son of the pensioner, Jonathan Gowen. My father moved from N.C. when I was eight years of age and settled near here. I was born February 2, 1851.

I have always been with my father or near him. I remember very well when he enlisted in the war. I was at home at the time. His health was as good as the ordinary man. He never was a very robust man. No, he never had any spells of sickness prior to his enlistment that I recollect about.

He came home during the war with a spell of ‘Yaller Jaunders’ and was awful bad, and we thought he would die. He was awful yellow when he came home. He came home on sick furlough and was there probably several months, don’t recollect exactly.

Question: Was there any thing the matter with his legs before he enlisted in the war?
Answer: No, if there ever was, I have no recollection of it. I worked with him daily from early boyhood till he went into the service and often saw his bare legs and know there was nothing the matter with his legs until he enlisted. My father had something like dropsy or something like that in the spring after he came out of the service.

I can’t say how he was affected, don’t know whether his legs swelled or not, but think they were. The first spring after he was discharged he and I were working together in the field. My father was plowing. He stopped and called to me that he had hurt his leg. I went to him and found that a cornstalk had knocked a little bit of skin off his shin, the left shin, I think, and it was bleeding. It did not seem to amount to much, and after wrapping it up with something, he went on with his work. His leg never healed up after that, and after a while, the other leg got sore.

This is the first I knew of my father having a sore on his leg, but he had complained of not being well from the time of his discharge, and I think his had been swelled from the time he came home more or less. I think both legs are affected about alike now. My father has only worn shoes on his feet with the exception one pair of fine boots all his life. He made his own shoes. He never fancied boots, but there was no reason for him not wearing boots before the war.

I remember that John Wauf struck my father on the head with a stick or something, but did not hit him on the leg. I know this took place after the war. My father was not hurt. Wauf was drinking at the time. The above is all the injury my father rec’d after the war except he would sometimes accidentally knock the scab off the sore on his legs.

I hear you read this. I have understood your questions, and my answers are correctly recorded. My father did not make a crop while at home on furlough. He did not work a lick. He was not able to work any. My mother and I made the crop. This is correct.
A. J. Gowen, Deponent”

Deposition: Case of Jonathan Gowen, No. 324757

“On this 16th day of December, 1898 at Gradyville, County of Adair, State of Kentucky, before me, R. J. Austin, a special examiner of the Bureau of Pensions, personally appeared W. M. Coomer, who being by me first duly sworn to answer truly all interrogatories propounded to him during this special examination of aforesaid claim for pension, deposes and says:

I am 59 years of age, my post-office address is as above, occupation, a farmer. I served in Co. E, 3rd Ky, Inf. from August 1861 till October 1864.

I got acquainted with Jonathan Gowen about 1858 or 1859, at any rate, it was when he came here from N.C. We lived about one mile & a half apart, and I saw him often up till I enlisted and visited at his house and courted his daughter.

He was a good fiddler and a good dancer at that time, and while I never examined his legs, I don’t believe there was a thing the matter with his leg or legs or I would know something about it. I did not see him from my enlistment till his discharge. We then lived about the same distance apart. We never worked together, but I have seen him at work in the field many a time.

The first I ever heard of his having any thing the matter with his legs was several years after his discharge when I heard Dr. J. G. Taylor [dead] say that Jonathan Gowen had something the matter with his legs and that he [Taylor] had made him an affidavit to that effect. I never heard that Jonathan Gowen hurt his leg or legs before or since the war. I reckon that Jonathan Gowen and John Wauf had a difficulty shortly after the war. I did not see the difficulty, but John Wauf came by my house the next day and stopped and told us about it. He said he hit him on the head with a piece of fence rail. No he did not say he hit him on the leg. That took place shortly after the war. I knew this from the fact that it was after I married, and I did not marry until the 18th of November 1866.

I never heard that he got his leg hurt while building a chimney for James Compton or anyone else.

I am not related to Jonathan Gowen nor have I any interest in the case. I have understood your questions and my answers are correctly recorded herein.
W. M. [X] Coomer
Attest:
S. A. Hurfur

On June 10, 1880 the household of Jonathan Henry Gowen ap­peared in Adair County at Gradyville, Kentucky, Civil District 5, Enumeration District 4, page 19:

Gowen, Jonathan 55, born in VA, father born in
[blank], mother born in NC,
farmer
Hannah 53, born in VA, father born in VA,
mother born in VA, wife
Elizabeth 21, born in KY, father born in VA,
mother born in VA, daughter
Nancy M. 17, born in KY, father born in VA,
mother born in VA, daughter
Cornelius 15, born in KY, father born in VA,
mother born in VA, son, farmer
Emley 9, born in KY, father born in VA
mother born in VA, daughter”

A. T. Wood, United States Pension Agent of Louisville, Kentucky reported January 22, 1906 that Jonathan Henry Gowen “who was last paid at $24 to May 4, 1905 has been dropped because of death in July 1905.”

According to the family bible owned in 1972 by Martha Ann Gowen McGrath, a descendant of Louisville, Kentucky, chil­dren born to them include:

Mary Frances Gowen born Jan. 23, 1848 [1844?]
Sarah Jane Gowen born May 4, 1849
John Gowen born in 1850
Andrew Jackson Gowen born February 2, 1851
Fanny Gowen born February 2, 1853
Thomas Jefferson Gowen born June 12, 1855
Henry Clay Gowen born June 12, 1855
Susan Elizabeth Gowen born in 1858
Jonathan Frederick Gowen born January 10, 1859
Nancy M. Gowen born April 20, 1962
Martha Alice Gowen born in 1864
Cornelius C. Gowen born February 14, 1867
Emily Gowen born in April 1870

Mary Frances Gowen, daughter of Jonathan Henry Gowen and Hannah J. Beasley Gowen, was born January 23, 1848 in Stokes County, according to the family bible. She appeared as a 15-year-old in the 1860 enumeration of her father’s house­hold in Adair County. She was married there about 1866 to John N. Moore.

Children born to them include:

Willie Lee Moore born about 1868
John Wess Moore born about 1870
Warren Moore born about 1872
Polly Ann Moore born about 1874
Charlie Best Moore born about 1875
Andrew Moore born about 1877
Luther Thomas Moore born about 1879
Clay Moore born about 1882

Willie Lee Moore, child of John N. Moore and Mary Frances Gowen Moore, was born about 1868.

John Wess Moore, son of John N. Moore and Mary Frances Gowen Moore, was born about 1870. He was married about 1893 to Eva Coomer.

Warren Moore, son of John N. Moore and Mary Frances Gowen Moore, was born about 1872. He was married about 1895 to Delie Sneed, according to Clara Jean Grider. Later he was remarried, wife’s name Mary. He was married a third time to Emma Tucker.

Polly Ann Moore, daughter of John N. Moore and Mary Frances Gowen Moore, was born about 1874. She was mar­ried about 1889 to Randal Cole.

Children born to them include:

Walter Cole born December 29, 1890
Felix Cole born about 1894
Lawrence Cole born about 1898
Allen Cole born September 16, 1906
Nellie Cole born June 3, 1913
Opal Cole [twin] born February 3, 1920
Bea Cole [twin] born February 3, 1920

Walter Cole, son of Randal Cole and Polly Ann Moore Cole, was born December 29, 1890. He was married about 1913, wife’s name Aurora. She was born in 1893. She died in 1970, and he died August 21, 1974.

Felix Cole, son of Randal Cole and Polly Ann Moore Cole , was born about 1894.

Lawrence Cole, son of Randal Cole and Polly Ann Moore Cole, was born about 1898.

Allen Cole, son of Randal Cole and Polly Ann Moore Cole, was born September 16, 1906, according to Clara Jean Grider. He was married about 1929, wife’s name Hallie. He died July 23, 1975.

Nellie Cole, daughter of Randal Cole and Polly Ann Moore Cole, was born June 3, 1913.

Opal Cole, twin daughter of Randal Cole and Polly Ann Moore Cole, was born February 3, 1920.

Bea Cole, twin daughter of Randal Cole and Polly Ann Moore Cole, was born February 3, 1920. She is believed to have been married about 1937, husband’s name Taylor.

Charlie Best Moore, son of John N. Moore and Mary Frances Gowen Moore, was born about 1875. He was married about 1898 to Sally Coomer.

Andrew Moore, son of John N. Moore and Mary Frances Gowen Moore, was born about 1877. He was married about 1900 to Carrie Compton.

Luther Thomas Moore, son of John N. Moore and Mary Frances Gowen Moore, was born about 1879. He did not marry.

Clay Moore, son of John N. Moore and Mary Frances Gowen Moore, was born about 1882. He was married about 1905 to Edna Wilcox.

Sarah Jane Gowen, daughter of Jonathan Henry Gowen and Hannah J. Beasley Gowen, was born May 5, 1849 in Stokes County. She appeared as 13-year-old in the 1860 census of Adair County. She was married January 5, 1868 to Henry C. Pike, according to Adair County marriage records. They removed to Missouri shortly afterward, according to Clara Jean Grider.

A son was born to them:

Ulysses Pike, Jr. born about 1869

John Gowen, son of Jonathan Henry Gowen and Hannah J. Beasley Gowen, was born in 1849 in Stokes County. He ap­peared in the 1860 census of Adair County as an 11-year-old, but did not reappear in the 1870 and 1880 enumerations. He was married in 1877 to Harriett Coomer, daughter of William R. Coomer and Delilah Coomer, according to Adair County Marriage Book 9, page 126. Harriett Coomer Gowen died, and he moved “out west,” according to Clara Jean Grider. Children born to John Gowen and Harriett Coomer Gowen are unknown.

Andrew Jackson Gowen, son of Jonathan Henry Gowen and Hannah J. Beasley Gowen, was born February 2, 1851 in Stokes County. He was brought to Adair County, Kentucky in 1859 by his parents. He did not appear in his father’s household in the 1860 census, but did appear as an 18-year-old farmer in the 1870 enumeration of Adair County. He was married October 28, 1873 to Nancy Adeline Rowe “at Preston B. Rowe’s”, according to Clara Jean Grider.

He appeared as the head of a household in the 1880 census of Adair County, Enumeration District 4, page 20, two households removed from that of his father:

“Gowen, Andy J. 28, born in NC, father born in VA,
mother born in VA, farm laborer
Nancy A. 25, born in KY, father born in KY,
mother born in KY, wife”

He operated a store and a sawmill in Adair County. He gave a deposition December 13, 1898 in support of his father’s pension application. He was 47 and living at Gradyville.

Andrew Jackson Gowen appeared in the 1903 city directory of Dallas, Texas as a driver for Henry T. Pollock Trunk Company and lived at 370 Williams, the address of his brother, Thomas Jefferson Gowen who was also employed by the same firm. In the 1904 city directory Andrew Jackson Gowen was listed as a salesman for L. B. Price Mercantile Company and was “boarding at 152 Motley.”

It is believed that they returned to Adair County shortly afterward. He died at age 71 September 24, 1922, according to Jessie Gowen Thompson. His death was recorded in Kentucky Death Records, Vol. 39, Certificate No. 19148. They were buried in “the old Moss Cemetery,” according to Clara Jean Grider. No children were born to Andrew Jackson Gowen and Nancy Adeline Roe Gowen, but they reared three children by the name of Taylor.

Fanny Gowen, daughter of Jonathan Henry Gowen and Hannah J. Beasley Gowen, was born February 2, 1853 in Stokes County. She appeared in her father’s household in the 1870 census of Adair County as a nine-year-old. She was married on Christmas Day in 1869 to Meredith J. Harper who was born December 27, 1852. “Meredith J. Hopper” gave a deposition in 1883 in support of his father-in-law’s pension application. He died September 28, 1912, and she was remarried to Peter Compton. She died June 11, 1937 and was buried in the Moss Cemetery beside her first husband.

Children born to Meredith Harper and Fanny Gowen Harper include:

Nancy Margaret Harper born about 1870
William Riley Harper born in 1871
Joe Taylor Harper born about 1873
Laura Ann Harper born in 1875
Henry Martin Harper born about 1878
Claudius Harper born February 14, 1880
Bert Harper born about 1883

Nancy Margaret Harper, daughter of Meredith Harper and Fanny Gowen Harper, was born about 1870. She was mar­ried about 1878 to Clarence Coomer.

William Riley Harper, son of Meredith Harper and Fanny Gowen Harper, was born in 1871 in Adair County. He was married about 1894 to Cena Bloyd. They moved to Texas about 1896.

Children born to them include:

Otis Harper born in 1896
Waldo Harper born about 1897
Johnny Harper born in 1898
Fannie Harper born in 1900
Mary Harper born in 1902
Porter Harper born in 1906
Cena Harper born in 1908
William H. Harper born in 1910
Earl Harper born in 1914
Paul Harper born in 1915
William Riley Harper, Jr. born in 1918

Otis Harper, son of William Riley Harper and Cena Boyd Harper, was born in 1896. He died in Texas in 1910.

Waldo Harper, son of William Riley Harper and Cena Boyd Harper, was born about 1897. He died when five days old.

Johnny Harper, son of William Riley Harper and Cena Boyd Harper, was born in 1898. Two sons and two daughters were born to him.

Fannie Harper, daughter of William Riley Harper and Cena Boyd Harper, was born in 1900. She was married about 1918, husband’s name Sluder.

Children born to them include:

John Sluder born about 1920
Lounett Sluder born about 1924
Herman Sluder born about 1926
Ruth Sluder born about 1929
Wanda Sluder born about 1932
David Sluder born about 1936

Mary Harper, daughter of William Riley Harper and Cena Boyd Harper, was born in 1902. She was married about 1920, hus­band’s name Kretzschman.

Children born to them include:

Claire Kretzschman born about 1922
Samuel Lee Kretzschman born about 1924
Daniel Kretzschman born about 1926
Bobby Ray Kretzschman born about 1929

Porter Harper, son of William Riley Harper and Cena Boyd Harper, was born in 1906. He died in 1981.

Children born to him include:

Johnny Harper born about 1930
Martha Harper born about 1932
Glendon Harper born about 1935
Kenneth Harper born about 1938

Cena Harper, daughter of William Riley Harper and Cena Boyd Harper, was born in 1908. She was married about 1926, husband’s name Pierce. Later she was remarried, husband’s name Durham.

Children born to her include:

George Pierce born about 1928
Katherine Pierce born about 1931
Clifford Pierce born about 1934

William H. Harper, son of William Riley Harper and Cena Boyd Harper, was born in 1910.

Children born to him include:

Benny Harper born about 1935
Lanier Harper born about 1937
William Douglas Harper born about 1941
Donald Keith Harper born about 1947

Earl Harper, son of William Riley Harper and Cena Boyd Harper, was born in 1914.

Children born to him include:

Earl Gene Harper born about 1940
Charles Harper born about 1942
Jerry Harper born about 1947

Paul Harper, son of William Riley Harper and Cena Boyd Harper, was born in 1915.

Children born to him include:

Betty Harper born about 1946
Leroy Harper born about 1950

William Riley Harper, Jr., son of William Riley Harper and Cena Boyd Harper, was born in 1918.

Children born to him include:

Sandra Kay Harper born about 1948

Joe Taylor Harper, son of Meredith Harper and Fanny Gowen Harper, was born about 1873. He was married about 1896 to Callie Wilcox.

Children born to them include:

Henry Harper born about 1898
Charlie Harper born about 1900
Connie Harper born about 1903
Mary Harper born about 1906
Flora Harper born about 1910

Laura Ann Harper, daughter of Meredith Harper and Fanny Gowen Harper, was born in 1875. She was married about 1896 to William Herbert Bennett, who was born in 1873. She died in 1951, and he died in 1961.

Children born to them include:

Lawrence Bennett born in 1898

Lawrence Bennett, son of William Herbert Bennett and Laura Ann Har­per Bennett, was born in 1898. He was mar­ried about 1921 to Nellie Pearl Franklin who was born in 1900. He died in 1962, and she died in 1986.

Children born to them include:

Thomas Bennett born about 1923
Chlotile Bennett born about 1925
May Ola Bennett born about 1928
Opal Bennett born about 1932
Jean Bennett born about 1935
Laurence Bennett ` born about 1938
Murrell Bennett born about 1942
Gerald Bennett born about 1946

Henry Martin Harper, son of Meredith Harper and Fanny Gowen Harper, was born about 1878. He was married about 1900 to Mary Alice Kessler.

Children born to them include:

John Henry Harper born about 1902

Claudius Harpers, son of Meredith Harper and Fanny Gowen Harper, was born February 14, 1880. He was married about 1902 to Mary Barley. Later he was remarried to Rebecca Coomer who was born January 1, 1877 to Floyd Coomer and Rachel Roach Coomer. Rebecca Coomer Harper died in 1943 and was buried in Moss Cemetery.

Children born to them include:

Edward Harper born in 1903
Beulah Harper born in 1905
Willie Clarence Harper born in 1906
[child] born about 1907
Jessie Harper born June 1, 1909
Hallie Harper born in 1911
Jimmie Johnson Harper born in 1913
Donnie Harper born 1915
Callie Elizabeth Donna Harper born in 1917
Claudis Harper born in 1921
Claudia Harper born April 1, 1924
Lillian Harper born in 1927
Flora Bell Harper born Dec. 25, 1920

Bert Harper, son of Meredith Harper and Fanny Gowen Harper, was born about 1883. He was married about 1906 to Montra Yarberry.

Children born to them include:

Anna Harper born about 1908
Louis Harper born about 1910
Thelma Harper born about 1913
Alfred Harper born about 1916
J. D. Harper born about 1920
Bert Harper, Jr. born about 1924

Alfred Harper, son of Bert Harper and Montra Yarberry Harper, was born about 1916. He was killed at Pearl Harbor in 1941, leaving a widow and one son.

Thomas Jefferson Gowen, twin son of Jonathan Henry Gowen and Hannah J. Beasley Gowen, was born June 12, 1855 in Stokes County, North Carolina, according to the family bible. He appeared in his father’s household in the 1860 census at Summersville, Kentucky as a five-year-old and again in the 1870 census as a 14-year-old farm laborer.

He was married in 1875 in McCracken County, Kentucky to Lucinda Margaret Floyd, daughter of James Floyd and Margaret Ann Bryant Floyd, according to Clara Jean Grider. She was born in Kentucky August 11, 1858, and both of her parents were born in Kentucky, according to Pearl Elmore Gowen Wheeler. However, in the census of 1880 Lucinda Margaret Floyd Gowen advised the enumerator that she and both of her parents were born in North Carolina.

Thomas Jefferson Gowen appeared as the head of a household adjacent to that of his twin brother in Green County, Enumera­tion District 56, page 3:

“Gowin, Thomas J. 23, born in KY, father born in KY,
mother born in KY [errors],
laborer
Elizabeth 22, born in NC, father born in NC,
mother born in NC
Mary 3, born in KY, father born in KY,
mother born in KY
John 6/12, born in KY, father born in KY,
mother born in KY, born in
January 1880”

After killing two men in an 1887 [1897?] dancehall shootout in Green County, Kentucky, Thomas Jefferson Gowen kissed his wife and children goodbye and lit out for St. Louis. The sheriff, meanwhile, was searching for his twin brother, Henry Clay Gowen who was originally suspected in the crime. In St. Louis the 31-year-old fugitive bought a ticket on the St. Louis, San Francisco & Texas Railway. At Frisco, Texas, he stepped off the train to an uncertain freedom, according to Jessie Morgan Gowen, his daughter-in-law.

Sarah B. Wheeler Welch, a descendant of Thomas Jefferson Gowen wrote February 12, 2001 that she questioned the date of the reported dance hall shooting. She stated that she possessed a letter written by Hannah J. Beasley Gowen written March 21, 1890 addressed to her son Thomas Jefferson Gowen in “Sumersville, Kentucky.”

The letter, postmarked April 1, 1890 at Greensburg, Kentucky read:

“Adair County
March the 21st 1890
Dear sun an dauter,

I seat myself one time more to drop you a few lines to let you no that we are not well. I am right pourley my self. Nobody knows how mutch I suffered an no body don’t care. I don’t think I will be in the way mutch longer. I hope this will find you all well an doing.

Cat Cumton an Role Cofey is married an it looky like we cant get a girl to stay with us more than 4 or 5 weeks at a time an I don’t know what we will do with out we brake up an live a bout with the children.

Lucinday, emily has a girl bornd the 29th of December. Me and your pap an Mr. Beson was aming to cum down thair the 2 day of January, but it was a raining that morning. I want to see you all awful bad, but I don’t know whether I every will see you all any more or not. If I live I want to cum down thair one time more before I die.

Lucinda, I will send that hair in this letter fears I wont get to cum.

Tommy, I think you might cum to see your poor old father and mother. If Lucinda an the children cant cum I want you to right and let us hear from you.

Mary Hopper died the other day an was buried at Maris Chapel. The house is burnt down. Thair is a heap of murders. Sun, a man got shot night before last at Gradyville. An one was shot over in Green the other week an a negro was shot at Gradyville at Christmas. Fouse Comton has got his pention, 6 hundred an 70. Emily call her baby Matty.

We had a bad storm through hear the other week. A heap of people lost thair meat. The Jints we cild Monday before Christmas we did not lose any as we no of. Nase lost 4 Joints. Every body I can hear of is going for the burley tobacco.

So I will close for this time. Right sure an don’t fail for I want to hear from you all. If I cant see you, [it] does me good to hear from you.

When this you see, think of poor me.

From Hannah Gowen to Tomas J. Gowen an family.”

Sarah B. Wheeler Welch also wrote, “I also have in my possession a letter from Margaret A. Floyd Gowen written to her daughter Lucinda Gowen dated March 30, 1884 from Monroe, Kentucky. In both letters, the parents of each, Thomas Jefferson Gowen and Lucinda Floyd Gowen, were urging them to come for a visit. They have heard that they were moving to Kansas and wanted to see them before they go and urged them ‘to suit yourselves closer to home.’”

The letter written by Margaret A. Floyd reads:

“Monroe, Kentucky
March 30, 1884
Mrs. Lucinda Goins & Family,

Dear Friends,

I seat my self to write you a few lines in answer to your kind and welcome letter which has just come to hand.

This leaves us all tolerable well, except my self. I have not been able to do a day’s work since I was at your house last March.

Well, you wrote in your letter that you were a going to Kansas and wanted us to come and see you before you went. I am not able to ride horse back, and the river is too deep to cross in a wagon. So I cannot come to see you, but I would like for you all to come and see me before you go.

I was sorry to hear that you were going so far away. You had better suit your selves closer by, but if you go, I want you to rite to me often and tell me how you are getting along, and tell little Mary to learn how to rite and write to her Grandma.

You said you wanted to see Betsy Ann. Well, Betsy is sick in bed. She has another son, it is two weeks old and her little Charley has been sick for a month or two. He has been like to die, but has made a start to get well the last we heard from him about a week ago.

Well, Tomy, I reckon you have heard Flourishing news from Kansas. I am sorry to think that you believe any such tales for the truth cannot be carried a half mile without being changed.

I will close for the present, hoping you will [write] soon and often to me. So, fare you well to you all.

From Margaret A. Floyd

Write often, to Lucinda Goins and Family.”

At Frisco, Thomas Jefferson Gowen got a job on a farm, stayed out of town and kept a low profile. Months later, when he thought it was safe, he got word to his older brother, Andrew Jackson Gowen of his whereabouts. He requested him to bring his wife, Lucinda Margaret Floyd Gowen and their three children to Frisco.

By 1903 they had removed 20 miles south to Dallas where both brothers were employed as “trunkmakers” by Henry Pollock Trunk Company, according to the city directory. Thomas Jefferson Gowen, a clerk, was boarding at 370 Williams, according to the 1903 Dallas city directory. Lu­cinda Margaret Floyd Gowen appeared as a grocer in the 1903 directory, living and working at 370 Williams. On June 3, 1903 he received a warranty deed from W. C. Ray for Lot 12, Block 1, Motley Addition, according to Dallas County Deed Book 303, page 146.

Andrew Jackson Gowen returned to Kentucky, but Thomas Jefferson Gowen remained in Dallas, opened a grocery in 1911 and became a successful merchant. He never went back to Kentucky, and many of his Gowen family had no inkling of his whereabouts.

In 1904 and 1905, he was listed in the city directory as a “trunkmaker” employed by Henry Pollock Trunk Company. In 1905 he lived at 317 San Jacinto. On October 9, 1905 he received a warranty deed from W. A. Hazlip for lot 12, Block 23, Caldwell Addition, according to Dallas County Deed Book 373, page 97. In the 1905, 1906 and 1907 directories she was listed as a seamstress employed by Rose Manufacturing Com­pany and living at 210 South Fitzhugh. A release was given on this property September 19, 1907 as recorded in Dallas County Deed Book 411, page 287.

From 1906 through 1910 he was employed as a trunkmaker by Wilkins Trunk Manufacturing Company and lived at 210 South Fitzhugh during this period.

From 1911 through 1919 Thomas Jefferson Gowen appeared in the Dallas city directory as a grocer operating a business at 4900 Terry. He continued to live on Fitzhugh until 1915 and afterwards showed his address as 5909 Santa Fe Avenue. In 1919 he went into the poultry and produce business, operating a store at the same address as his residence.

Sarah B. Wheeler Welch wrote March 7, 2001 that she had in her possession a photograph of Thomas Jefferson Gowen and Lucinda Margaret Floyd Gowen taken in 1925 on their 50th wedding anniversary. Another photograph was taken on that date of them and their family in their store

He died November 26, 1935 at age 81, according to Texas BVS File 50703. His will, dated September 9, 1935, was pro­bated December 17, 1935, and John Lemuel Gowen, 5907 Santa Fe Avenue, was named executor, according to Dallas County Probate File 14950. His estate, valued at $4,456 went to his widow. Included in the assets of the estate was a note from Edwin Wheeler and Pearl Elmore Gowen Wheeler for $2,000 and a note from M. Sherman Gumm and Mary Alice Gowen Gumm for $300. Fixtures and inventory in the grocery store at 5911 Santa Fe Avenue were valued at $300. Half interest in two trucks total $200, and cash in the bank totaled $1,030.

Lucinda Margaret Floyd Gowen died October 22, 1941 at age 83 years and 11 days, according to Dallas County Death Book 7, page 526. She had lived in Dallas County 38 years and was residing at 2011 Michigan Avenue at the time of her death attributed to acute meningitis and a fractured femur. She was buried in Restland Memorial Cemetery, according to Pearl Elmore Gowen Wheeler, informant.

Lucinda Margaret Floyd Gowen had written her will April 29, 1939 at age 80, and it was probated January 20, 1942, ac­cording to Dallas County Probate File 18869. Pearl Elmore Gowen Wheeler “of Allen, Texas” was named executrix. The will named legatees: daughters, Pearl Elmore Gowen Wheeler, Mary Alice Gowen Gumm and daughter-in-law Jessie Morgan Gowen to receive the estate valued at $10,000.

When Pearl Elmore Gowen Wheeler delayed in administering the estate, Jessie Morgan Gowen through Attorney William Timothy Whitehurst requested a court order demanding that Pearl Elmore Gowen Wheeler produce the will of Lucinda Margaret Floyd Gowen. The accounting of the estate showed a residence on Santa Fe Avenue valued at $5,000, a lot valued at $2,500, store fixtures valued at $20 and $20.18 in a bank ac­count.

Children born to Thomas Jefferson Gowen and Lucinda Mar­garet Floyd Gowen include:

Mary Alice Gowen born October 31, 1878
John Lemuel Gowen born February 3, 1880
Pearl Elmore Gowen born December 29, 1881

Mary Alice Gowen, daughter of Thomas Jefferson Gowen and Lucinda Margaret Floyd Gowen, was born October 31, 1878 at Summersville, Kentucky. She was married to M. Sherman Gumm about 1900 in Dallas. She continued to live there in 1942.

John Lemuel Gowen, son of Thomas Jefferson Gowen and Lucinda Margaret Floyd Gowen, was born February 3, 1880 in Summersville.

In 1906 he appeared in the Dallas city directory as a clerk em­ployed by Schoellkopf Saddlery Company and living in the residence of his father. In 1903 John Lemuel Gowen was listed as a farmer. It is believed that John Lemuel Gowen was married about 1905 to Viola Katherine Townsend who was born in Dallas in 1885. It is believed that several children were born to this union before Viola Katherine Townsend Gowen “ran away with a drummer,” according to a story told by members of the family.

In 1907 and 1908 he continued with the saddlery company and lived at 210 South Fitzhugh, the home of his parents. In 1909 he was employed by J. I. Case Threshing Machine Company and boarded at 222 Garland. From 1910 through 1919 he was employed by Huey & Philp Hardware Company. In 1910 he lived at 118 Sim Avenue. From 1911 through 1916 he lived at 502 South Fitzhugh. In 1917 he showed his address at 5909 Santa Fe Avenue. He was also listed as a clerk for MKT Rail­way and lived at 5425 Santa Fe Avenue, according to the city directory. “John Gowen, carpenter” lived at 5125 Santa Fe Avenue, according to the 1919 city directory.

“Kate Gowan, widow of John Gowan” was a seamstress living at 152 Race Street, according to the 1909 Dallas city directory. In 1910, she was listed as an “operator, M. Tent & Awning Company.” In 1911 she was shown “boarding at Mrs. M. F. McMillon’s,” working as a seamstress at Dallas Tent & Awning Company and living at 4537 Santa Fe Avenue. Her address and employment remained the same in 1912, 1913 and 1914.

“Mrs. Kate Gowen” was listed in the Dallas city directory in the 1915, 1916 and 1917 editions. She was listed as a seam­stress employed by Texas Tent & Awning Company and lived at 4537 Santa Fe Avenue. “Mrs. Viola K. Gowen” was mar­ried to A. J. Payne November 12, 1917, according to Dallas County Marriage Book 23, page 445.

“John L. Gowen” was married to Alburtie Champion January 8, 1909, according to Dallas County Marriage Book 5, page 297. They were the parents of a daughter, name unknown, born December 2, 1909, according to Dallas County Birth Book 6, page 97. Apparently the couple divorced because on September 26, 1910 “Alberta Gowan” received a warranty deed from “John L. Gowen.” “Bertie Gowan” was married to Joll W. Jones June 28, 1916, according to Dallas County Mar­riage Book 286, page 628.

On January 22, 1912 John Lemuel Gowen “of Tom Green County, Texas” bought land there from Ed Wheeler and wife for $2,000, according to Tom Green County Deed Book 79, page 411.

“John L. Gowen” was married to Miss Blessie Willis May 19, 1912, according to Dallas County Marriage Book 14, page 141. It is believed that no children were born to John Lemuel Gowen and Blessie Willis Gowen. On December 4, 1912 John Lemuel Gowen received a sheriff’s deed to Lot 9, Block B, Robertson Addition, according to Dallas County Deed Book 578, page 4.

On January 4, 1913 John Lemuel Gowen was married to Jessie Morgan, according to Collin County, Texas Marriage Book 16, page 618. She was born December 10, 1894 in Van Zandt County, Texas. Family members relate that while Jessie Mor­gan Gowen was preparing supper on their wedding night, John Lemuel Gowen instructed her to “set four more plates.” Thus she learned for the first time that she was the “mother of four.”

On August 14, 1913 John Lemuel Gowen and Jessie Morgan Gowen “of Dallas County” sold their land in Tom Green County back to Ed Wheeler and wife for $2,000, according to Tom Green County Deed Book 85, page 100.

John Lemuel Gowen in 1914 was a stenographer for Huey & Philp Hardware Company living in the home of his father at 502 South Fitzhugh Avenue, according to the Dallas city di­rectory.

John Lemuel Gowen and Jessie Morgan Gowen had 19 real estate transactions recorded in Dallas County deed books between 1914 and 1935. Jessie Morgan Gowen appeared in the 1918 city directory as a clerk in the grocery store owned by her father-in-law and residing at 5909 Santa Fe Avenue.

John Lemuel Gowen wrote his will January 29, 1937. He died about two weeks later February 13, 1937, at age 57, according to Texas BVS File 7566. Jessie Morgan Gowen was named administrator. His estate consisted of 266.4 acres of land in Denton County, 15 miles east of Denton, Texas valued at $10,000; 38.8 acres of land in Dallas County valued at $2,500; 80 acres of land in Hunt County valued at $4,000 and Lot 12, Block 3, Bergfeld Place Addition, Dallas, valued at $2,000. Value of his estate was $8,432.38, according to Dallas County Probate File No. 15882.

Children born to John Lemuel Gowen and Viola Katherine Townsend Gowen include:

[daughter] born about 1901
Jack Lemuel Gowen born January 31, 1903

Children born to John Lemuel Gowen and Alburtie Champion Gowen include:

[daughter] born December 2, 1909

Children born to John Lemuel Gowen and Jessie Morgan Gowen include:

Thelma Gowen born December 3, 1913
Mary Catherine Gowen born July 17, 1915
Evelyn Gowen born June 14, 1918
John Lemuel Gowen, Jr. born October 20, 1919
Thomas Jefferson Gowen born May 13, 1926
Elsie Mae Gowen born November 8, 1928
Joan Gowen born August 8, 1931
William Timothy Gowen born December 17, 1933

It is believed a daughter, name unknown, was born to John Lemuel Gowen and Viola Katherine Townsend Gowen about 1901. Of this individual nothing more is known.

Jack Lemuel Gowens, believed to be a son of John Lemuel Gowen and Viola Katherine Townsend Gowen, was born Jan­uary 31, 1903, according to Dallas County Birth Book 25, page 545. A corroborating birth certificate was filed in Dallas County Delayed Birth Book 6, page 371 February 2, 1942 by order of the Dallas County judge.

On November 5, 1923 Jack Lemuel Gowen was married to Mary Elizabeth Abernathy, according to Dallas County Mar­riage Book 37, page 141. On August 8, 1931 they gave a deed to National Standard Life Insurance Company to Lot 9, Block 2, Lovelace Addition, Dallas, according to Dallas County Deed Book 1705, page 628.

Jack Lemuel Gowen died December 13, 1967 in Dallas, and Mary Elizabeth Abernathy Gowen was named executrix by the terms of his will. He left his home at 6474 Royal Lane and $21,000 cash to his widow. Rosemary Gowen Payne and her husband Robert Benson Payne, witnessed the will. In the 1972 city directory of Dallas Mary Elizabeth Abernathy Gowen, “widow of Jack L. Gowen,” was listed as a saleswoman for Flower-A-Day Shop and continued to live at 6474 Royal Lane. She remained there in 1979.

Children born to Jack Lemuel Gowen and Mary Elizabeth Abernathy Gowen include:

Rosemary Gowen born May 29, 1931

Rosemary Gowen, daughter of Jack Lemuel Gowen and Mary Elizabeth Abernathy Gowen, was born May 29, 1931, accord­ing to Texas BVS File 38540. She was married December 3, 1953 to Robert Benson Payne, according to Dallas County Marriage Book 123, page 187.

A daughter, name unknown, was born to John Lemuel Gowen and Albertie Champion Gowen, according to Dallas County Birth Book 6, page 97. Of this individual nothing more is known.

Thelma Gowen, daughter of John Lemuel Gowen and Jessie Morgan Gowen, was born December 3, 1913 in Dallas. She was married July 1, 1933 to Jefferson Brim Crow, Jr, ac­cording to Dallas County Marriage Book 55, page 31. Thelma Gowen Crow died July 14, 1985 at age 81, according to Lisa Marie Jones, Foundation member of Mesquite, Texas, in a letter written November 16, 1995.

Children born to Jefferson Brim Crow, Jr. and Thelma Gowen Crow include:

Jefferson Brim Crow III born about 1936
Mary Evelyn Crow born about 1939
Ruth Crow born about 1942
Judy Crow born about 1947
Charles Crow born about 1950

Mary Katherine Gowen, daughter of John Lemuel Gowen and Jessie Morgan Gowen, was born July 17, 1915 in Dallas, ac­cording to Texas BVS File 25959. She was married to William Henry Meadows of Ft. Worth, Texas April 17, 1937, according to Dallas County Marriage Book 63, page 125. She died in 1940.

Children born to them include:

Clifford Meadows born about 1939

Clifford Thomas Meadows, son of William Henry Meadows and Mary Katherine Gowen Meadows, was born about 1939 in Ft. Worth. He continued there in March 1972.

Evelyn Gowen, daughter of John Lemuel Gowen and Jessie Morgan Gowen, was born June 14, 1918 in Dallas. She was married April 5, 1938 to Homer H. Massey, according to Dallas County Marriage Book 65, page 367. He was killed in the crash of an U.S. Army Air Corps AT-6 trainer plane at Paris, Texas. Evelyn Gowen Massey was later remarried to John Rodegherio and in March 1972 lived in Big Spring, Texas.

One son, Homer H. Massey, Jr. was born to Homer H. Massey and Evelyn Gowen Massey in 1939. No children were born to John Rodegherio and Evelyn Gowen Massey Rodegherio.

John Lemuel Gowen, Jr, son of John Lemuel Gowen and Jessie Morgan Gowen, was born October 20, 1919 in Dallas. Ap­parently he was married about 1939, wife’s name Addie Marie, and apparently they were divorced, but on March 26, 1941 John Lemuel Gowen, Jr. and Addie Marie Gowen were remarried by John T. Price, pastor, Presbyterian Church, Rockwall, Texas, according to Rockwall County Mar­riage Book 18, page 272. John Lemuel Gowen, Jr. was listed as a clerk for a drug corporation in the 1941 city directory of Dallas. Later the couple was divorced again, and Addie Marie Gowen on May 18, 1945 was remarried to Harvey N. Smith, according to Rockwall County Marriage Book 24, page 239.

John Lemuel Gowen, Jr. had been remarried April 23, 1945 to Miss Audrey Juanita Morrison who was born in Texas in 1924, according to Rockwall County Marriage Book 24, page 188.

In March 1972 he was vice-president of Southern Drugs and lived on Tripp Road, Garland, Texas, according to the tele­phone directory. In 1979 he continued to live there.

Children born to John Lemuel Gowen, Jr. and Addie Marie Gowen include:

Wylie Gene Gowen born August 2, 1941
Carol Ann Gowen born October 25, 1942

Children born to John Lemuel Gowen, Jr. and Audrey Juanita Mor­rison Gowen include:

John Lemuel Gowen III born February 11, 1949
Mary Catherine Gowen born about 1953
Karen Gowen born about 1955

Wylie Gene Gowen, believed to be the son of John Lemuel Gowen, Jr. and Addie Marie Gowen, was born August 2, 1941 in Dallas County. However Audrey Juanita Morrison Gowen stated in an affidavit dated August 5, 1958 that she was the mother of Wylie Gene Gowen, according to Dallas County Birth Book 64, page 483. In 1964 he was a freshman at East Texas State University, Commerce, Texas. His home address was shown as Route 2, Box 48, Mesquite, Texas. He was married February 15, 1966 to Dorothea Adams at Dallas. Children born to Wylie Gene Gowen and Dorothea Adams Gowen are unknown.

Carol Ann Gowen, daughter of John Lemuel Gowen, Jr. and Addie Marie Gowen, was born October 25, 1942 in Cooke County, Texas, according to Texas BVS File 100248. She was a student at East Texas State University in Commerce in 1964. Her home address was shown as Route 2, Mesquite, Texas. She was married August 19, 1969 to Melvin L. Mc­Farling, accord­ing to Dallas County marriage records.

John Lemuel Gowen III, son of John Lemuel Gowen, Jr. and Audrey Juanita Morrison Gowen, was born February 11, 1949. He was married March 28, 1969 at Mesquite to Judy Kay Bradshaw who was born July 2, 1951, according to Kaufman County Marriage Book 27, page 327. Children born to John Lemuel Gowen III and Judy Kay Bradshaw Gowen are un­known.

Mary Catherine Gowen, daughter of John Lemuel Gowen, Jr. and Audrey Juanita Morrison Gowen, was born about 1953. Of this individual nothing more is known.

Karen Gowen, daughter of John Lemuel Gowen, Jr. and Au­drey Juanita Morrison Gowen, was born about 1955. In 1972 she was listed in the Dallas city directory as office secretary of the American Cancer Society with residence in Mesquite.

Thomas Jefferson Gowen, son of John Lemuel Gowen and Jessie Morgan Gowen and namesake of his grandfather, was born May 13, 1926 at Dallas. He was married July 10, 1946 to Fernala Ann Shaffer, according to Rockwall County Mar­riage Book 26, page 565. In March 1972 they lived at 12209 Lake June Road, Mesquite.

Children born to Thomas Jefferson Gowen and Fernala Ann Shaffer Gowen include:

Barbara Aline Gowen born May 11, 1947
John Thomas Gowen born September 16, 1948
Thomas Jefferson Gowen, Jr. born about 1951
Gary Lynn Gowen born about 1952
Ricky Wayne Gowen born March 14, 1955

Barbara Aline Gowen, daughter of Thomas Jefferson Gowen and Fernala Ann Shaffer Gowen, was born May 11, 1947 in Dallas County, according to Texas BVS File 208080.

John Thomas Gowen, son of Thomas Jefferson Gowen and Fernala Ann Shaffer Gowen, was born September 16, 1948 in Dal­las County, according to Texas BVS File 106934.

Thomas Jefferson Gowen, Jr, son of Thomas Jefferson Gowen and Fernala Ann Shaffer Gowen, was born in Dallas about 1951.

Gary Lynn Gowen, son of Thomas Jefferson Gowen and Fer­nala Ann Shaffer Gowen, was born about 1952 in Dallas County. He was married February 13, 1968 to Cecilia M. Si­mons, according to Dallas County marriage records. He was remarried to Debra Jeanette Qualls October 10, 1970, according to Hopkins County, Texas Marriage Book 22, page 368. Cecilia M. Simons Gowen was remarried December 17, 1971 to Harold G. Manire, according to Dallas County mar­riage records. Of Gary Lynn Gowen and Debra Jeanette Qualls Gowen nothing more is known.

Ricky Wayne Gowen, son of Thomas Jefferson Gowen and Fernala Ann Shaffer Gowen, was born March 14, 1955 in Dallas County, according to Texas BVS files.

Elsie Mae Gowen, daughter of John Lemuel Gowen and Jessie Morgan Gowen, was born November 8, 1928 in Dallas. On August 29, 1947 she was married to Dr. Roy Delbert Wag­goner, according to Dallas County Marriage Book 99, page 56. The marriage certificate recorded her name as “Ester Mae Gowen.” In 1972 they lived in Mesquite.

Children born to Dr. Roy Delbert Waggoner and Elsie Mae Gowen Waggoner include:

Barbara June Waggoner born about 1950
Lillie Ann Waggoner born about 1952
James Allen Waggoner born about 1955
Nancy Lou Waggoner born about 1958
Lisa Carol Waggoner born about 1961

Joan Gowen, daughter of John Lemuel Gowen and Jessie Morgan Gowen, was born August 8, 1931 in Dallas County, according to BVS File 64476. She was married about 1951 to Jeff Rickard. About 1965 she was remarried to Wayne Kemp. In March 1972 they made their home in Mesquite.

Children born to Jeff Rickard and Joan Gowen Rickard in­clude:

Mary Jo Rickard born about 1952
Jeff Rickard, Jr. born about 1954
Shirl Ann Rickard born about 1955
David Rickard born about 1956
Jessie Annette Rickard born about 1958
Cinda Lou Rickard born about 1960
Roy Don Rickard born about 1962

William Timothy Gowen, son of John Lemuel Gowen and Jessie Morgan Gowen, was born December 17, 1933 in Dallas County, according to Texas BVS File 98667. He was named for his mother’s attorney William Timothy Whitehurst, a Dal­las attorney.

About 1954 he was married to Barbara G. Hager. They re­moved to Austin, Texas about 1959, and they received a deed from Wayne Burns Company September 18, 1969 to Lot 5, Block E, Greenwood Forest Addition, Austin, according to Travis County Deed Book 2096, page 475. In March 1972 the couple lived at 702 Philco, Austin where he was employed as an office equipment salesman.

Barbara G. Hager Gowen died November 29, 1972 at age 44 leaving a community estate of $24,000, according to Travis County Probate File 35385. She was living at 1702 Philco, Austin, at the time of her death. Her will was dated October 7, 1972 and was executed by William Timothy Gowen. During the probate, William Timothy Gowen showed his address at 1707 Jennings Street, Big Spring, Texas.

Mrs. Evelyn Rodeghiero, of Big Spring, was also an executor, and was named guardian of Barbara Hagar Gowen’s children:

On January 26, 1973 William Timothy Gowen was married to Mrs. Billie Rhea Covert in Big Spring by a Veterans Admin­istration Hospital chaplain, according to Howard County, Texas Marriage Book 18, page 89. William Timothy Gowen and Billie Rhea Covert Gowen gave a deed to his Austin home to Thomas Isom Harris October 15, 1973, according to Travis County Deed Book 4747, page 442.

Children born to William Timothy Gowen and Barbara G. Hager Gowen include:

Patricia Gail Gowen born January 25, 1955
William Timothy Gowen, Jr. born August 7, 1956
Mark Steven Gowen born May 22, 1958
Barbara Dee “Deedee” Gowen born July 4, 1960
Lemuel Clifton Gowen born November 21, 1961
Cara Lynn Gowen born April 11, 1964

Patricia Gail Gowen, daughter of William Timothy Gowen and Barbara G. Hager Gowen, was born January 25, 1955 in Dallas County, according to Texas BVS File 4400. She was married April 28, 1972 to Sean Lowry Rhodes at Austin, ac­cording to Travis County Marriage Book 99, page 96. They made their home there at 2204 Village Way.

William Timothy Gowen, Jr., son of William Timothy Gowen and Barbara G. Hager Gowen, was born August 7, 1956 in Dallas County, according to Texas BVS File 135943.

Mark Steven Gowen, son of William Timothy Gowen and Barbara G. Hager Gowen, was born May 22, 1958 in Dallas County, according to Texas BVS File 75866.

Barbara Dee “Deedee” Gowen, daughter of William Timothy Gowen and Barbara G. Hager Gowen, was born July 4, 1960 in Travis County, according to Texas BVS File No. 130324.

Lemuel Clifton [or James Clifton] Gowen, son of William Timothy Gowen and Barbara G. Hager Gowen, was born November 21, 1961 in Austin, according to Texas BVS File 130324.

Cara Lynn Gowen, daughter of William Timothy Gowen and Barbara G. Hager Gowen, was born April 1, 1964 in Austin.

Pearl Elmore Gowen, daughter of Thomas Jefferson Gowen and Lucinda Margaret Floyd Gowen, was born December 29, 1881 at Somerset, Kentucky. She moved with her parents to Denton County, Texas about 1900, and in 1903 was “boarding at 370 Williams Street,” according to the Dallas city directory. She was married to Edwin Wheeler May 18, 1904, according to Dallas County Marriage Book W, page 601. He was born September, 27, 1874 in Garland, Texas. In 1941 they lived at Plano, Texas. They lived at Allen, Texas in 1942 when she was named executrix of her mother’s will.

Edwin Wheeler died April 5, 1949 and was buried in Big Spring Cemetery near Richardson, Texas. Pearl Elmore Gowen Wheeler died December 29, 1969 and was buried beside her husband.

Children born to them include:

Rowena Travis Wheeler born April 1, 1905
John Edwin Wheeler [twin] born October 9, 1906
Pearl Wheeler [twin] born. October 9, 1906
Thomas Verdaman Wheeler born February 25, 1908
Robert Anthony Wheeler born about 1911
Mary Lou Wheeler born June 5, 1915

Rowena Travis Wheeler, daughter of Edwin Wheeler and Pearl Elmore Gowen Wheeler, was born April 1, 1905. She was married about 1923 to Harvey O. Lawless. No children were born to them. She died July 16, 1977.

John Edwin Wheeler, twin son of Edwin Wheeler and Pearl Elmore Gowen Wheeler, was born October 9, 1906. He was married about 1929 to Zella Mae “Billie” Nash He died July 17, 1971.

Children born to them include:

Gwendolyn Edene Wheeler born June 5, 1931

Gwendolyn Edene Wheeler, daughter of John Edwin Wheeler and Zella Mae “Billie” Nash Wheeler, was born June 5, 1931. She was married about 1950 to Arthur V. Doble.

Pearl “Little Pearl” Wheeler, twin daughter of Edwin Wheeler and Pearl Elmore Gowen Wheeler, was born October 9, 1906 and died 10 days later.

Thomas Verdaman “Bill” Wheeler, son of Edwin Wheeler and Pearl Elmore Gowen Wheeler, was born February 25, 1908.
He was married about 1931 to Ruby Huffhines. Later he was remarried to Mary Virginia Wells who was born March 5, 1914. He died April 13, 1988 and was buried in Big Spring Cemetery. Mary Virginia Wells Wheeler died November 30, 2000 and was buried in Frankford Cemetery, Addison, Texas.

Children born to them include:

Patsy Ann Wheeler born January 23, 1937
Sarah Beth Wheeler born September 12, 1939
Mary Linda Wheeler born July 26, 1941
John David Wheeler born July 25, 1945
Michael Wells Wheeler born December 12, 1949
Deborah Sue Wheeler born February 6, 1954.

Robert Anthony “Jack” Wheeler, son of Edwin Wheeler and Pearl Elmore Gowen Wheeler, was born about 1911. He was married about 1931 to Mary Susan Cagle. He died March 4, 1972 and was buried in Restland Cemetery.

Children born to them include:

Robert Dudley Wheeler born May 6, 1933
Travis Edwin Wheeler born August 28, 1935

Mary Lou Wheeler, daughter of Edwin Wheeler and Pearl Elmore Gowen Wheeler, was born June 5, 1911. She was married about 1937 to Lester Heller. They lived at 9822 Donegal Drive in Dallas, Texas where he died February 12, 2001.

Children born to them include:

Carleton William Heller born February 8, 1939
Arthur Eugene Heller born June 25, 1944
John Edward Heller born November 13, 1945
Leslie Jean Heller born December 9, 1947

Henry Clay Gowen, twin son of Jonathan Henry Gowen and Hannah J. Beasley Gowen, was born June 12, 1855, according to the family bible owned by Martha Gowen McGrath, a de­scendant of Louisville. His father reported to the 1850 census enumerator that Henry Clay Gowen was born in Stokes County, North Carolina. Willoth Albert Ethelbert Gowen, a son, wrote [erroneously?] in his father’s obituary that Henry Clay Gowen was born in Charlotte, North Carolina.

He appeared as a five-year-old in the 1860 census of his fa­ther’s household in Adair County. Willoth Albert Ethelbert Gowen wrote that the family “came to Kentucky and settled on Price’s Creek when he was six years old.” He appeared as a 14-year-old farm laborer June 22, 1870 in the federal census of Adair County.

Henry Clay Gowen was married December 22, 1877 to Martha Jane Patton. She was born in Adair County May 2, 1860 to Rev. Brutus Patton and Nancy Matilda Fair Patton.

Shortly after marriage Henry Clay Gowen removed to Green County, Kentucky where he was working as a laborer when the 1880 census was taken. His household was reported in Enumeration District 56, page 13, adjacent to that of his twin brother, Thomas Jefferson Gowen as:

“Gowin, Henry C. 24, born in NC, father born in NC,
mother born in NC, laborer
Martha 23, born in NC, father born in NC
mother born in NC
Robert 2, born in KY, father born in KY,
mother born in KY”

The enumerator erred in recording the birthplaces of the parents of Robert N. Gowen. In 1901 Henry Clay Gowen was a farmer in Green County. In 1906 Henry Clay Gowen entered the milling and lumber business under the trade style of H. C. Gowen & Son. He was a member of the Methodist Church for 50 years, the family having membership in the Ladies Chapel M.E.S. Church.

Martha Jane Patton Gowen died March 26, 1924. He was re­married in 1927 at age 70. Henry Clay Gowen died January 16, 1929 of bronchial pneumonia at his home near Donansburg, Kentucky and was buried beside his wife. It is reported that a monument was erected at his grave listing the names and birthdates of all of his brothers and sisters. Melissa Patton Moseley, sister of Martha Jane Patton Gowen, died in Green County November 10, 1893 and was buried in the Gowen family cemetery.

Martha Cecilia Gowen Herbert wrote February 25, 1987:

“I don’t know how he relates, but I knew R. C. Rocaush ‘Eunice’ Gowen. My Dad used to take us to visit him when I was about 12 years old. He had a son named Finis Gowen and a daughter named Doris Gowen. Doris Gowen Beams now lives in Campbellsville, Kentucky. She has a photograph of Henry Clay Gowen and all his children.”

Children born to Henry Clay Gowen and Martha Jane Patton Gowen include:

Robert N. Gowen born January 5, 1879
Samuel Marvin Gowen born Feb. 24, 1881
Jesse Lee Gowen born Dec. 11, 1882
Willoth Albert Ethelbert Gowen born August 25, 1884
Myrtie Bell Gowen born Dec. 11, 1886
Eunice Roe Cashious Gowen born August 27, 1892
Mary Frances Gowen born Nov. 7, 1894

Robert N. Gowen, son of Henry Clay Gowen and Martha Jane Patton Gowen, was born January 5, 1879 in Adair County. It is believed that he was married about 1900, wife’s name unknown. He became a schoolteacher. He died April 18, 1901 and was buried in the Gowen family cemetery.

Samuel Marvin Gowen, son of Henry Clay Gowen and Martha Jane Patton Gowen, was born February 24, 1881 in Adair County. He was married about 1902 to Amanda Harrison “Annie” Carter, daughter of William Calvin Carter and James Cornelia “Ma Jim” Buchanan Carter, according to Carol J. Coady. William Calvin Carter was born in 1854 in Adair County, Kentucky. He was married February 22, 1877 in Greensburg, Kentucky to James Cornelia Forbis who was born in August 1859 in Taylor County, Kentucky. She died December 23, 1941 in Springfield, Illinois.

Amanda Harrison “Annie” Carter was born November 16, 1888 in Kentucky. “Amanda H. Carter, age 11, born in November 1888” was enumerated in the 1900 census in the household of her widowed mother.

In 1904 Samuel Marvin Gowen and Amanda Harrison “Annie” Carter Gowen lived in Jefferson County. A grandson, Orville Cellen Gowen, wrote, “He was such a dark-skinned man with black hair and brown eyes. He exhibited Melungeon features.”

Amanda Harrison “Annie” Carter Gowen died August 6, 1951 in Jefferson County. Samuel Marvin Gowen died September 14, 1954 in Green County.

Children born to them include:

James Robert Gowen born January 7, 1904
Alice Pauline Gowen born about 1905
Eunice Gowen born about 1906
Jesse Carl Gowen born June 13, 1907
William Ralph Gowen born in 1910
Mary Magdalene “Sug” Gowen born about 1915
Cornelia Ann Gowen born about 1919
Samuel L. Gowen born about 1923

James Robert Gowen, son of Samuel Marvin Gowen and Amanda Harrison “Annie” Carter Gowen, was born January 7, 1904 in Jefferson County. He was married about 1925 to Martha Florence Carter. She was born November 12, 1903 to Oralander James Carter and Valera Ethel Atwell Carter.

In 1928 James Robert Gowen was a motorman for Louisville Railway Company and lived at 2013 Stuckey, according to the Louisville city directory. In 1970 the directory showed him as retired. He died January 6, 1971. At his death, he was living at 4115 Tuscarora Way, Louisville. He was buried in Green County.

His obituary was published in the January 8, 1971 edition of the “Central Kentucky News-Journal:”

Mr. James Robert “Bailey” Gowen, 66, son of the late Marvin and Amanda Carter Gowen, was born January 7, 1904 in Green County and died at 5:20 pm Wednes-day, January 6, 1971 at the Hazelwood Hospital in Louisville. He had made a profession of faith in Christ early in life and re-dedication last year. He had resided in Louisville for a number of years and was a retired barber. He united in marriage to Miss Florence Carter, who survives. To this union were born 2 sons and 2 daughters: Raymond Doyle Gowen, James Corley Gowen, Mrs. Janelle Hamilton all of Louisville; Mrs. Ruth Ann Campbell, Columbia. Also survived by 1 sister: Mrs. Pauline Jones, Louisville; 2 brothers: Josh Gowen, Buffalo and Carl Gowen, Cecelia; and 6 grandchildren. Funeral services were conducted at 1 pm Friday, January 8, 1971 at the Cowherd and Parrott Funeral Home. Rev. J. H. Bloyd officiated with burial in the Neagle Cemetery. Pallbearers were: Joe Gowen, Melvin Berry, Ronnie Gowen, Shirley Carter and Bob-by Gowen.”

Martha Florence Carter Gowen continued to live at 4115 Tuscarora Way in 1972 when she was interviewed by Arlee Claud Gowen. She died there December 15, 1977.

Children born to James Robert Gowen and Martha Florence Carter Gowen include:

Ormsby Eldridge Gowen born April 12, 1926
Raymond Doyle Gowen born October 15, 1929
James Corley Gowen born July 5, 1932
Loris Janell Gowen born September 19, 1935
Ruth Ann Gowen born February 25, 1939
Cornelia Gowen born about 1941
Samuel Gowen born about 1944

Ormsby Eldridge Gowen, son of James Robert Gowen and Martha Florence Carter Gowen, was born April 12, 1926 in Louisville. He lived only four days.

Raymond Doyle Gowen, son of James Robert Gowen and Martha Florence Carter Gowen, was born October 15, 1929 in Louisville. In 1987 and in 1992 he lived in Hudson, Kentucky. He was disabled at that time and lived alone.

He died March 10, 2001, according to his obituary in the “Greensburg Record-Herald.”

“Raymond Doyle Gowen, son of the late James Robert and Martha Florence Carter Gowen, was born October 15, 1929 in Green County and departed this life Satur-day, March 10, 2001 in the Hospice Care Unit in Lou-isville. He was 71 years, 4 months and 23 days of age. He had made a profession of faith in Christ. He is sur-vived by a daughter and son-in-law; Kim and Henry Brent Terry of Columbia; a son and daughter-in-law; Raymond and Gale Gowen of Louisville; a step-daughter and step-son-in-law; Donna Suzanne and Melton L. Trent of Brandenburg; four grandchildren: Brittany, Joshua and Sarah Terry, all of Columbia, and Christina Gowen of Louisville. He is also survived by two sisters: Ruth Ann Gowen Campbell of Columbia and Loris Janel Gowen Pruitt of Greensburg; one sis-ter-in-law; Martha Gowen of Louisville, and a host of other relatives and friends. He was preceded in death by one brother: James Corley Gowen. The funeral services for Raymond Doyle Gowen were conducted Tuesday March 13 at the Cowherd & Parrott Funeral Home with burial in the Neagle Cemetery. Lyndell Petty officiated. Pallbearers were Michael Campbell, Douglas Campbell, Joseph Gowen, Steven Pruitt, Greg Gowen and Freddie Gowen.”

Children born to Raymond Doyle Gowen include:

Raymond E. Gowen born about 1952
Kimberly Kay Gowen born about 1955

Raymond E. Gowen, son of Raymond Doyle Gowen and Martha Florence Carter Gowen, was born about 1952. He was married about 1975, wife’s name Gale. In 2001 Raymond E. Gowen and Gale Gowen lived in Louisville.

Children born to them include:

Christina Gowen born about 1980

Kimberly Kay Gowen, daughter of Raymond Dale Gowen and Martha Florence Carter Gowen, was born about 1955. She was married about 1975 to Henry Brent Terry. In 2001 they lived in Columbia, Kentucky.

James Corley Gowen, son of James Robert Gowen and Martha Florence Carter Gowen, was born July 5, 1932. He died of cancer March 19, 1990.

Loris Janell Gowen, daughter of James Robert Gowen and Martha Florence Carter Gowen, was born September 19, 1935 in Green County. She was married about 1955, husband’s name Pruitt. In 2001 she lived in Greensburg, Kentucky.

Ruth Ann Gowen, daughter of James Robert Gowen and Martha Florence Carter Gowen, was born February 25, 1939. in Green County. She was married about 1960, husband’s Campbell. In 1971 and in 2001 she lived in Columbia, Kentucky.

Cornelia Gowen, daughter of James Robert Gowen and Martha Florence Carter Gowen, was born about 1941. She died before 1971.

Samuel Gowen, son of James Robert Gowen and Martha Flo­rence Carter Gowen, was born about 1944. He died before 1971.

Alice Pauline Gowen, daughter of Samuel Marvin Gowen and Amanda Harrison “Annie” Carter Gowen, was born about 1905. She became a nurse. She was married to Ross Jones about 1926, according to Martha Florence Carter Gowen.

Children born to them include:

Samuel Worth Jones born about 1928

Eunice Gowen, daughter of Samuel Marvin Gowen and Amanda Harrison “Annie” Carter Gowen, was born about 1906. She was deceased prior to February 1972, according to Martha Florence Gowen.

Jesse Carl Gowen, son of Samuel Marvin Gowen and Amanda Harrison “Annie” Carter Gowen, was born June 13, 1907. He was married in 1927 to Audrey Lee Wilkerson. She was born May 9, 1906 to James Henry Wilkerson and Mary Elizabeth Beard Wilkerson, according to Mary Caven Gowen. They were living in Louisville in 1948.

Jesse Carl Gowen died October 2, 1978 and was buried in Bethlehem Cemetery. Audrey Lee Wilkerson Gowen died May 22, 1981 and was buried beside her husband.

Her obituary appeared in “Obituaries of Green County, Kentucky” compiled by Eunice Montgomery Wright:

“Mrs. Audrey Wilkerson Gowen, 75, of Cecilia, Ken-tucky, died Friday [22 May 1981] at St. Anthony’s Hospital in Louisville. She was a native of Green County and the widow of Jessie Carl Gowen. She is survived by one son, Joseph F. Gowen of Buffalo, Kentucky, two daughters, Mrs. Margie Gowen Noe of Brookport, Illinois, and Miss Deloris Gowen of Ceci-lia, one brother, Ulys Wilkerson of Indiana, one sister, Mrs. Mary Frances Wallace of Greensburg, Kentucky, six grandchildren and seven great grandchildren. The funeral was at the Brown Funeral Home in Elizabeth-town. Burial was in Bethlehem Baptist Church Cem-etery.”

Children born to Jesse Carl Gowen and Audrey Lee Wilkerson Gowen include:

Joseph Fredman Gowen born in 1928
Margie Marie Gowen born in 1929
Lenwood Buckner Gowen born in 1933
Mary Deloris Gowen born in 1935

Joseph Fredman Gowen, son of Jesse Carl Gowen and Audrey Lee Wilkerson Gowen, was born in 1928. In 1981 he was living in Buffalo, Kentucky.

Margie Marie Gowen, daughter of Jesse Carl Gowen and Audrey Lee Wilkerson Gowen, was born in 1929. She was married about 1947, husband’s name Noe. In 1981 Margie Marie Gowen Noe lived in Brookport, Illinois.

Lenwood Buckner Gowen, son of Jesse Carl Gowen and Audrey Lee Wilkerson Gowen, was born in 1933. He was not shown as a survivor in his mother’s obituary in 1981.

Mary Deloris Gowen, daughter of Jesse Carl Gowen and Audrey Lee Wilkerson Gowen, was born in 1935. She was a resident of Cecilia, Kentucky in 1981.

William Ralph “Josh” Gowen, son of Samuel Marvin Gowen and Amanda Harrison “Annie” Carter Gowen, was born in 1910 in Green County, according to a son, William Ralph Gowen, Jr. He was married January 4, 1928 to Elsie Mae Jeffries, daughter of Isaac Newton Jeffries and Hattie Judd Jeffries of Illinois. Isaac Newton Jeffries was born November 17, 1888 in Green County and died in March 1974. William Ralph Gowen, Jr. and Bobby Gene Gowen, his grandsons, were pallbearers at his funeral.

They farmed in Green County until 1945 when he moved to Larue County, Kentucky and began working at Ft. Knox as an electrician. He purchased a farm and continued farming as a sideline. In 1948 he was living at Hodgenville, Kentucky. He became known as an expert in making sorghum molasses. “W. R. Gowen” was a resident of Buffalo, Kentucky in 1972, according to the telephone directory.

Children born to William Ralph “Josh” Gowen and Elsie Mae Jeffries Gowen include:

Orville Cellan Gowen born December 7, 1928
Bobby Gene Gowen born December 27, 1932
Geraldine Virginia Gowen born January 16, 1934
Mae Prentice Gowen born April 8, 1941
Gloria Faye Gowen born March 14, 1943
Mary Ann Gowen born August 16, 1947
Ronnie Dale Gowen born August 16, 1949
William Ralph Gowen, Jr. born January 16, 1952

Orville Cellan Gowen, son of William Ralph Gowen “Josh” Gowen and Elsie Mae Jeffries Gowen, was born December 7, 1928 in Green County. He was married to Nora Lee Brown July 2, 1948. He became a plumber, and in 1993, they lived in Buffalo and received their mail at Hodgenville, Kentucky. He was a pallbearer at the funeral of his grandmother, Hattie Judd Jeffries.

Children born to Orville Cellan Gowen and Nora Lee Brown Gowen include:

Connie Jo Gowen born February 27, 1950
Eddie Joe Gowen born December 19, 1952
Kathie Ann Gowen born January 7, 1954
Orville Cellan Gowen, Jr. born April 25, 1956
Belinda Sue Gowen born July 26, 1959
Sandra Kaye “Sandy” Gowen born October 6, 1962

Bobby Gene Gowen, son of William Ralph Gowen “Josh” Gowen and Elsie Mae Jeffries Gowen, was born December 27, 1932 in Green County. He was married about 1955 to Avis Morgan. Later he was remarried to Estelle Underwood. In 1991 he was employed by General Electric Company and lived in Bardstown, Kentucky.

Children born to Bobby Gene Gowen and Avis Morgan Gowen include:

Ralph Wade Gowen born about 1957
Evonna Gail Gowen born about 1960

Children born to Bobby Gene Gowen and Estelle Under­wood Gowen include:

Gregory Gene Gowen born about 1964
Gary Wayne Gowen born about 1967

Geraldine Virginia Gowen, daughter of William Ralph Gowen “Josh” Gowen and Elsie Mae Jeffries Gowen, was born January 16, 1934 in Green County. She was married January 22, 1949 to Clifford Eugene Aubrey of the U.S. Navy and lived in San Diego. In 1990, they lived in Larue County.

Children born to them include:

Deborah Joyce Aubrey born about 1951
Patricia Diane Aubrey born about 1953
Eugene Gail Aubrey born about 1955
Clifford Eugene Aubrey, Jr. born about 1958
Terry Wade Aubrey born about 1962

Mae Prentice Gowen, daughter of William Ralph Gowen “Josh” Gowen and Elsie Mae Jeffries Gowen, was born in Green County April 8, 1941. She was married about 1970 to Gerald Franklin Puckett. She was remarried to Kenneth Long of Evansville, Indiana. In 1991, they lived in Lake City, Florida.

Children born to Gerald Franklin Puckett and Mae Prentice Gowen Puckett include:

Gerald Dewayne Puckett born about 1973
Jeffery Todd Puckett born about 1976

Gloria Faye Gowen, daughter of William Ralph Gowen “Josh” Gowen and Elsie Mae Jeffries Gowen, was born March 14, 1943 in Green County. She was married about 1954 to Bobby Donald Amos of Hart County, Kentucky. Later she was mar­ried to Gary Bradley of Pine Mountain, Georgia. A third mar­riage was to Dewey Stillwell in Larue County where they lived in 1991. “Dewey Stillwell is the hardest working man I ever knew,” reported his brother-in-law, William Ralph “Bugg” Gowen, Jr.

Children born to Bobby Donald Amos and Gloria Faye Gowen Amos include:

Cheryl Lynn Amos born about 1956
Kimberly Dawn Amos born about 1958

Children born to Gary Bradley and Gloria Fay Gowen Amos Bradley include:

Melissa Rene Bradley born about 1963
Faith Ann Bradley born about 1966

Mary Ann Gowen, daughter of William Ralph Gowen “Josh” Gowen and Elsie Mae Jeffries Gowen, was born Au­gust 16, 1947 in Green County. She was married to Wayne Thomas Meredith September 26, 1961 in Larue County. They removed to Lake City, Florida where he owned a landscaping company in 1991.

Ronnie Dale Gowen, son of William Ralph Gowen “Josh” Gowen and Elsie Mae Jeffries Gowen, was born August 16, 1949 in Green County. He was married November 13, 1962 to Margaret Lee Taylor. In 1991 they lived in New Haven, Kentucky where he was superintendent of Ni-Gas Company. He was a pallbearer at the funeral of his grandmother, Hattie Judd Jeffries.

Children born to Ronnie Dale Gowen and Margaret Lee Taylor Gowen include:

Angela Gail Caffee Gowen born about 1965

William Ralph “Bugg” Gowen, Jr, son of William Ralph Gowen “Josh” Gowen and Elsie Mae Jeffries Gowen, was born January 16, 1952 in Larue County. He was married July 18, 1975 to Julie Kathleen Chelf. They were divorced on their sixth anniversary in 1981. In May 1990 William Ralph “Bugg” Gowen, Jr. was in prison in LaGrange, Kentucky where he developed an interest in genealogy. On May 26, 1990 he wrote:

“I’m doing my research from prison, but my family has been very helpful. Here I’m known as ‘Bugg.’

‘Bugg’ was born in 1952 in Larue County, Kentucky–the baby of the family and also the blacksheep. ‘Bugg’ was capable of doing anything he set his mind to. He wasn’t afraid of work–he could lay down beside it and watch it all day. To ‘Bugg’ there was always an easier way of doing things. I suppose being the age of eight and having to go to the fields with his father and plow all day might have had something to do with his nature.

‘Bugg’ was married in 1975 to Julie, and to them two children were born. After six years of marriage, they were divorced. Julie managed to have her own business, and ‘Bugg,’ well he still thought money grew on trees. In 1984 ‘Bugg’ was arrested for growing marijuana. He was sent to prison for three months. After his release, since marijuana was Kentucky’s No. 1 cash crop, he went back to his old habit of growing reefer.

He was busted in 1986 for the same crime of cultiva­tion and did two years at the Kentucky State Refor­matory in LaGrange. After he was paroled, he skipped out on the state and moved to Florida. There he was stopped on a traffic violation and found to be on the run. You guessed it, still doing time at LaGrange.

He makes parole again in 1992, and this time, believe me, without a ‘green thumb!’ You don’t have to print my story, but you can if you want to.” W. R. ‘Bugg’ Gowen, No. 91548, P.O. Box 6, LaGrange, KY, 91548.

Mary Magdalene “Sug” Gowen, daughter of Samuel Marvin Gowen and Amanda Harrison “Annie” Carter Gowen was born about 1915. She was killed in an automobile accident, March 17, 1948, according to Martha Florence Gowen.

Her obituary appeared in “Obituaries of Green County, Kentucky,” Vol. 6, compiled by Eunice Montgomery Wright:

“Mrs. Mary M. Beard, 33, Texhoma Camp No. 22, died Wednesday March 17, 1948 in the North Plains Hospital as the result of injuries sustained in an auto-mobile accident the previous Sunday. Cause of death was given as internal injuries, crushed ribs, and a brok-en pelvic bond. Mrs. Beard was riding in a car driven by her husband, Ed P. Beard, when there was a head-on collision with the automobile driven by Harley Ayler, Gulf Camp, who has been charged with driving while intoxicated.

Two sons, Eddie Joe, 12 and Leonard Leon, 5, received cuts on the head, and Beard was bruised across the chest. A third son, George Dale, 10, was not injured. Besides her husband and sons, Mrs. Beard is survived by her parents, Mr. and Mrs. S. M. Gowen Greensburg, a sister, Mrs. Pauline Jones, Shively and 3 brothers, Jr. and Carl Gowen, both of Louisville and William Ralph Gowen, Hodgenville. Mrs. Jones and Carl Gowen at-tended the funeral services which were held March 20 in the chapel of the Minton funeral home.

Interment was in Highland Park Cemetery. Pallbearers were J.G. Bohart, G.W. Biggs, L.W. Metcalf, H.E. Jacobson, E.L. Sylor and W.D. Swann.”

Children born to Ed P. Beard and Mary Magdalene “Sug” Gowen Beard include:

Eddie Joe Beard born about 1936
George Dale Beard born about 1938
Leonard Leon born about 1943

Cornelia Ann Gowen, daughter of Samuel Marvin Gowen and Amanda Harrison “Annie” Carter Gowen, was born about 1919. She died in infancy.

Samuel L. Gowen, son of Samuel Marvin Gowen and Amanda Harrison “Annie” Carter Gowen, was born about 1923. He died in infancy.

Jesse Lee Gowen, son of Henry Clay Gowen and Martha Jane Patton Gowen, was born December 11, 1882 in Adair County. He was married November 25, 1905 to Mattie Frances Stearman who was born January 31, 1888 in Green County.

Her brother, Foster Ray Stearman died July 27, 1976 and his obituary appeared in the “Greensburg Record-Herald:”

“Foster Ray Stearman, son of the late Asa Chaney Thomas Stearman and Laura Ann Stearman, was born 1 Jun 1895 in Taylor County, Kentucky and departed this life Jul 27, 1976. He was 81 years, 1 month, and 26 days of age. He had made a profession of faith in Christ and was a member of the Summersville Baptist Church at the time of his death. He was united in marriage to Elsie Myrtle Marcum in 1917, and she preceded him in death in 1945. To this union were born 8 sons and 1 daughter. Surviving are Leonard Stearman, James Stearman, and Russell Stearman, all of Greensburg, Kentucky; William Stearman, Danville, Kentucky; Eudell Stearman and David Stearman, both of Hodgenville, Kentucky; Lee Stearman, Munford-ville, Kentucky; Mrs. Rachel Conrad, Irvine, Kentucky. One son, Theodore Ray Stearman, preceded his father in death. Mr. Stearman was united in marriage on August 20, 1947 to Katherine Ash Dobson, who sur-vives. Also surviving are two sisters: Mrs. Mattie Gowen, Yuma, Colorado and Mrs. Ida Henderson, Campbellsville, Kentucky. Seventeen grandchildren and 6 great-grandchildren survive along with a host of other relatives and friends. The remains were at the Cowherd and Parrott Funeral Home until time of funeral services at 2:00 pm at the Summersville Baptist church with burial in the Pleasant Valley Cemetery. Rev. D.L. Druien officiated with Rev. Jerry Parker assisting.”

Mattie Frances Stearman Gowen, an 87-year-old widow, residing in Yuma, Colorado when contacted in February 1973 advised that she and her husband “came west in 1913. They settled near Yuma where Jesse Lee Gowen was a farmer until his death August 19, 1937. Mattie Frances Stearman Gowen died January 23, 1991.

Children born to Jesse Lee Gowen and Mattie Frances Stearman Gowen include:

Henry Thomas Gowen born October 4, 1906
Iva Lee Gowen born August 3, 1910
Mary Magelene Gowen born January 19, 1914
Laura Ruth Gowen born December 27, 1918
Carl Vernon Gowen born August 26, 1922
James Wilburn Gowen born July 17, 1924

Henry Thomas Gowen, son of Jesse Lee Gowen and Mattie Frances Stearman Gowen, was born October 4, 1906 in Green County. At the age of seven he was brought to Yuma by his parents. He was married October 16, 1929 to Bertha Moran who was born in 1908. They were divorced in October 1951. Bertha Moran Gowen lived in Denver in 1971. Henry Thomas Gowen was remarried about 1954, wife’s name Dorothy Mae. Dorothy Mae Gowen died June 26, 1968. He was married for the third time March 22, 1969 to Gladys Luther. Gladys Luther Gowen was born November 12, 1905.

In his early years Henry Thomas Gowen was a farmer. In 1965 was custodian of the Continental Oil Company building in Denver and lived at 75 East Diff Avenue, according to the city directory. He was married March 22, 1969 to Gladys Luther. In 1973 he was retired and residing at 3635 Newland in Denver. They continued there in 1976. He lived in Wheatland, Colorado in 1994.

Gladys Luther Gowen died April 17, 1994 at her home in Wheat Ridge, Colorado. Her obituary appeared in the April 25 edition of the “Rocky Mountain News:”

“Gladys L. Gowen, 88, of Wheat Ridge died April 17 at home. No services were held. The body was cre-mated. Mrs. Gowen was born Nov. 12, 1905, in Cleve-land. She was married to Henry Gowen March 22, 1969, in Denver. She was a retired accountant and bookkeeper and she had taught at Parks School of Business.

She is survived by her husband; a daughter, Ruth Ann Gowen Ayala of Long Island, NewYork; two stepsons, Donald Gowen of Loveland and Gerald Gowen of Gar-den Grove, California and a stepdaughter, Laura Gow-en Dellinger of Westminster.”

Children born to Henry Thomas Gowen and Bertha Moran Gowen include:

Donald Arthur Gowen born August 13, 1930
Laura Naoma Gowen born December 11, 1931
Gerald Lee Gowen born April 22, 1936

A daughter was adopted by Henry Thomas Gowen and Dorothy Mae Gowen:

Ruth Ann Gowen born April 2, 1961

Donald Arthur Gowen, son of Henry Thomas Gowen and Bertha Moran Gowen, was born August 13, 1930 at Yuma. He was married September 18, 1949 to Rose Marie Blackford who was born October 8, 1931 in Loveland, Colorado. Donald Arthur Gowen, a cable splicer for the telephone company and his wife lived 2000 Floral Drive in Boulder, Colorado, according to the 1964 city directory. In January 1976 he was employed by Mountain Bell Telephone Company and continued in Boulder at the same address. In 1992 and 1994 they lived in Loveland.

Children born to Donald Arthur Gowen and Rose Marie Blackford Gowen include:

Donna Rose Gowen born May 21, 1951
David Wayne Gowen born October 12, 1953

Donna Rose Gowen, daughter of Donald Arthur Gowen and Rose Marie Blackford Gowen, was born May 21, 1951 at Ft. Collins, Colorado. She was married March 6, 1971 to Gary Wayne Roerig who was born February 7, 1950. In 1973 she continued to live in Denver while he was serving an enlist­ment in the U.S. Navy. They were divorced in 1980, and she was remarried April 9, 1982 to Kenneth Gene Kent. They were divorced in 1988.

Three sons were born to them:

Bryan Scott Roerig born February 22, 1975
Andrew David Roerig born October 28, 1979
Thomas Warner Kent born November 22, 1982

David Wayne Gowen, son of Donald Arthur Gowen and Rose Marie Blackford Gowen, was born October 12, 1953 in Boul­der. On April 30, 1972 he was killed in an automobile acci­dent at age 18.

Laura Naoma Gowen, daughter of Henry Thomas Gowen and Bertha Moran Gowen, was born December 11, 1931 at Yuma. She was married April 21, 1956 to Alvin Dellinger who was born May 18, 1924. In March 1973 he was employed by Gates Rubber Company in Denver. In 1994 they lived in Westminster, Colorado.

Children born to them include:

Daniel Brent Dellinger born December 22, 1956
Greg Alan Dellinger born July 25, 1958
Mary Ardith Dellinger born August 28, 1960
Loren Glen Dellinger born April 3, 1964

Gerald Lee Gowen, son of Henry Thomas Gowen and Bertha Moran Gowen, was born April 22, 1936 at Yuma. He served in the U.S. Army. He was married February 18, 1961 to Margie Rodel. “Gerald L. Gowen, a stock clerk for Wonstop Automotive, and his wife “Margaret Gowen” lived at 1495 S. Utica, according to the 1965 city directory of Denver. They were divorced in 1972. In 1973 he was an automobile salesman in Albuquerque, New Mexico, and in 1976 was back in Denver. She and the children were living in Springer, New Mexico in 1976. In 1994 he lived in Garden Grove, Cali-fornia.

Children born to Gerald Lee Gowen and Margie Rodel Gowen include:

Leann Gowen born November 4, 1962
Mark Allen Gowen born July 21, 1966

Ruth Ann Gowen, adopted daughter of Henry Thomas Gowen and Dorothy Mae Gowen, was born April 2, 1961. In 1976 she continued to live in the home of her parents.

Iva Lee Gowen, daughter of Jesse Lee Gowen and Mattie Frances Stearman Gowen, was born August 3, 1910, probably in Green County. On April 21, 1931 she was married to George E. Sewell, a farmer. In April 1973 the couple was liv­ing at Yuma in retirement. She continued there in February 2003.

Children born to them include:

Margaret June Sewell born April 7, 1934
Howard Dean Sewell born March 1, 1938
Harold Wilbur Sewell born January 24, 1945

Margaret June Sewell, daughter of George E. Sewell and Iva Lee Gowen Sewell, was born April 7, 1934 in Colorado. She was graduated from Colorado State University, majoring in home economics. She was married December 28, 1957 to Tom Spellman who was born February 19, 1936. She taught school for several years. In March 1973 they lived in Canon City, Colorado where he was the manager of a Safeway su­permarket. In 1976 they lived in Longmont, Colorado when he was the manager of an Albertson’s supermarket. In February 2003, Iva Lee Gowen Sewell was residing in a nursing home in Yuma, Colorado at the age of 92.

Children born to them include:

Richard Alan Spellman born March 17, 1959
Douglas Lee Spellman born May 8, 1963

Howard Dean Sewell, son of George E. Sewell and Iva Lee Gowen Sewell, was born March 1, 1938 in Colorado. He was married December 1, 1958 to Donna Ellsworth. Following a divorce he was remarried October 9, 1966 to Betty Friehauf who was born June 17, 1946. After four years of service in the U.S. Air Force he took over the operation of his father’s farm and dairy near Yuma in 1973.

One son was adopted by Howard Dean Sewell and Donna Ellsworth Sewell:

Dean Ellsworth Sewell born February 7, 1962

Two sons were born to Howard Dean Sewell and Betty Friehauf Sewell:

Brian Sewell born April 29, 1967
Kevin Eugene Sewell born July 11, 1970

Harold Wilbur Sewell, son of George E. Sewell and Iva Lee Gowen Sewell, was born January 24, 1945 at Yuma. On February 28, 1965 he was married to Dianna Carlholm who was born November 9, 1945. In March 1973 they lived in Dansville, Michigan where he had served six years in the National Guard from 1963 through 1969. In 2003 he had served 35 years with General Motors Corporation and was nearing retirement. In 2003 they lived on an 83-acre farm where they raised English Walnut seedlings.

They were the parents of:

Toby Dean Sewell born September 13, 1965
Wendy Ann Sewell born February 16, 1967

Mary Magelene Gowen, daughter of Jesse Lee Gowen and Mattie Frances Stearman Gowen, was born January 19, 1914 at Yuma. She was married July 31, 1938 to Richard Henry Wilshusen who was born June 9, 1905. He was graduated from Colorado State University as an electrical engineer. He was employed by the City of Yuma for 40 years and in 1973 continued to live there in retirement. She continued there in February 2003.

One child was born to them:

Ralph Eugene Wilshusen born March 21, 1941

Ralph Eugene Wilshusen, son of Richard Henry Wilshusen and Mary Magelene Gowen Wilshusen, was born March 21, 1941 in Yuma. He was graduated from Colorado State Uni­versity with a degree in physical education. After graduation he served three years in the Long Island, New York Naval Hospital as a physical therapist. On September 24, 1966 he was married to Lucy Mary Beth who was born January 22, 1940. In 1973 he was associated with Moline Public Hospital, Moline, Illinois as a physical therapist and lived in Silvis, Illi­nois.

Children born to them include:

Jo Ann Marie Wilshusen born November 17, 1964
Michael Arthur Wilshusen born November 23 1970

Laura Ruth Gowen, daughter of Jesse Lee Gowen and Mattie Frances Stearman Gowen, was born December 27, 1918 at Yuma. She was married June 4, 1937 to Clarence Mekelburg who was born December 27, 1917. In 1973 they lived on a farm near Yuma where he and his sons worked together as carpenters. She continued there in 2003.

Children born to them include:

Le Roy August Mekelburg born August 23, 1940
Leonard L. Mekelburg born January 17, 1942
Lyle M. Mekelburg born March 1, 1948
Lola Irene Mekelburg born June 12, 1951

Le Roy August Mekelburg, son of Clarence Mekelburg and Laura Ruth Gowen Mekelburg, was born August 23, 1940 at Yuma. He served five years in the U. S. Air Force and was married February 18, 1962 to Shirley Turner who was born July 1, 1945.

Children born to them include:

Le Roy August Mekelburg, Jr. born February 27, 1963
Lorinda Mekelburg born May 2, 1964
Laura Ann Mekelburg born August 9, 1965
Larry Dean Mekelburg born August 23, 1968
Lyn Eugene Mekelburg born November 24, 1970

Leonard L. Mekelburg, son of Clarence Mekelburg and Laura Ruth Gow­en Mekelburg, was born January 17, 1942. He was married November 4, 1966 to Melinda Taylor who was born in January 1946. He served four years in the U.S. Navy.

Children born to Leonard L. Mekelburg and Melinda Taylor Mekelburg include:

Stephanie Taylor Mekelburg born June 28, 1964
Annabel Mekelburg born September 16, 1968

Lyle L. Mekelburg, son of Clarence Mekelburg and Laura Ruth Gowen Mekelburg, was born March 1, 1948 at Yuma. In 1973 he was serving in the U.S. Navy.

Lola Irene Mekelburg, daughter of Clarence Mekelburg and Laura Ruth Gowen Mekelburg, was born June 12, 1951 at Yuma. She was married July 31, 1970 to Gary Anderson who was born June 28, 1948. In 1973 they lived in Denver where he was employed in a supermarket.

Children born to them include:

Lon Patrick Anderson born June 12, 1971
Christina Ann Anderson born November 15, 1972

Carl Vernon Gowen, son of Jesse Lee Gowen and Mattie Frances Stear­man Gowen, was born August 26, 1922 in Yuma. He served three years in the U.S. Army during World War II. About 1942 he was married to June Nitzen. Fol­lowing a di­vorce he was remar­ried to Jeanette Judy . Fol­lowing a second divorce he was re­married to Etha B. Hood who was born June 5, 1922.

In 1965 Carl Vernon Gowen was employed by Silver Engi­neering Works and lived 1277 Logan, according to the Denver city directory. Etha B. Hood Gowen was the manager of the Logan House at that time. In 1973 Carl Vernon Gowen, a re­tired carpenter and Etha B. Hood Gowen lived in Denver.

Children born to Carl Vernon Gowen and June Nitzen Gowen include:

Barbara Gowen born about 1943
Sylvia Gowen born about 1945

Children born to Carl Vernon Gowen and Jeanette Judy Gowen include:

Sandra Gowen born about 1956

James Wilburn Gowen, son of Jesse Lee Gowen and Mattie Frances Stearman Gowen, was born July 19, 1924 at Yuma. He received a medical discharge during World War II. Later he worked as a barber. He was married about 1944 to Hattie Oberchain. Later they were divorced. He died January 6, 1967.

Children born to James Wilburn Gowen and Hattie Oberchain Gowen include:

Rodney Lee Gowen born June 20, 1945
Cathy Lou Gowen born February 16, 1947

Rodney Lee Gowen, son of James Wilburn Gowen and Hattie Oberchain Gowen, was born June 20, 1945. He was married about 1966, wife’s name Mary. Later they were divorced.

Children born to Rodney Lee Gowen and Mary Gowen in­clude:

Laura Ann Gowen born about 1967

Cathy Lou Gowen, daughter of James Wilburn Gowen and Hattie Ober­chain Gowen, was born February 16, 1947. She was married about 1967, and twins, Tad and Tess, were born to her September 7, 1968. A daughter, Jewel, was born to her Au­gust 12, 1969. Later the family moved to South Dakota.

Willoth Albert Ethelbert “Buzzy” Gowen, son of Henry Clay Gowen and Martha Jane Patton Gowen, was born August 25, 1884 in Adair County. He was married September 9, 1918 in Jeffersonville, Indiana to Mattie Lena “Mamie” Bale. She was born May 11, 1895 in Green County.

Martha Cecilia Gowen Herbert, a granddaughter wrote Jan­uary 15, 1987:

“I have several love letters, poems and songs he wrote for my grandmother whom we called ‘Mamie.’ He was very good with words and quite the romantic when he was courting Mamie. He taught her to read by reading to her from the bible. He helped run the sawmill in Donansburg with his father. They lived in his parents’ house until he could build a house. Both houses are still standing today. The old Henry C. Gowen place is used to store grain for cattle, but my grandparents’ home is now occupied by the Ernest C. Davis family. The Gowen cemetery is located on the same property.”

Much comment has been made about the year the mar­riage took place. But Mary [the oldest child] stated several times she was two years old when her parents were married. The date has been scratched off the marriage license.

She was a mid-wife. She delivered her own 10 chil­dren herself and raised all 10 to adulthood. She was a tiny woman of about 5 feet, 3 inches. She wasn’t very beautiful, only in his eyes. He was quite handsome. She never remarried after his death. She was only 39 when he died at age 50.”

He died March 1, 1934 and was buried with his parents at Donansburg. Mattie Lena “Mamie” Bale Gowen died January 22, 1961 in Williamsport, Indiana and was buried beside her husband.”

Children born to Willoth Albert Ethelbert Gowen and Mattie Lena Bale “Mamie” Gowen include:

Mary Ethelbert Gowen born April 16, 1916
Henry Chester Robert Gowen born April 25, 1919
Jessie Elmer Gowen born January 5, 1921
Martha Frances Gowen born February 4, 1922
Geneva Mae Gowen born June 3, 1923
Elsie Bell Gowen born July 13, 1924
Mandy Rachel Gowen born July 21, 1926
Mertie Dow Gowen born May 21, 1927
Samuel Lambert Gowen born April 28, 1928
Wylie Edman Gowen born February 21, 1930

Mary Ethelbert Gowen, daughter of Willoth Albert Ethelbert Gowen and Mattie Lena Bale “Mamie” Gowen, was born April 16, 1916 at Donansburg. She was married April 1, 1934 to John Washington Price. In February 1979 and in January 1987 she lived at Summersville, Kentucky.

Children born to them include:

Willow Dean Price born November 19, 1934
Geneva Harlow Price born March 28, 1938
Robert Antonia Price born March 10, 1941
Ernest Shrene Price born October 23, 1944
Pamela Artemas Price born November 24, 1948

Willow Dean Price, daughter of John Washington Price and Mary Ethelbert Gowen Price, was born November 19, 1934 at Donansburg. She was married November 26, 1953 in Sum­mersville to William Leslie Barrick who was born December 18, 1933 in Bar­ren County, Kentucky. In 1987 they lived at Glas­gow, Kentucky.

Children born to them include:

Karen Jean Barrick born October 24, 1954
Wanda Gail Barrick born August 17, 1956
Sandie Carol Barrick born May 2, 1965

Karen Jean Barrick, daughter of William Leslie Barrick and Willow Dean Price Barrick, was born October 24, 1954 at Glasgow. She was married there October 24, 1970 to Tommy Joe Howard.

Geneva Harlow Price, daughter of John Washington Price and Mary Ethelbert Gowen Price, was born March 28, 1938 in Green County. She was mar­ried December 30, 1953 to Ken­neth Harold Price who was born there March 6, 1931. She was remar­ried February 4, 1970 to Eddy Pierce. He died June 17, 1973 at Greensburg, and she was remarried January 26, 1979 to James Warf.

Children born to Kenneth Harold Price and Geneva Harlow Price Price include:

Rhonna Allyn Price born August 26, 1957
Cynthia Dianne Price born December 25, 1959
Kenneth Greg Price born May 8, 1965

Rhonna Allyn Price, daughter of John Washington Price and Geneva Harlow Price Price, was born August 26, 1957 at Glasgow. She was married March 29, 1976 to Tim Braden “somewhere in Texas,” according to Martha Cecilia Gowen Herbert.

Robert Antonia Price, son of John Washington Price and Mary Ethelbert Gowen Price, was born March 10, 1941 in Green County. He was married October 16, 1960 Mrs. Willow Kay Davis Price. Following a divorce he was remarried March 15, 1972 to Becky Anderson. In 1972 the lived in Sandpoint, Idaho, and in 1987 they lived in Congress, Arizona.

Children born to Robert Antonia Price and Willow Kay Davis Price include:

Michael Anthony Price born August 3, 1961
Mitchell Glenn Price born November 22, 1962
Tonia Ann Price born March 27, 1964
Melissa Reane Price born September 21, 1965

Children born to Robert Antonio Price and Becky Anderson Price include:

Robert Lesley Price born August 8, 1972

Ernest Shrene Price, son of John Washington Price and Mary Ethelbert Gowen Price, was born October 23, 1944 in Green County. He was married December 26, 1970 in Summersville to Phyllis Ann Lewis. They continued there in 1987.

Children born to them include:

Sundown Marrille Price born July 2, 1972
Spring Makeen Price born July 27, 1974
Shane Mitchell Price born June 21, 1977

Pamela Artemas Price, daughter of John Washington Price and Mary Ethelbert Gowen Price, was born November 24, 1948 at Summersville. She was married there June 11, 1966 to James McIntosh. She was accidentally elec­trocuted June 1, 1972.

Children born to them include:

Jennifer Lynn McIntosh born March 14, 1967
Jeffery Lane McIntosh born December 21, 1968
Jessie Lincoln McIntosh March 23, 1971

Henry Chester Robert Gowen, son of Willoth Albert Ethelbert “Buxxy” Gowen and Mattie Lena Bale “Mamie” Gowen, was born April 25, 1918 at Donansburg, according to Green County birth records. Martha Cecilia Gowen Herbert wrote, “Bob changed his name to ‘Gowin’ because of trouble he got into before going into the army. He sold bootleg liquor and got caught. He was put into Elizabethtown jail for a period of time.”

He died November 21, 1980 in Tacoma, Washington and was buried there.

One son was born to Henry Chester Robert Gowin:

Gary Gowin born about 1947

Jessie Elmer Gowen, daughter of Willoth Albert Ethelbert Gowen and Mattie Lena “Mamie” Bale Gowen, was born Jan­uary 5, 1921 at Donansburg. She was married about 1940 to James Thompson. When he was shot and killed, she was sus­pected, according to Martha Cecilia Gowen Herbert. Two sons were born to them. Subsequently she was married and divorced several times. Later she was married, husband’s name Wigand. In 1979 Jessie Elmer Gowen Thompson Wigand live in Pasadena, California. In 1986 she lived in Greensburg.

Martha Frances Gowen, daughter of Willoth Albert Ethelbert “Buzzy” Gowen and Mattie Lena “Mamie” Bale Gowen, was born February 4, 1922 at Donansburg. She was married about 1943 to James Hobart Morrison. She died of “tuberculosis of the brain” July 22, 1947 and was buried in the family cemetery.

A son was born to her before her marriage:

William Thomas Gowen born January 12, 1942

William Thomas Gowen, son of Martha Frances Gowen, was born January 12, 1942. In 1987 and in 1989, he lived in Danville, Illinois.

Geneva Mae Gowen, daughter of Willoth Albert Ethelbert Gowen and Mattie Lena “Mamie” Bale Gowen, was born June 3, 1923 at Donansburg. She was married May 29, 1948 to William Eugene Higgins. She died in Savannah, Georgia De­cember 17, 1986 and was buried in the Gowen family ceme-tery. Her obituary was published in “Obituaries of Green County, Kentucky,” Vol. 3, page 122, compiled by Eunice Montgomery Wright.

“Geneva Mae “Neby” Higgins, 63, daughter of the late Willie E. and Mattie Bales Gowen, was born June 3, 1923 in Green County and died at 3:38 a.m, Wednes-day December 17, 1986 at her home in Savannah, Georgia. She was of the Baptist faith. She united in marriage March 29, 1948 to William Higgins who sur-vives. She is survived by 3 sisters, Mary E. Gowen Price, Summersville, Mrs. Jessie Gowen Thompson, Greensburg, and Elsie Gowen Penn, Brandenburg; 1 brother, Wylie Gowen, Louisville; 2 nephews, Jack Wigand and William T. Gowen, Georgia; and a host of other relatives and friends. Funeral services were at 10:00 a.m, Saturday December 20 with burial in the Gowen Cemetery. The Rev. Gleason Bloyd officiated. Cowherd and Parrott Funeral Home was in charge of arrangements. Pallbearers were Gleason Thompson, Tim Carlile, Billy Barnett, William Gowen, Matthew Patter-son, Earnest Price and Robert Jordan.”

No children were born to them.

Elsie Bell Gowen, daughter of Willoth Albert Ethelbert Gowen and Mattie Lena “Mamie” Bale Gowen, was born July 13, 1924 at Donansburg. She was married May 7, 1940 to Melvin Lee Penn. Following his death she lived in Bran­denburg, Kentucky. Two sons were born to them. She continued there in 1979 and in 1986.

Mandy Rachel Gowen, daughter of Willoth Albert Ethelbert Gowen and Mattie Lena “Mamie” Bale Gowen, was born July 21, 1926 at Donansburg. She was married about 1946 to John Jones and later divorced. She was remarried, husband’s name Prater. She died February 17, 1979 in Chillicothe, Ohio of emphysema and lung cancer and was buried there. No children were born to them.

Her obituary was published in the “Greensburg Record-Herald:”

Mrs. Rachel Gowen Prater, daughter of the late W. E. “Buzzy” Gowen and Mattie Bale Gowen, was born July 21, 1926 in Green County and departed this life at 7 pm Saturday, February 17, 1979 at the Medical Hos-pital in Chillicothe, Ohio. She was 52 years, 6 months and 17 days of age. She was a member of the Chilli-cothe Baptist Church at the time of her death. She was educated in the Green County Schools.

She is survived by 1 foster daughter, Connie Joe Sager, and 3 foster grandchildren: 5 sisters and 3 brothers: Mary Price, Summersville; Jessie Thompson, Greens-burg; Elsie Penn, Brandenburg; Geneva Higgins, Sa-vannah, Georgia, Mertie Wiggand, Pasadena, Califor-nia; Robert Gowen, Tacoma, Washington ; Lambert Gowen, Louisville and Wylie Gowen, Pasadena. A sister, Martha Morrison, preceded her in death July 22, 1947. An Aunt, Mary McAlister, Greensburg, also sur-vives. Funeral services were conducted at 11 am Feb-ruary 21, 1979 at the Boyers Funeral Home in Waverly Ohio, with burial in the Waverly Cemetery.”

Mertie Dow Gowen, daughter of Willoth Albert Ethelbert Gowen and Mattie Lena “Mamie” Bale Gowen, was born in Donansburg May 31, 1927. She subsequently changed her middle name to “Ann.” She was married June 4, 1949 to John Fredrick Wizand. She died September 22, 1979 in Pasadena, California and was buried in the Gowen family cemetery at Donansburg. Two sons and a daughter were born to them.

Samuel Lambert Gowen, son of Willoth Albert Ethelbert Gowen and Mattie Lena “Mamie” Bale Gowen, was born in Donansburg April 28, 1928. He was married November 27, 1948 to Edna Norton who was born June 29, 1932. He died March 21, 1980 in Louisville of emphysema and was buried in the Gowen family cemetery. All of their children inherited blue eyes. Edna Norton Gowen continued in Louisville in August 1989.

Seven children were born to Samuel Lambert Gowen and Edna Norton Gowen:

Martha Cecilia Gowen born November 17, 1949
Mary Geneva Gowen born June 5, 1951
Carol Bruce Gowen born February 14, 1953
Rita Faye Gowen born March 3, 1954
Phyllis Ann Gowen born November 25, 1955
Patricia Marie Gowen born September 6, 1962
Samuel Lambert Gowen, Jr. born October 30, 1963

Martha Cecilia Gowen, daughter of Samuel Lambert Gowen and Edna Norton Gowen, was born November 17, 1949 in Louisville and was graduated from high school there. She was married June 29, 1970 to Billy Wayne Herbert. In December 1986 he completed 25 years employment with Anaconda Cop­per Company. In 1975 they moved to Meade County, Ken­tucky to be near his aged parents.

Martha Cecilia Gowen Herbert, an accomplished Gowen his­tory researcher, supplied the details of this account of her branch of the family in a letter written January 15, 1987.

Children born to them include:

Lorena Herbert born in 1971
Jerusha Herbert born in 1979

Mary Geneva Gowen, daughter of Samuel Lambert Gowen and Edna Norton Gowen, was born June 5, 1951 in Louisville. She was described as having blue eyes and a dark complexion. She was married about 1966, husband’s name Isaacs. She was remarried May 7, 1971 to James Edward Carrier. In February 1979 Mary Geneva Gowen Isaacs Carrier Higgins lived in Savannah, Georgia. In January 1987 they continued in Louisville.

Children born to Mary Geneva Gowen Isaacs and her first husband include:

Diana Lynn Isaacs born August 18, 1967
Richard Kevin Isaacs born June 8, 1970

Children born to James Edward Carrier and Mary Geneva Gowen Isaacs Carrier include:

Laura Kay Carrier born March 21, 1972
James Edward Carrier, Jr. born January 26, 1976
Samantha Lee Carrier born June 28, 1980

Carol Bruce Gowen, daughter of Samuel Lambert Gowen and Edna Norton Gowen, was born February 14, 1953 in Louisville. She was married about 1969 to Donald Lee Sat­terly. Following a divorce she was re­married about 1972, husband’s name Pike. After a second divorce she lived at Brandenburg, Kentucky in January 1987.

A son was born to Donald Lee Satterly and Carol Bruce Gowen Satterly:

Donald Lee Satterly, Jr. born Oct. 25, 1970

Another son was born to Carol Bruce Gowen Satterly Pike:

Leland Samuel Sherman Jerome Pike born Jan. 15, 1973

Rita Faye Gowen, daughter of Samuel Lambert Gowen and Edna Norton Gowen, was born in Summersville March 3, 1954. She was married June 6, 1969 to Gary Lynn Washburn. In January 1987 they lived in Louisville.

Children born to them include:

Dusty Lee Washburn born February 8, 1970

Phyllis Ann Gowen, daughter of Samuel Lambert Gowen and Edna Norton Gowen, was born in Louisville November 25, 1955. She displays a dark complexion fea­tures with blue eyes. She was married August 4, 1979 to Larry Allen Mayes. In January 1987 they lived in Cary, North Carolina.

Children born to them include:

Lauren Amber Mayes born November 21, 1986

Patricia Marie Gowen, daughter of Samuel Lambert Gowen and Edna Norton Gowen, was born in Louisville Septem­ber 6, 1962. In January 1987 she, a legal secretary, single, lived in Bountiful, Utah.

Samuel Lambert Gowen, Jr., son of Samuel Lambert Gowen and Edna Norton Gowen, was born October 30, 1963 in Louisville. He was married about 1984 to Theresa Rackley.

Children born to Samuel Lambert Gowen, Jr. and Theresa Rackley Gowen include:

Jeremiah Cole Gowen born April 7, 1986

Wylie Edman Gowen, son of Willoth Albert Ethelbert “Buzzy” Gowen and Mattie Lena “Mamie” Bale Gowen, was born February 21, 1930. “He didn’t like his name and changed it to ‘Wylie Edward Gowin,'” his niece Martha Cecilia Gowen Herbert wrote. He was married December 7, 1948 to Pauline Norton, sister of Edna Norton.

Following a divorce Pauline Norton Gowen was remarried to James Cain, and six children were born to them. In January 1987 they lived in Piketon, Ohio. In 1979 Wylie Edward Gowen lived in Pasadena, California. Wylie Edward Gowen died August 3, 1989 and was buried in Gowen Cemetery. Pauline Norton Gowen Cain died October 9, 1998 of a brain tumor and was buried in Waverly, Ohio. She had 13 children, 26 grandchildren and 10 great-grandchildren.

Children born to Wylie Edward Gowen and Pauline Norton Gowen include:

Connie Jo Gowen born October 5, 1950
Imogene Gowen born about 1952
Williard Earl Gowen born April 15, 1953
Jerry Wayne Gowen born October 8, 1954
Wylie Edward Gowen, Jr. born about 1955
Chester Gowen born about 1958

Connie Jo Gowen, daughter of Wylie Edward Gowen and Pauline Norton Gowen, was born October 5, 1950. She was reared by her aunt and uncle, Robert Prater and Rachel Gowen Prater in Piketon, Kentucky.

She was married May 22, 1971 to Phillip Leroy Sager, and they lived in Columbus, Ohio. In 1973 they lived at Waverly, Ohio. In 1974 they lived in Dayton, Ohio. She was remarried January 2, 1988 to Donald Eugene Powell of Crisfield, Maryland. In 1989 they lived at Ft. Meade, Maryland. In 1998, they lived at Weaver, Alabama.

Children born to them include:

Sandra Inez Sager born August 9, 1971
Sonya Jo Sager born June 4, 1973
Tammy Marlene Sager born December 13, 1974

Imogene Gowen, daughter of Wylie Edward Gowen and Pauline Norton Gowen, was born about 1952. She was mar­ried about 1975, husband’s name Blair. In 1989 she lived in Louisville, Ken­tucky.

Williard Earl Gowen, son of Wylie Edward Gowen and Pauline Norton Gowen, was born April 15, 1953. He was married in 1971 to Rebecca Ratliff. In 1998 they lived in Chillicothe, Ohio where he is a plumber.

Children born to Willard Earl Gowen and Rebecca Ratliff Gowen include:

Wendy Gowen born about 1974
Elizabeth Gowen born about 1976
Christine Gowen born about 1979

Jerry Wayne Gowen, son of Wylie Edward Gowen and Paluline Norton Gowen, was born October 8, 1954. He was killed in an autmobile accident October 13, 1967 and was buried in Attica, Indiana.

Wylie Edward Gowen, Jr. son of Wylie Edward Gowen and Pauline Norton Gowen, was born about 1955. In 1989 he lived in Waverly, Ohio.

Chester Gowen, son of Wylie Edward Gowen and Pauline Norton Gowen, was born about 1958. In 1989 he lived in Wa­verly, Ohio.

Myrtie Bell Gowen, daughter of Henry Clay Gowen and Martha Jane Patton Gowen, was born December 11, 1886 in Adair County. She was married about 1903 to James A. McAfee who was born October 8, 1880. He died November 30, 1923, and she died December 29, 1930. They were buried in the Gowen family cemetery.

Eunice Roe Cashious Gowen, son of Henry Clay Gowen and Martha Jane Patton Gowen, was born August 27, 1892. He was married about 1915 to Nancy Summersville. He was also married to Mary Evelyn Irvine. They had five children, according to Clifton Price, a grandson.

He wrote a narrative of the life and descendants of his grandfather for the Foundation Library in August 2003:

“Eunice Roe Cashious Gowen was the youngest son in the family with four brothers and two sisters and preferred to be called “R.C.” He grew up in the Donansburg community of Green County, Kentucky working on his father’s farm and at a sawmill owned by his father and one of his brothers [Willoth].

As a young man he traveled to Texas and later in life told the story to his children and of being in Galveston, Texas where he witnessed a cyclone that killed hundreds of people. He worked in helping to clean up the damage. More than likely he had traveled to Texas to visit his uncle, Thomas Jefferson Gowen, who was residing in Dallas and had drifted on down to Galveston. According to the time frame this could have been the great hurricane of 1915 which resulted in the deaths of 275 people.

His daughter, Doris Lorraine Gowen Beams, stated that he never mentioned Thomas Jefferson Gowen in his stories but he did talk about “Aunt Lucindy.” Not much mention was made by the family back in those days about Thomas Jeffer-son Gowen. It would have given away the secret to anyone wondering as to his whereabouts. Thomas Jefferson Gowen had killed two men in a fight in Green County, Kentucky a few years earlier and immediately relocated in Texas.

R.C. Gowen came back to Kentucky and was married to Mary Evelean Erwin, daughter of Scott Erwin and Matilda Meadows Erwin about 1925. She was born September 29, 1907 in Thurlow, Kentucky. They lived at Grab, Kentucky, near Donansburg, where R.C. owned and operated a general store for a number of years through the depression of the 1930’s.

About 1940 he was employed by the WPA and later, went to work at the rock quarry just outside of Greensburg. In the mid 40’s he worked on the Texas Gas pipeline as it was being laid through central Kentucky. When construction began on the Fruit of the Loom factory in Campbellsville he took a job there and continued until the plant was completed retiring shortly afterwards.

Mary Evelean Erwin Gowen died March 22, 1954 and is bur-ied in the Jesus Name Tabernacle Cemetery near Campbells-ville, Ky. R.C. Gowen continued to live at Grab, Ky. He died April 15, 1963 of congestive heart failure at the home of his daughter, June Charlotte Gowen Crowe, in Louisville, Ken-tucky. He is buried in the Gowen Family Cemetery.

Children born to Eunice Roe Cashious Gowen and Mary Evelean Erwin Gowen are:

Finis Roe Gowen born October 26, 1926
Doris Lorraine Gowen born June 16, 1929
Minah Jane Gowen born November 6, 1930
Ruth Carolyn Gowen born November 28, 1939
June Charlotte Gowen born December 20, 1943

Finis Roe Gowen, son of Eunice Roe Cashious Gowen and Mary Evelean Erwin Gowen, was born October 26, 1926 at Grab. He lived all his life in and around Green County, Ken-tucky and was never married. He died June 5, 1981 of con-gestive heart failure at the home of his sister, Doris Lorraine Gowen Beams. He is buried beside his mother in the Jesus Name Tabernacle Cemetery.

Doris Lorraine Gowen, daughter of Eunice Roe Cashious Gowen and Mary Evelean Erwin Gowen, was born June 16, 1929 at Grab. She helped her father in the store as she was growing up. She was married to Ernest Price November 16, 1946. Doris Lorraine Gowen Price and Ernest Price were divorced in 1959, and she was remarried to William Bloyd Beams February 15, 1960.

Doris Lorraine Gowen Price Beams and William Bloyd Beams built a home on the Hodgenville Road near Camp-bellsville in 1961 and have lived at that same location until the present day. She enjoys gardening and spends much of her time at planting, landscaping, and maintenance. Through the years visitors from all over the United States have stopped there to observe the many different varieties of trees and plants they have growing in their yard. William Bloyd Beams is an electrician now retired.

Children born to them are:

Ernest Clifton Price born November 19, 1947
Wanda Jane Price born May 25, 1949
Brunetta Sharon Price born August 28, 1951
Pamela Reba Price born March 30, 1954

Ernest Clifton Price was born November 19, 1947 in Green County. He was married to Glenda K. Miller of Hodgenville, Kentucky January 22, 1966. He worked in law enforcement until 1986 and has since been employed at Campbellsville Industries, Inc. Formerly a police detective and firearms in-structor for the city of Campbellsville, he is still actively in-volved in police firearms competition and training programs. He is also currently a licensed firearms instructor of the Ken-tucky Concealed Carry Program for the Department of Crim-inal Justice Training at Richmond, Kentucky.

Clifton Price and Glenda Miller Price were divorced in July of 1986 and he later married Penny Lynne Stotts of Columbia, Kentucky on May 21, 1987. They reside in a home they built in 1995 on property adjacent to the home of his mother, Doris Lorraine Gowen Price Beams.

Children born to Ernest Clifton Price and Glenda Miller Price are:

Regina Kay Price born July 14, 1969
Angela Lynne Price born October 1, 1971
Brian Wesley Price born November 28, 1973
Amanda Layne Price [twin] born March 12, 1980
Scott Clayton Price [twin] born March 12, 1980

Wanda Jane Price daughter of Ernest Price and Doris Lorraine Gowen Price, was born May 25, 1949 in Green County. Her first marriage was to Junior Allen Beams, son of Everette Al-len Beams of Taylor County, Kentucky. He died in 1978 of injuries sustained in a motorcycle accident.

She was remarried March 10, 1981 to Melvin Kimble Hall. Their home is on the Hodgenville Road at Campbellsville. They have a successful marketing business and also own the Ole Mule Country Store.

Children born to Wanda Jane Price Beams and Junior Allen Beams are:

Junior Allen Beams, Jr. born January 27, 1965
Tammy Jayne Beams born February 18, 1966
Timothy Allen Beams born August 17, 1967
Thomas Everette Beams born June 28, 1972
Jemima Christine Beams born October 1, 1974

Brenetta Sharon Price, daughter of Ernest Price and Doris Lorraine Gowen Price, was born August 28, 1951 in Green County. She was married to John Thomas Rainwater, son of J. D. Rainwater and Frances Rainwater of Taylor County, in 1968. She is a retired Adanta Clinical Services supervisor, and he is retired from Fruit of the Loom Company. They reside on Martin Road at Campbellsville. Children born to them are:

John Thomas Rainwater, Jr. born July 26, 1969
Julie Marie Rainwater born August 9, 1972
Paula Jill Rainwater born March 22, 1974

Pamela Reba Price, daughter of Ernest Price and Doris Lor-raine Gowen Price, was born March 30, 1954 in Green Coun-ty. She was married to Donald Raymond Colvin, son of Brad-ley Colvin and Agnes Colvin of Philipsburg, Kentucky August 22, 1970. She is an Adanta Clinical Services secretary. He is employed at Parker-Kalon. They live on Palestine Road at Campbellsville. Children born to them are:

Pamela Michelle Colvin born June 12, 1971
Justin Donald Colvin born June 6, 1989

Minah Jane Gowen, daughter of of Eunice Roe Cashious Gowen and Mary Evelean Erwin Gowen, was born November 6, 1930. She died in January of 1932 and was buried in the Gowen family cemetery.

Ruth Carolyn Gowen, daughter of Eunice Roe Cashious Gow-en and Mary Evelean Erwin Gowen, was born November 28, 1939 at Grab. She was married to Vernon Ray “Pete” Carter, son of James Carter and Elizabeth Carter of Louisville, in June of 1956. They made their home in Louisville for several years and later moved to Campbellsville

They were divorced about 1976, and Ruth Carolyn Gowen Carter later married Bob Meadows of Campbellsville about 1978. They were divorced about 1980, and she was remarried to Billy Dickens of Campbellsville. She died February 25, 1984 at Norton’s Hospital in Louisville after surgery to install a mechanical heart valve. She is buried in the Gowen family cemetery.

Children born to them are:

Kenneth Ray Carter born April 26, 1957
Michael David Carter born January 29, 1959
Shannon Renee Carter born February 4, 1963

June Charlotte Gowen, daughter of Eunice Roe Cashious Gowen and Mary Evelean Erwin Gowen, was born December 20, 1943 at Grab. She was married to Roy Crowe of Louis-ville, Kentucky about 1960. He was born October 23, 1941. They lived in Louisville and both of them were employed at the Philip Morris Tobacco Company. Following a divorce, she died October 19, 1988 at Jewish Hospital in Louisville of complications after receiving a heart transplant. She is buried in the Gowen Family Cemetery. Roy Crowe died May 27, 1995 and is buried in the Gowen Family Cemetery beside June Charlotte Gowen Crowe.

Children born to them are:

Roy Dion Crowe born about 1961
Kimberly June Crowe born December 25, 1962
Travis Roy Crowe born October 6, 1971

Roy Dion Crowe, son of Roy Crowe and June Charlotte Gowen Crowe, was a police officer at Fulton, Kentucky around 1984. He moved back to Louisville about 1986 and continued to work in law enforcement for the Department of Corrections.

Kimberly June Crowe, daughter of Roy Crose and June Char-lotte Gowen Crowe, was born on Christmas day in 1962. She was enlisted in the United States Army shortly after graduat-ing from high school.

Travis Roy Crowe, son of Roy Crowe and June Charlotte Gowen Crowe, was born October 6, 1971. He died February 22, 1991 of injuries sustained in an automobile accident and is buried in the Gowen Family Cemetery.”

Mary Frances Gowen, daughter of Henry Clay Gowen and Martha Jane Patton Gowen, was born November 7, 1894 in Green County. She was married about 1916 to Lawrence Lincoln McAlister. She was a 76-year-old invalid living in Greensburg, according to a letter written October 11, 1972 by Mattie Frances Stearman Gowen.

Mary Frances Gowen McAlister died May 17, 1979, according to her obituary published in “The Greensburg Record-Herald” and transcribed by Alayne Jorgensen.

“Mrs. Mary Frances McAllister, age 84, 117 South First Street, Greensburg, died May 17, 1979 at her home after a long illness. She was born in Green County, November 7, 1894, the daughter of the late Henry and Martha Patton Gowen. She was a member of the Greensburg United Methodist Church. She is survived by four daughters and two sons: Richard and Jesse McAlister, Louisville, Kentucky; Mrs. Nellie Moran, Greensburg; Mrs. Hilda Davis, Seminole, Flor-ida; Mrs. Allene McKinney, Prospect, Kentucky; and Mrs. Hazel Tucker, LaGrange, Kentucky. Other sur-vivors include 23 grandchildren and 29 great-grand-children. Her funeral was at Foster-Jones Funeral Home, Saturday, May 19, with the Rev. James Loy, pastor of the Greensburg United Methodist Church of-ficiating. Special music was provided by the church choir. She was buried at Campbellsville Memorial Gardens. Pallbearers were David Milby, Nick McGar-vey, Jim Brown, Steve Meacham, Wallace Kidwell, and Charles Stivers. Foster-Jones Funeral Home was in charge of the arrangements.”

Children born to them include:

Alpha McAlister born March 21, 1917
Richard McAlister born about 1919
Nellie McAlister born about 1920
Hilda McAlister born about 1922
Jesse McAlister born about 1924
Allene McAlister born about 1927
Hazel McAlister born about 1931

Alpha McAlister, son of Lawrence Lincoln McAlister and Mary Frances Gowen McAlister, was born in Green County March 21, 1917. He died the same day and was buried in the Gowen family cemetery at Donansburg.

Richard McAlister, son of of Lawrence Lincoln McAlister and Mary Frances Gowen McAlister, was born in Green County about 1919. In 1979 he lived in Louisville.

Nellie McAlister, daughter of Lawrence Lincoln McAlister and Mary Frances Gowen McAlister, was born in Green County about 1920. She was married about 1938, husband’s name Moran. In 1979 she lived in Greensburg.

Hilda McAlister, daughter of Lawrence Lincoln McAlister and Mary Frances Gowen McAlister, was born in Green County about 1922. She was married about 1940, husband’s name Davis. In 1979 she lived in Seminole, Florida.

Jesse McAlister, son of Lawrence Lincoln McAlister and Mary Frances Gowen McAlister, was born in Green County about 1924. In 1979 he lived in Louisville.

Allene McAlister, daughter of Lawrence Lincoln McAlister and Mary Frances Gowen McAlister, was born in Green County about 1927. She was married about 1946, husband’s name McKinney. In 1979 she lived in Prospect, Kentucky.

Hazel McAlister, daughter of Lawrence Lincoln McAlister and Mary Frances Gowen McAlister, was born in Green County about 1931. She was married about 1950, husband’s name Tucker. In 1979 she lived at LaGrange, Kentucky.

Susan Elizabeth Gowen, daughter of Jonathan Henry Gowen and Hannah J. Beasley Gowen, was born August 2, 1858 in Adair County. She appeared in her father’s household in the 1860 census as “Susan E, age 3.” In the 1870 enumeration she was shown as “Susan E, age 12.” She did not reappear in the 1880 census. She was married January 3, 1881 to William Elucian Grider, according to Adair County Marriage Book 10, page 180. She died March 19, 1941 at Glasgow, Kentucky and was buried in Weed, Kentucky.

Children born to William Elucian Grider and Susan Elizabeth Gowen Grider include:

James Edward Grider born October 25, 1881
Leroy Harbert Grider born in 1884
Vando Hayden Grider born in 1888
Henry Thurman Grider born May 24, 1891
Luther Owen Grider born December 15, 1893
Hobart McKinley Grider born in 1896
Lora Vera Grider born December 9, 1898

James Edward Grider, son of William Elucian Grider and Susan Elizabeth Gowen Grider, was born October 25, 1881 in Adair County. He was married about 1905 to Mandie Irene Garrison. She died in 1939, and he was remarried to her cousin Cordie Garrison. He died in Barren County in 1970 and was buried beside his first wife in Hiseville Cemetery.

Children born to James Edward Grider and Mandie Irene Garrison Grider include:

Dessie Grider born about 1906
Henry Owen Grider born May 1, 1909
Ernest Grider born September 16, 1913
Edward Grider born March 21, 1922

Dessie Grider, daughter of James Edward Grider and Mandie Irene Garrison Grider, was born about 1906. She was married about 1930 to Jack Turner in Barren County and lived at Cave City. One daughter, Irene Turner, was born to them about 1930.

Henry Owen Grider, son of James Edward Grider and Mandie Irene Garrison Grider, was born May 1, 1909. He was married in 1929 to Mamie McGuire. He was remarried to Mamie Childress. He died January 3, 1966 and was buried in Cave City Cemetery.

Three children were born to them:

Christine Grider born about 1930
Henry Owen Grider, Jr. born about 1933
Jimmy Grider born about 1947

Ernest Grider, son of James Edward Grider and Mandie Irene Garrison Grider, was born September 16, 1913 at Weed. He was married about 1933 to Thelma Patton.

Children born to them include:

James Logan Grider born December 30, 1934
Kenneth Lee Grider born about 1937

James Logan Grider, son of Ernest Grider and Thelma Patton Grider, was born December 30, 1934. He was married May 16, 1953 to Sue Nell Alexander who was born in 1934.

Kenneth Lee Grider, son of Ernest Grider and Thelma Patton Grider, was born about 1937. He was married about 1957 to Berdetta E. Riley.

Edward Grider, son of James Edward Grider and Mandie Irene Garrison Grider, was born March 21, 1911 in Kentucky.

Leroy Harbert Grider, son of William Elucian Grider and Susan Eliza­beth Gowen Grider, was born in 1884 in Adair County. He was married about 1907 to Hattie Vergie Mooneham. He died July 16, 1970. They were buried in Hiseville Cemetery.

Children born to them include:

Lizzie Grider born about 1909
May Grider born about 1911
Walbert Grider born about 1914
Elsie Grider born about 1916
Louis Reed Grider born about 1920

Lizzie Grider, daughter of Leroy Harbert Grider and Hattie Vergie Mooneham Grider, was born about 1909. She was married about 1927 to Clark Garrison.

May Grider, daughter of Leroy Harbert Griderand Hat­tie Vergie Mooneham Grider, was born about 1911. She was married about 1930 to Howard Estes.

Walbert Grider, son of Leroy Harbert Grider and Hattie Vergie Moone­ham Grider, was born about 1914.

Elsie Grider, daughter of Leroy Harbert Grider and Hattie Vergie Mooneham Grider, was born about 1916. She died in child­hood, according to Clara Jean Grider Sexton Fry.

Louis Reed Grider, son of Leroy Harbert Grider and Hattie Vergie Mooneham Grider, was born about 1920 and died in child­hood.

Vando Hayden Grider, son of William Elucian Grider and Su­san Elizabeth Gowen Grider, was born in 1888 in Adair County. He died in 1908 and was buried in Weed Cemetery.

Henry Thurman Grider, son of William Elucian Grider and Susan Elizabeth Gowen Grider, was born May 24, 1891. He was married in 1911 to Elizabeth Caroline Welson, his cousin. He died May 30, 1926 and was buried in Weed Cemetery. She died October 23, 1953.

Children born to them include:

Esma Christine Grider born May 13, 1912
Mary Vera Grider born November 26, 1914
Mattie Lee Grider born November 26, 1917
Roy Leon Grider born April 4, 1920
Anna Catherine Grider born June 4, 1923

Esma Christine Grider, daughter of Henry Thurman Grider and Elizabeth Caroline Welson, was born May 13, 1912. She was married about 1920 to Sylvester Sexton. Later she was remarried to Albert Bell.

Mary Vera Grider, daughter of Henry Thurman Grider and Elizabeth Caroline Welson, was born November 26, 1914. She was married about 1933 to Walter Burbridge.

Mattie Lee Grider, daughter of Henry Thurman Grider and Elizabeth Caroline Welson, was born November 26, 1917. She was married about 1938 to Kenneth Layman Bennett. One daugh­ter, unnamed, was born to them, according to Clara Jean Grider Sexton Fry who reported that she became a Hollywood ac­tress.

Roy Leon Grider, son of Henry Thurman Grider and Eliza­beth Caro­line Welson, was born April 4, 1920. He was mar­ried about 1946 to Anna Ruth Slack.

Anna Catherine Grider, daughter of Henry Thurman Grider and Eliza­beth Caroline Welson, was born June 4, 1940. She was married about 1959 to Orville Gilpin.

Luther Owen Grider, son of William Elucian Grider and Su­san Eliza­beth Gowen Grider, was born Decem­ber 15, 1893 in Adair County. He was mar­ried in 1915 to Gladys Coomers. He was remarried about 1927 to Mary Alice Barton. She died Novem­ber 13, 1974, he died December 9, 1980. They were buried in Cave City Ceme­tery.

Two children were born Luther Owen Grider and Gladys Coomer Grider:

Claudia Marie Grider born in 1917
Robert B. Grider born in 1918

Children born to Luther Owen Grider and Mary Alice Bar­ton Grider in­clude:

Dave Grider born December 29, 1924
Owen Luther Grider born May 13, 1929
Thurman Ed Grider born June 6, 1931
Clara Jean Grider born April 18, 1935
Deloris Fay Grider born January 14, 1940

Claudia Marie Grider, daughter of Luther Owen Grider and Gladys Coomer Grider, was born in 1917 in Barren County.

Robert B. Grider, son of Luther Owen Grider and Gladys Coomer Grider, was born in 1918 in Barren County.

Dave Grider, a child of the first marriage of Mary Alice Barton, was born December 29, 1924 and was adopted by Luther Owen Grider. He was married in June 1946 to Ina Sloan. He died June 20, 1972 and was buried in Horse Cave Cemetery.

Children born to them include:

David M. Grider born May 13, 1947
Charles Richard Grider born in 1949
Darlene Grider born December 16, 1958

Owen Luther Grider, son of Luther Owen Grider and Mary Al­ice Barton Grider, was born May 13, 1929. He was mar­ried about 1952 to Sue Bowles.

Children born to them include:

Carla Grider born July 4, 1953
Sheila Kay Grider born in 1958

Thurman Ed Grider, son of Luther Owen Grider and Mary Al­ice Barton Grider, was born June 6, 1931. He did not marry.

Clara Jean Grider, daughter of Luther Owen Grider and Mary Alice Barton Grider, was born April 18, 1935. She was married in 1953 to Roy Sex­ton. She was remarried Novem­ber 3, 1979 to Dale Fry. In 1987 and in 1991, they lived at Cave City, Kentucky. She continued there in 1997.

Clara Jean Grider Sexton Fry has made a detailed study of the history of her branch of the Gowen family and has per­formed an outstanding service in gathering data on the de­scendants of Jonathan Gowen and Hannah J. Beasley Gowen. It is through her kindness in sharing her research that much of the data on this branch of the fam­ily appears in this manuscript.

Two daughters were born to her:

Pamula Jean Sexton born June 23, 1953
Deloris Ann Sexton born June 1, 1954

Pamula Jean Sexton, daughter of Roy Sexton and Clara Jean Grider Sexton, was born June 23, 1953. She was married about 1972 to Henry E. Gil­pin. Later she was remarried, hus­band’s Neace. She died April 27, 1984 and was buried in Cave City Ceme­tery.

Born to her were:

Henry E. Gilpin, Jr. born June 8, 1972
Christopher Paul Neace born April 17, 1977

Deloris Ann Sexton, daughter of Roy Sexton and Clara Jean Grider Sexton, was born June 1, 1954. She was married about 1975 to William Glen Minton, a policeman.

Children born to them include:

Jonathan Bradley Minton born July 24, 1974
Angelia Ruth Minton born January 25, 1976

Deloris Fay Grider, daughter of Luther Owen Grider and Mary Alice Barton Grider, was born January 14, 1940.

Hobart McKinley Grider, son of William Elucian Grider and Susan Elizabeth Gowen Grider, was born in 1896 in Adair County. He was married December 30, 1919 to Lizzie Jessie who was born in 1901. He died in 1975 in Glasgow.

Children born to them include:

Myrtle Ruth Grider born March 10, 1921
Carl Braxton Grider born March 19, 1925
Thelma Helen Grider born February 28, 1927
Paul Preston Grider born about 1928
Hobart Murrel Grider born in 1930
Jesse William Grider born December 23, 1932
McKinley Eugene Grider born about 1935

Lora Vera Grider, daughter of William Elucian Grider and Su­san Eliz­abeth Gowen Grider, was born De­cember 9, 1898 in Adair County. She was mar­ried about 1918 to Clarence Garri­son. She died May 24, 1935 and was buried in Weed Cemetery, Adair County.

Children born to them include:

Myrtle Garrison born May 25, 1922
Dona Garrison born January 25, 1924
Herbert Garrison born May 12, 1930

Jonathan Frederick Gowen, son of Jonathan Henry Gowen and Hannah J. Beasley Gowen, was born January 10, 1860 in Adair County, according to the research of Barbara Jean Mitchell Ludwig, a descendant of Bloomington, Indiana. He appeared in the 1860 census as “Frederick, age 3 months.” In 1870 he was enumerated as “Jonathan, 10.” He did not reappear in the 1880 census of Adair County. He was married December 25, 1882 in Metcalf County, Kentucky to Amanda Jane Sexton, daughter of Pinkney J. Sexton and Lu­cinda Fenton Sexton. She was born in Adair County in December 1859.

They removed to Jefferson County, Ken­tucky. She died there February 20, 1908 and was buried in St. Stephens Cemetery in Louisville. He died there October 22, 1924 and was buried be­side his wife.

Children born to Jonathan Frederick Gowen and Amanda Jane Sexton Gowen include:

Vesta B. Gowen born May 4, 1884
Lou Hannah Gowen born in April 1886
Edna Lee Gowen born February 7, 1888
Harrison Pinkney “Harry” Gowen born January 10, 1890
Rosa Ann Gowen born in August 1891
John Daniel Gowen born in November 1893
Goldie Jane Gowen born October 12, 1896
Rena Frances Gowen born in February 1899

Vesta B. Gowen, daughter of Jonathan Frederick Gowen and Amanda Jane Sexton Gowen, was born May 4, 1884 in Adair County. She was married to George A. Bishop November 26, 1916 in Green County, Kentucky. She died there November 26, 1916 and was buried in Oak Grove Baptist Church Ceme­tery.

Lou Hannah Gowen, daughter of Jonathan Frederick Gowen and Amanda Jane Sexton Gowen, was born in April 1886, ac­cording to the research of Barbara J. Ludwig. She was married about 1904 to Bud Bishop. She died in Green County at age 19, in 1905, during childbirth. She was buried in Oak Grove Baptist Church Cemetery.

Edna Lee Gowen, daughter of Jonathan Frederick Gowen and Amanda Jane Sexton Gowen, was born February 7, 1888 in Adair County. She was married about 1906 to Charles Hoagland. Later she was remarried, husband’s name Mooney. She died April 21, 1966 in Indianapolis and was buried there in New Crown Cemetery.

Harrison Pinkney “Harry” Gowen, son of Jonathan Frederick Gowen and Amanda Jane Sexton Gowen, was born January 10, 1890 in Adair County. He was married about 1913 to Hazel B McGowan. Later he was remarried to Mildred Young. He died in Galesburg, Illinois July 21, 1945, and his body was cre­mated. Children born to Harrison Pinkney “Harry” Gowen, Hazel B. McGowan Gowen and Mildred Young Gowen are un­known.

Rosa Ann Gowen, daughter of Jonathan Frederick Gowen and Amanda Jane Sexton Gowen, was born in August 1891 in Adair County. She was married about 1910 to Harley Smith. Later she was remarried to Ben Banta. She died in 1962 in Ve­vay, Indiana.

John Daniel Gowen, son of Jonathan Frederick Gowen and Amanda Jane Sexton Gowen, was born in November 1893 in Adair County. He was married about 1916, wife’s name Lillian. He died April 30, 1938 in Louisville and was buried in Cave Hill Cemetery. Children born to John Daniel Gowen and Lil­lian Gowen are unknown.

Goldie Jane Gowen, daughter of Jonathan Frederick Gowen and Amanda Jane Sexton Gowen, was born October 12, 1896 in Adair County. She was married September 15, 1914 to Cecil Oran Mitchell who was born in Indianapolis August 28, 1893 to Levi Lawrence Mitchell and Georgia Ann Pendley Mitchell. He died there December 23, 1935 and was buried in Round Hill Cemetery. Later she was remarried to Clarence Mitchell. She died April 19, 1967 in Franklin, Indiana. She was buried there in Forest Lawn Memory Gardens in Greenwood, Indiana.

Barbara Jean Mitchell Ludwig of Bloomington, Indiana wrote April 25, 1990:

“My mother was Goldie Jane Gowen, seventh child in a family of eight children. She was born in Adair County, Kentucky. The family lived in Green County for a short time before moving to Louisville in the early 1900s. My mother and three of her sisters, Edna, Rose and Irene were placed in an orphanage. Later these sisters and their brother, Harry, moved to Indi-anapolis. There the name was changed to “Gowan.” Vesta, Lou Hannah and John were the names of the other children. We believe that they remained in Louisville. I have two sisters and two brothers.”

Children born to Cecil Oran Mitchell and Goldie Jane Gowen Mitchell include:

Dorothy Rose Mitchell born November 3, 1915
Ruth Alberta Mitchell born May 18, 1924
Lawrence Ray Mitchell born November 2, 1926
Barbara Jean Mitchell born May 12, 1931
Robert Dale Mitchell born July 26, 1934

Rena Frances Gowen, daughter of Jonathan Frederick Gowen and Amanda Jane Sexton Gowen, was born in February 1899 in Adair County. She was married about 1919 to Oakley Koehler. She was remarried in 1944 to William Griffith. She was mar­ried a third time to George Carroll. She died December 8, 1974 in Indianapolis and was buried in Mt. Pleasant Cemetery in Johnson County, Indiana.

Nancy M. Gowen, daughter of Jonathan Henry Gowen and Hannah J. Beasley Gowen, was born April 20, 1862 in Adair County. She appeared in her father’s fam­ily in the 1870 cen­sus of Adair County as an eight-year-old and again in 1880 at age 17. She was married in 1883 to Charles C. Rowe who was born in 1853, accord­ing to Adair County Marriage Book 11, page 204.

Children born to them include:

Martin Rowe born about 1885
Edna Rowe born about 1887
Frances Rowe born about 1889
Winfrey Rowe born about 1892
Maggie Rowe born about 1895

Martin Rowe, son of Charles C. Rowe and Nancy M. Gowen Rowe, was born about 1885. He was married about 1908 to Viola Reece.

Edna Rowe daughter of Charles C. Rowe and Nancy M. Gowen Rowe, was born about 1887. She was mar­ried to Lu­cian Yarberry.

Frances Rowe, daughter of Charles C. Rowe and Nancy M. Gowen Rowe, was born about 1889. She was married about 1910, husband’s name Gadberry.

Winfrey Rowe, daughter of Charles C. Rowe and Nancy M. Gowen Rowe, was born about 1892. She was married about 1909 to Bud Yarberry .

Maggie Rowe, daughter of Charles C. Rowe and Nancy M. Gowen Rowe, was born about 1895. She was married about 1913 to Lucian Schulls.

Martha Alice Gowen, daughter of Jonathan Henry Gowen and Hannah J. Beasley Gowen, was born in Adair County in 1864. She ap­peared in her father’s house­hold in the 1870 census as a six-year-old and in the 1880 census at age 18. She was married “at age 20” October 23, 1884 “at Jonathan Gowens” to an 18-year-old farmer, James Anderson Wom­ack, son of Milton Womack and Lockie Grider Womack, ac­cording to Adair County Marriage Book 11, Page 414. The groom was born in Adair County in 1866. Both fathers gave their written consent, as noted on the marriage license. She was buried in Evergreen Cemetery in Louisville.

Children born to them include:

Kiziah Mae Womack born in 1885
Mamie Womack born in 1888
Charlie Womack born January 22, 1895
Filmore Womack born in 1897

Kiziah Mae Womack, daughter of James Anderson Womack and Martha Alice Gowen Womack, was born in 1885. She was married May 8, 1904 to Hulliet Coomer who was born in 1867. She died in 1925 in Hardin County, and he died there in 1939, according to the research of Jean Grider Fry.

Children born to her include:

Bradley Owen Coomer born about 1906
Carli Coomer born about 1908
Helen Coomer born about 1911
Ada Pearl Coomer born about 1913
Edna Coomer born about 1916
Maggie Coomer born about 1920

Mamie Womack, daughter of James Anderson Womack and Martha Alice Gowen Womack, was born in 1888 in Adair County. She was married December 27, 1906 to Ezra Kay Coomer who was born November 2, 1889 to Grady Coomer and Mary Jane Beasley Coomer. He died in 1937 and was buried in Hiserville Cemetery in Barren County. She died in 1972 at Hiserville, Kentucky and was buried beside her hus­band.

Children born to them include:

James Willis Coomer born November 11, 1907
Mary Ellen Coomer born January 4, 1909
Bessie Pearl Coomer born October 27, 1914
Garnett Lawrence Coomer born August 9, 1912
Mattie Belle Coomer born July 2, 1919
Walter Leon Coomer born April 11, 1920
Evelyn Coomer born March 11, 1924
Haskell Coomer born November 25, 1926
Harold Thomas Coomer born February 14, 1929
Frances Marie Coomer born April 26, 1933

James Willis Coomer, son of Ezra Kay Cooper and Mamie Womack Coomer, was born November 11, 1907. He was mar­ried about 1930 to Lucille Estes. He died January 15, 1966 and was buried in Hiserville Ceme­tery.

Children born to them include:

Leslie Coomer born about 1932
Ina Mae Coomer born about 1933
J. T. Coomer born about 1935
Leo Coomer born about 1937
Bobby Joe Coomer born about 1940
Mary Catherine Coomer born about 1943
James Wallace Coomer born about 1948

Mary Ellen Coomer, daughter of Ezra Kay Cooper and Mamie Womack Coomer, was born January 4, 1909. She died Febru­ary 2, 1921 and was buried in Hiserville Cemetery.

Bessie Pearl Coomer, daughter of Ezra Kay Cooper and Mamie Womack Coomer, was born October 27, 1914. She was mar­ried about 1933 to Hershel McGlasson. She died April 19, 1981.

One daughter was born to them:

Dorothy Jean McGlasson born about 1936

Garnett Lawrence Coomer, son of Ezra Kay Cooper and Mamie Womack Coomer, was born August 9, 1912. He was married February 8, 1934 to Bernice Atwell.

Children born to them include:

Kenneth Coomer born about 1936
Lorene Coomer born about 1937
Joann Coomer born about 1939
Mike Coomer born about 1942
Kathy Coomer born about 1945
Judy Coomer born about 1948
Vickie Coomer born about 1952
Phillip Coomer born about 1954
Teresa Coomer born about 1957
Tim Coomer born about 1962

Mattie Belle Coomer, daughter of Ezra Kay Coomer and Mamie Womack Coomer, was born July 2, 1919. She was married December 17, 1938 to Jack Judd.

One son was born to them:

Larry Judd born January 1, 1943

Walter Leon Coomer, son of Ezra Kay Cooper and Mamie Womack Coomer, was born April 11, 1920. He was married December 24, 1953 in Adair County to Lillian Nell Adams. He died February 10, 1981.

Children born to them include:

Betty Jean Coomer born May 3, 1954
Janice Lynn Coomer born July 22, 1955
Joyce Dean Coomer born February 25, 1958
Kaye Adams Coomer born March 24, 1964

Evelyn Coomer, daughter of Ezra Kay Cooper and Mamie Womack Coomer, was born March 11, 1924. She was mar­ried January 10, 1942 to Maxie Atwell.

Children born to them include:

Brenda Atwell born June 23, 1945
Rebecca Atwell born May 19, 1951

Haskell Coomer, son of Ezra Kay Cooper and Mamie Wom­ack Coomer, was born November 25, 1926. He died July 1, 1974.

Children born to him include:

Jerry Coomer born October 12, 1952
Pamela Coomer born February 20, 1956

Harold Thomas Coomer, son of Ezra Kay Cooper and Mamie Womack Coomer, was born was born Febru­ary 14, 1929. He was married about 1950 to Lola Woodcock.

Children born to them include:

Donald Wayne Coomer born July 11, 1951

Frances Marie Coomer, daughter of Ezra Kay Cooper and Mamie Womack Coomer, was born April 26, 1933. She was married about 1952 to Earl Brown.

Children born to them include:

Richard Daryl Brown born September 24, 1954
Robin Rena Brown born August 9, 1959

James Coomer, son of Ezra Kay Coomer and Mamie Wom­ack Coomer, was born about 1912. He was mar­ried about 1925 to Lu­cella Estes.

Bessie Coomer, daughter of Ezra Kay Coomer and Mamie Womack Coomer, was born October 27, 1914. She was mar­ried January 21, 1933 to Hershel Mc­Glasson. She died April 19, 1981.

Lawrence Coomer, son of Ezra Kay Coomer and Mamie Wom­ack Coomer, was born about 1917. He was married about 1930 to Berneice Atwell. Twelve children were born to them.

Leon Coomer, son of Ezra Kay Coomer and Mamie Wom­ack Coomer, was born about 1920. He was mar­ried about 1941 to Lillie Neil Adams.

Evelyn Coomer, daughter of Ezra Kay Coomer and Mamie Womack Coomer, was born about 1923. She was married about 1940 to Maxie Atwell.

Haskell Coomer, son of Ezra Kay Coomer and Mamie Womack Coomer, was born about 1925.

Thomas Coomer, son of Ezra Kay Coomer and Mamie Womack Coomer, was born about 1927. He was married about 1950 to Lola Mae Woodcock.

Frances Coomer, daughter of Ezra Kay Coomer and Mamie Wom­ack Coomer, was born about 1930. She was married about 1947 to Earl Brown.

Mary Coomer, daughter of Ezra Kay Coomer and Mamie Womack Coomer, was born about 1932. She died in child­hood.

Charlie Womack, son of James Anderson Womack and Martha Alice Gowen Womack, was born January 22, 1895 in Adair County. He was married January 22, 1914 at Glasgow to Fan­nie Barton who was born in 1895 to James A. Barton and Mary Alice Piper Barton.. He died December 10, 1938 at Sonora, Kentucky. Fannie Barton Womack died March 8, 1975.

Children born to them include:

Celettia Womack born October 17, 1914
Howard D. Womack born January 3, 1917
Pauline Womack born October 29, 1918
Charles Chester Womack born June 16, 1921
Martha Alice Womack born October 29, 1923
Marvin Womack born December 10, 1925
Naomi Louise Womack born June 22, 1927
Dorothy Marie Womack [twin] born July 12, 1931
Flossie Mae Womack [twin]) born July 12, 1931
Lucille Womack born December 10, 1933

Celettia Womack, daughter of Charlie Womack and Fannie Barton Womack, was born October 17, 1914. She was mar­ried February 22, 1935 to James Hugh Ireland.

Howard D. Womack, son of Charlie Womack and Fannie Bar­ton Womack, was born January 3, 1917. He was married July 11, 1943 to Ruby Heath. He died August 1, 1969.

Pauline Womack, daughter of Charlie Womack and Fannie Barton Womack, was born October 29, 1918 at Sonora. She was married December 26, 1934 to Ernest Day.

Charles Chester Womack, son of Charlie Womack and Fannie Barton Womack, was born June 16, 1921. He was married April 22, 1942 to Cora Evelyn Adams. Clara Jean Grider Sex­ton Fry reports that he was killed June 16, 1944 in World War II and was buried in Italy.

Martha Alice Womack, daughter of Charlie Womack and Fan­nie Barton Womack, was born October 29, 1923 at Sonora. She was married February 10, 1944 to Gobel Pilkenton. Later she was remarried to Arthur Priddy. She died July 5, 1986.

Marvin Womack, son of Charlie Womack and Fannie Barton Womack, was born December 10, 1925 and died August 14, 1926.

Naomi Louise Womack, daughter of Charlie Womack and Fan­nie Barton Wom­ack, was born June 22, 1927 at Sonora. She died January 30, 1948 in Indiana..

Dorothy Marie Womack, twin daughter of Charlie Womack and Fannie Barton Womack, was born July 12, 1931 at Sonora. She was married February 6, 1956 to Franklin Delano Carder.

Flossie Mae Womack, twin daughter of Charlie Womack and Fannie Barton Womack, was born July 12, 1931 at Sonora. She was married August 21, 1948 to Dillard Wesley Love..

Lucille Womack, daughter of Charlie Womack and Fannie Barton Womack, was born December 10, 1933 at Glasgow.. She was married June 26, 1952 to Cecil Leon Dalton.

Filmore Womack, son of James Anderson Womack and Martha Alice Gowen Womack, was born in 1897 in Adair County. He was married December 14, 1914 in Barren County to Jennie Lee Pace and lived in Louisville. He and his children were of dark complexion, ac­cording to Clara Jean Grider Sexton Fry. They were buried in Evergreen Cemetery.

Children born to them include:

Sanford Womack born about 1916
Christine Womack born about 1919
Paul Womack born about 1922
Winfrey Womack born about 1925

Cornelius C. Gowen, son of Jonathan Henry Gowen and Han­nah J. Beasley Gowen, was born in Adair County Febru­ary 14, 1867. He appeared as a three-year-old in the 1870 census and at “age 15” in the 1880 enu­meration.

About 1888 he was married to Arrena Beth Hamilton, prob­ably in Adair County. She was born October 4, 1871. During his lifetime he operated a general store and sawmill at Sparksville, Kentucky. Arrena Beth Hamilton Gowen died about 1945, and was buried at Sparksville. He was then re­married to Dee Sex­ton. Dee Sexton Gowen was a younger half-sis­ter to Ar­rena Beth Hamilton Gowen and a sister to Lucinda Sex­ton Gow­en. She died
January 23, 1945. He died March 7, 1951

Children born to them include:

Charles Gowen born in 1888
Edward Montgomery Gowen born in 1889
Clarence W. Gowen born in 1890
John David Gowen born in 1892
Arie Gowen born about 1894
William Albert Gowen born about 1897
Chester Arthur Gowen born May 4, 1907

Charles Gowen, son of Cornelius C. Gowen and Arrena Beth Hamilton Gowen, was born in 1888. “Charley Lee Gowen,” be­lieved to be died in Adair County September 5, 1918.

Edward Montgomery Gowen, son of Cornelius C. Gowen and Arrena Beth Hamilton Gowen, was born in 1889 at Sparksville. He was married about 1910 to Sarah E. Wooten who was born in 1894 to Spencer Wooten. Edward Mont­gomery Gowen was killed in 1943 when struck by a truck.

Children born to Edward Montgomery Gowen and Sarah E. Wooten Gowen include:

Wilmer Gowen born about 1912
Ruel Cornelius Gowen born February 3, 1914

Wilmer Gowen, son of Edward Montgomery Gowen and Sarah E. Wooten Gowen, was born about 1912 in Adair County. He was married about 1933, wife’s name Doris M. In 1957 they lived in Louisville, Ken­tucky where he was a stone­mason with two children. Wilmer Gowen and Doris M. Gowen continued there in 1972 at 3623 Wheeler Avenue.

Ruel Cornelius Gowen, son of Edward Montgomery Gowen and Sarah E. Wooten Gowen, was born February 3, 1914 in Adair County. He was married about 1935 to Tress Brum­mett. In February 1972 they lived in Sparksville.

Children born to Ruel Cornelius Gowen and Tress Brummett Gowen include:

Terry E. Gowen born about 1936
Tobey Gowen born about 1939

Terry E. Gowen, son of Ruel Cornelius Gowen and Tress Brummett Gowen, was born about 1936. In February 1972 he was living at 1833 Kendall Lane, Louisville.

Tobey Gowen, daughter of Ruel Cornelius Gowen and Tress Brummett Gowen, was born about 1939.

Clarence W. Gowen, son of Cornelius C. Gowen and Arrena Beth Hamilton Gowen, was born in 1890 at Sparksville. About 1910 he was married to Verda Gorman. In 1972 they were living at 7144 74th Summit, Chicago, Illinois. He died there in June 1976.

Children born to Clarence W. Gowen and Verda Gorman Gowen include:

Hanson “Pug” Gowen born about 1911
Arthur Gowen born September 24, 1913
Ardella Gowen born about 1915
Gloria Gowen born about 1918
[daughter]) born about 1920

Hanson “Pug” Gowen, son of Clarence W. Gowen and Verda Gorman Gowen, was born about 1911 in Louisville. During World War II he became wealthy in partnership with his brother, Arthur Gowen in the manufacture of military radio equipment on gov­ernment contract. At that time he lived in Baltimore, Maryland and owned manufacturing plants in Jack­son, Michigan and Jackson, Missis­sippi. He died in 1968 with­out children.

Arthur Gowen, son of Clarence W. Gowen and Verda Gor­man Gowen, was born September 24, 1913 in Louisville. He was married about 1933, wife’s name Bessie, probably in Chicago. He was en­gaged in the manufacture of mili­tary ra­dio equipment during World War II. After the war he be­came a vice-president of Rheem Man­ufacturing Company of Sparrows Point, Mary­land. In February 1972 he was liv­ing in In­diana. By 1975 he had removed to Adair County and lived at Columbia, Ken­tucky. No children were born to Arthur Gowen and Bessie Gowen.

Ardella Gowen, daughter of Clarence W. Gowen and Verda Gorman Gowen, was born about 1915, proba­bly in Louisville. She accompanied her family in a move to Chicago in the 1920s. She was married several times and in February 1972 continued in Chicago.

Gloria Gowen, daughter of Clarence W. Gowen and Verda Gorman Gowen, was born about 1918, probably in Louisville. She accompanied her parents to Chicago in the 1920s and re­mained there in 1972.

Of an unidentified daughter who was born about 1920, nothing is known.

John David Gowen, son of Cornelius C. Gowen and Ar­rena Beth Hamil­ton Gowen, was born about 1892 at Sparksville. He was married about 1915, wife’s name Etta. She died July 6, 1971 according to Kentucky Death Records, Volume 32, certificate 15806, and he continued there in 1975.

Children born to John David Gowen and Etta Gowen include:

James E. Gowen born about 1917
Jewel Gowen born about 1919
Oscar David Gowen born about 1921
Anetta Gowen born about 1924

James E. Gowen, son of John David Gowen and Etta Gowen, was born about 1917 in Kentucky. He, a soldier in the U.S. Army, was married November 2, 1943 in Austin, Texas to Miss Junette Wieruscheske, according to Travis County, Texas Marriage Book 43, page 33. She was the daughter of Emma Wieruscheske. He continued in the army in 1944 and 1945 and lived at 1204 1/2 South Congress, according to the Austin city directory. In 1946 and 1947 he was shown as a carpenter. In 1946 he continued on South Congress and in 1947 lived at 105 Nellie.

On April 14, 1950 James E. Gowen and Junette Wieruscheske Gowen received a deed to Lots 11, 12, 13, Block 5, Walsh Place Addition, Austin from Paul Murchison, according to Travis County Deed Book 1036, page 382. In the 1952 and 1954 directories James E. Gowen was shown as a foreman for Murchison-Sheppard and lived at 3507 Bridle Path. In 1955 he was listed as a building contractor with Frank C. Barron and continued to live on Bridle Path.

They received a deed to a lot in the Ward & Treadwell Ad­dition January 12, 1953, according to Travis County Deed Book 1305, page 78. They sold the property seven days later to T. B. Bailey, according to Travis County Deed Book 1306, page 103.

In 1957 and 1958 James E. Gowen, carpenter for Barron Builders, continued to live on Bridle Path. On May 12, 1961 they deeded the Walsh Place property back to Paul Murchison, according to Travis County Deed Book 2306, page 279.

They gave a deed to W. A. Beck July 23, 1962 to two parcels of land containing 99 acres, according to Travis County Deed Book 2499, page 310. They gave a deed to Forest Pearson June 18, 1963 for 357.35 acres of land, according to Travis County Deed Book 2620, page 402. They gave a deed to James R. Lindley January 28, 1966 to Lot 5, Block 30, Austin Lake Estates Addition, according to Travis County Deed Book 3077, page 1307.

Apparently the couple was divorced about 1964. Junette Wieruscheske Gowen received a deed from Austin Lakes Estates to Lot 20, Block 30, Austin Lake Estates Addition, according to Travis County Deed Book 2943, page 1400. Junette Wieruscheske Gowen “estranged wife of James E. Gowen, Killeen, Texas contractor,” lived at 4709 Harmon, Austin and was employed by Real Best Western Motel, ac­cording to the 1972 directory. Children born to them are un­known.

Jewel Gowen, daughter of John David Gowen and Etta Gowen, was born about 1919 in Kentucky. In September 1972 she lived in Chicago.

Oscar David Gowen, son of John David Gowen and Etta Gowen, was born in Kentucky about 1921. He was married about 1946, wife’s name Lenora. In 1957 he was employed by Phillip Morris Company in Louisville. In February 1972 he lived at 2008 Nelson, Louisville. No children were born to Os­car David Gowen and Lenora Gowen.

Anetta Gowen, daughter of John David Gowen and Etta Gowen, was born about 1924 in Ken­tucky. About 1944 she was married to Harold Page. In 1972 they lived at Sparksville on the farm originally owned by her grandfather Cornelius C. Gowen.

Arie Gowen, son of Cornelius C. Gowen and Arrena Beth Hamilton Gowen, was born about 1894 at Sparksville. About 1915 he was married, wife’s name Vada. He was deceased prior to February 1972, and Vada Gowen was living in a con­valescent home in Louisville at that time.

Children born to Arie Gowen and Vada Gowen include:

Jesse Nino Gowen born about 1916
Carlson Ray “Snooks” Gowen born about 1918
Wanda Gowen born about 1920
Oris “Preach” Gowen born about 1922
[daughter] born about 1925

Jesse Nino Gowen, son of Arie Gowen and Vada Gowen, was born about 1916 in Kentucky. He was married about 1938, wife’s name Mariam E. In 1957 he was a machine operator for Phillip Morris Company. Children born to Jesse Nino Gowen and Mariam E. Gowen are un­known.

Carlson Ray “Snooks” Gowen, son of Arie Gowen and Vada Gowen, was born about 1918 in Kentucky.

Wanda Gowen, daughter of Arie Gowen and Vada Gowen, was born about 1920 in Kentucky. She was married about 1941 to Jack Sparks.

Oris “Preach” Gowen, son of Arie Gowen and Vada Gowen, was born in Kentucky about 1922. At age six months he de­veloped infantile paralysis and was an invalid from that time forward. However he was married about 1946, wife’s name Polly, and in September 1972 was owner of a radio station at Somerset, Kentucky. One daughter was born to Oris “Preach” Gowen and Polly Gowen.

A daughter was born to Arie Gowen and Vada Gowen about 1925. Of this individual nothing more is known.

William Albert Gowen, son of Cornelius C. Gowen and Ar­rena Beth Hamilton Gowen, was born about 1897 in Adair County. He died at age 16.

Chester Arthur Gowen, son of Cornelius C. Gowen and Ar­rena Beth Hamilton Gowen, was born May 4, 1907 in Adair County. He was married July 4, 1925 to Mary Ruby Brum­mett at Sparksville. They moved to Louisville in 1939 where he was employed by Brown-Williamson Tobacco Company. He died October 19, 1953. Mary Ruby Brummett Gowen in August 1972 lived at 4002 Mapleton in Louisville.

Children born to Chester Arthur Gowen and Mary Ruby Brummett Gowen include:

Kenneth Ervin Gowen born Decem­ber 10, 1926
Alma Dare Gowen born March 2, 1930
Willie Swanson “Pete” Gowen born March 4, 1931
Betty Ellen Gowen born July 30, 1933
Johnny Payne Gowen born October 7, 1935
Martha Ann Gowen born October 6, 1938
Richie Hanson Gowen born August 11, 1940
Roger Dale Gowen born November 5, 1942

Kenneth Ervin Gowen, son of Chester Arthur Gowen and Mary Ruby Brummett Gowen, was born December 10, 1926 at Sparksville. He was married about 1948, wife’s name un­known. In September 1972 he was living at 2519 Acacia Drive, Louisville where he was employed by International Harvester Company. He continued there in January 1987.

Children born to Kenneth Ervin Gowen include:

Nancy Gowen born about 1950
Kenneth Ervin Gowen, Jr. born about 1952
John Arthur Gowen born about 1954

Nancy Gowen, daughter of Kenneth Ervin Gowen, was born about 1950 in Louisville. About 1969 she was married to Mike Neimeier. The couple and their two daughters lived in Louisville in September 1972.

Kenneth Ervin Gowen, Jr., son of Kenneth Ervin Gowen, was born in Louisville about 1952. He was married about 1972, wife’s name unknown, and continued to live in Louisville.

John Arthur Gowen, son of Kenneth Ervin Gowen, was born about 1954. He was married about 1972, wife’s name Judy. John Arthur Gowen and Judy Gowen were living in Louisville at that time.

Alma Dare Gowen, daughter of Chester Arthur Gowen and Mary Ruby Brummett Gowen, was born March 2, 1930 at Sparksville. She died three weeks later.

Willie Swanson “Pete” Gowen, son of Chester Arthur Gowen and Mary Ruby Brummett Gowen, was born at Sparksville March 4, 1931. From 1948 to 1951 he served in the U.S. Ma­rine Corps, and following service in Korea he was discharged as a corporal. On April 20, 1953 he was married to Patricia Joan Burris of La Follette, Tennessee. From 1956 until 1964 they lived in Florida. In 1965 they lived in Louisville, and in 1966 moved to Garland, Texas. He was employed there in 1972 as a re­altor and lived at 1916 Ridgecrest Drive.

When Willie Swanson “Pete” Gowen was inter­viewed by Ar­lee Claud Gowen in 1972 he told a story about an antique pistol. On a battlefield near Chosen Reservoir in North Ko­rea he re­moved from the body of a dead Chinese soldier an an­tique American pistol dating from the time of Admiral Oliver Hazard Perry’s visit to China about 1818. He sent the pistol to the Original Gun Reblue Corporation of Biltmore, North Carolina, near Asheville. By coincidence the owner of the corpo­ration was a Gowen, and thus began correspondence between the two. The gunsmith wrote Willie Swanson “Pete” Gowen that he had re­searched his family’s history for several gen­erations. Before a copy of the research could be obtained the gunsmith died. In Jan­uary 1987 they lived at Plano, Texas where they man­aged an apartment complex. Willie Swanson “Pete” Gowen died there in 1988. In 1991, Patricia Joan Burris Gowen and her children lived in Dallas.

Children born to Willie Swanson “Pete” Gowen and Patricia Joan Burris Gowen include:

Rebecca Sue Gowen born November 20, 1956
Marye Renee Gowen born December 30, 1958
Paula Kay Gowen born October 15, 1960
Tracey Lee Gowen born October 5, 1961
Willie Swanson Gowen, Jr. born March 28, 1965

Betty Ellen Gowen, daughter of Chester Arthur Gowen and Mary Ruby Brummett Gowen, was born at Sparksville July 30, 1933. About 1953 she was married to Richard Hundley. In Septem­ber 1972 the couple and their four children lived in Jef­fersontown, Kentucky.

Johnny Payne Gowen, daughter of Chester Arthur Gowen and Mary Ruby Brummett Gowen, was born October 7, 1935. She was named for two uncles who were killed simul­taneously in an automobile acci­dent in Kentucky. She was married about 1956 to Ray De­Mar, a captain with Texas In­ternational Airlines. In September 1972 the cou­ple and their three children lived at West Tawakoni, Texas.

Martha Ann Gowen, daughter of Chester Arthur Gowen and Mary Ruby Brummett Gowen, was born October 6, 1938 in Sparksville. About 1957 she was married to Robert L. Mc­Grath. In February 1972 the couple and their three children lived at 3020 Wurtle Avenue, Louisville where he operated McGrath Enterprises. She continued in Louisville in April 1991 at 507 Wendover.

Richie Hanson Gowen, son of Chester Arthur Gowen and Mary Ruby Brummet Gowen, was born August 11, 1940 at Louisville. He was married twice. In February 1972 he lived at 6703 Strawberry Lane, Louisville. A son was born to the second union.

Roger Dale Gowen, son of Chester Arthur Gowen and Mary Ruby Brummett Gowen, was born November 5, 1942 in Louisville. He was married about 1963, wife’s name Frances. In September 1972 he was a government employee living in Oregon.

Children born to Roger Dale Gowen and Frances Gowen in­clude:

Lisa Renee Gowen born about 1965
Rusty Gowen born about 1967

Emily Gowen, daughter of Jonathan Henry Gowen and Hannah J. Beasley Gowen, was born in April 1870 in Adair County. She appeared at age two months in the 1870 census and as a nine-year-old in the 1880 census of her father’s household. She was married about 1889 to Henry Compton and removed shortly afterward to Illinois, according to Clara Jean Grider Sexton Fry.

Children born to them include:

Claude Compton born about 1891
Dina Compton born about 1893
Mattie Compton born about 1896
Cecilia Compton born about 1899

James Going, son of John Going, Jr. and Margaret Gregory Going, was born about 1825.

Leroy Going, son of John Going, Jr. and Margaret Gregory Going, was born about 1835. He was enumerated as “grandson, age 15 in the 1850 census enumeration of John Going, Jr.
==O==
David Smith Goins, son of Shadrach Going and regarded as a Melungeon, was born in Hanover County, Virginia November 21, 1757, according to his Revolutionary War pension ap­plication abstracted in “Tennessee Heroes of the Revolution” by Zella Armstrong.

“David Going of Halifax County” bought 270 acres for £55 from Joseph Tate of Rowan County, North Carolina, according to Halifax County Deed Book 1759-1767, page 440.

He volunteered for service in the Revolutionary War in Halifax County to serve under Col. William Terry. He served several enlistments, including a march to Portsmouth, Virginia to serve in Gen. George Washington’s army in the Battle of Yorktown.

Apparently David Smith Goins was married, wife’s name unknown, shortly after his return home. “David Going” was listed in the state census of Virginia of 1782 as the head of a household of two people in Halifax County, according to “Heads of Households, Virginia, 1790,” page 24. He reappeared in the 1785 state census of Halifax County as the head of a household of “four white souls,” according to the same volume. In 1787 in Halifax County “David Gowin” rendered for taxes “two horses and five head of cattle.” About In the fall of 1787 he removed to Grayson County, Virginia and from there he relocated in adjoining Wythe County about 1791.

“David Going” appeared on the tax lists of Patrick County, Virginia for the years of 1797 and 1800.

The case of “Obadiah Going vs David Going” was tried in Patrick County on July 25-26, 1799, according to Patrick County Order Book 0, pages 217 and 218. Laban Going appeared as a witness on both days.

“David Gowin” was listed as the head of a household in the 1810 census of Wythe County, according to “Index to 1810 Virginia Census” by Madeline W. Crickard. About 1811 he moved again to Grainger County, Tennessee “where he had a brother, Laban Goin,” according to his pension application.

The 1820 census of Grainger County [and all but 10 counties of Tennessee] was destroyed by a fire in Washington, and no copy remains. “David S. Going, free negro” appeared in the 1821 tax list of Grainger County and paid a tax on “one free poll.” “David Goan” reappeared in the 1830 census of Grainger County, page 359, heading a household of “free col­ored persons.” It is believed that David Smith Goins removed to Hamilton County, Tennessee to join his brother Laban Goins, arriving there February 28, 1833, according to .

In 1830, the federal census of Grainger County, Tennessee listed him as “David Goan, free colored.” In 1832, he applied for his pension at age 76 in Hamilton County, Tennessee. He was granted a pension of $32 per year, but he died there February 26, 1834. His pension file states in 1840 that his pension was paid to his children [unnamed].

During his life he was sometimes enumerated as “white” and sometimes as “free colored.” His family removed to Halifax County prior to the Revolution. He enlisted there in a militia company commanded by “Capt. Rogers,” according to his pension application:

“David Goins, a resident of Hamilton County and State of Tennessee, aged 76 years doth appear in open court before the Worshipful Justices of the Court of Pleas & Quarter Sessions of Hamilton County now sitting and on his oath make the following Declaration:

That he entered the service of the United States as a vol­unteer under Capt. Rogers in Halifax County, State of Virginia and was mustered into service under Col. William Terry at Halifax Courthouse, to Williamsburg, from Williamsburg to Norfolk, and from Norfolk to Portsmouth where he was discharged, having served three months.

“Six or eight months after his return home, he was drafted, according to his memory under Capt. Bates and joined the regiment at Bibb’s Ferry under Maj. Jones. He was marched from there to Cabbin Point below Petersburg, Virginia and was stationed there until his term of service expired, having served three months this tour and was discharged by Capt. Bates and returned home.

About two years after the last mentioned service, this ap­plicant was again drafted, according to his memory under Capt. Pregmore in Halifax County. They marched to join Gen. Washington’s army at Portsmouth where this applicant remained about two months before the surrender of Corn Wallis. About three days afterward, his term of service expired, and he was discharged by Capt. Pregmore and returned home, having served three months this tour.

Four or five years after the termination of the Revolutionary War [October 1781], he moved from Halifax County to Grayson County, Virginia where he resided three years. From there he moved to Wythe County, Virginia and resided there for 10 years. From there he moved to Grainger County and resided there for 14 years. From there he moved to Hamilton County, Tennessee and has resided here twelve months the last day of this month and still resides here.”

“David Goins, age 76” was listed as Revolutionary War Pen­sioner S3406 in Hamilton County in 1834, according to “Twenty Four Hundred Tennessee Pensioners” by Zella Armstrong.

David Smith Goins died in 1840 in Hamilton County, “his pension then being paid to his children” [unnamed], according to pension records. He did not appear in the 1840 census of Hamilton County.

One son was born to David Smith Goins:

David Smith Goins, Jr. born about 1786

David Smith Goins, Jr, son of David Smith Goins was born about 1786 in Virginia. He accompanied his father in a move to Hamilton County. On June 7, 1841 he proved himself to be the heir of David Smith Goins in Hamilton County Court. With reference to Certificate No. 26755, regarding David Smith Goins, “He left no widow or child except the same David Goings, Jr. of Hamilton County, Tennessee.”

E. Raymond Evans, an anthropologist, made a study of the mysterious Melungeons of Hamilton and Rhea Counties, Tennessee and wrote a report of his findings in “Tennessee Anthropologist,” Spring 1979. He wrote:

“Located approximately 30 miles north of Chattanooga, the community of Graysville, Tennessee contains one of the most stable Melungeon settlements in the state. Field work in the community conducted in conjunction with archival research demonstrates that the Melungeons, who now compose more than half of the local population, came from Hamilton County during the latter half of the nineteenth century.

Census records and other archival sources indicate that prior to coming to Hamilton County they had lived in Virginia and North Carolina. In Graysville, the Melun­geons strongly deny a black heritage and explain their genetic difference by claiming to have had Cherokee grandmothers.

Many of the local whites also claim Cherokee ancestry and appear to accept the Melungeon claim. The racist discrimination common in Hancock County and in most other Melungeon communities is absent in Graysville. Here, the Melungeons interact in all phases of commu­nity life, and exogamy with local whites is a common practice. The group is called after the most common surname present–Goins–and the term ‘Melungeon’ is not used by the people or by their neighbors.

Recent field observations have led to the conclusion that the culture and social activities of the Graysville Melungeons differs in no way from that of any small Southern Appalachian community.

No people in Tennessee have been subjected to more romantic speculation than have the so‑called ‘Melungeons.’ These dark‑skinned people, living in a white world, have attempted to explain their color by saying they were of Portuguese descent, according to Swan Burnett in 1889 in “The American Anthropologist.” Popular writers, including Thurston L. Willis in ‘The Chesapiean’ in 1941 and Leo Zuber in ‘The Melungeons’ in 1941, have elaborated on this theme They have been claimed to be descendants of the ‘lost’ tribes of Israel as reported by Jean Patterson Bible writing in 1975 in ‘Melungeons Yesterday and Today.’ and ‘old world Gypsies,’ ‘Welsh Indians,’ and Arabs by others.

Others have attempted to link their origin with established historical events. Raleigh’s ‘Lost Colony’ and the De Soto expedition are two examples suggested by Mozon Peters writing in 1970 in the ‘Chattanooga Times.’ In what is probably the least plausible claim, it is a matter of legal record that the Tennessee courts have accepted ‘proof’ that the Melungeons are descendants of settlers from ancient Carthage propounded by Judge Lewis Shepherd in 1915.

The actual ethnic background of the Melungeons and their place of origin is far less dramatic. Modern genetic studies have demonstrated that Melungeons are a tri‑racial people with Indian, African and European ancestry.

In Tennessee, public attention has usually focused on the Melungeon Communities of upper East Tennessee. In particular, Hancock and Hawkins counties are usually regarded as the Melungeon homeland. There are, how­ever, well documented Melungeon communities in Vir­ginia and Kentucky as well as in other parts of Tennessee. In addition to the well known Hancock-Hawkins county Melungeons, there are established communities such as Oakdale, Morgan County, Tennessee Bazeltown, Roan County, Tennessee; in the Bell’s Bend area of the Cumberland River west of Nashville and in Graysville, Rhea County, Tennessee.

Regarding the Graysville community, Jean Patterson Bible as observed: ‘The Graysville aggregate is probably one of the most stable of all Melungeon communities today.’

The purpose of this paper is not to perpetuate the popular myth of an exotic Melungeon ‘race,’ but rather to provide an ethnographic description of the cultural background and contemporary life of the Graysville Melungeons. The term ‘Melungeon’ is used solely for the purpose of defining the study group and is not intended as a negative reflection on the ethnic background of any member of the community. The data presented herein were obtained by the author during an extended study of the community from November 1976 through August 1977, and are based on personal observations, 83 informal interviews with 36 residents of the community and surrounding areas, and a review of available documentary and published materials.

Graysville is a small semi‑urban community similar to the hundreds of other country towns characteristic of the Appalachian area. There are no paved streets, and there is no real business district. Sprinkled haphazardly among a the fading frame dwelling houses are two general purpose ‘grocery’ stores, a TV repair shop, a small community library, a barber shop, three automotive repair shops and one service station. The community has a school and eight Protestant churches‑‑four of which are Baptist.

There is no local industry. The economy of the area is geared toward small scale farming, mining, and pulp‑wood cutting, supplemented with sporadic industrial employ-ment outside the area.

The community is located in the southern part of Rhea County, Tennessee approximately two miles north of the Hamilton County line and one mile west of U.S. Highway 27. Rugged ridges, typical of the eastern Tennessee Valley surround the town. Lone Mountain in the north and Black Oak Ridge to the east form two sides of a rough triangle in which Graysville is located. The third side of the triangle is formed by Walden’s Ridge on the west. The Cumberland escarpment, which forms the eastern edge of the ridge, is cut by many streams heading directly against the rim. One of these, Roaring Creek, flows along the southwestern side of Graysville. The central portion of the community sprawls between the base of Walden’s Ridge on the west and the tracks of the Cincinnati, New Orleans and Texas Railroad to the east.

The town takes its name from William Gray, one of its earliest and best­known residents, who arrived after the Civil War. The real beginning of the community, how­ever, is marked by the coming of the railroad. It then experienced an influx of population from all points of the compass. The post office was established in 1875 with William Gray as postmaster. In 1884 Henry and William Fox organized the Fox Coal Company, which opened mines in the side of Walden’s Ridge west of the town. In addition to coal, a large deposit of tile clay was also mined from an adjoining range of hills and shipped to markets in other areas. A bank was organized and two hotels were established. In 1835, an additional demand for coal was created in the area by the establishment the Dayton Coal & Iron Company a few miles to the north. Funded by European investors, the Dayton Coal & Iron Company operated 375 coke ovens in which coke was made from coal to fuel two large blast furnaces with an annual production capacity of 90,000 tons of foundry and forge pigiron. After 1900 the Fox Coal Company at Graysville was acquired and expanded by the Durham Coal & Iron Company, and a large coke oven complex was established near Roaring Creek. After an initial period of intense prosperity, the industrial development of Graysville entered a decline following World War I and was completely crushed by the economic depression of the 1930’s.

Most of the mines were closed. The bank was consolidated with the Dayton Bank, the hotels were closed, and the people began to leave. The present population is less than one thousand persons.

Ethnically, with the exception of the Melungeon com­ponent, the community is largely composed of persons of Anglo‑Scotch‑Irish descent who have lived in the area for at least three generations. There are no blacks in the community, and most of the residents, including the Melungeons, tend to express strong racist attitudes in their conversation. Social cleavage is along religious rather than ethnic lines in Graysville. In 1891, several families of Seventh Day Adventists settled in Graysville. A year later a religious academy was established by the group. A sanitarium was also set up and enjoyed a wide patronage. While these facilities were later moved to Collegedale in Hamilton County, many of the people remained in Graysville and still tend to hold themselves apart from the rest of the community.

The most common surname among the Graysville Melungeons is Goins, being so prevalent that the whites in the surrounding area call all the Graysville Melun­geons ‘Goinses,’ rather than Melungeons. In fact, the term ‘Melungeon’ is rarely used anywhere in lower East Tennessee. The Goins families are so well known in Rhea County that any dark skinned person, not regarded as a black, is said to ‘look like a Goins.’

Edward T. Price wrote:

‘The name Goins seems to be a peculiar marker of these mixed‑bloods. It has already been mentioned in connection with the Melungeons and certain strains in North Carolina. It is prominent among the mixed­bloods of Darke County, Ohio, and was associated with the Redbones in what is now Calcasieu Parish, Louisiana. It is a minor name among the Croatans and is the chief name among a mixed‑blood group with a special school in Williamsburg County, South Carolina. Further, Goins is an unusual name; though many whites are named Goins.’

It occurred with a much greater frequency among free colored persons in 1830 [2.8 per thousand] than among the population at large in 1790 [0.1 per thousand] in six populous Southern and Middle states. Over a hundred free colored families named Goins were well scattered in 1830 through the South and southern parts of the Northern border states. The two greatest concentrations occurred in the Melungeon area and the North Carolina‑Virginia Piedmont where so many are found today.

Will Alen Dromgoole states that among the Hancock-Hawkins County Melungeons the first was a man named Goins who entered the area shortly after the formation of the state of Tennessee. Early land records indicate that the Goins mentioned came from North Carolina. Both North Carolina and Virginia had several mulattoes named Goins [spelled Gowen or Goin], who were veterans of the American Revolution, and it is possible that the individual in question came to Tennessee as the recipient of a land grant for his military service.

Colonial records show three men named Gowen serving in a mulatto militia unit in 1754, and land records from 1718 show a Mihil Gowen as a property owner in James City County, Virginia. The same unusual name, Mihil Gowen, was born by a ‘colored servant’ who gained his freedom in 1657.

Both local tradition and documentary sources agree that the Graysville Melungeons entered the community from Hamilton County, Tennessee sometime after 1880. Census records show that prior to 1880 there were no persons with Melungeon surnames living in Rhea County.

There were, however, such persons among the earliest non‑Indian settlers in Hamilton County. In 1830, when Hamilton County reported less than 400 families total in the census records, there were four Goins [spelled Gowan, Gowin, or Goens] families present. Each of these families listed colored members [total of 13] and three of them had white members [total of 6].

The most prominent of these first Melungeon settlers in Hamilton County was David Goens, a veteran of the American Revolution. David Goens was born in Hanover County, Virginia. During the war he served in the company commanded by a Capt. Rogers of Halifax County, Virginia. After the close of hostilities, he lived in Wythe and Grayson counties, Virginia, before moving to Grainger County, Tennessee. From Grainger County, he moved to Hamilton County, where he died in 1834. His younger brother, Laban Goens preceded him to Hamilton County by a short time.

Hamilton County census for 1840 listed 13 ‘free colored’ families as residents of the county. eight of which were named Gowin with a total of 53 persons. In 1850, there were 16 ‘mulatto’ families named Goins [spelled Goins, Goinz or Gowens]. Of this group two members were born in Virginia and one in North Carolina. The rest, including some as old as 50, were born in Tennessee.

After the 1850 census the Melungeons in Hamilton County are no longer listed as ‘free‑colored’ or mulattos. A few were regarded as blacks, but most are listed as white. Other Melungeon names present in the early records are Bolden [Bolin or Bolton] and Collins. Following 1880 there is a decrease in Melungeon names listed for Hamilton County, accompanied by the appearance of them on the lists from Rhea County.

With the exception of David and Laban Goins, there is no record of where the individual Melungeons who moved to Hamilton County originated. It is probable, however, that most of them came from the upper East Tennessee area where Melungeons were numerous by the end of the eighteenth century.

Most of their members entered Tennessee from the Virginia-North Carolina Piedmont area. There is no record that the early Melungeon settlers in Hamilton County formed a separate community or regarded themselves as a distinct ethnic group. Many of them settled in the northern end of the county in the Sale Creek area, only about five miles from the present town of Graysville. Here there was some intermarriage with the Hicks and Fields families who were a European‑Cherokee mixed‑blood group. Today Sale Creek has a few families who call themselves ‘Black Cherokees,’ but are regarded as blacks by their white neighbors. The Graysville Melungeons emphatically deny any relationship with this group, but it is probable that such a relationship does, in fact, exist.

Some of the Hamilton County Melungeons seem to have been regarded as Indian. A newspaper article. appearing in the ‘Chattanooga Times’ March 31, 1894, relates to a man named William Bowlen described in the sub‑heading as ‘A half‑witted Melungeon,’ and in the text as ‘a half‑witted Indian.’ Further in the text he is referred to as ‘belonging to that peculiar people called the Melungeons.’

Also in Chattanooga, in 1872, there was a widely publi­cized court case involving a Melungeon. The case in­volved a lawsuit challenging the inheritance of some property by a girl whose mother had been a Melungeon named Bolton. The contention was that the girl could not legally inherit the land due to the fact that, as a Melungeon, her mother had been part black and since interracial marriage was illegal in Tennessee, the girl was therefore illegitimate. Her attorney, S. L. Shepherd, won the case by convincing the court that Melungeons have no black ancestry, but are rather derived from ancient Carthaginians who came to North America by way of Portugal.

The first Melungeon to settle in the Graysville community was George Goins, who has children still living in the area. He was born in Hamilton County around 1865. His wife, Cordie, was born in 1876. Her maiden name and place of birth are not known, but her children recall that she claimed to be Cherokee. The children of George and Cordie Goins, Alvin [also known as ‘Albert’] Goins and Gracie Goins Patton are the oldest Melungeons living in the community today. Alvin was born in 1903, and his sister was born a few years earlier.

A photograph was taken of Alvin Goins preparing roots to be used in a ‘blood tonic.’

In Graysville, the Melungeons are fully accepted and participate fully in all phases of community life. When schools were segregated, their children attended white schools without question. Intermarriage between Melungeon and white non‑Melungeon individuals in the community is a common pattern. A less tolerant attitude was reported by an earlier observer by Edward T. Price who wrote:

‘The Melungeons here are characterized by a single sur­name, Goins, though several others have been acquired, apparently by intermarriage with the Goinses. The group consists mostly of miners and farm laborers and forms 30 or 40 percent of the population of the town. These people are grouped under the general term, ‘the Goins,’ and the better known term Melungeon is applied by the relatively few who link them with the broader group. Some of these people are distinctly dark in skin and claim Cherokee Indian ancestry.

Based on appearance, it appears that the strongest genetic factor in the background of the Graysville Melungeons is northern European. About half of them have very fair skin, with light brown or blond hair. Some have blue eyes. This is particularly true of the younger members of the community. Some have dark skin, but no more so than many non-Melungeons who spend much of their time out‑of‑doors. There are a few with slight Negroid features such as wide noses, thick lips, etc., and some who have a somewhat similar appearance to Cherokee‑White mixed‑bloods.

The Graysville Melungeons apparently feel no special kinship with other Melungeon groups in the state. When asked directly if they had relatives in the Hancock-Hawkins County area, most responded that they did not.

From the beginning, the major occupation in the Graysville area has been coal mining. This was especially true while the big iron works were active here and in nearby Dayton. With the passing of the major industries, some of the Melungeons left the area to seek work elsewhere. Others continued to mine coal for which there is still, even today, a moderate demand as a domestic heating fuel.”
==O==
Laban Goins, son of Shadrach Going and a younger brother of David Smith Goins, was born in 1760 in Hanover County. He lived in Halifax County during the Revolutionary War, but did not serve in the militia with his brother. He was shown as a taxpayer there, along with “James Goin, Claiborne Goin, Daniel Goin, John Goin and Caleb Goin.”

He was married about 1787 to Ella Duncan, according to testimony of Sarah Goins, a granddaughter, according to the research of Ethel Louise Goins Dunn of Crandall, Georgia.

On July 25 and July 26, 1799, Laban was allowed “one day witness pay in Obadiah Going vs. David Going,” according to Patrick County Order Book O, page 217-218.

He appeared as a taxpayer in Patrick County, Virginia in 1797. “Laberne Going” was taxed there in 1801. “Laban Going” was included among the Going taxpayers in Patrick County for the last time in 1803.

About 1803 Laban Goins removed, apparently with several families of relatives, to Grainger County, Tennessee. The 1805 tax list of Grainger County included “Laborn Going, Claborn Goins, Daniel Going, Caleb Going, James Goins and John Goins. A second version of the “Taxable Inhabitants or the Year 1805” listed “Laban Going, Claiborne Going, Daniel Goin, Shadrack Goin, James Going, John Going and Calib Going.”

Although the spelling varies from the first list to the second, it is obvious that the two lists refer to the same individuals. Of the second group only Shadrack Goin does not appear in the first list. “Laborn Going” was rendered as “one free poll, ne­gro” in the tax list.

Laban Goins preceded his brother in the move to Hamilton County, arriving there about 1829. He appeared in the 1830 census of that county, page 75, as the head of a “free colored” household. The enumerator obviously had no way to properly record a Melungeon household. Although he did not record the “free colored” individuals, he did enumerate in the household “one white female, 5-10” and “one white female, 0-5.”

In the 1830 census, Hamilton County reported less than 400 families. Four of them were headed by “Laban Gowan, Roland Gowin, Sandford Gowin and Dodson Gowin.” Each of these families listed colored members [total of 13] and three of them listed white members [total of 6]. All were listed on Page 75 and were located in the north part of the county, just south of Graysville, Tennessee.

On February 7, 1834 Laban Goins submitted his affidavit to the Hamilton County Court attesting to his brother’s Revolu­tionary War service.

Laban Goins lived on Sale Creek on the land that David Gray, the founder of Graysville, Tennessee, later donated to the Audubon Society.

Ethel Louise Goins Dunn, Gowen Research Foundation mem­ber of Crandall, Georgia, wrote an article on Laban Goins and his descendants for “History of Rhea County, Tennessee.” She wrote:

“Laborn Goins was the first one of the name in this area. He was born in Hanover County, Virginia in 1760. His brother, David. two years his senior, fought with George Washington in the Revolutionary War. In 1802-84, both of these brothers were in Grainger and Jefferson counties tax records. The 1830 census shows them living in the northern end of Hamilton County.”

On July 18, 1855, a younger “Laborn Goen” was married to Artine Clark in Cannon County. Of Laborn Goen and Artine Clark Goen nothing more is known.

Possible children born to Laban Goins and Ella Duncan Goins include:

Roland Goins born about 1787
Carter Goins born about 1788
Dodson Goins born about 1789
Merilla Goins born about 1790
Shadrach Goins born April 17, 1791
Tilman Goins born about 1795
Thomas Goins born about 1797
Preston Goins born about 1800
Harvard Goins born about 1804

Ethel Louise Goins Dunn of Crandall, Georgia wrote in the July 1997 Foundation Newsletter, “Granville Goins, my g-g-grandfather, was born about 1810 in Grainger County, Tennessee of parents unknown, according to the affidavit of Matilda Goins of Dayton, Tennessee in the Court of Claims June 24, 1908.”

He joined the exodus of some of the Melungeon Goins fami­lies who removed to Hamilton County, Tennessee. Prominent in this group was David Smith Goins, Revolutionary soldier who moved about 1832 and his younger brother, Laban Goins who had preceded him in the move about 1829. They were sons of Shadrach Goins of Hanover, Halifax and Patrick Counties, Virginia.

E. Raymond Evans, an anthropologist, made a study of the mysterious Melungeons and wrote a report of his findings in “Tennessee Anthropologist,” Spring 1979. He wrote:

“Located approximately 30 miles north of Chattanooga, the community of Graysville, Tennessee contains one of the most stable Melungeon settlements in the state.

No people in Tennessee have been subjected to more romantic speculation than have the so‑called ‘Melungeons.’ These dark‑skinned people, living in a white world, have attempted to explain their color by saying they were of Portuguese descent, according to Swan Burnett in 1889 in ‘The American Anthropolo­gist.’ Popular writers, including Thurston L. Willis in ‘The Chesapiean’ in 1941 and Leo Zuber in ‘The Melungeons’ in 1941, have elaborated on this theme They have been claimed to be descendants of the ‘lost’ tribes of Israel as reported by Jean Patterson Bible writ­ing in 1975 in ‘Melungeons Yesterday and Today.’ and ‘old world Gypsies,’ ‘Welsh Indians,’ and Arabs by others.

Others have attempted to link their origin with estab­lished historical events. Raleigh’s ‘Lost Colony’ and the De Soto expedition are two examples suggested by Mozon Peters writing in 1970 in the ‘Chattanooga Times.’

The most common surname among the Graysville Melungeons is Goins, being so prevalent that the whites in the surrounding area call all the Graysville Melungeons ‘Goinses,’ rather than Melungeons. In fact, the term ‘Melungeon’ is rarely used anywhere in lower East Tennessee. The Goins families are so well known in Rhea County that any dark skinned person, not regarded as a black, is said to ‘look like a Goins.”

In the 1830 census, Hamilton County reported less than 400 families. Four of them were headed by “Laban Gowan, Roland Gowin, Sandford Gowin and Dodson Gowin.” Each of these families listed colored members [total of 13] and three of them listed white members [total of 6]. All were listed on Page 75 and were located just south of Graysville, Tennessee. Since Granville Goins did not appear as a householder in 1830, he may have been a son of Laban Goins.

“David Goins, age 76” was listed as Revolutionary War Pen­sioner S3406 in Hamilton County in 1834, according to “Twenty Four Hundred Tennessee Pensioners” by Zella Armstrong. David Smith Goins died in 1840 in Hamilton County, “his pension then being paid to his children” [unnamed], according to pension records. He did not appear in the 1840 census of Hamilton County.

Granville Goins was married about 1831, wife’s name Mary “Polly,” probably in Graysville, located just across the county line in Rhea County.

Twelve households of the family were enumerated in the 1840 census of Hamilton County: Sanford Gowin, page 150; Thomas Gowin, page 150; George Gowin, page 150; William Gowin, page 150; John Gowin, page 150; Martin Gowin, page 150; G.[ranville] Gowin, page 150; P. Gowin, page 150; John Gowan page 175; Pryor Gowen, page 175, Carter Gowin, page 177 and Preston Gowen, page 178. All except the last four were recorded as “free colored.”

Granville Goins was born in Grainger County about 1810, ac­cording to the affidavit of Matilda Goins of Dayton, Tennessee in the Court of Claims June 24, 1908. He was married about 1833, wife’s name Mary “Polly.” By 1837 they were located in Hamilton County, Tennessee

Granville Goins was enumerated as the head of a household No. 1339 in the 1850 census of Hamilton County. The family was recorded October 21, 1850 as:

“Goins, Granvill 40, farmer, born in Tennessee
Mary 33, born in Tennessee
Mahaley 18, born in Tennessee
Rachel 14, born in Tennessee
Noah 12, born in Tennessee
Roland 10, born in Tennessee
Dopson 8, born in Tennessee
James 6, born in Tennessee
Nancy 4, born in Tennessee
William 8/12, born in Tennessee”

Adjoining the household of Granville Goins was that of Nancy Goins. The household, No. 1340, was recorded on Page 925 as:

“Goins, Nancy 45, born in Tennessee
Elizabeth 29, born in Tennessee
Fanney 10, born in Tennessee”

“Granville and Polly Goins” were mentioned in an affidavit signed in 1908 by J. P. Talley of Chattanooga, according to “Cherokee by Blood: Records of Eastern Cherokee Ances­try in the U. S. Court of Claims, 1906-1910” by Jerry Wright Jordon.

“[I affirm] that I am 80 years of age and lived in James County, Tennessee. I was just partially acquainted with Mary Jane Irwin and know W. V. Goins quite well. May Jane Irwin is the second cousin of W. V. Goins. I knew Polly and Granville Goins. They lived in Hamil­ton County, but I think they were born in upper East Tennessee, probably Grainger County. Alfred and Halie, I think, were born in Hamilton County. Alfred, I think, was most too young to live with the Indians. They lived around where there were Indians, in the same neighborhood and country, and whether they ever took a part in the tribal councils as recognized Indians, I don’t know. Polly and Granville Goins were a little older than myself. They have been dead about 12 or 15 years. They were never on any Indian rolls that I know of. They were always called Indians, Cherokees. I was ac­quainted with Nathan and Marila Goins. They lived in Hamilton County, but I think they were born some­where else. The parents and grandparents of W. V. Goins were recognized as having Cherokee Indian blood in them. Don’t know that they were on any rolls. It’s been 50-odd years ago since I first got acquainted with them, and ever since I knew them, they have lived in Hamilton County. I know of nothing further to give in aid of ei­ther of said claims.

J. P. Talley
Chattanooga, Tenn, June 18, 1908”

At the same time W. T. Irwin of Chattanooga, former husband of Mary Jane Goins Irwin who died in 1897, made an affidavit about the family:

“I affirm that I live in Marion County, Tennessee. I am 49 years of age. I make claim for my children. My first wife has been dead 11 years. She was about 30 or 32 when she died. Her parents names were Alfred and Halie Goins. She claims Indian descent on her father’s and mother’s side. Her grandparents on her mother’s side were Granville and Polly Goins. On her father’s side they were Thomas and Betsy Goins. They come by the same name because they were probably related. She was always recognized as an Indian in the commu­nity in which she lived. Her parents and grandparents lived in what is now James County [?]. Her grandpar­ents origi­nated from Grainger County. She claimed to be a full blood Cherokee. Her grandparents lived in Hamilton County in 1835. She had only two brothers, those men­tioned in the application. The children of Granville and Polly Goins are Halie, Jim, Dodson or Dotson and Nancy. I have heard that my wife’s parents and grand­parents were on some roll, but I don’t know what roll. I have nothing further to add to what I have already said.

W. T. Irwin
Chattanooga, Tenn, June 18, 1908”

==O==
Granville Goins was enumerated as the head of a household No. 1339 in the 1850 census of Hamilton County. The family was recorded October 21, 1850 as:

“Goins, Granvill 40, farmer, born in Tennessee
Mary 33, born in Tennessee
Mahaley 18, born in Tennessee
Rachel 14, born in Tennessee
Noah 12, born in Tennessee
Roland 10, born in Tennessee
Dopson 8, born in Tennessee
James 6, born in Tennessee
Nancy 4, born in Tennessee
William 8/12, born in Tennessee”

Adjoining the household of Granville Goins was that of Nancy Goins. The household, No. 1340, was recorded on Page 925 as: “Goins, Nancy, 45, born in Tennessee; Elizabeth, 29, born in Tennessee and Fanney, 10, born in Tennessee.”

“Granville and Polly Goins” were mentioned in an affidavit signed in 1908 by J. P. Talley of Chattanooga, according to “Cherokee by Blood: Records of Eastern Cherokee Ancestry in the U.S. Court of Claims, 1906-1910” by Jerry Wright Jordon. In the hope of compensation, several Melungeon families claimed Cherokee ancestry. Talley stated:

“I [affirm] that I am 80 years of age and lived in James County, Tennessee [later absorbed]. I knew Polly and Granville Goins. They lived in Hamilton County, but I think they were born in upper Tennessee, probably Grainger County. Polly and Granville were a little older than myself. They have been dead 12 or 15 years. They were never on any Indian rolls that I know of.”

J. P. Talley June 18, 1908 Chattanooga, Tenn.”

At the same time, W. T. Irvin of Chattanooga, grandson-in-law of Granville Goins, and former husband of Mary Jane Goins Irvin who died in 1897, made an affidavit about the family:

“I affirm that I live in Marion County, Tennessee [adjoining Hamilton County]. I am 49 years of age. I make claim for my children. My first wife has been dead 11 years. She was about 30 or 32 when she died. Her parents were Alfred Goins and Halie [Mahala?]Goins. She claims Indian descent on her father’s side and her mother’s side. Her grandparents on her mother’s side were Granville and Polly Goins. On her father’s side they were Thomas and Betsy Goins. They come by the same name because they were probably related. She was always recognized as an Indian in the community in which she lived. Her parents and grandparents lived in what is now James County. Her grandparents originated in Grainger County. She claimed to be a full-blood Cherokee. Her grandparents lived in Hamilton County in 1835.
W. T. Irvin June 18, 1908 Chattanooga, Tenn”

Betsy Jane Goins, daughter of Granville Goins and Mary “Polly” Goins, was born in Hamilton County about 1834, according to the research of Ethel Louise Goins Dunn of Crandall, Georgia. She did not appear in the 1850 census of her parents’ household.

Rachel Goins, daughter of Granville Goins and Mary “Polly” Goins, was born in Hamilton County about 1836. She appeared as a 14-year-old in the 1850 census of the household of her parents.

Mary Goins, daughter of Granville Goins and Mary “Polly” Goins, was born in Hamilton County about 1837, according to Ethel Louise Goins Dunn. She did not appear in the 1850 census.

Noah Goins, son of Granville Goins and Mary “Polly” Goins, was born in Hamilton County about 1838. He appeared in the 1850 census of his father’s household at age 12.
==O==

Granville Goins was enumerated as the head of a household No. 1339 in the 1850 census of Hamilton County. The family was recorded October 21, 1850 as:

“Goins, Granvill 40, farmer, born in Tennessee
Mary 33, born in Tennessee
Mahaley 18, born in Tennessee
Rachel 14, born in Tennessee
Noah 12, born in Tennessee
Roland 10, born in Tennessee
Dopson 8, born in Tennessee
James 6, born in Tennessee
Nancy 4, born in Tennessee
William 8/12, born in Tennessee”

Adjoining the household of Granville Goins was that of Nancy Goins. The household, No. 1340, was recorded on Page 925 as: “Goins, Nancy, 45, born in Tennessee; Elizabeth, 29, born in Tennessee and Fanney, 10, born in Tennessee”

“Granville and Polly Goins” were mentioned in an affidavit signed in 1908 by J. P. Talley of Chattanooga, according to “Cherokee by Blood: Records of Eastern Cherokee Ances­try in the U.S. Court of Claims, 1906-1910” by Jerry Wright Jordon. In the hope of compensation, several Melungeon families claimed Cherokee ancestry. Talley stated:

“I [affirm] that I am 80 years of age and lived in James County, Tennessee [later absorbed]. I knew Polly and Granville Goins. They lived in Hamilton County, but I think they were born in upper Tennessee, probably Grainger County. Polly and Granville were a little older than myself. They have been dead 12 or 15 years. They were never on any Indian rolls that I know of.”
J. P. Talley
June 18, 1908 Chattanooga, Tenn.

At the same time, W. T. Irvin of Chattanooga, grandson-in-law of Granville Goins, and former husband of Mary Jane Goins Irvin who died in 1897, made an affidavit about the family:

“I affirm that I live in Marion County, Tennessee [adjoining Hamilton County]. I am 49 years of age. I make claim for my children. My first wife has been dead 11 years. She was about 30 or 32 when she died. Her parents were Alfred Goins and Halie [Mahala?] Goins. She claims Indian descent on her father’s side and her mother’s side. Her grandparents on her mother’s side were Granville and Polly Goins. On her father’s side they were Thomas and Betsy Goins. They come by the same name because they were probably related. She was always recognized as an Indian in the community in which she lived. Her parents and grandparents lived in what is now James County. Her grandparents originated in Grainger County. She claimed to be a full-blood Cherokee. Her grandparents lived in Hamilton County in 1835.
W. T. Irvin
June 18, 1908 Chattanooga, Tenn”

Granville Goins and Mary “Polly” Goins died about 1914. Children born to them are believed to include:

Mahala “Halie” Goins born about 1832
Betsy Jane Goins born about 1834
Rachel Goins born about 1836
Mary Goins born about 1837
Noah Goins born about 1838
Roland Goins born about 1840
Dodson Goins born about 1842
Martha Goins born about 1843
James L. Goins born about 1844
Nancy Goins born about 1846
John Goins born about 1847
William Goins born about 1849
Francis Marion Goins born about 1853

Dodson Goins, above, was the subject of an article in the Newsletter, January 1997.

Mahala “Halie” Goins, daughter of Granville Goins and Mary “Polly” Goins, was born in Hamilton County about 1832. She appeared as an 18-year-old in the 1850 census of her parents household. She was married about 1850 to Alfred Goins, a cousin. He was a son of Thomas Goins and Betsy Goins.

Children born to Alfred Goins and Mahala “Halie” Going Goins include a daughter, Mary Jane Goins, born about 1865. The daughter was married about 1882 to W. T. Irvin of Chatanooga. She died in 1897 at about age 31, according to an affidavit furnished by Irvin, according to “Cherokee by Blood.”

Betsy Jane Goins, daughter of Granville Goins and Mary “Polly” Goins, was born in Hamilton County about 1834, according to the research of Ethel Louise Goins Dunn of Crandall, Georgia. She did not appear in the 1850 census of her parents’ household.

Rachel Goins, daughter of Granville Goins and Mary “Polly” Goins, was born in Hamilton County about 1836. She ap­peared as a 14-year-old in the 1850 census of the household of her parents.

Mary Goins, daughter of Granville Goins and Mary “Polly” Goins, was born in Hamilton County about 1837, according to Ethel Louise Goins Dunn. She did not appear in the 1850 census.

Noah Goins, son of Granville Goins and Mary “Polly” Goins, was born in Hamilton County about 1838. He appeared in the 1850 census of his father’s household at age 12.
==O==

Roland Goins, son of Laban Goins, was born about 1787 in Virginia. He accompanied his father in a move to Hamilton County about 1829. He purchased 160 acres there from George Irwin for $50, according to Hamilton County deed records.

Children born to Roland Goins are believed to include:

Granville Goins born about 1808
Roland Goins born about 1810

Roland Goins, son of parents unknown, was born about 1810. He was married about 1833, wife’s name Elizabeth. He was reported at age 40 October 1, 1850 in the census of Hamilton County, Civil District 27, Household 662-830:

“Goins, Rolen 40, born in Tennessee, farmer
Elizabeth 35, born in Tennessee
John 14, born in Tennessee
Dodson 13, born in Tennessee
Harrison 10, born in Tennessee”

The family reappeared in the 1860 census of adjoining Roane County, Civil District 6, Household 927-1064:

“Goen, Rowlen 45, born in TN
Betsy 35
Wm. D. 23
Harrison 19”

“Betsy Goen” is regarded as the second wife of Rolin Goins. Children born to Roland Goins and Betsy Goins are unknown.

Children born to Roland Goins and Elizabeth Goins include:

John Goins born about 1835
William Dotson Gowins born about 1837
Jesse Harrison Goins born about 1840

John Goins, son of Roland Goins and Elizabeth Goins, was born about 1835, probably in Hamilton County. He appeared as a 15-year-old in the 1850 census in the household of his father.

William Dotson Gowins, son of Roland Goins and Elizabeth Goins, was born about 1836, probably in Hamilton County, Tennessee. He appeared at age 23 in his father’s household in the 1860 census of Roane County.

He was married to Sarah E. Morris in Roane County March 20, 1861, according to Roane County marriage records. They were members of the Prospect Baptist Church there [now Loudon County] along with several Morris families.

He enlisted in the Forty-third Tennessee Infantry Regiment, Company F, in 1861, along with his brother, Jesse Harrison Goins. He participated in the Battle of Vicksburg and died during the battle or shortly afterwards, according to Mary Ruth McKinney, a descendant of Dallas, Texas. His widow was remarried to Robert E. Redpath and removed to Illinois about 1868, according to research of Mary Ruth McKenney.

Children born to William Dotson Gowin and Sarah E. Morris Gowin include:

Jesse Harrison Gowin born July 28, 1862

Jesse Harrison Gowin, son of William Dotson Gowin and Sarah E. Morris Gowin, was born July 28, 1862 in Loudon, Tennessee. He was married in 1887 to Sallie Ann Robertson in Seymore, Missouri. Children born to Jesse Harrison Gowin and Sallie Ann Robertson are unknown.

Jesse Harrison Goins, son of Roland Goins and Elizabeth Goins, was born about 1840. He appeared as a 10-year-old in the 1850 census of Hamilton County in his father’s household. He was enumerated at age 19 in the 1860 census of Hamilton County as “Harrison Goen.” He and his brother William Dotson Gowin enlisted in 1861 in Company F, 43rd Tennessee Infantry Regiment and participated in the Battle of Vicksburg.

Dodson Goins, son of Granville Goins and Mary “Polly” Goins, was born in Hamilton County about 1842. He was recorded as an eight-year-old in the 1850 census of Hamilton County. He was married about 1864 to Erelda Goins, daughter of Nathan Goins and Sarah Elizabeth McGill Goins, according to Dunn research.

“Dodson Goin” was listed as the head of a household in the 1880 census of Cannon County, Enumeration District 24, page 25, Civil District 9, enumerated as:

“Goin, Dodson 36, born in TN
Erilday 35, born in TN
Noah 15, born in TN
William 13, born in TN
Psalmist 9, born in TN, son
Mahala 7, born in TN
Lotta 6, born in TN
De A. 1, born in TN, son”

The full name of the third son of Dodson Goin and Erilday Goin is believed to be “Psalmist David Goin.” Later he would be known as “Sam D. Goin.” [Samuel David Goins] He was born in Tennessee in January 1870, according to the census.

Dodson Goin died in 1887, according to Dunn research, and his widow was remarried to Joshua Columbus Goins, unidenti­fied. Erelda Goins Goins Goins was still living in 1905 in Cannon County.

Children born to Dodson Goins and Erelda Goins Goins in­clude:

Noah Goins born about 1865
William Granville Goins born about 1866
Psalmist David Goins born January 1870
Mahala Goins born about 1873
Lottie Bell born about 1874
De Amold born about 1878
Jacob Benjamin born about 1883

Noah Goins, son of Dodson Goin and Erelda Goins Goins, was born about 1865 in Hamilton County. He appeared as a 15-year-old in the 1880 census of his father’s household. He was married about 1888, wife’s name Jane. Children born to Noah Goins and Jane Goins are unknown.

William Granville Goins, of Dodson Goin and Erelda Goins Goins, was born about 1866 in James County, Tennessee. He appeared as a 13-year-old in the 1880 census of Cannon County. He was married about 1889, wife’s name unknown.

Children born to them include:

Ida Goins born January 4, 1891
Claud Goins born October 11, 1895
Irene Goins born December 9, 1901

Psalmist David Goins, son of Dodson Goin and Erelda Goins Goins, was born in January 1870. He was enumerated at age 9 in the 1880 census.

“Sam D. Goin” was married about 1897 to Mary Clark, de­scribed as a “caucasian.” He filed suit in 1905 in Franklin County, Tennessee seeking to have his son Henry E. [or Harry E.] Goins reinstated in school from which he had been ex­pelled for “being a Negro.”

In a deposition taken December 22, 1905 in Winchester, Ten­nessee, Sam D. Goin advised that he would be “35 next month” and that he was the father of Harry E. Goin who was born July 19, 1898. He stated that “Harry E. Goin, his oldest living child” was enrolled in school in the Ninth Civil District of Franklin County in July 1904 at age six. He was dismissed by the teacher, J. B. Smith on the suspicion of being a Negro.

“Sam D. Goin” testified that he was “Cherokee and Irish” and had no Negro blood. He stated that he went to white schools in Cannon and Wilson Counties.

In the hearing Mary Clark Goin deposed that she was “born and raised in Franklin County and that she did not know if her husband had any Negro blood.”

“Mrs. Erilday Goin, mother of Sam D. Goin, age 73” [most likely 60], testified that her son was a “little darker than white people.” The deposition record gives no hint as to the final re­sult of the hearing.

Children born to Psalmist David Goins and Mary Clark Goins include:

Harry E. Goins born July 19, 1898

Harry [Henry] E. Goins, son of Psalmist David Goins and Mary Clark Goins, was born July 19, 1898. He was the subject of a school controversy in 1905 in Franklin County, Tennessee.

Mahala Goins, daughter of Dodson Goin and Erelda Goins Goins, was born about 1873. She was recorded at age seven in the 1880 census of Cannon County. She died in 1884, ac­cording to Dunn research.

Lottie Belle Goins, daughter of Dodson Goin and Erelda Goins Goins, was born about 1874. She was enumerated at age six in the 1880 census. She died in 1893, according to Dunn research.

De Amold Goins, son of Dodson Goin and Erelda Goins Goins, was born about 1879. He was recorded as a one-year-old in the 1880 census of his father’s household. He died in 1884, according to Dunn research.

Jacob Benjamin Goins, son of Dodson Goin and Erelda Goins Goins, was born about 1883. He died in 1891, according to Dunn research.

Martha Goins, daughter of Granville Goins and Mary “Polly” Goins, was born in Hamilton County about 1843, according to Ethel Louise Goins Dunn. She did not appear in the 1850 census of her father’s household..

James L. Goins, son of Granville Goins and Mary “Polly Goins, was born in Hamilton County about 1844. He ap­peared as a six-year-old in the 1850 census. He was married about 1870 to a cousin, Melvina Goins, daughter of Martin Goins and Susan Goins. James L. Goins died August 20, 1897.

According to the research of Ethel Louise Goins Dunn, chil­dren born to James L. Goins and Melvina Goins Goins in­clude:

Mary Goins born about 1871
Elijah Goins born June 7, 1873
Archibald Goins born September 8, 1874
Charles Goins born February 10, 1876
Albert Goins born about 1878
Mattie Goins born about 1879
Thomas Goins born about 1880
John Goins born about 1883

Mary Goins, daughter of James L. Goins and Melvina Goins Goins, was born about 1871. She was married about 1890, husband’s name Erwin, according to Dunn research.

Elijah Goins, son of James L. Goins and Melvina Goins Goins, was born June 7, 1873 in James County, Tennessee. He was married about 1896, wife’s name Dora. Children born to Elijah Goins and Dora Goins are unknown.

Archibald Goins, son of James L. Goins and Melvina Goins Goins, was born September 8, 1874 in James Gounty. He was married about 1897, wife’s name Florence.

Children born to Archibald Goins and Florence Goins include:

Eliza Goins born about 1900

Eliza Goins, daughter of Archibald Goins and Florence Goins, was born about 1900, according to John Harrison, a grandson.

Charles Goins, son of James L. Goins and Melvina Goins Goins, was born February 10, 1876. He was married about 1899, wife’s name Nancy. Of Charles Goins and Nancy Goins nothing more is known.

Albert Goins, son of James L. Goins and Melvina Goins Goins, was born about 1878.

Mattie Goins, daughter of James L. Goins and Melvina Goins Goins, was born about 1879. She died in 1898, according to Dunn research.

Thomas Goins, son of James L. Goins and Melvina Goins Goins, was born about 1880. He died in 1906, according to Dunn research.

John Goins, son of James L. Goins and Melvina Goins Goins, was born about 1886. He died in 1906, according to Dunn research.

Nancy Goins, daughter of Granville Goins and Mary “Polly” Goins, was born in Hamilton County about 1846. She ap­peared as a four-year-old in the 1850 census.

John Goins, son of Granville Goins and Mary “Polly” Goins, was born in Hamilton County about 1847, according to Ethel Louise Goins Dunn. He did not appear in the 1850 census of his father’s household.

William Goins, son of Granville Goins and Mary “Polly” Goins, was born in Hamilton County about 1849. He was enumerated at “eight months” in the 1850 census of his par­ents’ household.

Francis Marion Goins, son of Granville Goins and Mary “Polly” Goins, was born in Hamilton County about 1853, according to Ethel Louise Goins Dunn..

Granville Goins, regarded as a son of Roland Goins, was born about 1808, probably in Granville County, Tennessee. He accompanied his father and grandfather in the move to Hamilton County, Tennessee about 1829. He was married about 1831, wife’s name Mary “Polly,” probably in Graysville, located just across the county line in Rhea County.

“G. Goins, free colored,” regarded as Granville Goins, was enumerated as the head of a household in the 1840 census of Hamilton County, page 150.

Twelve households of the family were enumerated in the 1840 census of Hamilton County: Sanford Gowin, page 150; Thomas Gowin, page 150; George Gowin, page 150; William Gowin, page 150; John Gowin, page 150; Martin Gowin, page 150; G.[ranville] Gowin, page 150; P. Gowin, page 150; John Gowan page 175; Pryor Gowen, page 175, Carter Gowin, page 177 and Preston Gowen, page 178. All except the last four were recorded as “free colored.”

Granville Goins was enumerated as the head of a household No. 1339 in the 1850 census of Hamilton County. The family was recorded October 21, 1850 as:

“Goins, Granvill 40, farmer, born in Tennessee
Mary 33, born in Tennessee
Mahaley 18, born in Tennessee
Rachel 14, born in Tennessee
Noah 12, born in Tennessee
Roland 10, born in Tennessee
Dopson 8, born in Tennessee
James 6, born in Tennessee
Nancy 4, born in Tennessee
William 8/12, born in Tennessee”

Adjoining the household of Granville Goins was that of Nancy Goins, perhaps a sister-in-law to Granville Goins. The household, No. 1340, was recorded on Page 925 as:

“Goins, Nancy, 45, born in TN
Elizabeth, 29, born in TN
Fanney 10, born in TN”

“Granville and Polly Goins” were mentioned in an affidavit signed in 1908 by J. P. Talley of Chattanooga, according to “Cherokee by Blood: Records of Eastern Cherokee Ancestry in the U.S. Court of Claims, 1906-1910” by Jerry Wright Jordon. In the hope of compensation, several Melungeon families claimed Cherokee ancestry. Talley stated:

“I [affirm] that I am 80 years of age and lived in James County, Tennessee [later absorbed]. I knew Polly and Granville Goins. They lived in Hamilton County, but I think they were born in upper Tennessee, probably Grainger County. Polly and Granville were a little older than myself. They have been dead 12 or 15 years. They were never on any Indian rolls that I know of.”

J. P. Talley
June 18, 1908 Chattanooga, Tenn.”

At the same time, W. T. Irvin of Chattanooga, grandson-in-law of Granville Goins, and former husband of Mary Jane Goins Irvin who died in 1897, made an affidavit about the family:

“I affirm that I live in Marion County, Tennessee [adjoining Hamilton County]. I am 49 years of age. I make claim for my children. My first wife has been dead 11 years. She was about 30 or 32 when she died. Her parents were Alfred Goins and Halie [Mahala?]Goins. She claims Indian descent on her father’s side and her mother’s side. Her grandparents on her mother’s side were Granville and Polly Goins. On her father’s side they were Thomas and Betsy Goins. They come by the same name because they were probably related. She was always recognized as an Indian in the community in which she lived. Her parents and grandparents lived in what is now James County. Her grandparents originated in Grainger County. She claimed to be a full-blood Cherokee. Her grandparents lived in Hamilton County in 1835.
W. T. Irvin
June 18, 1908 Chattanooga, Tenn”

Granville Goins and Mary “Polly” Goins died about 1914. Children born to them are believed to include:

Mahala “Halie” Goins born about 1832
Betsy Jane Goins born about 1834
Rachel Goins born about 1836
Mary Goins born about 1837
Noah Goins born about 1838
Roland Goins born about 1840
Dodson Goins born about 1842
Martha Goins born about 1843
James L. Goins born about 1844
Nancy Goins born about 1846
John Goins born about 1847
William Goins born about 1849
Francis Marion Goins born about 1853

Dodson Goins, above, was the subject of an article in the Newsletter, January 1997.

Alfred Goins and Mahala Goins was enumerated in the 1880 census of James County, Tennessee, Civil District 2:

“Goins, Alfred 54, farm laborer, native American, born in TN,
father born in TN, mother born in TN
Haily 48, wife, keeping house, native American, born
in TN, father born in TN, mother born in TN
William B. 20, son, farm laborer, single, native American
born in TN, father born in TN, mother born in – TN
Mary J. 13, daughter, single, at home, native American
born in TN, father born in TN, mother born in – TN
Thomas 11, son, single, native American, father born
in TN, mother born in TN”

Granville Goins and Mary “Polly” Goins died about 1914. Children born to them are believed to include:

Mahala “Halie” Goins born about 1832
Betsy Jane Goins born about 1834
Rachel Goins born about 1836
Mary Goins born about 1837
Noah Goins born about 1838
Roland Goins born about 1840
Dodson Goins born about 1842
Martha Goins born about 1843
James L. Goins born about 1844
Nancy Goins born about 1846
John Goins born about 1847
William Goins born about 1849
Francis Marion Goins born about 1853

Dodson Goins, above, was the subject of an article in the Newsletter, January 1997.

Mahala “Halie” Goins, daughter of Granville Goins and Mary “Polly” Goins, was born in Hamilton County about 1832. She appeared as an 18-year-old in the 1850 census of her parents’ household. She was married about 1850 to Alfred Goins, a cousin. He was a son of Thomas Goins and Betsy Goins.

Living near the Jackson Goins family were Alfred Goins and Mahala Goins. Nearby was the family of Francis M. Goins and Sarah Goins.

The household of Alfred Goins was enumerated in the 1880 census of James County, Civil District 2 as:

“Goins, Alfred 54, farm laborer, married born in
TN, father born in TN, mother
born in TN, native American
Haily 48, wife, keeping house, born in
TN, father born in TN, mother
born in TN, native American
William B. 20, son, farm laborer, single, born
in TN, father born in TN,
mother born in TN, native American
Mary J. 14, daughter, single, born in TN
father born in TN, mother
born in TN, native American
Thomas 11, son, single, born in TN, father
born in TN, mother born in
TN, native American”

Children born to Alfred Goins and Mahala “Halie” Going Goins include:

William Bird Goins born about 1860
Mary Jane Goins born about 1865
Thomas Goins born about 1869

William Bird Goins, son of Alfred Goins and Mahala “Halie” Going Goins, was born about 1860. He appeared as a 10-year old in the 1870 census and as a 20-year-old in the 1880 census of James County. He later removed to Crawford County, Illinois, according to David Goins.

Mary Jane Goins, daughter of Alfred Goins and Mahala “Halie” Going Goins, was born about 1865. She was married about 1882 to W. T. Irvin of Chatanooga. She died in 1897 at about age 31, according to an affidavit furnished by Irvin, according to “Cherokee by Blood.”

Thomas Goins, son of Alfred Goins and Mahala “Halie” Going Goins, was born about 1869. He appeared as an 11-year-old in the 1880 census of James County.

Mahala “Halie” Goins, daughter of Granville Goins and Mary “Polly” Goins, was born in Hamilton County about 1832. She appeared as an 18-year-old in the 1850 census of her parents household. She was married about 1850 to Alfred Goins, a cousin. He was a son of Thomas Goins and Betsy Goins.

They were enumerated in the 1870 and 1880 census of James County, living in Civil District 2 near Long Savannah, Tennessee.

Children born to Alfred Goins and Mahala “Halie” Going Goins include a daughter, Mary Jane Goins, born about 1865. The daughter was married about 1882 to W. T. Irvin of Chatanooga. She died in 1897 at about age 31, according to an affidavit furnished by Irvin, according to “Cherokee by Blood.”

Betsy Jane Goins, daughter of Granville Goins and Mary “Polly” Goins, was born in Hamilton County about 1834, according to the research of Ethel Louise Goins Dunn of Crandall, Georgia. She did not appear in the 1850 census of her parents’ household.

Rachel Goins, daughter of Granville Goins and Mary “Polly” Goins, was born in Hamilton County about 1836. She appeared as a 14-year-old in the 1850 census of the household of her parents.

Mary Goins, daughter of Granville Goins and Mary “Polly” Goins, was born in Hamilton County about 1837, according to Ethel Louise Goins Dunn. She did not appear in the 1850 census.

Noah Goins, son of Granville Goins and Mary “Polly” Goins, was born in Hamilton County about 1838. He appeared in the 1850 census of his father’s household at age 12.
==O==

Granville Goins and his wife, Polly, also lived among the Cherokees in Hamilton County. It was said that Granville knew the Cherokee language and had an Indian name. Granville, who was a carpenter, started on the Trail of Tears, but was among those turning back to Tennessee. Children of Granville included Mahala, Rachael,
Noah, Roland, Dodson, Barnes, Nancy and William.

zzzzzzzz

Carter Goins, son of Laban Goins was born about 1788 in Vir­ginia, and died in northern Hamilton County in the Graysville area. He was married about 1809, wife’s name unknown.

Children born to Carter Goins include:

Carter Goins, Jr. born in 1810
Harbance Goins born about 1812
Charles Goins born about 1815

Carter Goins, Jr, son of Carter Goins, was born in 1810 in Grainger or Jefferson County, Tennessee. He was brought to Hamilton County, Tennessee by his father about 1829. Carter Goins, Jr. was married about 1834 to Cynthia A. McGill of Graysville, Rhea County, Tennessee.

Seven children, four sons and three daughters were born to Carter Goins, Jr. and Cynthia A. McGill Goins:

William Goins born in 1836
Francis Marion Goins born about 1838
James Goins born about 1840
Elizabeth Goins born in 1842
Jefferson Goins born in 1844
Vandola Goins born in 1848
Minerva Goins born in 1852

William Goins, son of Carter Goins, Jr. and Cynthia McGill Goins, was born in 1836 at Graysville.

Francis Marion Goins, son of Carter Goins, Jr. and Cynthia McGill Goins, was born at Graysville in 1838, the year of the Cherokee removal. He enlisted, along with Jefferson Goins, in the First Light Artillery Regiment in the Union Army and was injured in the Cumberland Gap area for which he received a pension in his older years.

He was married about 1865 to Sarah Neely who was born in 1843 in Cannon County, Tennessee. They continued to live there until about 1871 and then returned to Graysville. She died there in 1881 and he was remarried to Margaret J. Murphy in Cannon County. Francis Marion Goins died March 2, 1895 at Burt, Tennessee in Cannon County and was buried on his farm there.

Six children, five sons and one daughter, were born to Francis Marion Goins and Sarah Neely Goins:

James M. Goins born in 1867
William J. Goins born in 1870
Samuel Ulysses S. Grant Goins born July 29, 1872
Charles Goins born in 1874
Andrew Goins born in 1876
Lavada Goins born in 1880

Three children were born to Francis Marion Goins and Mar­garet J. Murphy Goins:

James Robert Goins born March 26, 1883
Ida Jane Goins born July 12, 1887
Maria Elizabeth Goins born June 10, 1892

James M. Goins, son of Francis Marion Goins and Sarah Neely Goins, was born in Hamilton County in 1867.

William J. Goins, son of Francis Marion Goins and Sarah Neely Goins, was born in Hamilton County, Tennessee in August 1871. He was married about 1890 to Mrs. Margaret “Maggie” Emeline Moore Merritt. She was the widow of Benjamin H. Merritt whom she had married June 28, 1884 in Dekalb County, Tennessee. She was the daughter of Jesse Moore and Frances L. Hutchins Moore.

William J. Goins was recorded living in Cannon County near his brother, Samuel Ulysses Simpson Grant Goins in 1900. “William J. Goin, Indian,” was enumerated as the head of a household in the 1900 census of Cannon County, Enumeration District 24, page 8, 4th Civil District:

“Goin, William J. 28, born in TN, August 1871
Maggie E. 30, born in TN, March 1870
Sarah F. 9, born in TN, June 1891
Julia A. 3, born in TN, January 1897
[son] 3/12, born in TN, February 1900
Merritt, William F. 15, born TN, Feb. 22, 1885,
step-son
Robert C. 10, born in TN, June 18, 1889,
step-son”

Children born to William J. Goins and Margaret Emeline “Maggie” Moore Merritt Goins include:

Sarah F. Goins born in June 1891
Julia A. Goins born in January 1897
[son] born in February 1900

Samuel Ulysses Simpson Grant Goins, son of Francis Marion Goins and Sarah Neely Goins, was born in Cannon County July 29, 1872. He was married there July 17, 1892 to Mrs. Amanda A. Mooneyham Barrett, widow of Albert Barrett. She was born there January 16, 1864 to Robert Mooneyham and Mary M. Manus Mooneyham. She had four children, but only one of the four survived.

“Samuel U. G. Goin, Indian,” was enumerated as the head of a household in the 1900 census of Cannon County, Enumeration District 24, page 10, 4th Civil District:

“Goin, Samuel U. G. 26, born in TN, July 1873
Amanda E. 40, born in TN, July 1870
John 4, born in TN, October 1895
Lavada 1, born in TN, August 1898
Barrett, Maggie 14, born in TN, Sept. 1885,
step-daughter”

They removed to Hamilton County and settled at Graysville about 1904. She died in Chattanooga January 21, 1944 and was buried in Lomineck Cemetery there. He died in Cannon County February 21, 1947 and was buried in Cherry Cemetery at Woodbury, Tennessee.

Children were born to Samuel Ulysses Simpson Grant Goins and Amanda A. Mooneyham Barrett Goins:

Maggie Barrett born in September 1885
John Wiley Goins born October 18, 1895
Levada Emiline Goins born August 13, 1897
Andrew Jackson Goins born July 26, 1899
Ammie Marchell Goins born November 2, 1903
Charles W. Goins born July 29, 1908

Maggie Barrett, daughter of Albert Barrett and Amanda A. Mooneyham Barrett, was born in September 1885 in Cannon County. She was married eight or nine times, but had no chil­dren. She died in Dalton, Georgia.

John Wiley Goins, son of Samuel Ulysses Simpsson Grant Goins and Amanda A. Mooneyham Barrett Goins, was born October 18, 1895 at Manchester, Tennessee in Coffee County. He was brought back to Hamilton County about 1904 by his parents. He was married December 29, 1916 to Dovie Mae Bedwell, daughter of Jessie Harrison Bedwell and Sarah Doss Bedwell of McMinn County, Tennessee. They lived on ad­joining farms from 1905 until they were married.

He served in World War I and was buried in the National Cemetery in Chattanooga when he died there October 2, 1938. Children born to John Wiley Goins and Dovie Mae Bedwell Goins are unknown.

Levada Emilene Goins, daughter of Samuel Ulysses Simpson Grant Goins and Amanda A. Mooneyham Barrett Goins, was born August 13, 1897 in Hamilton County. She was married about 1918 to Charles Albert Leffew who was born at Dayton, Tennessee in 1880. Four sons and three daughters were born to them. She died August 18, 1973 in San Bernandino, California.

Andrew Jackson Goins, son of Samuel Ulysses Simpson Grant Goins and Amanda A. Mooneyham Barrett Goins, was born July 26, 1899 in Cannon County. He served in World War I. He did not marry and for years pushed an ice cream cart around Chattanooga. He died in 1982 and was buried in the National Cemetery there.

Ammie Marshell Goins, daughter of Samuel Ulysses Simpson Grant Goins and Amanda A. Mooneyham Barrett Goins, was born November 2, 1903 in Cannon County. She was married January 13, 1921 to Floyd Martin Larmon who was born in Dalton, Georgia in 1902. In 1991 they lived in Etowah, Ten­nessee. Five children, one son and four daughters, were born to them.

Charles W. Goins, son of Samuel Ulysses Simpson Grant Goins and Amanda A. Mooneyham Barrett Goins, was born July 29, 1908 at Graysville. He was married about 1931 to Beatrice Goins, a second cousin. She was the daughter of James Granville Goins and Ora Goins. James Granville Goins was a first cousin to Samuel Ulysses Simpson Grant Goins.

One son was born to Charles W. Goins and Beatrice Goins Goins:

Charlie Goins born in 1935

Charley Goins, son of Francis Marion Goins and Sarah Neely Goins, was born in Cannon County in 1874.

Andrew Goins, son of Francis Marion Goins and Sarah Neely Goins, was born in 1876 in Cannon County. He was married about 1899, wife’s name Lizzie. Children born to Andrew Goins and Lizzie Goins are unknown.

Lavada Goins, daughter of Francis Marion Goins and Sarah Neely Goins, was born in Cannon County in 1880. She was married about 1898 to William Bolin.

James Goins, son of Carter Goins, Jr. and Cynthia McGill Goins, was born about 1840 at Graysville.

Elizabeth Goins, daughter of Carter Goins, Jr. and Cynthia McGill Goins, was born in 1842 at Graysville. She was mar­ried about 1860 to Pleasant Bowling.

Jefferson Goins, son of Carter Goins, Jr. and Cynthia McGill Goins, was born in 1844 at Graysville. He was married about 1867 to Sarah Mooneyham.

Vandola Goins, daughter of Carter Goins, Jr. and Cynthia McGill Goins, was born in 1848 at Graysville.

Minerva Goins, daughter of Carter Goins, Jr. and Cynthia McGill Goins, was born in 1852 at Graysville. She was mar­ried to James Goins, her second cousin.

Harbance Goins, son of Carter Goins was born about 1812. He was married about 1835, wife’s name unknown.

Children born to Harbance Goins include:

Laban Goins born about 1837
William Goins born about 1839
Duncan Goins born about 1841
Jane Goins born about 1845

Charles Goins, son of Carter Goins, was born about 1815 in Hamilton County.

Dodson Goins, regarded as a son of Laban Goins, was born about 1789 in Patrick County. The Dodson family was a neighbor to the Goins family in Grainger County. He accompanied his father to Hamilton County about 1829. He participated in the Second Seminole War in 1837. His company was mustered at Ross’s Landing, according to “The History of Hamilton County and Chattanooga, Tennessee” by Zella Armstrong.

This company was mustered out at Baton Rouge, Louisiana May 9, 1838. Members of the company were:

Capt. Darlen A. Wilds
1st Lt. G. B. Gwathney
2nd Lt. E. H. Freeman
2nd Lt. John H. Boyd

William J. Standifer, transferred from Capt. Farris’ Company.
Nov. 6, 1837
Joseph Lovelady
William Compton
John Avery
Thomas J. Candler. died Jan. 24, 1838, wounded in battle
Sevier Fryer, wounded in battle
Thomas Elliott
William FRYAR
William LOVELADY
James AUSTIN
James AUSTIN; killed in battle Jan 24, 1838
John BRANUM
Richard BOATMAN, Jr.
Benjamin BUNTYN
Jacob BRAMBULL
Jonathan COCHRAN
Thomas CONNER
William CONNER; died Feb 28, 1838
William CORNETT
John CORNETT
William CHADWICK
William COBB; died Feb 27, 1838
James COBB
L. CONDRAY
George R. DAVIS
Barney EASTRIDGE
Thomas FENNELL
Pleasant FRYAR
Mark FITZGERALD
William GAUT
Dodson GOWINS (Goins)
John W. GIDEON
Francis HUGHES
William HUGHES
George W. HAGLER
Jesse L. HIBBS
William JONES
Andrew J. JOHNSON
Samuel M. LOVE
William T. LOWRY died Feb 13, 1838
John S. MARSH
John McDONOUGH
Walter K. MERONY
John T. MATHIS
Herbert H. MOON
Moses A. NELSON
Isaac NICHOLS; died Apr. 20, 1838
A.D. PERRY
Peter PARKISON
Jonathan C. ROGERS
James RAMSEY
William RUSSELL
William ROBERTS
Edward ROBB
John RAMSEY
Daniel J. STAFFORD
James STRINGER
James SMITH
William SMITH
Edwin SMITH
Thomas E. SMITH
Archeleus SMITH
Calvin SMITH; died Feb. 20, 1838
Green SMITH
Jesse M. SMITH
John SMITH (substitute for James WARDLAW)
Pryor A. SMITH
William STORY
William STARLING
James TAYLOR
William E. TAYLOR; died Feb 28, 1838
Sevier TYNER
William TYNER
Thomas WADKINS
William J. WALKER
Lewis WEBB
William WALTERS; died Mar. 7, 1838
Walter WADKINS
Jeremiah FRYAR
David COPE
Abram NICHOLS
Washington JASPER
(The last 3 seem to have been transferred from Capt. FARRIS’ Company)

(Signed) Capt. D.A. WILDS
Lt. Col. W.L. FOSTER, United States Army

Harbord H. MOORE was in the 2nd Seminole War (reference Goodspeed). John P.
LONG was in the 2nd Seminole War.

Merilla Goins, daughter of Laban Goins and Ella Duncan Goins, was born about 1790 in Patrick County.

Tilman Goins, son of Laban Goins and Ella Duncan Goins, was born about 1795, probably in Patrick County. He was married about 1818 and lived in Cherokee County, North Carolina, in the extreme western tip of the state, according to Melton E. Gene” Scott, a descendant of Trenton, Georgia.

Children born to Tilman Goins include:

Julia Ann Goins born about 1820

Julia Ann Goins, daughter of Tilman Goins, was born about 1820 in Cherokee County, North Carolina. She was married about 1836 to John Goins who was born in Bledsoe County, Tennessee, a son of Thomas Goins of Grainger County, according to Melton E. “Gene” Scott, a descendant of Trenton, Georgia.

Children born to John Goins and Julia Ann Goins Goins include:

Sarah Isabelle Goins born 1860

Sarah Isabelle Goins, daughter of John Goins and Julia Ann Goins Goins, was born about 1860. She was married November 28, 1883 to Columbus Scott at Smithville, Tennessee in DeKalb County, according to Melton E. “Gene” Scott, a grandson.

Thomas Goins, son of Laban Goins and Ella Duncan Goins, was born about 1797, probably in Grainger County. He lived in Bledsoe County about 1820 where a son was born.

Children born to him include:

John Goins born about 1824

John Goins, son of Thomas Goins, was born about 1824 in Bledsoe County.

Preston Goins, son of Laban Goins and Ella Duncan Goins, was born about about 1800, probably in Patrick County. Martin Fields, son of George Fields and Cassandra Fields, was born about 1822. He was married about 1845 to Cythianna Goins, daughter of Preston Goins and Betsy McGill of Hamilton County.

Harvard Goins, son of Laban Goins and Ella Duncan Goins, was born about 1804, probably in Grainger County.

Harvard Goins was enumerated as the head of Household No. 422 in the 1850 census of Hamilton County, Page 796. The family was rendered September 18, 1850 as:

“Goins, Harvard 46, farmer, born in TN
Laborn 16, born in Tennessee, laborer
William 11, born in Tennessee
Duncan 9, born in Tennessee
Jane 7, born in Tennessee”

Charlie Goins was enumerated as the head of Household No. 423-423 adjoining Harvard Goins in the 1850 census of Hamilton County:

“Goins, Charlie 45, born in North Carolina
Nathan 18, born in Tennessee
Rhoda 15, born in Tennessee
Catharin 8, born in Tennessee
Sarah 5, born in Tennessee”

Melton E. “Gene” Scott, Trenton, Georgia wrote December 20, 1993:

“My grandmother was born Sarah Isabelle Goins. Her father was John Goins, born in Bledsoe County, TN. His father was Thomas Goins, born in Grainger County, TN. The mother of Sarah Isabelle Goins was also a Goins. Julia Ann Goins was her maiden name. She was the daughter of Tilman Goins, born in Cherokee County, North Carolina. His father was Laborn Goins, born in Patrick County, VA. The sister of Tilman Goins, Marilla Goins was born in Patrick County also. His brothers were Preston Goins, Harbard Goins and Shadrack Goins.

My grandmother, Sarah Isabelle Goins was married to my grandfather, Columbus Scott November 28, 1883 at Smithville, TN in DeKalb County. His brother, James Scott was his bondsman. I believe that the mother of Columbus and James Scott was a Goins also. Both were listed as Indian in the 1880 census of DeKalb County. My grandmother had cousins in Grainger County by the names of Granville Goins and Sanford Goins.”

Daniel Going, regarded by some researchers as a son of Shadrach Going, was born about 1760, probably in Hanover County and brought to Halifax County by his father.

“Daniel Going, born about 1760,” was enlisted in the Virginia Continental Line in February 1777, according to his pension application. He served in the Battle of Germantown and in the Battle of Brandywine. He was discharged at Valley Forge, Pennsylvania.

Daniel Going appeared on the 1782 tax list of Halifax County with two in the family. He began paying taxes in Bedford County in 1783. He reappeared on the Bedford County tax rolls from 1786 through 1794, according to the research of June A. Smith of Bremerton, Washington.

Daniel Going was one of the men who posted bond when items were sold from the estate of Maryann Franklin in Bed-ford County November 22, 1794. The bond was “examined by the Bedford County Court September 19, 1797 and re-turned July 23, 1798,” suggesting that Daniel Going remained there at that time.

He was not mentioned in the will of Shadrach Going written in 1805. Daniel Going appeared in the 1805 tax list of Grainger County, Tennessee, but did not join the sons of Shadrach in filing suit against their younger brother, Obadiah Goins, exec-utor of the will of Shadrach Goins, for forging the will of Shadrach Goins.

Hannah Going, daughter of Shadrach Going, was born about 1763 in Hanover County. She was married to Thomas Beasley about 1781. She was mentioned in the will of her father written in 1805 as the recipient of “five shillings.”

Caleb Going, son of Shadrach Going, was born about 1765, probably in Hanover County. He appeared as a taxpayer in the 1782 tax list of Halifax County. He was mentioned in the will of his father written in 1805 as the recipient of five shillings.

Caleb Going appeared on the 1805 tax list of Grainger County, Tennessee as “one white poll.” In 1806 he joined his brothers in protesting the administration of his father’s estate by his brother Obadiah Going.

“Caleb Goan” was enumerated in the 1810 census of Grainger County as the head of a household composed of “6 free colored, 4 children.”

James Going, son of Shadrach Going, was born about 1769, probably in Hanover County. “James Goin” appeared as a taxpayer in Halifax County along with “Laban Goin, Claiborne Goin, Daniel Goin, John Goin and Caleb Goin.”

About 1797, James Goin removed, apparently with several families of relatives regarded by some researchers as Melun­geons, to Grainger County, Tennessee.

On November 27, 1797, James Goin received North Carolina Land Grant No. 300 for 262 acres on the Tennessee River and 938 acres on the north side of Tennessee River in what is now Grainger County. The 1799 tax list for this county shows “Thomas Goen, James Goen, John Goen, John Gowen, William Gowen and Alexander Gowen,” all listed as “white.” Grainger County was formed from Hawkins and Knox Counties in 1796.

“James Goin, free colored” appeared in the 1799 tax list of Grainger County “in Capt. McKee’s Company.” The 1805 tax list of Grainger County included “James Goins, Laborn Going, Claborn Goins, Daniel Going, Caleb Going and John Goins. A second version of the “Taxable Inhabitants for the Year 1805” listed “James Going, Laban Going, Claiborne Going, Daniel Goin, Shadrack Goin, John Going and Calib Going.” “James Goin” was shown with “one free poll” in each tax list.

“James Goan” was enumerated as the head of a household in the 1810 census of Grainger County as “three free colored and one white female, 16-26.” Enumerators at that time did not record the age of free colored individuals. A duplicate enumeration for “James Goan” appeared in adjoining Claiborne County, Tennessee in 1810. Claiborne County was organized in 1801 from land taken from Grainger and Hawkins Counties, perhaps explaining the duplication.

“James Goin, Sr.” received a deed from Blain Davison in 1815 to land in Claiborne County for $200, according to Claiborne County Deed Book H, page 14.

The 1820 enumeration of James Goin did not survive. Most of the individual enumeration sheets of the census of 1820 of the state of Tennessee were destroyed by fire in Washington, D. C. Fragments of the census for only ten counties and re­caps of others escaped the fire. No enumeration sheets were available for Claiborne or Hawkins County. Recap sheets showed 310 “free persons of color” in the 1820 census.

In 1825, “James Goin, Sr.” deeded land in Claiborne County to John Harris for $200, according to Claiborne County Deed Book H, page 448. It is believed that James Goin died before 1830 because he did not appear in the 1830 census of Ten­nessee.

It is obvious that the census enumerator in 1830 had difficulty in deciding whether to list the seven Goen and Goin families as “white” or “free colored people.” In the summary sheet 37 families composed of 331 people were recorded as “free col­ored” in 1830. White and “free colored” were listed in con­secutive entries which perhaps indicated adjacent locations.

Possible sons of James Goin, Sr. are:

James Chambers Gowan born June 1, 1795
Prudence Going born about 1800

James Chambers Gowan, possible son of James Goin, Sr, was born June 1, 1795, probably in Halifax County, according to Mary Alice Fritch, a descendant of Flat River, Missouri. James Chambers Gowan served in the Tennessee militia companies of Capt. George Gregory and Capt. Elisha Milliken during the War of 1812, according to “War of 1812, Index of Pensioners” by Virgil D. White. He enlisted January 8, 1814 in Capt. George Gregory’s company of Tennessee militiamen and also served under Capt. Elisha Milliken. He was discharged as a private May 17, 1814. He reenlisted September 20, 1814 in preparation for a march to New Orleans with Gen. Andrew Jackson. He was discharged May 5, 1815, again a private, according to “War of 1812, Index of Pensioners.”

James Chambers Gowan was married May 25, 1824 to Lucinda Margaret True at Tazewell, Tennessee. She was born in Virginia February 12, 1806, according to a letter written August 26, 1991 by Mary Alice Fritch.

He was enumerated as the head of a household in the 1830 census of Claiborne County, page 106:

“Goin, James white male 30-40
white female 30-40
white female 0-5
white female 0-5”

Some disabling statutes were installed in 1831, 1832 and 1834 in the Tennessee constitution to prevent free colored from certains rights enjoyed by the white citizens. They could not own land, pay taxes, vote or testify in court in matters involving white men. These discouraging statutes caused many Melungeons and free colored to leave the state. However, the census enumerators mitigated some of the injustice by a liberal interpretation of who was white and who was free negro or mulatto.

The state of Tennessee filed charges against several Melungeons “for voting in an election held on the seventh day of August 1845.” Some convictions were handed down in a trial held in Rogersville, Tennessee on Saturday, July 29, 1848.

James Chambers Gowan lived in Kentucky in 1832, according to Diane Marie Dunbar Howard, a descendant of Cleveland, Ohio and a Foundation member.

It is believed that they had removed about 1835 to Harrison County, Indiana, perhaps in the expectation of receiving a bounty land grant. In 1850 James Chambers Gowan received Bounty Land Grant No. 8904 to 80 acres of land.

He was enumerated in the 1850 census of Harrison County, 45th township, page 398 as the head of a household composed of:

“Gowan, James 54, born in VA
Lucinda 46, born in VA
Jahue 20,
Mary A. 18,
John 16,
James E. 13,
Lucinda 12,
Levina 9,
Rezin 7,
Miriam 5”

The sons of James Chambers Gowan were stonemasons, carpenters and farmers, and all were in Harrison County in 1850, according to Mary Alice Fritch.

In 1855, James Chambers Gowan and Lucinda Margaret True removed to Jefferson County, Missouri, just south of St. Louis. James Chambers Gowan died there July 28, 1874 at age 79 and was buried in the Gowan Cemetery, according to Mary Alice Fritch.

His obituary appeared in the “Jefferson County Leader:”

“Died at De Soto, July 29, of Cholera Morbus, James Chambers[?] Gowan aged 79 years, 1 mo. and 27 days. Mr. Gowan was born in Virginia and raised in Tennes-see, came to Missouri in 1852, and was one of the first who settled in DeSoto.

He possessed all the qualities of a good man and was respected and beloved by all who knew him. He was a man of peace and sobriety. He joined the M.E. church when quite a youth, and remained a faithful member till death. He lived to see all of his children, 14 in number, grown up, the youngest being 29[?] years old. The writer of this was present and saw him fall asleep in Jesus. J.T.M.”

Lucinda Margaret True Gowen later lived in Harrison City, Indiana and Jefferson City, Missouri. She received Widow’s Pension Nos. WC-28454 and SC-15459.

The death of “Mrs. [Lucinda] Gowan, nearly 80,” on March 8, 1880 was reported in the Friday, March 12, 1880 edition of the “Jefferson Democrat” of Hillsboro, Missouri:

“There was another death Monday night of a very old lady. Mrs. Gowan, aged nearly 80 years. Mrs. Gowan lived alone and the neighbors not seeing her stirring about in the morn-ing went to see what was the matter. They found her lying on the floor dead. She had prepared herself to retire for the night and had evidently died at about usual bed time. She has a large number of relatives and friends who attended her funeral yesterday.”

Two weeks later the “Jefferson Democrat” carried a second obituary for Lucinda Margaret True Gowan in its March 26, 1880 edition:

“At De Soto. Mo., March 8, 1880, Mrs. Lucinda Gowan, aged 74 years. Mrs. Gowan was born in Virginia, lived at different periods in Tennessee, Kentucky and Indiana, but had been a resident of Jefferson County twenty-eight years, being one of the first to locate in the town of De Soto. She was a member of the M.E. Church for forty years. For many years had been af-flicted with heart disease, and died — as her friends anticipated — alone, as she had lived alone for a long time.

The evening before her death she was visited by a neighbor, who took her some refreshments, which she ate. Next morn-ing when the lady again looked in Mrs. Gowan was on the floor dead. Those who knew Mother Gowan believe that she had Jesus with her when she died, and that was better company than all earthly friends. T.M.”

Lucinda Margaret True Gowan was buried beside her husband in DeSoto, Missouri.

Among the 14 children born to James Chambers Gowan and Lucinda Margaret True Gowan were:

[daughter] born about 1826
[daughter] born about 1828
John Jehu Gowan born in 1830
Mary Ann Gowan born April 1, 1832
John Gowan born about 1834
James E. Gowan born August 20, 1836
Lucinda Gowan born about 1838
Levinia Gowan born about 1841
Rezin Gowan born about 1843
Miriam Gowan born about 1845

A daughter, name unknown, was born to James Chambers Gowan and Lucinda Margaret True Gowan about 1826. She appeared in the 1830 census of Claiborne County as a “white female, 0-5.”

A second daughter, possibly Mary Ann Gowan, was born to James Chambers Gowan and Lucinda Margaret True Gowan about 1828. She appeared in the 1830 census of Claiborne County as a “white female, 0-5.” Mary Ann Gowan was married to John Hopson in Floyd County, Indiana about 1850. He was the brother of Elizabeth Hopson who was married to her brother John Jehu Gowan. They may have removed to Jefferson County, Missouri along with John Jehu Gowan.

John Jehu Gowan, son of James Chambers Gowan and Lucinda Margaret True Gowan, was born in 1830 in Claiborne County, Tennessee according to Emma Gowen Bogue of Hawaii, a Foundation member. He removed with his father to Harrison County, Indiana about 1835. He appeared there at age 20 in the household of his father in the 1850 census.

He was married about 1853 to Elizabeth Hopson, daughter of Thomas F. Hopson and Jane Linder Hopson who lived in adjoining Floyd County, Indiana. Thomas F. Hopson was the son of John Hopson and Mary “Polly” Shanks Hopson who came to Floyd County from Jefferson County, Kentucky about 1809, according to Dianne Howard, a descendant of Cleveland, Ohio.

John Jehu Gowan and Elizabeth Hopson Gowan removed to Jefferson County, Missouri by 1875. He died in 1914 in DeSoto, Missouri.

Children born to them are unknown.

Mary Ann Gowan, daughter of James Chambers Gowan and Lucinda Margaret True Gowan, was born April 1, 1832 in Kentucky, according to Diane Marie Dunbar Howard. “Mary Gowin” was born “in New York state in 1832,” according to “Goodspeed’s History of Missouri.”

She was brought to Harrison County, Indiana about 1835 by her parents. She was enumerated at age 18 in her father’s household in the 1850 census. She was married August 1, 1850 in Harrison County, Indiana to John Hopson who was born May 3, 1832 in Floyd County, Indiana to Thomas F. Hopson and Jane Linder Hopson. He was a brother to Elizabeth Hopson who was married to Jehu John Gowan.

In 1851, they accompanied his parents in a move to Jefferson County, Missouri. In 1852, they removed to Washington County, Missouri, but returned to Jefferson County the following year where he owned a farm. In 1858 he entered the carpentry trade. All of his sons and two sons-in-law became carpenters. He was a member of the Methodist Church.

Mary Ann Gowen Hopson died there May 19, 1912 in DeSoto, Missouri and was buried in DeSoto City Cemetery.

Children born to them include:

James T. Hopson born in November 1852
Charles Edward Hopson born March 4, 1854
John Henry Hopson born May 19, 1862
Mary Jane Hopson born in 1867
Sara Ann Hopson born June 26, 1868
Florence M. Hopson born in 1873
Hester Maude Hopson born December 7, 1875

John Gowan, son of James Chambers Gowan and Lucinda Margaret True Gowan, was born about 1834 in Claiborne County.

John Gowan received a notice of an advalorem tax increase vy the Jefferson County Boad of Equalization on his property February 22, 1867, according to the “Jefferson County Leader.”

In the 1880 census of Jefferson County “John Gowan” appeared as the head of a household, Enumeration District 190, Vallie township, page 6:

“Gowan, John 49, born in TN
Henry 22, born in Indiana, son
Emma 18, born in Indiana, daughter
Anna 11, born in Indiana, daughter
Eliza L. 9, born in Indiana, daughter
Minnie E. 5, born in MO, daughter”

James E. Gowan, son of James Chambers Gowan and Lucinda Margaret True Gowan, was born in Harrison County May 20, 1836. He was married in Jefferson County, Missouri December 27, 1864 to Susan Robertson. She was a daughter of William Robertson and Mary Robertson who were associated with James Chambers Gowan and Margaret Lucinda True Gowan, according to Mary Alice Fritch of Flat River, Missouri.

“James Gowan and R. Gowan” were registered to vote September 20, 1866 in Valle Township, according to the “Jefferson County Leader” published October 12, 1866 in Hillsboro, Missouri.

James E. Gowan was enumerated as the head of a household in the 1880 census of Jefferson County, Enumeration District 190, Vallie Township, page 6:

“Gowan, James 43, born in IN
Susan 40, born in Missouri
Lenard A. 14, born in Missouri
Sarah 12, born in Missouri
Carry 9, born in Missouri
Maggie 7, born in Missouri
Eugene 3, born in Missouri”

Children born to James E. Gowan and Susan Robertson Gowan include:

Leonard A. Gowan born about 1866
Sarah Jane Gowan born about 1868
Carrie Gowan born about 1871
Margaret “Maggie” Gowan born about 1873
Eugene Gowan [twin] born about 1877
[twin] born about 1877
Irene Anna Gowan born about 1881
Sopha Gowan born about 1884

Irene Anna Gowan, daughter of James E. Gowan and Susan Robertson Gowan, was born about 1881. She was married in October 1899 to John Ruff, according to Mary Alice Fritch.

Rezin Gowan, son of James Chambers Gowan and Lucinda Margaret True Gowan, was born May 24, 1843 in Harrison County.

“R. Gowan and James Gowan” were registered to vote September 20, 1866 in Valle Township, according to the “Jefferson County Leader” published October 12, 1866 in Hillsboro, Missouri.

Rezin Gowan was married about 1867, wife’s name Lavonie. She may have been Catherine Lavonie Gowan who was born March 26, 1846.

“Reusin Gowan,” a veteran of the Civil War joined some of his comrades in a meeting held in 1866, according to the August 10, 1866 edition of the “Jefferson County Leader.”

“The soldier’s meeting convened at the Court House on Monday evening. Lieut. John Williams was made chairman and Capt. E. Amor, secretary. The following ex-soldiers were appointed delegates to the convention which meets at St. Louis today:

E. Amor, R. W. McMullin, John Williams, Herman Richter, Herman Goskin, Wash. Williams, Henry Mei—-, John T. Huskey, Wm.. S. Null, Jr., R. Wood, B. F. Maness, John ——y, Wilton Seneter, Alfred Richtey, R. N. Hunt, John Hunt, C. C. Fletcher, H. F. Ahlvers, G. W. McFry, D. F. McKee, John Stubinger, Peter Williams, Landon S. Williams, D. A. Sullens, Jas Hamell, J. M. Jackson, Thos. McGee, J Buxton, R. C. Whitehead, John Schorr, Geo. Scamman, Alonzo Bell, Fred Byrsdoff, Jas. Davis, Wm Davis, F. Arnold, F. Louck, Anderson Russell, John Rowe, Reusin Gowan, Thos Cook, Pick Cross, —-Lyon, W. H. Dodson, J. N. Whitehead, Chas. Miller, R. E. Kenney, R. Hendrickson, J. Harmony, Gust. Thumbolt, Elbert Ogle, Rudolph Haverstick, C. W. Nelson, S. G. McGee, and all other soldiers that indorse this call.”

This could have been a meeting of veterans to decide the for-mation of a Jefferson County Grand Army of the Republic post. There would eventually be three G. A. R. posts in Jef-ferson County.

They were enumerated in the 1880 census of Jefferson County, Enumeration District 190, Vallie Township, page 1 as:

“Gowan, Rezin 38, born in Indiana
Lavonie 34, born in Missouri
Richard A. 12, born in Missouri
James T. 6, born in Missouri
Lovenia 6, born in Missouri
Rhoda E. 3, born in Missouri
Nancy 3/12, born in Missouri”

Rezin Gowan died September 13, 1902 and Catherine L. Gowan died July 2, 1908. They were buried in DeSoto City Cemetery.

Children born to Rezin Gowan and Catherine L. Gowan include:

Richard A. Gowan born about 1868
James T. Gowan [twin] born about 1874
Lovenia Gowan [twin] born about 1874
Rhoda E. Gowan born about 1877
Nancy Gowan born about 1880

Richard A. Gowan, son of Rezin Gowan and Catherine L. Gowan, was born about 1868. He was married about 1890, wife’s name Rosa. She was born in 1869. In 1900 they lived in Jefferson County. Richard A. Gowan died there in 1943 and was buried in DeSota City Cemetery. Rosa Gowan died there in 1947 and was buried beside her husband.

Children born to Richard A. Gowan and Rosa Gowan include:

Clifford A. Gowan born May 22, 1901

Clifford A. Gowan, son of Richard A. Gowan and Rosa Gowan, was born in Jefferson County May 22, 1901. He died February 21, 1902.

Six other Gowan families were recorded in the 1880 census of Jefferson County.

James Gowan was enumerated as the head of a household in 1880 in Jefferson County, Enumeration District 190, Vallie Township, page 18:

“Gowan, James 29, born in Illinois
Marthy J. 35, born in Indiana
Henry A. 6, born in Missouri
Arther E. 2, born in Missouri”

John B. Gowan was born February 27, 1852 in Indiana to parents unknown. He was reported as the head of a household in 1880 in Jefferson County, Enumeration District 190, Vallie township, page 3:

“Gowan, John B. 28, born in Indiana
Perlina E. 22, born in Missouri
William E. 2, born in Missouri”

A daughter, name not given, was born to Mrs. John B. Gowen May 1, 1888, according to the June 13, 1888 edition of the “Jefferson Democrat.”

John B. Gowan died October 4, 1907 and was buried in DeSoto City Cemetery. Bettie E. Gowan, apparently his wife, was born January 1, 1859. She died February 6, 1905 and was buried beside her husband.

Edward F. Gowan was recorded as the head of a household in 1880 in Jefferson County, Enumeration District 190, Vallie township, page 1:

“Gowan, Edward F. 26, born in Illinois
Margery E. 19, born in Missouri
Frazel E. 3, born in Missouri”

The estate of Edward F. Gowan was probated in the January 1912 session of the Jefferson County Court, according to the legal column of the “Jefferson Democrat” of Hillsboro, Missouri.

Elemael Gowan was enumerated as the head of a household in 1880 in Jefferson County, Enumeration District 190, Vallie township, page 12:

“Gowan, Elemael 26, born in Missouri
Matilda J. 21, born in Indiana
Malcum L. 5, born in Missouri”

Ervin F. Gowan was reported as the head of a household in 1880 in Jefferson County, Enumeration District 190, Vallie township, page 1:

“Gowan, Ervin F. 24, born in Illinois
Mary J. 19, born in Indiana
George 1/12, born in Missouri”

Benjamin Gowan was recorded as the head of a household in 1880 in DeSoto, Missouri, Enumeration District 18, page 14:

“Gowan, Benjamin 26, born in Indiana
Kate 24, born in Missouri
Ida 4, born in Missouri
Dora 2, born in Missouri
Benjamin F. 4/12, born in Missouri”
==O==
Herbert A. Gowan, son of Thomas Gowan and Ellie Gowan was born January 9, 1901. He died March 22, 1901 and was buried in DeSoto City Cemetery.
==O==
A daughter [unnamed] of James Gowan was mentioned in the obituary of John Thompson McMullin published in the August 1, 1888 edition of the “Jefferson Democrat:”

“DIED – At De Soto, July 29, 1888, John Thompson McMullin, in his 77th year. While in the discharge of his duties as Deputy Assessor, on the 16th, he was caught in a rain storm, which produced chills and fe-ver; the fever assumed typhoid form and there was also inflammation of the bowels. During his last 21 hours he could neither see, hear, speak nor swallow, but con-tinued to breathe, almost once for every second of time.

He was buried on Monday, at his home on the Plattin. Mr. McMullin was of Irish parentage, and was born in Washington County, Missouri February 14, 1818, and was brought to this county before he was two years of age and resided here ever since. Of the early history of this county, he knew more than any one now living. His was an active and efficient particular in the pioneer struggles for the advancement of civilization, educa-tion, morality and religion.

As a county official, school teacher or minister of the Gospel, his influence always was for progress in what was right and good. In the neighborhood he was an ever-ready counsellor and guide; to those in sickness and distress, a minister of peace and consolation – while his hospitality, generosity and charity were only bounded by his means. His life was a struggle with poverty, but cheerfully borne. Twice comfortable homes were sacrificed by his having stood security for the contracts of others; but he never gave up the battle and would at once strike out to prepare another home for his family.

His first wife was Eliza M. Jameson, daughter of Rob-ert Jameson, mother of the pioneer settlers of this county. To them were given nine children. Some of them died at an early age – two after having arrived at maturity. There are now but four living. He was mar-ried four times, his second wife living but a year or two, and his third but a month or two. His fourth, now left a widow for the second time, is a daughter of the late James Gowan of De Soto.”
==O==
William E. Gowan was born in 1878 of parents unknown. He was married about 1900, wife’s name Sadie. She was born in 1870. He died in 1928, and she died in 1934. They were buried in DeSoto City Cemetery. Children born to William E. Gowan and Sadie Gowan are unknown.
==O==
James C. Gowan was born in 1902 to parents unknown. He died in 1977 in Jefferson County and was buried in DeSoto City Cemetery.
==O==
Prudence Going, daughter of James Going, was born about 1800. She was married about 1818 to William Going. Children born to William Going and Prudence Going Going are unknown.
==O==
Solomon Going, identified as a son of Shadrach Going by Donna Gowin Johnston, was born about 1771, probably in Halifax County. He was not mentioned in the will of Shadrach Going, suggesting that he died early.

Claiborne Going, son of Shadrach Going, was born about 1773, probably in Halifax County. He was married about 1796, wife’s name Sarah. He was living in Grainger County, Tennessee July 24, 1806 when he joined his brothers in protesting the administration of the estate of his father. The 1810 tax list of Grainger County showed “Claiborne Goan, 1 white poll” assessed taxes on “100 acres on Young’s Creek.” His brother, “John Goan” lived nearby.

The 1810 federal census enumerated “Claibourn Goan, 8 free colored, 6 children.”

Children born to Claiborne Going and Sarah Elizabeth “Betsy” Going are believed to include:

Sallie Goen born about 1810

Sallie Goen, daughter of Claiborne Goen and Sarah Elizabeth “Betsy” Goen, was born in Grainger County about 1810. “Sallie Goins” was married January 3, 1834 to Edmond Boling, according to “Grainger County, Tennessee Marriages, 1796-1850.”

Children born to Sallie Goen include:

Levi Sterling Goen born March 5, 1834

“Levi Goen,” a Cherokee, was born in Tennessee in March 1835, according to his enumeration in the 1900 census of Collin County. He is identified as Levi Sterling Goen, according to Sandy Beard, a descendant, who reports that he was born in Morristown, Tennessee in Grainger County [later in Hamblen County]. She reported September 9, 2000, “Some documents state that he was illegitimate.”

It is believed that he was married in Tennessee about 1853, wife’s name unknown, and remained there until about 1883. It is believed that he was remarried in Tennessee about 1868, wife’s name Sarah Jane. It is believed that they lived in Arkansas in 1884 and probably arrived in Collin County in 1888.

Levi Sterling Goen and Sarah Jane Goen appeared in the 1900 census of Collin County, Enumeration District 22, page 4, precinct living in the household of his son, William Anderson Goen.

Levi Sterling Goen appeared as an applicant for a grant in “An Index to the Cherokee Applications.” The applications were filed between the years 1908-1910 for funds granted to the Cherokees and their descendants who were alive as of May 28, 1906. His claim was No. 28920, according to Texas Secretary of State records.

Levi Sterling Goen died February 4, 1908 at age 74 and was buried in Jones County Cemetery located near Hawley, Texas, according to the February 14, 1908 edition of the “Stamford News.” “Mr. Goen was a native of Tennessee, having moved to Texas 22 years ago. He was the grandfather of Mrs. Mable House of Anson, Texas. The services were conducted by Rev. Gibbs.”

Sarah Jane Goen, “widow of L. S. Goen,” died of senility and cancer of the throat” July 21, 1936, according to Cherokee County Death Book 9, page 304. She was born August 20, 1851 in Tennessee “of parents unknown,” according to R. A. Gullion, the informant. She was buried in Henry Cemetery at Gallatin, Texas. Children born to Levi Goen and Sarah Jane Goen are unknown.

Children born to Levi Goen and his first wife include:

William Anderson Goen born in February 1855

William Anderson Goen, “a white man,” son of Levi Sterling Goen, was born in Tennessee in February 1855, according to his enumeration in the 1900 census of Collin County. He was married about 1876 to Julia A. Mackinturff, probably in Tennessee. She was born in Tennessee in March 1858. They continued to live in Tennessee until July 1882 and in February 1884 appeared in Arkansas. They were living in Texas, probably Collin County, in May 1888.

William Anderson Goen appeared as the head of a household in the 1900 census of Collin County, Enumeration District 22, page 4, precinct 7. The family was rendered as:

“Goen, William A. 45, born in TN in Feb. 1885
Julia A. 42, born in TN in March 1858
Thomas Luther 19, born in TN in June 1880
Mary A. 17, born in TN in July 1882
Eddie 16, born in AR in Feb. 1884
Samuel [twin] 12, born in TX in May 1888
Henry [twin] 12, born in TX in May 1888
Fannie 10, born in TX in Feb. 1890
Georgie 3, born in TX in Sept. 1896,
son
Levi 65, born in TN in March 1835,
father
Jane 52, born in TN in Aug. 1847,
step-mother”

In 1904 the family lived in Greenville, Texas.

William Anderson Goen filed an application between 1908 and 1910 as a Cherokee entitled to a federal grant, according to “An Index to the Cherokee Applications” filed in the Texas Secretary of State’s Office. His application was given Claim No. 33219.

William Anderson Goen died November 21, 1921, according to the Hunt County, Texas Probate File 2433. He was recorded as bankrupt at the time. Julia A. Mackinturff Goen was appointed administratrix of the estate which consisted of half interest in 57 acres in Cherokee County, valued at $750.

The probate record listed the living children of William Anderson Goen over 21 on November 15, 1921 as “W. R. Goen, Mary Ann Goen Baumgardner, Henry Goen, Fannie Goen Baumgardner, G. D. Goen, John Goen, Claude Goen”.

Children of William Anderson Goen who were deceased on November 25, 1921 were Thomas L. Goen and Ed Anderson Goen. Julia A. Mackinturff Goen died in Hunt County May 28, 1926, according to BVS File 18465.

Julia A. Mackinturff Goen died November 23, 1903, according to her tombstone in Wylie Cemetery, according to “Collin County Cemetery Inscriptions.”

Children born to William Anderson Goen and Julia A. Mackinturff Goen include:

William Roscoe Goen born in November 1876
Thomas Luther Goen born in June 1880
Mary Ann Goen born in July 1882
Eddie Anderson Goen born in February 1884
Samuel L. Goen born in May 1888
Henry Harrison Goen born in May 1888
Fannie Bell Goen born in February 1890
George Dewey Goen born in September 1896
John Wiley Goen born about 1901
Claude Ervin Goen born in 1904″

William Roscoe Goen, son of William Anderson Goen and Julia A. Mackintuff Goen, was born in November 1876 in Tennessee, according to his enumeration in the 1900 census of Cherokee County. He was married about 1898, wife’s name Laura. Laura Goen was born in Kentucky in November 1876.

William Roscoe Goen appeared as the head of a household in the 1900 census of Cherokee County, Enumeration District 17, page 11, precinct 1:

“Goen, William R. 23, born in November 1876 TN
Laura 23, born in November 1876 KY
Willie M. 1, born in July 1899 in TX
daughter”

William Roscoe Goen filed an application between 1908 and 1910 as a Cherokee entitled to a federal grant, according to “An Index to the Cherokee Applications” filed in the Texas Secretary of State’s office. His application was given Claim No. 32252.

William Roscoe Goen was shown in the probate records of his father’s estate in 1921. He died in Brazos County, Texas September 4, 1926, according to BVS File 30762.

Children born to William Roscoe Goen and Laura Goen in­clude:

Willie Lee Goen born July 21, 1899

Willie Lee Goen, daughter of William Roscoe Goen and Laura Goen, was born in Collin County July 21, 1899, ac­cording to BVS File 473847. She appeared in her father’s household in the 1900 census enumeration of Cherokee County as “age 1.”

Thomas Luther Goen, son of William Anderson Goen and Julia A. Mackinturff Goen, was born in Tennessee in June 1880. His parents continued to live in Tennessee in 1882, in Arkansas in 1884 and in Texas by 1888. He appeared in the 1900 census of Collin County, as a 19-year-old living in the household of his father. He was married to Rosie Baker September 15, 1901, according to Hunt County, Texas Mar­riage Book K, page 431.

Thomas Luther Goen filed an application between 1908 and 1910 as a Cherokee entitled to a federal grant, according to “An Index of Cherokee Applications” filed in the Texas Secretary of State’s office. His application was given Claim No. 32251.

Thomas Luther Goen was deceased prior to the probate of his father’s estate on November 15, 1921. Rosie Baker Goen, widow, lived at 1514 Stonewall, Greenville, Texas, according to the 1924 city directory.

Children born to Thomas Luther Goen and Rosie Baker Goen include:

Everett Lonnie Goen born in 1904
Bula Goen born in 1906
Frank William Goen born November 11, 1909
Thomas Eugene Goen born May 25, 1911
Beatrice Lucille Goen born June 28, 1913
Mary Goen born in 1916

Everett Lonnie Goen, son of Thomas Luther Goen and Rosie Baker Goen, was born in 1904, probably in Hunt County. On November 23, 1923 he was married to Opal Bettie Roberts, according to Hunt County Marriage Book W, page 55.

Everett Lonnie Goen, an unemployed mechanic, and his wife Opal Bettie Roberts Goen, lived at 1514 Stonewall, the ad­dress of his mother, in the 1924 city directory of Greenville. He was the father of a child born November 30, 1924, ac­cording to BVS File 75405.

In 1928 Everett Lonnie Goen, a farmer, and Mary Goen, be­lieved to be his sister, lived at 4110 Spencer, according to the Greenville city directory. In 1939 he, a trucker, lived at 3104 Barling, the same address given by William B. Goen, believed to be a son. Four children under 16 were shown to be in the household by the city directory. “E. L. Goen” died December 4, 1943 in Dallas County, according to BVS File 54275.

In 1949 Opal Bettie Roberts Goen, “widow” and a nurse lived at 3014 Barling, according to the Greenville city directory. She continued at that address from that time through 1972. She was listed as a nursery employee of the First Baptist Church of Greenville in each issue of the city directory.

Children born to Everett Lonnie Goen and Opal Bettie Roberts Goen include:

Everett Lonnie Goen, Jr. born December 19, 1925
Otho Morris Goen born April 15, 1927
William B. Goen born about 1928

Everett Lonnie Goen, Jr., son of Everett Lonnie Goen and Opal Bettie Roberts Goen was born December 19, 1925 at Greenville, according to BVS File 979916.

He was enlisted in the U. S. Army April 19, 1944 and was dis­charged October 12, 1944 as a private. His discharge de­scribed him as single, 18, and a truck driver by profession, ac­cording to Hunt County Discharge Book 4, page 284.

Everett Lonnie Goen, Jr. was married to Nettie Lou Graham in 1946, according to Hunt County Marriage Book 33, page 62. Everett Lonnie Goen, Jr, a truck driver, and Nettie Lou Gra­ham Goen appeared in the 1949 city directory of Greenville liv­ing at 2706 Morse Street with one child.

Everett Lonnie Goen, Jr. was married to Mrs. Carolyn Wester in 1966, according to Hunt County Marriage Book 39, page 538. He was shown as an employee of Greenville Cafe, living at 4316 O’Neal in a mobile home, according to the city directory.

In 1970 Everett Lonnie Goen, Jr., an employee of LTV, and Carolyn Wester Goen also employed by LTV, were living on Route Three with their son, William Goen who was born in 1967. In 1972 Everett Lonnie Goen, Jr., an inspector for LTV and Carolyn Wester Goen, were living at 5002 Wellington. Carolyn Wester Goen was also employed by LTV.

Mrs. Nettie Lou Graham Goen, a machine operator at Hen­son’s lived at 1504 Jones with her two sons, Roddin Goen and Randy Goen, according to the 1965 and 1966 Greenville city directory. Mrs. Nettie Lou Graham Goen was married to Allen William Harris in 1966, according to Hunt County Marriage Book 39, page 543.

Children born to Everett Lonnie Goen, Jr. and Nettie Lou Gra­ham Goen include:

Roddin Goen born about 1948
Glenn Randall Goen born July 21, 1953

Children born to Everett Lonnie Goen, Jr. and Carolyn Wester Goen include:

William Goen born in 1967

Glenn Randell Goen, son of Everett Lonnie Goen, Jr. and Net­tie Lou Graham Goen, was born July 21, 1953, according to BVS File 116515, at Greenville. He appeared in the 1970 city directory of Greenville living on Route Three. In the 1972 directory he was listed as a student living at 5002 Wellington.

Otho Morris Goen, son of Everett Lonnie Goen and Opal Bettie Roberts Goen, was born April 15, 1927 at Greenville, according to Hunt County Probate Book 23, page 694.

He enlisted February 5, 1945 in the U. S. Army and was dis­charged November 1, 1946 as a Technician Fifth Grade, according to Hunt County Discharge Book 9, page 522. He gave his address as 3014 Barling Street, Greenville, the ad­dress of his mother.

Otho Morris Goen was married to Bessie P. Shirley in 1949, according to Hunt County Marriage Book 34, page 381. Of Bessie P. Shirley Goen nothing more is known. Otho Morris Goen, partsman for Little’s Inc. at Wolfe City, Texas and his “wife, Hazel Goen,” were listed in the 1962 city directory of Greenville.

Children born to Otho Morris Goen and Bessie P. Shirley Goen include:

Otho Morris Goen, Jr. born March 3, 1964

Otho Morris Goen, Jr, son of Otho Morris Goen and Bessie P. Shirley Goen was born March 3, 1964 in Harris County, Texas, according to BVS Files.

William B. Goen, son of Lonnie Everett Goen and Opal Bettie Roberts Goen was born about 1928. He died November 30, 1929, according to Hunt County Death Book 6, page 115.

Bula Goen, daughter of Thomas Luther Goen and Rosie Baker Goen, was born in 1906, probably in Greenville. Nothing more is known of this individual.

Frank William Goen, son of Thomas Luther Goen and Rosie Baker Goen, was born November 11, 1909, according to Collin County Birth Book 2, page 173.

He was married about 1932 to Allie Ray Sprinkle who was born July 16, 1913. She was born to Elisha Parish Sprinkle and Flora A. Freeman Sprinkle who were married in 1893 at Rocky Station, Virginia, in Lee County, according to Margaret L. Sopp.

Frank William Goen and Allie Ray Sprinkle Goen were the parents of a child born April 6, 1933 in Hunt County, according to BVS File 30287. He, a, truck driver, and Allie Ray Sprinkle Goen lived at 2216 Stuart, according to the 1937 Greenville city directory. In 1939 he was listed as a trucker, living at 1221 Walworth. Included in his household were two children under 16. In 1949 Frank William Goen, trucker, continued to live at 1221 Walworth. Four children under 18 were included in his household in that year.

The name of Frank William Goen appeared several times from 1946 through 1952 in the index to Criminal Minutes of Hunt County. Charges filed against him were recorded in Minute Book 9, page 206, 245 and 483; Minute Book 10, pages 174, and 211; Minute Book 11, page 359; and Minute Book 12, page 299.

Frank William Goen, owner of Goen & Son Truck Line and Goen Trading Post, and Allie Ray Sprinkle Goen, employed by the Fabric Shop, were listed in the 1959 city directory of Greenville, living at 1221 Walworth. Goen Trading Post was located at 2306 Jordan. Goen & Son Truck Line, a partnership composed of Frank William Goen and sons, Don William Goen and Perry Ray Goen, was located at 2306 Jordan.

Frank William Goen and Allie Ray Sprinkle Goen continued to live at 1221 Walworth, according to the 1962 city directory of Greenville. They were shown as owners of the Remnant Shop and Goen Trading Post at 2306 Jordan. Reba Goen was listed as the manager of the Remnant Shop.

Apparently Frank William Goen and Allie Ray Sprinkle Goen were divorced about 1964. He was remarried to Mrs. Ouida Faye Bailey in 1965, according to Hunt County Marriage Book 39, page 235. In the city directory of 1965 Frank William Goen, partner in Goen Trading Post, and Ouida Faye Bailey Goen, an employee of LTV, lived at 1226 Skyline Drive with her daughter Lisa Bailey.

Allie Ray Sprinkle Goen continued to live at 1221 Walworth through 1972 and was a partner in the Club Cafe with her son, Don William Goen. The partnership was listed as manager of the Club Cafe in each addition of the city directory through 1972. She died February 14, 1992.

Frank William Goen and Ouida Faye Bailey Goen continued to be listed at 1226 Skyline Drive through 1972. He continued as the proprietor of the Goen Trading Post at 2204 Lee. A gun shop was added in 1972. He died August 17, 1977.

Children born to Frank William Goen and Allie Ray Sprinkle Goen include:

Don William Goen born April 6, 1933
Perry Ray Goen born about 1937
Jerry Wayne Goen born January 4, 1944

Don William Goen, son of Frank William Goen and Allie Ray Sprinkle Goen, was born April 6, 1933 probably in Greenville. About 1955 he was married, wife’s name Erma L. Don William Goen, partner in Goen & Son Truck Line, and Erma L. Goen and two children lived at 2910 James, according to the 1959 city directory of Greenville.

In 1962 he was listed as a partner in the Renmant Shop contin­uing to live at 2910 James, according to the city directory. He was also listed as an aircraft worker for Temco. In 1965 he was listed as an employee of LTV and partner with his mother in the Club Cafe. In that year and continuing through 1972 his family lived at 1314 Park and his employment remained the same. Erma L. Goen was listed in 1972 as a beauty operator at Kut & Kurl Beauty Shop.

Children born to Don William Goen and Erma L. Goen in­clude:

Michael Ray Goen born October 19, 1956
Michelle Goen born May 16, 1956
Lynette Goen born October 7, 1962

Perry Ray Goen, son of Frank William Goen and Allie Goen, was born about 1937, probably in Greenville. About 1958 he was married, wife’s name Geraldine.

Perry Ray Goen, an employee of Temco and Geraldine Goen, an employee of Goen & Son Truck Line, lived at 2824 Hemphill, according to the 1959 city directory of Greenville. In 1962 Perry Ray Goen, production controlman for Temco and Geraldine Goen, a typist for the same company, lived at 4016 Gordon with their two sons, according to the city di­rectory.

Perry Ray Goen and Geraldine Goen received a warranty deed to property in Greenville June 4, 1962, according to Hunt County Deed Book 606, page 276. From 1965 through 1972 Perry Ray Goen and Geraldine Goen lived at 2405 Davis Circle with their two children. Perry Ray Goen was employed by LTV during that period.

Children born to Perry Ray Goen and Geraldine Goen in­clude:

Ervin F. Goen born in 1960
Trent Wayne Goen born February 10, 1961

Jerry Wayne Goen, son of Frank William Goen and Allie Ray Sprinkle Goen, was born January 4, 1944, in Hunt County, according to BVS File 7624. He appeared in the 1962 city directory of Greenville as the owner of Jerry’s Cafe living in the home of his mother at 1221 Walworth. At that time he was a freshman at East Texas State University, Commerce, Texas.

In the 1966 city directory Jerry Wayne Goen, an employee of LTV and Judy Ann Griffith Goen, his wife, lived at 2211 Stu­rart. Later she was listed as a teacher at Greenville High School living at 2900 Robin. In the 1970 city directory Jerry Wayne Goen, a supervisor for LTV, Judy Ann Griffith and their son, Jeffrey Wayne Goen lived at 6320 Stonewall.

Children born to Jerry Wayne Goen and Judy Ann Griffith Goen included:

Jeffrey Wayne Goen born August 8, 1968

Jeffery Wayne Goen, son of Jerry Wayne Goen and Judy Grif­fith Goen, was born August 8, 1968, according to Hunt County Birth Certificate No. 31213.

Thomas Eugene Goen, son of Thomas Luther Goen and Rosie Baker Goen, was born May 25, 1911 in Greenville, ac­cording to Hunt County Probate Birth Book 25, page 72.

Beatrice Lucille Goen, daughter of Thomas Luther Goen and Rosie Baker Goen, was born June 28, 1913 in Greenville, ac­cording to Hunt County Probate Birth Book 20, page 432.

Mary Goen, daughter of Thomas Luther Goen and Rosie Baker Goen, was born in 1916. She appeared in the estate pro­bate of her grandfather November 15, 1921.

Mary Ann Goen, daughter of William Anderson Goen and Ju­lia A. Mackinturff Goen, was born in Tennessee in July 1882. Her parents lived in Arkansas in 1884 and in Texas in 1888. She was enumerated as a 17-year-old in the 1900 census of her father’s household in the 1900 census of Collin County. She was married April 5, 1915 to James H. Baumgardner, according to Camp County, Texas Marriage Book 5, page 583. She was referred to in her father’s probate records dated November 25, 1921. Six children were born to them.

Eddie Anderson Goen, son of William Anderson Goen and Ju­lia A. Mackinturff Goen, was born in Arkansas in February 1884, according to his enumeration in the 1900 census. His family removed to Texas prior to May 1888. He was enumer­ated as a 16-year-old in his father’s household in the 1900 cen­sus of Collin County, Texas. He was married to Rosa D. Wood, daughter of W. A. Wood and Nancy Wood, September 21, 1903, according to Hunt County Marriage Book 1, page 485. In 1904 they lived in Hunt County.

He was a farmer living at Ovalo, Texas in 1906. He died October 30, 1918 in Hunt County, according to BVS File 42054.

Children born to Eddie Anderson Goen and Rosa D. Wood in­clude:

Stella Goen born in 1904
Ernest R. Goen born January 27, 1906
Henry Bedford born March 21, 1908
Louis O. Goen born in 1911
Wayne R. Goen born October 18, 1913
William Leroy Goen born in 1915

Stella Goen, daughter of Ed A. Goen and Rosa D. Wood Goen, was born in 1904 in Hunt County.

Ernest R. Goen, son of Eddie Anderson Goen and Rosa D. Wood, was born January 27, 1906, according to Taylor County, Texas Birth Book 1, page 102. His parents were residents of Winters, Texas at that time.

He was married to Fannie Gaston about 1927. She was born in Texas in 1907. In 1928 Ernest R. Goen was a farmer near Win­ters. Ernest R. Goen, a section foreman for Texas & Pa­cific Railway, and Fannie Gaston Goen, a nurse’s aide at Hendricks Hospital, lived at 3025 Waverly Avenue, according to the 1953 city directory of Abilene, Texas. In 1955 Fannie Gaston Goen lived at 242 South 8th Street, according to the city directory.

Children born to Ernest R. Goen and Fannie Gaston Goen in­clude:

Burnice Devon Goen born June 12, 1928
Ernestine Marie Goen born about 1932
Jimmy Raymond Goen born September 22, 1948

Burnice Devon Goen, son of Ernest R. Goen and Fannie Gaston Goen, was born in Ballinger, Texas June 12, 1928, ac­cording to Runnells County, Texas Birth Book CC7, page 359. He was married to Voleen Faye Hudson May 24, 1951, according to Runnells County Marriage Book 11, page 283.

Burnice Devon Goen was listed in the 1955 city directory of Abilene as a fireman living at 842 East North 13th Street. Voleen Faye Hudson Goen was a secretary for Ace Air Condi­tioning. Living at the same address in 1955 was H. T. Goen, a truck driver. In 1953 H. T. Goen lived at 1141 Rogers.

Ernestine Marie Goen, daughter of Ernest R. Goen and Fannie Gaston Goen, was born about 1932, probably in Run­nells County. She was married to Albert Bailey Johnes of Route 1, Winters, May 14, 1955 according to Runnells County Marriage Book 11, page 592.

Jimmie Raymond Goen, son of Ernest R. Goen and Fannie Gaston Goen, was born in Abilene September 22, 1948, ac­cording to Taylor County Birth Book 35, page 53.

He was married to Rebecca Jean Spergle February 2, 1969, ac­cording to Taylor County Marriage Book 38, page 579. Of Jimmie Raymond Goen and Rebecca Jean Spergle Goen noth­ing more is known.

Henry Bedford Goen, son of Eddie Anderson Goen and Rosa D. Wood Goen, was born March 21, 1908 at Ovalo, Texas, ac­cording to Taylor County Birth Book 1, page 215. He was married to Miss Lula Fleming January 24, 1930 in Sweetwater, Texas, according to Nolan County, Texas Mar­riage Book 7, page 116.

In 1933 they lived at Winters. He was a veteran of World War II. He was committed to Wichita Falls State Hospital for mental illness April 3, 1950, according to Taylor County Probate Book 21, page 505. He was recommitted for 90 days February 26, 1952, according to Probate Book 25, page 379.

Henry Bedford Goen, laborer, died of “alcoholic asphyxiation” at Big Spring, Texas December 8, 1958 at age 50, according to Howard County Texas death records. His usual residence was listed as 758 Pecan Street, Abilene, Texas. He was buried in Abilene Cemetery.

Children born to Henry Bedford Goen and Lula Flemming Goen include:

Harley Bedford Goen born in 1930

Harley Bedford Goen, son of Henry Bedford Goen and Lula Flemming Goen, was born in 1930. He died of diphtheria February 16, 1933 at Sweetwater, according to Nolan County Death Book 4, Page 241. He was two years, nine months old and was buried at Sweetwater.
==O==
Louis O. Goen, son of Eddie Anderson Goen and Rosa D. Wood Goen, was born in 1910 in Hunt County. He was mar­ried June 30, 1931 to Elizabeth Thomas, according to Taylor County Marriage Book 12, page 548. Louis O. Goen was a railroad section worker at that time. Elizabeth Thomas Goen was born in 1913 in Alabama.

Children born to Louis O. Goen and Elizabeth Goen include:

Roselene Goen born November 19, 1932

Roselene Goen, daughter of Louis O. Goen and Elizabeth Thomas Goen, was born at Ovalo, Texas November 19, 1932, according to Taylor County Birth Book O, page 118.

Wayne R. Goen, son of Eddie Anderson Goen and Rosa D. Wood Goen, was born October 18, 1913 in Greenville, Texas, according to Hunt County Probate Birth Book 1. page 492. He was married to Connie Lee Price October 24, 1933, ac­cording to Runnells County Marriage Book 7, page 533. Connie Lee Price was born in Wood County, Texas in 1915. Wayne R. Goen was a railroad section hand in Winters, Texas in 1934 when their first child was born there.

Connie Lee Price Goen was a resident of Santa Clara County, California later when she gave a deed to property in Winters, Texas, according to Runnells County Deed Book 431, page 458.

Children born to Wayne R. Goen and Connie Lee Price Goen include:

Wanda Gennell Goen born December 18, 1934

Wanda Gennell Goen, daughter of Wayne R. Goen and Connie Lee Price Goen, was born December 18, 1934 in Winters, according to Runnells County Birth Book CC9, page 261.

On April 26, 1952 Wanda Gennell Goen was married to Victor Wallis Poole, according to Rockwell County, Texas Marriage Book 35, page 381. They were residents of Wylie, Texas at the time.

William L. Goen, son of Eddie Anderson Goen and Rosa D. Wood, was born in Texas in 1915. He was married about 1943 to Nadine Jo Kerby, who was born in 1925. In 1944 he was a bus driver employed by the city of Abilene. In the 1944 city directory of Abilene he was a driver for Short Furniture Company and lived at 1324 Locust with his wife, Nadine Jo Kerby Goen and one child. In 1948 he was listed as a baker for Mead’s Bakery and continued to live at 1313 Locust. In 1951 he lived at 1318 Locust. William L. Goen and Nadine Jo Kerby Goen deeded a house and lot to J. D. Johnson February 6, 1946, according to Taylor County Deed Book 340, page 385.

Children born to William L. Goen and Nadine Jo Kerby Goen include:

Florence Geraldeen Goen born January 15, 1944

Florence Geraldeen Goen, daughter of William L. Goen and Nadine Jo Kerby Goen, was born January 15, 1944, according to Taylor County Birth Book 23, page 292.

Samuel L. Goen, twin son of William Anderson Goen and Ju­lia A, Mackinturff Goen, was born in Texas in May 1888. He appeared in the 1900 census of his father’s household in Collin County as a 12-year-old. He was married February 18, 1912 to Mary Alma Webb, according to Hunt County Marriage Book Q, page 108. A child was born to them there January 13, 1913, according to BVS File 16474. Mary Alma Webb Goen, “widow of Samuel L. Goen,” in 1919 lived at 4504 Stonewall, in Greenville, according to the city directory. She was listed as a saleswomen for Perkins Bros. In 1922 she roomed at 4402 Stonewall. Mary Alma Webb Goen was listed in the city directory of 1928.

Henry Harrison Goen, twin son of William Anderson Goen and Julia A. Mackinturff Goen, was born in May 1888, according to his enumeration in the 1900 census of Collin County. He was enumerated as a 12-year-old living in his father’s household.

He was married to Laura Webb, believed to be a sister to Mary Alma Webb, daughter of John L. Webb November 11, 1911 in Greenville according to Hunt County Marriage Book Q, page 15. In 1912 they lived at Caddo Mills, Texas, and in 1915 they lived at 4104 Pennsylvania, Dallas, Texas, accord­ing to the city directory. Henry Harrison Goen received a warranty deed from his father-in-law February 28, 1919 to a lot in Greenville, according to Hunt County Deed Book 231, page 530. In 1922 they lived at 4505 Stonewall, according to the Greenville city di­rectory. In 1924 they lived at 4511 Stonewall. In 1925 Henry Harrison Goen had removed to Lubbock, Texas and lived at 1411 Avenue F, according to the city directory. They were the parents of an infant born in Dallas County, Texas March 15, 1928, according to BVS File 18113.

By 1937 Henry Harrison Goen and Laura Webb Goen had re­turned to Greenville. He lived at 2208-C O’Neal Street and was listed as unemployed by the city directory. Henry Harri­son Goen was listed in the city directory of Greenville in each edition from 1959 through 1972 as a retiree living at 3800 Bourland Avenue.

Laura Webb Goen died June 12, 1965, according to Hunt County Death Certificate 14864. Henry Harrison Goen died November 17, 1972, in Hunt County.

Children born to Henry Harrison Goen and Laura Webb Goen include:

[daughter] born September 4, 1912
Henry Milford Goen born April 23, 1919
[infant] born March 15, 1928

Henry Milford Goen, son of Henry Harrison Goen and Laura Webb Goen, was born at Greenville April 23, 1919. He, a messenger for Western Union in 1937, lived at 2208-C O’Neal Street, the same address given by Henry Harrison Goen, according to the city directory. In 1939 he was listed in the Greenville city directory as a lens grinder who lived at 4116 Stuart Street.

In 1954 he was an optician employed by Bausch & Lomb Optical Company of Dallas. His address was given as 3800 Bourland Street, the same as Henry Harrison Goen. He was married, wife’s name Helen Goen, prior to 1954. On August 24, 1954 he enlisted in the U. S. Air Force and was discharged as an airman third class August 27, 1955. He was also shown as a veteran of World War II. His discharge is recorded in Hunt County Discharge Book 13, page 346.

In 1959 he was employed in the shipping department of TEMCO and lived at 3111 Mitchell, an address he maintained through 1972, according to the Greenville City Directory. From 1965 through 1972 he was shown as an employee of LTV Corporation.

Henry Harrison Goen and Laura Webb Goen were the parents of an infant born in Dallas County March 15, 1928. according to BVS File 18113.

Fannie Goen, daughter of William Anderson Goen and Julia A. Mackinturff Goen, was born in Texas in February 1890, according to her enumeration in the 1900 census. At that time she was shown as a 10-year-old living in the household of her father in Collin County. She was married to John Tipton Baumgardner about 1910. He was a brother to James M. Baumgardner who was married to her sister, Mary Ann Goen. She was mentioned in the probate of her father’s estate dated November 25, 1921. Six children were born them.

George Dewey Goen, son of William Anderson Goen and Julia A. Mackinturff Goen, was born in Collin County September 25, 1897. He appeared in the 1900 census of his father’s household as a three-year-old. On April 19, 1919 he was married to Alvon Lucille Dickson who was born in Greenville May 21, 1899. In 1925 they removed to Anton, Texas where they were charter members of Lawrence Street Church of Christ. She taught Sunday School classes there for many years.

George Dewey Goen was the father of a child born in Hockley County July 23, 1928, according to BVS File 53411.

He was an estimator for Forrest Lumber Company and lived at 2510 34th Street, Lubbock, according to the 1944 city di­rectory of Lubbock. In 1952 and 1953 he was listed as man­ager of Forrest Lumber Company at Anton, Texas, according to the city directory. In 1970 he was retired and living at 601 Sylvan Avenue in Anton. He died September 25, 1980 and was buried in Anton Cemetery.

In 1998 she was named Hockley County Senior Citizen of the Year. She died at age 99, January 28, 1999 at Lakeside Rehabilitation & Nursing Center in Lubbock, Texas. Her funeral was held January 29, 1999 at the Lawrence Avenue Church of Christ, Larry Bloskas officiating.

Her obituary, published in the “Lubbock Avalanche-Journal” in its January 29, 1999 edition mentioned, “She is survived by two daughters, Loraine Morris of Littlefield and Louise Boothe of Anton, four sisters, four grandchildren, seven great-grandchildren and two great-great-grandchildren.”
Children born to George Dewey Goen and Alvon Lucille Dickson Goen include:

Jean Louise Goen born about 1922
Merle Goen born about 1924
Loraine Goen born about 1927

Jeane Louise Goen, daughter of George Dewey Goen and Alvon Lucille Dickson Goen, was born at Anton, according to Hockley County, Texas Birth Book 4, page 625. She was born about 1922. “Louise Goen” was married to Lewis Earl Boothe September 14, 1947, according to Lamb County, Texas Marriage Book 6, page 168. In 1999 they lived at Anton.

Merle Goen, son of George Dewey Goen and Alvon Lucille Dickson Goen, was born about 1924, probably at Greenville, Texas. He died in 1927.

Loraine Goen, daughter of George Dewey Goen and Alvon Lucille Dickson Goen, was born about 1927. She was married about 1948, husband’s name Morris. In 1999 they lived at Littlefield, Texas.

John Wiley Goen, son of William Anderson Goen and Julia A. Mackinturff Goen, was born in Collin County about 1901. On February 14, 1924 he was married to Hiva Savannah [also given as Susanah] Sills, according to Hunt County Marriage Book W, page 170.

John Wiley Goen and his wife, Hiva Savannah Sills Goen of Hockley County, Texas purchased a lot in Anton, August 15, 1929, according to Hockley County Deed Book 27, page 420.

In the 1952-1953 city directory of Anton John Wiley Goen was listed as a laborer. On December 31, 1962 John Wiley Goen and Hiva Savannah Sills Goen sold the lot in Anton to Glen Donn Goen and Mary Maxine Wright Goen for $750, according to Hockley County Deed Book 204, page 104.

In 1970 John Wiley Goen was listed as a custom combine operator and trucker living at 502 Sylvan Avenue, Anton, with his wife.

Children born to John Wiley Goen and Hiva Savannah Sills Goen include:

Glen Donn Goen born in 1928
Ruby June Goen born January 17, 1930
Johnnie Nell Goen born September 5, 1937

Glen Donn Goen, son of John Wiley Goen and Hiva Savan­nah Goen, was born in 1928, in Oklahoma. He was married to Mary Maxine Wright February 18, 1945, according to Gaines County, Texas Marriage Book 4, page 5.

In 1955 Glen Donn Goen, a derrickman, and Mary Maxine Wright Goen who was born in Texas in 1928, lived at 1503 2nd Street in Levelland, Texas. Glen Donn Goen, a rough­neck for Great Western Drilling Company, lived at 107 SE 3rd Street in Andrews, Texas, according to the 1957 Andrews city directory. On December 31, 1962 they purchased a lot in Anton from his parents. Glen Donn Goen and his wife, Mary Maxine Wright Goen entered into a real estate transaction December 1, 1969, according to Hockley County Deed Book 105, page 601.

Children born to Glen Donn Goen and Mary Maxine Wright Goen include:

James Robert Goen born November 10, 1955

James Robert Goen, son of Glen Donn Goen and Mary Maxine Wright Goen, was born in Levelland November 10, 1955.

Ruby June Goen, daughter of John Wiley Goen and Hiva Sa­vannah Goen, was born January 17, 1930 at Anton, according to Hockley County Birth Book 6, page 271. She was married at age 16 to Johnny J. Lindsey May 25, 1946 in Clovis, New Mexico, according to Curry County, New Mexico Marriage Book 31, page 6560. The groom was from Carizozo, New Mexico. Hiva Savannah Sills Goen gave parental consent.

Johnnie Nell Goen, daughter of John Wylie Goen and Hiva Savannah Sills Goen, was born September 5, 1937 at Anton, according to Hockley County Birth Book 1. She was married to Bobby Gerald Roper December 28, 1954, according to Lamb County Marriage Book 9, page 120.

Claude Ervin Goen, son of William Anderson Goen and Ju­lia A. Mackinturff Goen, was born at Greenville September 21, 1904. He appeared in the probate records of his father’s estate November 25, 1921, as “age 17.” One record states the date of his birth as August 24, 1904.

He was married February 11, 1932 to Jessie Pearl Minton at Clovis, according to Curry County Marriage Book 11, page 166. Jessie Pearl Minton Goen was born at Peacock, Texas September 22, 1909. Both were residents of Anton at the time of their marriage.

They were the parents of an infant born in Hockley County November 13, 1939, according to BVS File 100320. In 1943 Claude Ervin Goen was a truck driver living at Anton. On February 9, 1965 Claude Ervin Goen was committed to the Big Spring, Texas State Hospital as a mentally ill person, ac­cording to Howard County, Texas Probate Book 68, page 329. In 1966 they were living on a farm near Anton. In 1970 he was retired and living at 601 Vernon Avenue in Anton, ac­cording to the 1970 Anton city directory. Claude Ervin Goen died December 20, 1970 and was buried in the Anton Ceme­tery, according to Lamb County Death Book 7, page 160.

Jessie Pearl Minton Goen died March 15, 1999 at age 89 at Covenant Medical Center, Lakeside in Lubbock, Texas. Her funeral service was conducted in the Lawrence Avenue Church of Christ in Anton where she was the last surviving charter member. She was buried beside her husband.

Children born to Claude Ervin Goen and Jessie Pearl Minton Goen include:

Billy Claude Goen born August 1, 1935
David Anderson Goen born September 5, 1937
Douglas Eugene Goen born November 13, 1939
James Ervin Goen born December 27, 1943
Jerry Goen born about 1945
Ronald Lee Goen born March 11, 1946

Billy Claude Goen, son of Claude Ervin Goen and Jessie Pearl Minton Goen was born at Anton August 1, 1935, according to Hockley County Birth Book 1. On February 18, 1955 he was married to Francys Nadine Martin, according to Lamb County Marriage Book 9, page 154. She was born about 1936 to Willie Lee Martin and Bobbye Dimples Broyles Martin, according to Juanita Joyce Martin Lewis, a sister of Francys Nadine Martin. Juanita Joyce Martin Lewis has traced her Martin lineage back to Peter [or Pierre] Martin who emigrated from France to King William Parish, James River, Virginia before 1745. He was married to Margaret Rapine.

Billy Claude Goen was discharged from the U. S. Navy August 16, 1961, according to Hockley County Discharge Book 5, page 305. In 1966 he was shown as the owner of an 86-acre farm in Hockley County. In 1999 they lived in Lubbock. Children born to Billy Claude Goen and Francys Nadine Martin Goen are unknown.

David Anderson Goen, son of Claude Ervin Goen and Jessie Pearl Minton Goen, was born at Anton September 5, 1937, ac­cording to Hockley County Birth Book 1. On October 10, 1958 he was married to Linda Kay Emfinger at Anton, ac­cording to Castro County, Texas Marriage Book 2, page 224. In 1966, David Anderson Goen and Linda Kay Emfinger Goen were living at 416 East 9th Street in Littlefield, Texas with two sons, according to the city directory. He was listed as a farmer and she a telephone operator. In 1972 they were living at 1205 West 14th Street, Littlefield. They continued in Littlefield in 1999.

Children born to David Anderson Goen and Linda Kay Emfin­ger Goen include:

David William Goen born October 4, 1959
Bret John Goen born June 25, 1963

David William Goen, son of David William Goen and Linda Kay Emfinger Goen was born in Lamb County, Texas October 4, 1959, according to BVS File 214038.

Bret John Goen, son of David Anderson Goen and Linda Kay Emfinger Goen, was born in Lubbock County June 25, 1963, according to BVS File 100847.

Douglas Eugene Goen, son of Claude Ervin Goen and Jessie Pearl Minton Goen, was born November 13, 1939 at Pettit, Texas, according to Hockley County Birth Book 11, page 109. On December 23, 1960 he was married to Glenda Ruth Chesser, according to Lubbock County Marriage Book 28, page 350.

In 1962, Douglas Eugene Goen, a Texas Tech student, and Glenda Ruth Chesser Goen, lived at 4111-31st Street, Lub­bock, their home through 1965, according to the city direc­tory. Douglas Eugene Goen was a junior at Texas Tech Uni­versity, according to the 1963 college directory. In 1963 and 1964 he was a metal worker for Bailey & Howard Sheet Metal in Lub­bock, and in 1965 he was employed by Gifford-Hill-Western, Inc. During this period Glenda Ruth Chesser Goen was a secre­tary for Cone Grain & Seed Company.

In 1972 he was listed as a taxpayer on 160 acres of farmland in Hale County, Texas. In 1973 he was listed as a salesman for Gifford-Hill-Western, Inc. living in Olton, Texas. They continued in Olton in 1999.

James Erwin Goen, son of Claude Erwin Goen and Jessie Pearl Minton Goen, was born December 27, 1943 at Anton, according to Hockley County Birth Book 3, page 344. His birth certificate recorded his name as James Earl Goen.

James Erwin Goen was married to Pamela Rae Wallace on November 25, 1962, according to Lamb County Marriage Book 12, page 116. James Erwin Goen was married to Laveda Kaye Burns in Muleshoe, Texas August 1, 1967, ac­cording to Bailey County, Texas Marriage Book 6, page 226.

“James Goen,” whose wife was named Ethel Goen, was listed in the Lubbock city directory from 1966 through 1970 as a warehouseman for William Cameron & Company in Lub­bock. During this period they lived at 713 East Quinn. In 1999 they continued in Lubbock.

Jerry Goen, son of Claude Ervin Goen and Jessie Pearl Minton Goen, was born about 1945. In 1999 he lived at Post, Texas.

Ronald Lee Goen, son of Claude Erwin Goen and Jessie Pearl Minton Goen, was born March 11, 1946 at Anton. He died September 16, 1949 of embolism, according to Hockley County Death Record Book 3, page 29. He was “found dead under the table” according to his death certificate.
==O==
Boyd Thomas Goen was born July 1, 1932 in Hockley County, according to BVS File 54044. Boyd Thomas Goen was married to Reese Ann Williams February 16, 1957, ac­cording to Lubbock County Marriage Book 23, page 573. In 1952 and 1953 he was listed as a salesman for Forrest Lumber Company, residing at Anton, according to the Lubbock city directory.

Boyd Thomas Goen was listed as department manager for Montgomery Ward & Company living at Anton, according to the 1967 city directory of Lubbock. In 1971 and 1972 he was listed as parts manager for Hufstedler Truck Company, Lub­bock, and lived at 206 East 8th Street, Anton, according to the Lubbock city directory. “Boyd Goen” in 1971 was a student living at 2415 Auburn Street, Apartment No. 11, according to the Lubbock city directory. Children born to Boyd Thomas Goen and Reese Ann Williams Goen are unknown.
==O==
Miss C. A. Goen was married to John N. Farris December 14, 1912, according to Lamb County Marriage Book 2, page 174.
==O==
Carl Wylie Goen was married to Shirley Kay Butler May 27, 1967, according to Lamb County Marriage Book 14, page 32. Children born to Carl Wayne Goen and Shirley Kay Butler Goen are unknown.
==O==
Billie Joe Goen was born October 28, 1936 in Collin County, according to BVS File 77545. He was married December 17, 1955 to Evelyn Renner, according to Rockwall County, Texas Marriage Book 29, page 207. Of Billie Joe Goen and Evelyn Renner Goen nothing more is known.
==O==
G. Goen, father, and L. Gown, mother, were the parents of a son born in Collin County October 7, 1907, according to BVS File 53510.
==O==
Rosa Mae Goen died May 1, 1956 in Collin County, according to BVS File 23788. She was born October 4, 1881, according to her tombstone in Wylie Cemetery.
==O==
Leona Goin, who was born in 1920, and was married to M. B. Wheeler, died in 1966, was buried in Ridgeview Cemetery, according to “Collin County, Texas Cemetery Inscriptions” by Alice Pitts.
==O==
Mary Dell Goin was born in Collin County July 28, 1926, ac­cording to BVS File 1239054.
==O==
Peggy Goin was born in Collin County July 20, 1928, accord­ing to BVS File 49957.
==O==
Richard Goins was born March 29, 1957 in Collin County, ac­cording to BVS File 58787.

Silas Lincoln Goins died in Collin County June 13, 1952, ac­cording BVS File 37594.
==O==
Shadrach Going, Jr, son of Shadrach Going, was born April 17, 1791, probably in Halifax County, according to David Goins, a family researcher. He was married about 1814 to Mary “Polly” Bass who was born August 16, 1797. They removed to Crawford County, Illinois. She died there March 10, 1871, and he died there November 27, 1878. They were buried in Sumner Cemetery in Lawrenceville, Illinois.

Obadiah Going, youngest living son of Shadrach, Going, was born about 1776 in Halifax County. On June 25-26, 1799, the case of Obadiah Going vs. David Going” was heard by the Patrick County Court. Laban Going appeared as a witness.

Obadiah Going appeared as a taxpayer on the tax rolls of Patrick County from 1800 to 1807.

Obadiah Going was named administrator of the estate of his father in 1805 in Patrick County. “Obadiah Gowing” was sued by his brothers in Grainger County, Tennessee in 1806 for settling the property unfairly and submitting a will which was not Shadrack Gowing’s will.”

On August 6, 1808, Obadiah Going of Patrick County sold to Gabriel Hanby 1,200 acres on the Little Dan River for $1,600 whereon Shadrick Going, deceased lived.”

On February 20, 1812, James S. Gains and “Obediah Goin,” “heir at law of Shadrack Goin, dec’d exchanged land on the west side of the Goin line on Thomas Beazley’s corner,” ac­cording to Patrick County Deed Book 3, page 530. Witnesses were John Tatum, Thomas Beazley and William D. Gaines.

Obadiah Going was the only member of the family listed in the 1830 census of Monroe County, Tennessee. His household appeared on Page 92 as:

“Going, Obadiah white male 50-60
white female 50-60
white female 10-15”

Obadiah Goings appeared in the 1840 census of Monroe County, page 189:

“Goings, Obadiah free colored male 55-100
white female 60-70”

He might have been of Melungeon ancestry, accounting for the dark color of his skin.

Hugh Goins appeared as the head of a household in the Monroe County, Tennessee census of 1840, page 195, nearby to Obadiah Goins, page 189, enumerated as:

“Goins, Hugh white male 30-40
white female 30-40
white female 20-30
white male 15-20
white male 15-20
white male 10-15
white male 10-15
white male 10-15
white female 10-15
white male 5-10
white male 0-5
white female 0-5”

Hugh Goins was married, wife’s name Elizabeth, in Rutherford County April 1, 1820, according to Monroe County, Tennessee Circuit court records. “Hugh Gowen” appeared as the head of a household in the 1820 census of Rutherford County, page 58, according to “Index to the 1820 Census of North Carolina.”

Hugh Goins was later convicted of bigamy and imprisoned in the Tennessee State Penitentiary.

“Obadiah Gowens” was enumerated as the head of Household 484-71 in the 1850 census of Monroe County:

“Gowens, Obadiah 73, born in born in VA, farmer,
$ 250 real estate
Synthia 22, born in NC”

Obadiah Gowen wrote his will in Roane County in 1858, according to the research of Sarah Foster Kelley, historian of Nashville, Tennessee.

“Obadiah Gowens” and “Synthia Gowins” do not reappear in the 1860 census of Monroe County, according to Sandy Ratledge of Cleveland, Tennessee who researched the matter.

Nathan Going, son of Shadrach Going, was born about 1777 in Halifax County. He accompanied his father in the move to Patrick County. He was killed there in 1793 with a hoe by Robert Hall on the plantation of Jacob Lawson. His father administrated his estate which was valued at “£25:8:10.”

Fanny Going, daughter of Shadrach Going, was born about 1781, probably in Halifax County. She was married about 1798 to Edmund Bowlin. She was mentioned in the will of her father written June 4, 1805 as the recipient of a cow and five shillings.

Rebecca Going, daughter of Shadrach Going, was born about 1783 in Halifax County. She received a cow by the terms of the will of Shadrach Going. She was married about 1806 to P. Finley.

Jerusha Going, daughter of Shadrach Going, was born in Halifax County about 1787. “Jerusha Gowing” joined five of her brothers in protesting the administration of Obadiah Going of the estate of Shadrach Going, but was not mentioned in the body of the document. On March 31, 1808 “Jerusha Gowing and Kesiah Gowing, heirs of Shadrack Gowing, dec’d, gave a quit claim deed to their interest in the estate to Gabriel Hanby, Sr.

Keziah Going, daughter of Shadrach Going, was born about 1789. She and her sister, Jerusha Going, were named in the will of Shadrach Going to receive the household furnishings of his home upon the death of his widow. She was also named to receive “1 rone horse, saddle, bridle, 1 cow, bed & furniture.”
==O==
Pryor L. Goins was an early day resident of Hamilton County, Tennessee. He purchased 82 acres from William Reed for $80 in 1841, according to Hamilton County deed records.
==O==
Price Goins and his wife, Martha Goins were early day residents of Hamilton County, according to John Wilson.

Children born to Price Goins and Martha Goins include:

Andrew Jackson Goins born about 1840
Rachel Goins born about 1843
Joseph Goins born about 1845
Preston Goins born about 1847
Priscilla Goins born about 1850
Thomas Goins born about 1853
Mary Goins born about 1857
==O==
Tillman Goins and his wife, Dinah Goins were early day residents of Hamilton County, according to John Wilson. Tillman Goins died about 1858.

Children born to Tillman Goins and Dinah Goins include:

Julia Ann Goins born about 1803
Spencer Goins born about 1805
Eliza Goins born about 1807
William Goins born about 1810
Carter Goins born about 1812
Jackson Goins born about 1815
Isabella Goins born about 1819
==O==
Preston Goins was born about 1804. He was in Hamilton County prior to the Civil War with his wife Mary Goins, according to John Wilson. Children born to them include:

Jarrett Goins born about 1829

Jarrett Goins, son of Preston Goins and Mary Goins, was born about 1829. He was married about 1842, wife’s name Rebecca. Children born to Jarrett Goins and Rebecca Goins include:

William Goins born about 1844
James Goins born about 1846
Sarah Goins born about 1850
==O==
William A. Goins enlisted from Hamilton County with the Confederacy, according to John Wilson. He was captured at Grand Gulf, Mississippi May 18, 1863, and taken to a prison at Alton, Illinois. William Goins was sent for exchange on June 12, 1863, but he objected to the terms of the oath of allegiance and was returned to the Alton prison. He died there July 2, 1864.
==O==
Asa “Acy” Goins married Sara Bolden and they had a large family in the Brown Rock section. Acy Goins was one of the sons of Jackson Goins and Jennie Goins who moved to Hamilton County from Georgia about 1843. Other sons of Jackson Goins and Jennie Goins were Richard Goins, William Goins, Henry Goins, Nathaniel Goins, Bradford Goins, George Goins and Robert Goins. Daughters of Jackson Goins and Jennie Goins were Sarah J. Goins, Nancy Goins, Caroline Goins, Viola Goins, Lydia Goins and Jane Goins.

The youngest child of Asa “Acy” Goins was Alvin Goins, who was born in 1903. He was kicked in the head by a mule when he was five, and he never learned to read and write. But he could “perform a remarkable feat of computation in his head that would baffle a math professor. Given the day, month and year of someone’s birth, in a few seconds, Alvin could estimate the exact number of days that elapsed since then.”

Tested on this by an author doing a book on Melungeons, “his figures were found to be correct down to the last digit.” It was said when he worked at a sawmill, he could accurately compute a load of logs and tell how many slabs to cut off. Some contractors building a brick building asked his advice on how many bricks to order. He made the computation in a few minutes. After the project, three bricks were left over.

John C. Goins was born near Apison, Tennessee in 1896. His grandfathers fought on different sides in the Civil War. His father was Daniel Alexander Goins and the grandfather was John Goins, who married Amanda Jane Hughes in 1852 and lived in Bradley County, Tennessee. John Goins, who was a native of Blount County, fought for the Confederacy with Company D of Thomas’ Legion.

John Goins was the father of 12 children, including Daniel Alexander Goins who was born in Bradley County in 1869. He married Mary Alta Johnson.

Daniel Alexander Goins was killed near his home at Apison in 1939 when he was hit by a bus.

John C. Goins and his younger brother, Charles Daniel Goins were Chattanooga lawyers. John C. Goins became a judge in Hamilton County Circuit Court. John C. Goins was also president of the Chattanooga Bar Association in 1934 and the Tennessee Bar Association in 1941-42. He was also a member of the American Bar Association House of Delegates in 1953-56. He married Wilda Swick, but she died a few hours after their son, John C. Goins, Jr. was born. His second wife was Martha Raulston of Marion County, and their son, Landon Haynes Goins became a lawyer in Chattanooga. His first name came from his father’s longtime law partner, Landon Gammon. John C. Goins, Jr. became a biologist in Missouri.

Caroline Goins, daughter of John C. Goins, was married to attorney Keith Harber.

Bess Goins, sister of John C. Goins, was a teacher at Tyner High School, and she was married to the school’s principal, Paul Morris.

John C Goins had brothers Thomas M. Goins and James Goins. Thomas M. Goins was an attorney in Pennsylvania.
==O==
Henry Going, born before 1761, was on the 1782 tax list for Hanover County with eight in his family, possibly six children born before 1782.
==O==
Walter N. Gowin and Annie N. Gowin were buried in Mt. Olivet Cemetery in Hanover County, according to Sheri Milliken. Walter N. Gowen was born January 5, 1909 and died February 3, 1962. Annie N. Gowin, perhaps his wife, was born April 27, 1911 and died February 14, 1994.
==O==
The John Goins family was allied with the Fields family, which had a Cherokee background. John’s children included Sandell, Polly, John Jr., Sanford, Martin, Thomas and Nathan. Sandell was first married to George Fields, a Cherokee who went to Arkansas on the Trail of Tears but returned to Hamilton County a few years later and died about 1841. Sandell then married George Still. Nathan married Mary Fields. Another member of the family, Nancy, was married to John Fields.
==O==
One of the best known of the Goinses – Oscar Claiborne Goins – was born at Grainger County Feb. 24, 1830. His parents moved to Hamilton County when he was three. His father died when he was 11 and the mother, Nancy Biby Goins, was married in 1846 to a kinsman, Levi Goins. The other children were Pleasant,
William, George W. and Sarah Jane who married the carpenter James K. Cornell.
Oscar and his family “settled on a farm among the Cherokee Indians.” He took over the farm’s management after his father’s death, then he began clerking in a store at Chattanooga when he was 16. He married Nancy Florence Potter, daughter of Moses and Ellen Potter, in 1853. They separated after they had a son, William Preston Goins. John C. Potter, who married Tennessee Iles, may be another son of O. C. and Nancy Potter Goins. William Preston Goins lived with his Potter grandparents during the Civil War. William Preston Goins moved to Greene County, Arkansas. He married Lydia Elizabeth Lafferty, a descendant of the wealthy Rockefeller family. In 1858, Oscar married Esther Reynolds, daughter of Anderson and Maria Reynolds.

Oscar C. Goins was operating a grocery and supply house at Chattanooga when the Civil War broke out. He enlisted on the Confederate side in the 19th Tennessee Infantry Regiment. He first saw action at the Battle of Fishing Creek, then was in the fighting at Shiloh. He was detailed to bring wounded soldiers to Chattanooga, then he helped raise the Lookout Battery. He was with this unit at Mobile, then was at Vicksburg before he finally had to leave the service because of poor health. He was a traveling salesman after the war, and he moved his family near Spring Place, Georgia in 1873, when he acquired the three-story Joe Vann mansion. The Goins family lived on this fine plantation the next 22 years. Oscar C. Goins was in Bradley County when he died in 1903.
==O==
Asa “Acy” Goins married Sara Bolden and they had a large family in the Brown Rock section. Acy Goins was one of the sons of Jackson Goins and Jennie Goins who moved to Hamilton County from Georgia about 1843. Other sons of Jackson Goins and Jennie Goins were Richard Goions, William Goins, Henry Goins, Nathaniel Goins, Bradford Goins, George Goins and Robert Goins. Daughters of Jackson Goins and Jennie Goins were Sarah J. Goins, Nancy Goins, Caroline Goins, Viola Goins, Lydia Goins and Jane Goins.

Living near the Jackson Goins family were Alfred Goins and Mahala Goins. Nearby was the family of Francis M. Goins and Sarah Goins.

The youngest child of Asa “Acy” Goins was Alvin Goins, who was born in 1903. He was kicked in the head by a mule when he was five, and he never learned to read and write. But he could “perform a remarkable feat of computation in his head that would baffle a math professor. Given the day, month and year of someone’s birth, in a few seconds, Alvin could estimate the exact number of days that elapsed since then.”

Tested on this by an author doing a book on Melungeons, “his figures were found to be correct down to the last digit.” It was said when he worked at a sawmill, he could accurately compute a load of logs and tell how many slabs to cut off. Some contractors building a brick building asked his advice on how many bricks to order. He made the computation in a few minutes. After the project, three bricks were left over.
==O==
John C. Goins was born near Apison, Tennessee in 1896. His grandfathers fought on different sides in the Civil War. His father was Daniel Alexander Goins and the grandfather was John Goins, who married Amanda Jane Hughes in 1852 and lived in Bradley County, Tennessee. John Goins, who was a native of Blount County, fought for the Confederacy with Company D of Thomas’ Legion.

John Goins was the father of 12 children, including Daniel Alexander Goins who was born in Bradley County in 1869. He married Mary Alta Johnson.

Daniel Alexander Goins was killed near his home at Apison in 1939 when he was hit by a bus.

John C. Goins and his younger brother, Charles Daniel Goins were Chattanooga lawyers. John C. Goins became a judge in Hamilton County Circuit Court. John C. Goins was also president of the Chattanooga Bar Association in 1934 and the Tennessee Bar Association in 1941-42. He was also a member of the American Bar Association House of Delegates in 1953-56. He married Wilda Swick, but she died a few hours after their son, John C. Goins, Jr. was born. His second wife was Martha Raulston of Marion County, and their son, Landon Haynes Goins became a lawyer in Chattanooga. His first name came from his father’s longtime law partner, Landon Gammon. John C. Goins, Jr. became a biologist in Missouri.

Caroline Goins, daughter of John C. Goins, was married to attorney Keith Harber.

Bess Goins, sister of John C. Goins, was a teacher at Tyner High School, and she was married to the school’s principal, Paul Morris.

John C. Goins had brothers Thomas M. Goins and James Goins. Thomas M. Goins was an attorney in Pennsylvania.

*****************************************

Virginia Counties
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