Virginia – Brunswick County – 1700s to early 1800s

Brunswick County, Virginia – INFO

(Below are different Going, Goyen, Gowen related sources for those people were in the Virginia, North Carolina, or South Carolina areas in the early 1700’s to early 1800’s)

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Parent County

1720–Brunswick County was created 2 November 1720 from Prince George County. Additional territory from Isle of Wight and Surry Counties was added in 1732.
County seat: Lawrenceville [1]

Neighboring Counties

Brunswick County INFO:

1709 Cornelius Keith arrives in the Colony of Virginia (filed affid in 1739 in Brunswick Co, Va that he arrived 30 years earlier).
http://interactive.ancestry.com/49387/FLHG_VAAncestorsAdventurers-0033/112152?backurl=http%3a%2f%2fsearch.ancestry.com%2fcgi-bin%2fsse.dll%3fdb%3dFLHG-VAAncestorsAdventurers%26gss%3dsfs28_ms_db%26new%3d1%26rank%3d1%26msT%3d1%26gsln%3dKeith%26gsln_x%3d0%26MSAV%3d1%26uidh%3dm37&ssrc=&backlabel=ReturnSearchResults&rc=673,1494,783,1524 (Note:  It does not say he came from Ireland or Great Britain.  It only says he arrived in the colony.  In reviewing the Hollis family, there were several times that the Hollis family travelled back and forth from the Maryland Colony to the Virginia Colony, receiving land grants when they moved across the Potomac River from one colony to the other.  Since this does not say Cornelius Keith came from Ireland or Great Britain, the possibility that he came from Maryland, or another American colony, to Virginia is an open question).  

1724 December 24, 1724 – 1728 November 16 – The parents of Mary Keith Going who married John Going Sr b. 1710,  Cornelius and Elizabeth Keith, moved from Stafford County to Brunswick County, Virginia between December 24, 1724 [when their son John was born] and November 16, 1728. They settled on Maj. Mumford’s land on the Roanoke River near Monisep Ford. Stafford Co, Va

1734 June 6 upon the motion of James Vaughan Jr it is ordered that Cave Gowen a boy about seven years of age be bound to him by the Church Wardens.  Brunswick Court Orders pg. 66. Brunswick Co, Va.

1734 June 6 motion granted to James Vaughan to have Cave Gowen age 7 bound to him in Brunswick Co Va

1734 July 7:  Gift Deed from Robert Hix, Senr. of St. Andrews Parish in Brunswick County dated July 7, 1734, for “especially for and in consideration of the true love and natural affection which I bear to Samuel Clark, Jr. of the parish and county aforesaid”  conveying land to Samuel Clark, Jr., containing by estimation 580 acres lying and being on the North side of Roanoke River in the County of Brunswick (description includes Richard Jones’ line and Cornelius Keith). Signed by Robert Hix, Senr. Witnessed by Moses Dunkley, Theophilus Feild and Josias Randle. Brunswick County, Va Deeds and Wills Book 1, page 165.

1736 March 26 – Cornelius Keife/Keith (see John Going Sr) had appeared in the legal records of Brunswick County March 26, 1736 when he was a witness to the will of John Nipper, Sr. of St. Andrews Parish of Brunswick County. Va. Wills/Probate – Brunswick Co.
http://www.freeafricanamericans.com/revolution.htm

1738 Oct 23 – Catherine Patterson / (previously married to William Gowen who died about 1725) appeared October 23, 1738 in Brunswick County, Virginia where she, Mary King and Cornelius Keife/Keith were witnesses to the will of Thomas Stroud, according to Brunswick County Will Book 2, page 1. Va. Wills/Probate – Brunswick Co.

1739 affid filed by Cornelius Keith arrives in America in 1709 (filed affid in 1739 in Brunswick Co, Va that he arrived 30 years earlier). (See John Going Sr page).
http://interactive.ancestry.com/49387/FLHG_VAAncestorsAdventurers-0033/112152?backurl=http%3a%2f%2fsearch.ancestry.com%2fcgi-bin%2fsse.dll%3fdb%3dFLHG-VAAncestorsAdventurers%26gss%3dsfs28_ms_db%26new%3d1%26rank%3d1%26msT%3d1%26gsln%3dKeith%26gsln_x%3d0%26MSAV%3d1%26uidh%3dm37&ssrc=&backlabel=ReturnSearchResults&rc=673,1494,783,1524

1739 May 3: O. S., Page 240 On the motion of Cornelius Keith Leave is granted him to keep a Ferry over Roanoak River from his own Landing below the Horse ford to Alexander’s Landing and that he keep for that purpose a good and Sufficient Strong flatt flatt fourteen foot and a half in her bottom and Six foot upon her beam and that he Receive for his ferriage Six pence for Man and Six pence for a Horse and as the Law directs for Wheel Carriages, two pence for Every Hogg and four pence for Each of the Cattle Kind, also ordered that he give bond and Security for the Same — Road Orders. Brunswick County, Virginia.

1739 July 5 ordered that John and Thomas Going be bound by the Church Wardens as the law directs to Ralph Jackson.  Brunswick Court Orders pg 254.  Brunswick County, Virginia.

1739 July 5 John and Thomas Going bound to Ralph Jackson in Brunswick Co Va

1740 March 5: O. S., Page 406 Upon the Petition of Martha Alexander Setting forth That having Land on the South Side of Roanok River opposite to Cornelius Keith’s Land she humbly desires an Order of this Court Licensing her to keep a Ferry from her Land over the River to Cornelius Keith’s Landing she being ready to give Security as the Law directs It is Ordered That the Clerk prepare a Licence for her accordingly upon her giving such Security — Road Orders.  Brunswick County, Virginia.

1740 April 3 ordered that Eleanar Going and Drury Going sons to Mary Gowing be bound as the law directs to Ralph Jackson untill they shall arive to the age of twenty one years. according to Order Book 1, page 302. Va. Court Order – Brunswick Co.

1740 April 3 Eleanar Going and Drury Going sons to Mary Gowing bound out to Ralph Jackson in Brunswick Co Va

 

1740 June, Sept, Oct – Going, Ann
1-321 – June 1740 Court.
1-353 – September 1740 Court.
1-379 – October 1740 Court
Brunswick County, Virginia Court Order

1740 June Ct: John Magosse and Jane his wife Pltfs v. Anne Going Deft. In Trespass assault and battery. The deft being returned nonevlinvention(sp?) on the motion of the plts by Clement Read their attorney an alias capias is awarded them against the said Deft returnable here the next Court. Brunswick Co Va court orders v 1, pgs 321 to 322.

1740 June ct John Magosse and Jane wife v Anne Going in Brunswick Co Va p1

1740 June ct John Magosse and Jane wife v Anne Going in Brunswick Co Va p2

1740 Sept Ct: John Magosse and Jane his wife v. Anne Going. In trespass assault and battery. The Deft being returned nonevt inventia upon the alias capias on the motion of the plts by their attorney apruries(sp?) . Capias is awarded them against the said Deft returnable the next Court. Brunswick Co Va court orders v 1, pg 353.

1740 Sept ct John Magosse and Jane wife v Anne Going in Brunswick Co Va

1740 Oct Ct: John Magosse and Jane his wife Pltfs v Anne Going. For trespass assault and battery. Discontinued being agreed by the parties, and ordered that the Deft pay unto the Plts their costs. Brunswick Co Va court orders v 1, pg. 378.

1740 Oct ct John Magosse and Jane wife v Anne Going in Brunswick Co Va

1741 Oct – Going, Michael
1742 Feb
2-037 – October 1741 Court.
2-078 – February 1741/2 Court.
Brunswick County, Virginia Court Order

1741 Oct Ct:  Certificates granted to Michael Going, Cornelius Keith, and John Mitchell by William Hagood Gent, for 1 old wolfs head 140. Brunswick Co, Va. court orders v 1. pg 37.

1741 Michael Going, Cornelius Keith and John Mitchell listed on William Hagood list in Brunswick Co Va

1741 Nov 13:  Indenture (Lease) made the 13th day of November, 1741, between William Gower and wife, Anne Gower, and John Collier of Prince George County, for tract on Reedy Branch. Witnesses were Nicholas Lanier and John Cooke. Acknowledged in Court on December 3, 1741.  Brunswick County, Va Deed Book 2, page 122. Release begins on page 124. (This appears to be “Gower”, not Gowin).  

1742 Feb Ct: (cut off first page – need to go back and get pg 77) . . . this day came the pet by Clement Read his attorney and William Maclin one of the undersherifs of this county made return that by virtue of the said writ of scare facias he had made known to the said John by Nicholas Moshier, Richard York, and Michael Going good and lawful men of his Bailiwic that he be before the justices here to shew cause if any he could as by the said writ was commanded whereupon the said John being solemnly called came not therefore it is considered by the court that the Pet have execution against him the said Deft of the damages aforesaid as also for his costs by him in this behalf expended and the said Deft in mercy etc. Brunswick County, Virginia. v 1 pg. 77 to 78.

1742 Michael Going in court order in Brunswick Co Va

1742 Feb 28: Indenture made the 28th day of February, 1742,   between Cornelius  Keith and Thomas Twitty, for 25 pounds, conveying 100 acres, being same land in that certain deed of gift from Robert Hix, Sr., late of Brunswick County, dec’d. to the said  Cornelius Keith, dated the 2nd day of May, 1734, and the same being part of a larger tract of land granted to the said Robert Hix in his lifetime. Witnesses were Clement Read, M. Cadet Young, and  Thomas Lanier. Acknowledged in Court on March 3, 1742, at which time Elizabeth, wife of the said Cornelius Keith, appeared and relinquished her dower interest. Deed Book 2, page 236. Brunswick County, Virginia.

1745 June 6:  Indenture made 6 June 1745 between Richard Huckiby Late of the County of Brunswick and John Roberson of Brunswick, £50, 350a, 100a of the said Quantity purchased of William Gower being part of a tract Granted to the said William Gower by Patent for 300a dated 18 February 1722, and 135a more part granted to Thomas  Huckiby by patent dated 17 July 1726, residue being part of a tract granted to the said Thomas Huckiby by patent for 316a dated 28 September 1728. Signed Richard Huckiby (bhm). Witnesses:  Micajah Perry, James Cook. Court June 6, 1745, Indenture and Memorandum acknowledged by Richard Huckabee and Mary the wife of the said Richard relinquished her right of dower. Brunswick Co, Va Deed Book 3, Page 30.   (This appears to be “Gower”, not Gowin).  

1745 June 29: Indenture made the 29th day of June, 1745, between John Robinson and William Brodnax of Prince George County, for 18 pounds, conveying 351 acres bounded by James Walkers land he bought of William King, John Colliers land, Henry Wilkins land, William Gowens and Cage Perry’s land (the land whereon the church stands and the land which the said John Robinson bought of Richard Hockebe. Condition of the indenture was to secure payment of 36 pounds. Witnesses were Elizabeth Carlos, Ann Brodnax, and Henry Brodnax. Acknowledged in Court on August 1, 1745. Deed Book 3,  page 54. Brunswick County, Virginia.

1745 Aug 2 – Indenture made 2 June 1748, between John Roper of Charles City County and Edward Going of Brunswick County, £5, 100a, on South side of the Mill Creek, being part of a Larger Tract containing 1601a granted to John Roper by Letters Patent dated 2 August 1745. Signed John Roper. Witnesses: Thomas Twitty, William Linsey, John Roberts (bhm). Court June 2, 1748, Indenture proved by oaths of Thomas Twitty, William Linsey and John Roberts. Deed Book 3, Page 444. Va. Land Trans – Brunswick County, Va
http://www.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~vabrunsw/deeds/brundb3.htm

1746 April 3 – Indenture made the 3rd day of April, 1746, between James Lanier of Brunswick County, and William Whittendon, for 15 pounds, conveying 175 acres on South side of Three Creeks bounded by the lands of Samuel Lanier, Thomas Sissons, and James Cook.  Witnesses were Sampson Lanier and John Harwell. Acknowledged in Court on April 3, 1746. Deed Book 3, page 177. Va. Land Trans – Brunswick Co. (See Drury Going b. 1729 page)
http://www.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~vabrunsw/deeds/deedbrns.txt

1746 Sept – Going, William
1747 June
3-102 – September 1746 Court.
3-202 – June 1747 Court.
Brunswick County, Virginia Court Order

1746 Sept 5: Humphery Bell of London mercht agst William Going. Upon a pet. in debt for 4.15.8 current money said to be due upon account. Continued till the next court. Brunswick Co Court Order book v3 pg. 102.

1746 Humphery Bell v William Going court order in Brunswick Co Va

1746 Nov 20 – Indenture made 20 November 1746, between Samuel Chamberlin of Brunswick County, St. Andrews Parish, and Moses Davis Smith of same, £10, 100a. Signed Sma Chamberlin. Wit: John Duglass, Sampson Lanier, Edmon Sweeny, Daniel Hix (bhm). Court 1 January 1746, Indenture and Memorandum proved by oaths of John Duglass and Sampson Lanier. Court 27 March 1750, further proved by the oaths of Daniel Hicks. Deed Book 4, Page 119.
http://www.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~vabrunsw/deeds/brundb4.htm

1747 June Ct: William Going of this county planter having behaved himself in a very disorderly indecent contemptive manner to this Court. It is considered that he make his fine with our Lord the King for the said offence by the paiment of five shillings sterling to his Majesty’s use and the sd William may be taken etc.
William Going of this County planter having behaved himself in a very disorderly indecent contemptive maner to this Court. It is ordered that he give security for his good behaviour during the space of twelve months and a day next ensuing and being in custody of the sherif. It is further ordered that the sherif keep him in custody till he give such security.  Brunswick Co Court Order book v3 pg. 204.

1747 June ct William Going found disorderly and indecent behavior by court in Brunswick Co Va

1746 Nov 20 – Indenture made 20 November 1746, between Samuel Chamberlin of Brunswick County, St. Andrews Parish, and Moses Davis Smith of same, £10, 100a. Signed Sma Chamberlin. Wit: John Duglass, Sampson Lanier, Edmon Sweeny, Daniel Hix (bhm). Court 1 January 1746, Indenture and Memorandum proved by oaths of John Duglass and Sampson Lanier. Court 27 March 1750, further proved by the oaths of Daniel Hicks. Deed Book 4, Page 119. Va. Land Trans – of Brunswick County, St. Andrews Parish (See Drury Going b. 1729) http://www.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~vabrunsw/deeds/brundb4.htm

1748 June – Going, Edward
3-388 – June 1748 Court
Brunswick County, Virginia Court Order

1748 June 2: John Roper of Charles City to Edward Going of Brunswick Co, Va . . . 100 acres in Brunswick Co, on the south side of the Mill Creek, beginning at Simmon’s corner . . . being part of a larger tract containing 1600 acres granted to John Roper on Aug 1, 1745 out of Williamsburg.  Signed: John Roper. Wits: Thomas Twitty, William Linsey, John Roberts. Proved up June 2, 1748.  Brunswick County Deed Book 3, pg 444-445. Brunswick Co, Va.  http://interactive.ancestry.com/6131/VGS_1970_01_01_0018/508593170?backurl=&ssrc=&backlabel=ReturnSearchResults&rc=2228,2483,2378,2525 1748 John Roper of Charles City conveys land in Brunswick Co to Edward Going
http://interactive.ancestry.com/6131/VGS_1970_01_01_0018/508593170?backurl=http%3a%2f%2fsearch.ancestry.com%2fcgi-bin%2fsse.dll%3fdb%3dvgs%26gss%3dsfs28_ms_db%26new%3d1%26rank%3d1%26msT%3d1%26gsln%3dGoing%26gsln_x%3d0%26MSAV%3d0%26uidh%3dm37&ssrc=&backlabel=ReturnSearchResults&rc=2228,2483,2378,2525

 

1748 June Ct: An indenture of bargain and sale from John Roper to Edward Going was mov’d by the oaths of the witnesses thereto and ordered to be recorded. Brunswick Co Va, Court Orderes v 3 pg 388.

1748 John Roper to Edward Going memorial in Brunswick Co Va

 

1749 March 20 – Indenture made 20 March 1749, between Mary Smith and William Smith of Brunswick County, and David Sims of same, £28, 100a, Rattlesnake Creek. Signed William Smith (bhm) and Sarah Smith (bhm). Wit: Sampson Lanier, Edward Wesson, William Johnson. Court 28 March 1750, Indenture and Memorandum acknowledged by William and Mary Smiths. Deed Book 4, Page 135. Va. Land Trans – Brunswick County.  (See Drury Going b. 1729).
http://www.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~vabrunsw/deeds/brundb4.htm

1749 Dec 11 – Indenture made 11 December 1749, between John Jackson of Brunswick County and Burwell Lucy of same, £15, 200a, granted to the above said John Jackson Junr. by Patent for 200a, 1742. Signed John Jackson. Wit: Sampson Lanier, Daniel Hix (bhm), Elizabeth Lanier. Court 27 March 1750, Indenture and Memorandum acknowledged by John Jackson. Deed Book 4, Page 115. Va. Land Trans – Brunswick County. (See Drury Going b. 1729).  http://www.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~vabrunsw/deeds/brundb4.htm

1749/50 Feb 17:  Indenture made 17 February 1749/50 Between John Jackson Junr. of St. Andrew Parish, Brunswick County, and Robert Rivers of Bath Parish, Prince George County, £130, 400a, on N side of the Three Creeks, bounded as in certain Letters Patent dated 22 February 1724 granted to Edward Accolls and assigned by Deeds of Bargain and Sale to John Jackson Junr, dated 1 October MDCCXLVII, and also on S side of Nottoway River adjoining the land containing 100a., being part of 195a granted to John Jackson  Senr. by Letters Patent dated 18 September 1730, and assigned by the said John Senr. to the aforesaid John Junr. dated 1 October 1747[?]. Signed John Jackson, Willmuth Jackson (bhm). Wit:  William Gower, John Maclin, Robt. Whitehall. Court 29 March 1750, Indenture and Memorandum acknowledged by John Jackson and Willmuth his Wife previous to which the said Willmuth was privately examined. Brunswick Co, Va Deed Book 4, Page 141. (This appears to actually be “Gower” – not Going). 

1750 June 26 – Indenture made 26 June 1750, between William Dugger of Brusnwick County, and Benjamin Lanier of same, £23, 200a, on both sides of Beechlick Branch, and bounded as by Letters Patent dated 12 January 1746. Signed Wm. Dugger. Wit: Sampson Lanier, William Rawlings, John Marshall. Court 26 June 1750, Indenture acknowledged by William Dugger previous to which Martha the Wife of the said William was privately examined. Deed Book 4, Page 161. Land Trans – Brusnwick County.    (See Drury Going b. 1729).  http://www.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~vabrunsw/deeds/brundb4.htm

1751 March 26 – Indenture made 26 March 1751, between Thomas Jackson of Brusnwick County, and Ralph Jackson of same, £50, 250a, being part of a tract of land granted to Thomas Jackson aforesaid for 325a, by Patent dated 22 February 1724, Chinkaponbottom / Road from Allens Mill to Meherrin River / Little Creek / Plantation Branch. Signed Thomas Jackson (bhm). Wit: Sampson Lanier, Mark Harwell, John Jackson (bhm). Court 26 March 1751, Indenture and Memorandum acknowledged by Thomas Jackson. Deed Book 5, Page 18. Land Trans – Brunswick County.   (See Drury Going b. 1729).
http://www.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~vabrunsw/deeds/brundb5.htm

1754 Feb Ct: An indenture of bargain and sale from William Gower and his wife to John Maclin was acknowledged by the said William and his wife and ordered to be recorded and she the said being first privately examined relinquished her right of dower in the lands conveyed by the said indenture. Brunswick Co Va, Order book v3 pg 166.  (This appears to actually be “Gower”, not Gowing).  

1754 Feb ct William Gower and wife to Maclin in Brunswick Co Va

1755 Sept Ct: the petition of John Gower (Gowen) against William Thornton is continued till next court. Brunswick Co Va Order book pg 472.  (This appears to be Gowen, not Gower – see the following entries.  This appears to be John Gowen from Lunenburg County, Virginia – involved in the lawsuit against William Thornton).  

1755 Sept ct John Gower or Gowen v William Thornton continued in Brunswick Co Va

1756 Jan Ct: John Gowen pltf v William Thornton deft. Upon a petition. On the motion of the pltf by his attorney a commission is awarded him to examine and take the deposition of Christopher Hudson directed to Richard Witton of the County of Lunenburg Gent. he giving the Deft legal notice of the time and place of executing the same. Another petition is continued till next court. Brunswick Co Va order book pg. 10.

1756 Jan ct John Gowen v Wm Thornton motion for depo of Christopher Hudson in Lunenburg Co in Brunswick Co Va

1756 April Ct: John Goin pltf v. William Thornton deft. Upon a petition for two pounds three shillings due by account. The parties being this day heard upon the said petition it is considered by the court that the pltf recover against the defts his debt aforesaid in the said petition mentioned and his costs including a lawyers fee. (note on side of page: Costs. 1558 tobo + 7/6 costs 27 July 1756 for costs only residue paid). Brunswick Co Va order book pg. 46.

1756 April ct John Gowin v William Thornton in Brunswick Co Va

1756 April Ct: On the motion of Christopher Hudson a witness for John Gowin against William Thornton it is ordered that the said Gowin pay him six hundred and twenty nine pounds of tobacco for five days attendance and travelling forty two miles four times according to Law.
On the motion of Thomas Norrell a witness for John Gowin against William Thornton it is ordered that the said Gowin pay him seven hundred and seventy five pounds of tobacco for seven days attendance and travelling forty miles five times according to law. Brunswick Co Va order book pg. 47

1756 April Ct John Gowin v William Thornton with Christopher Hudson and Thomas Norrell as wits for in Brunswick Co Va

1757 Dec 27 – Indenture made the 27th day of December, 1757, between Thomas BULL and Lemuel HARWELL, for 30 pounds, conveying 99 acres, being part of a tract of land taken up by the said Thos. BULL by patent bearing date of January 12, 1746. Beginning at the mouth of a Great Branch thence up the said branch as it meanders to a white oak on the same and from thence to a white oak from thence to the dividing branch and thence down the said branch to Ralph JACKSONs line and up the said line and up the said line (sic) to the Beginning. Signed by Thos. BULL and Susanna BULL. Witnesses were Thos. JACKSON, John HICKS, and Samuel JACKSON. Indenture and Memorandum of Livery of Seizin were acknowledged by Thomas BULL and Susanna, his wife. Deed Book 6, page 223
Va. Land Trans – Brunswick Co.   (See Drury Going b. 1729).
http://www.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~vabrunsw/deeds/brundb6.htm

1759 July 23 – Drury Going was paid 5 pounds for a year’s work according to the account of the Brunswick County, Virginia estate of Sampson Lanier which was returned 23 July 1759 [\VB 3:297]. Brunswick Co, Va.

1759 Sampson Lanier estate with Drury Going in Brunswick Co Va

1759 Nov 26 – Indenture made the 26th day of November, 1759, between Henry COOK and David PEOPLES, for 30 pounds, conveying 557 acres, adjoining the County line, and lands of John JACKSON, James WATSON, Jehu PEEBLES, Thomas SISSON, LANIER, Sampson LANIER and Richard LANIER. Witnesses were Laml. (or Saml.) LANIER, Joseph PEEPLES and Phil. BURROW. Signed by Henry COOK (his mark). Indenture acknowledged in Court on November 26, 1759, by Henry COOK. Deed Book 6, page 420. Va. Land Trans – Brunswick Co. (See Drury Going b. 1729).
http://www.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~vabrunsw/deeds/brundb6.htm

1760-61 June – Surveyed for James GOWEN, 376 Acres Situated on Carters Creek; List of all the Surveys made in the County of Brunswick from June, 1760 to June, 1761 by Drury STITH, Surveyor. Deed Book 6, page 627. Brunswick Co, Va
http://www.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~vabrunsw/deeds/brundb6.htm

1761 March 23:  Indenture made the 23rd day of March, 1761, between Russell BLACKLEY and Abel GOWER, for 6 pounds, conveying 80 acres. Names of witnesses not given. Indenture acknowledged in Court on March 23, 1761, by Russell BLACKLEY, and on October 25, 1762, Sarah, his wife, appeared and relinquished her right of dower. Deed Book 6, page 640.  (This appears to be “Gower”, not Gowin). 

1761 April 28:  Indenture made the 28th day of April, 1761, by John MACLIN and Frederick MACLIN, for 50 pounds, conveying 254 acres, adjoining lands of Mark HARWELL, Henry WILKINS, David PEEPLES, John SHEARIN, and Joseph CARTER, and being the plantation whereon the said Frederick MACLIN now lives which formerly belonged to William GOWER. Names of witnesses not given. Indenture was acknowledged in Court on April 27, 1761, by John MACLIN and Susanna, his wife, appeared and relinquished her right of dower. Deed Book 6, page 675.  (This appears to actually be “Gower”, not Gowing).  

1762 – James Gowen received a land grant in Brunswick County in 1762, citing Virginia Land Office Book 15. Brunswick Co, Va.

1762 Jan 25 – Indenture made the 25th dayof January, 1762, between Theophilus Field of Prince George County, and John Sims, for 200 pounds, conveying 275 acres on North side of the Little Creek, adjoining land of Ralph Jackson, and purchased of Thomas Jones and Anne, his wife, by two deeds, the first dated the 3rd day of March, 1748, and the other dated the 6th day of October, 1748. Witnesses were Gray Briggs, John Thornton, Theophilus Field, Junr., and James Walker. Indenture was proved in Court on June 28, 1762, by the oaths of Gray Briggs, John Thornton, and Theophilus Field, Junr. Deed Book 7, Page 122. Va. Land Trans – Brunswick Co.  (See Drury Going b. 1729).
http://www.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~vabrunsw/deeds/brundb7.htm

1762 March 22 – Indenture made the 22nd day of March, 1762, between Edward Roberson and Anne, his wife, parties of the first part, and Joseph Peoples. for 60 pounds, conveying 297 acres, adjoining land of Ralph Jackson, which was conveyed to William Roynolds by Letters of Patent dated September 28, 1728, and thence conveyed by William Roynolds to Ralph Jackson and then conveyed by his Last Will and Testament to the said Edward Roberson. Signed by Edward Roberson (his mark) and Anne Roberson. Witness was Lemuel Lanier. Indenture and Memorandum of Livery of Seizin were acknowledged in Court on March 22, 1762, by Edward Roberson and Anne, his wife, appeared and relinquished her right of dower. Deed Book 7, Page 77. Brunswick Co. (See Drury Going b. 1729). http://www.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~vabrunsw/deeds/brundb7.htm

1762 Oct 26:   Indenture made the 26th?? day of October, 1762, between Abel Gower and Obedience, his wife, parties of the first part, and Richard Rains. Deed Book 7, Page 187.   (This appears to be “Gower”, not Gowin).

1763 May 23 – James Gowin – 376 acres adjoining the land of Brewer, Perry, Cook &c., and being on Carter’s Creek in Brunswick County, Va
http://lva1.hosted.exlibrisgroup.com/F/NUXGTGU21PJDCXUBKG3PDBV219M4QEL55EPI2E853P1FEJACEA-27945?func=full-set-set&set_number=005392&set_entry=000010&format=999

1763 May 23 – “James Gowin” received a grant of 376 acres “adjoining land of Brewer, Perry, Massey, and Cook on Carter’s Creek” May 23, 1763, according to Brunswick County deed records. . . beginning at Brewer’s corner . . . perry’s line . . . Cook’s line . . . Massey’s line .  Brunswick Co, Va.
http://image.lva.virginia.gov/cgi-bin/drawer?retrieve_image=LONN&dir=/LONN/LO-1/035/035&image_number=0155&offset=%2B18&name=Patents+No.35+1762-1764+(VOL.1+%26+VOL.2)&dbl_pgs=no&round=

1764 Oct 20 – Indenture made 20 October 1764 between Ambros Harwell and Margret his wife of Brunswick County and Eward (sic) Sanders of Lancaster County, for five pounds, sells to Edward Sanders, one Tract or parcell of Land lying and being in the County of Brunswick Containing by Estimation one Hundred & Twenty five Acres, it being part of a Tract of Land Thomas Bull the Twelfth day of January one Thousand Seven Hundred and forty six and bounded as followeth: Beginning at a branch thence a Strait Course to a Croner Shrub White Oak thence South sixty Six degrees West ninty eight poles to Ralph Jacksons line thence along his Line North Seven degrees Est (sic) Eighty poles to his Corner red oak thence along the said Line East four degrees West Seventy Six poles to his Corner red oak thence along the said Jacksons line fifty two Degrees west fifty four poles to the Ready Creek thence up the said Creek as it mainders (sic) to the Beginnig (sic). Signed Ambros Harwell and Margret Harwell (bhm). Witnesses: Joel Threwitts, nathaniel Green, swan Prichard. Court 25 February 1765, Indenture was acknowledged by Ambros Harwell and Margret the wife of the said Ambros personally appeared in Court & having been first privly Examined as the Law Directs freely & Volunterily Relinquihsed her Right of Dower. page 22-24. Brunswick Co., Va. http://www.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~vabrunsw/deeds/brundb8.htm

1765 Jan 26 – 81-(133) Richard Rains of Brunswick Co to Gray Briggs of Dinwiddie Co. 26 Jan 1765. £105. A mortgage for 307 acres which sd Rains purchased from Thomas Gowen Richard Rains, Joseph Peebles, George Clayton, John Bailey, William Woodward, Lewelling Wmson, Joseph Wmson, Robert Gee Jr., Sd Briggs, Edward Adams, James Adams, Richard Atkins, Reuben Bennitt, Joseph Blayton, Bunell Claiborne, Francis Coleman, Samuel Coleman, Joshua Cook, Samuel Craft, Thomas Craft, William Duglas, Charles Edwards, H. Garrott, Robert Garrott, Henry Gee, Charles Golestone, Benjamin Harrison, Jr., John Hilton, Judith Jones, Tomas Jones, Solomon King, Richard Lanier, Richard Littlepage, William Lucas, Bernd. Major, Frizell McTier, James Proctor, Joseph Proctor, Robert Proctor, Moses Quarles, Richard Rains, Henry Rawlings, William Rawlings, Josiah Reams, John C. Robinson, Peter Simmons Jr, Thomas Steagall, John Tankersly, Roger Tillman, Littleberry White, David Wiggons, Joseph Williamson, John Wood, Gray Briggs. Proved 30 May 1765. N. Edwards DCC.  Brunswick Co, Va.

1765 Feb 25:  I Mark Harwell of Sussex County, for the Love good will & Affection that I have and do bear unto my son Ishmael Harwell of Brunswick and for his advancement and preferment in this World, give to the said Ishmael Harwell, One Certain Tract or parcell of land lying Scituate in the County of Brunswick Containing by Estamation Three Hundred & fifty one Acres, it is the Tract of Land I Purchased of John Roberson and whereon my said son Ishmael Harwell now lives and is bounded thus Beginning at a White Oake on William Gowers Branch thence Down the said Branch to a Chestnut Oak thence along Capt. Frederick Maclins Line to Joseph Carters Line thence along the said Carters line to a branch on Kettle Stick thence up the sid Branch to Alexander Watsons line thence along the Said Watsons line to John Colliers line thence along the said Colliers line to Frederick Maclins line thence along the said Maclins line to the Beginning on Gowers Branch, this 23rd day of February 1765. Signed Mark Harwell. Witnesses: James Mangam, Thomas Hunt, Richard harwell. Court 25 February 1765, Indenture was proved by the oaths of James Mangam Thomas Hunt & Richard Harwell & OTBR. page 30-31.  (This appears to actually be Gower, not Gowing).  

1765 Sept 21 – 329-(12) William Guynne & his wife Elizabeth of St Andrew Parish in Brunswick Co to Thomas Brooks of sd parish. 21 Sep 1765. £70 VA. 200 acres which was part of a 400 acre tract, joining Ingram, Hagood, Johnson & Maclin, & which had formerly been a patent to Thomas Singleton who…….(Note from Tracy Hutchison- I do not have the next page). Brunswick Co , Va. (Note:  Not able to tell if this is a Gwin, Goyne, or Gower name – likely Gwin – but not sure)    http://www.freeafricanamericans.com/revolution.htm

1765 Sept 22 – 210-(359) James Goin & wife Amy of Meherrin Parish in Brunswick Co to Peter Solomon of sd parish. 22 Sep 1765. £20 VA. 150 acres which is part of the tract where sd James Goin now lives & was patent to him 23 May 1763, on the south side of Meherrin River & on Spring Branch, joining George Renn, Henry Cook, sd James Goin, sd Peter Solomon, John Massey, William Massey. Witnesses omitted. Proved 22 Sep 1766. N. Edwards Jr DCC. Brunswick Co, Va.

1766 Nov 28 – 293-(505) Robert Gwaltney of Meherin Parish in Brunswick Co to Drury Gowing (Goen) of sd parish. 28 Nov 1766. £5 VA. 50 acres which was part of a patent to Thos Burnett & laid off by John Burrow & conveyed by sd Thomas Burnett to sd Robert Gwaltney, on the south side of Meherin River, joining ad Robert Gwaltneys Spring Branch. Wit: Burrel Sims, Thos(xo)Burnet, Samuel( ) Sexton. Proved 27 Apr 1767. N. Edwards Jr DCC.  Brunswick Co, Va

1768 Dec 2 –  1768 – 1769 Freeholders; Submitted by Dennis Hudgins; James Gowing; is listed:
A list of polls/voters of the Brunswick County Freeholders, for the House of ; Burgesses was returned to Nathaniel Edwards, Jr. on 10 January 1769, taken ; from a poll dated 2 December 1768. The list of voters is contained in Brunswick County Deed Book 9 pages 279-290. Each person was allowed two votes and these were listed according to their choices of the four candidates, as was done in 1748 [See The Southside Virginian Vol XI No. 1]. The following list is in apparent voter order, followed by the sequence number they appear in, within each candidates list.
https://archive.org/stream/southsidevirgini111993/southsidevirgini111993_djvu.txt
487-(279) “A Poll Taken for Nathanie Edwards Jun’ at an Election of Burgeses for the County of Brunswick the 2nd Day of December 1768.” Included in the list of names is James Gowing. Brunswick Co, Va.
http://lumbeeindiansandgoinsfamily.blogspot.com/2008_06_01_archive.html

1768 Dec 2 – James Going votes in House of Burgesses Va. Election of Burgeses for the County of Brunswick the 2nd Day of December 1768.” Brunswick Co, Va.
http://interactive.ancestry.com/6131/VGS_1974_01_01_0021/510690325?backurl=&ssrc=&backlabel=ReturnSearchResults&rc=1170,838,1304,867#?imageId=VGS_1974_01_01_0018

http://interactive.ancestry.com/6131/VGS_1974_01_01_0021/510690325?backurl=&ssrc=&backlabel=ReturnSearchResults&rc=1170,838,1304,867#?imageId=VGS_1974_01_01_0021

http://interactive.ancestry.com/6131/VGS_1974_01_01_0021/510690325?backurl=http%3a%2f%2fsearch.ancestry.com%2fcgi-bin%2fsse.dll%3fdb%3dvgs%26gss%3dsfs28_ms_db%26new%3d1%26rank%3d1%26msT%3d1%26gsln%3dGoing%26gsln_x%3d0%26MSAV%3d0%26uidh%3dm37&ssrc=&backlabel=ReturnSearchResults&rc=1170,838,1304,867#?imageId=VGS_1974_01_01_0021

1769 Nov 4 – 75-(107) Peter Solomon & his wife Mary of Sussex Co to Lewis Solomon Jr of same. 4 Nov 1769. £10 VA. 150 acres in Meherin Parish & on the south side of Meherin River, bounded as by deed from James Gowen to sd Peter Solomon & is part of the patent to sd James Gowen & is the land where Lewis Solomon the elder now lives. Wit: Lewis Solomon, George Wrenn, David Mason, Penny Hurst. Proved 22 Jan 1770 & again 25 Mar 1771. P. Pelham CC. Brunswick Co., Va.

1770 Jul 21 – Deed Book 10, Brunswick County, Va Deed Books – Vol 5 1770-1775. Abstracted by Dr. Stephen E. Bradley, Jr.
7-(8) Nicholas Brewer and his wife Sarah of Meherin Parish in Brunswick Co to William Brewer (son of the sd Nicholas Brewer). 21 Jul 1770. Deed of gift to their son and 5s Va. 200 acres in Meherin Parish which was part of a patent to Nicholas Brewer 5 Jul 1751, joining a branch, George Renn, James Gowing, Carters Creek, John Brewer, Nicholas Brewer Jr., Wits: Charles Powell, Thomas Brewer, Nicholas Brewer Jr., Proved 27 Aug 1770. Edwd Fisher CC.  Brunswick Co, Va.
http://lumbeeindiansandgoinsfamily.blogspot.com/2008/06/brunswick-county-va-early-records.html

1773 Oct 18 – Brunswick County, Virginia Will Books – Volume 2, Will Books 4 and 5 (in part) 1761-1780, Abstracted by Dr. Stephen E. Bradley, Jr., Will Book 4, Pt 1
143-(193) Account 1773 for the estate of Jno Underwood dec’d by James & Betty Solomon. Named in Sales/Probate of Jno Underwood:
David Adams, Jno Ballard, Peter Brooks, Sarah Brooks, Clack Courtney, Crawford & Co, Jno Doby, Nathl Edwards, Wm Edwards & Co, James Goen, Richard Hay Jr, Richard Massey, Thomas Massey, William Massey, Jno Peeblees
Noted was the sheriff of Mecklenburg. Audited by David Mason, Alexr Watson. Returned to Court 28 Feb 1774.
141-(191) Will of Thomas Underwood – 18 Oct 1773 – 24 Jan 1774
“very sick and Weak in Body” . . . To my wife Elizabeth – all my estate during her lifetime or widowhood & afterward then the sd land to my son[s] William & Sammons Underwood; William’s to join the lower line of Tomlin’s Run, Harrison, Second Branch, Drury Going, & all above that branch to belong to my son Sammonds.
Ex. Friend Richard Hay, my wife
Wit. Edward Freeman, Richard Mason, Avey Mason
Probate indicates that sd Elizabeth Underwood refused to qualify, that sd Richard Hay qualified with David Sills & Richard Mason his securities.
Brunswick Co, Va.
http://lumbeeindiansandgoinsfamily.blogspot.com/2008/06/brunswick-county-va-early-records.html

1774 Jan 11 – 511-(201) Drury Goin of Meherring Parish in Brunswick Co to Pheby Smith of sd parish. 11 Jan 1774. £5. 50 acres on the south side of Meherring River, joining Edward Freeman, Wall, Thomas Underwood, Spring Branch. Wit: Edward Freeman, Elizabeth Underwood, John Burnett. Brunswick Co., Va.
http://lumbeeindiansandgoinsfamily.blogspot.com/2008/06/brunswick-county-va-early-records.html

1778 will of William Gower – wife:  Anne Gower and Frederick Maclin executors, Brunswick Co, Va. (Note:  Showing that William Gower is different from William Gowing – I am assuming the Gower deeds with Maclin connections are actually “Gower” as most of them show.  William Gowing moved to Granville Co, NC – just on the Virginia line – around 1750).  

1778 William Gower decd estate in Brunswick Co Va p1

1778 William Gower decd estate in Brunswick Co Va p2

1779 Feb 4 – 507-(347) Peter Lee Jr & his wife Elizabeth of Duplin Co North Carolina to Drury Going of Brunswick Co. 4 Feb 1779. £26s15 VA. 223 acres on the north side of Fountains Creek, joining Ridly, Goodrich, Forgason, Branscob, Allin. Wit: William Goodrich, John Camp, Briggs Goodrich, John Forgason. Proved 26 Jul 1779 & again 23 Aug 1779. P. Pelham Jr CC. Brunswick Co, Va.
http://lumbeeindiansandgoinsfamily.blogspot.com/2008/06/brunswick-county-va-early-records.html

1780 Feb 21 – 597-(8) William Wren & his wife Mary of Meherrin Parish in Brunswick Co to Henry Mangum of same. 21 Feb 1780. £7000 VA. 371 acres, joining Carter’s Creek, Massey, Solomon, Going, William Robinson, Littleberry Robinson, William Peebles, John Collier. Wit: Briggs Goodrich, William Robinson, John Camp, John Woodroof. Proved 27 Mar 1780. Peter Pelham Jr CC. Brunswick Co., Va.

1784 Meherin Parish Va.
John Phillips: Frederick Going between 16 & 21 [frame 92] pers prop tax list,
http://www.freeafricanamericans.com/brunswick.htm

1787 Oct 21: Drury Going of Greensville Co Va to Daniel Harrison of Brunswick Co Va . . . conveys land in Brunswick on the south side of the Meherrin River containing 50 acres . . . along Harrison’s land to Pompey’s line, to Rebeccah Stewart’s line, to Freeman’s line, to Barnet’s line . . . signed by Drury Going (witnesses omitted). Proved up on June 23, 1788. pgs 366 to 367. Brunswick Co, Va.  [DB 14:366].

1789 Meherin Parish Va.
Drury Goins 2 tithes 1 horse pers prop tax list, Meherin Parish Va
Thomas Toins 1 tithe pers prop tax list, Meherin Parish Va
http://www.freeafricanamericans.com/brunswick.htm

1797 Meherin Parish Va.
Thomas Going 1 tithe – pers prop tax list, Meherin Parish Va
http://www.freeafricanamericans.com/brunswick.htm

1806 Meherin Parish Va.
Thomas Going 1 tithe pers prop tax list, Meherin Parish Va
http://www.freeafricanamericans.com/brunswick.htm

1807 Meherin Parish Va.
Thomas Going 1 tithe pers prop tax list, Meherin Parish Va
http://www.freeafricanamericans.com/brunswick.htm

Gowen Manuscript:

BRUNSWICK COUNTY, VIRGINIA

Brunswick County was organized in 1720 with land taken from three counties–Prince George, Isle of Wight and Surry.
==O==
Thomas Goin was born in Brunswick County about 1755, according to Varion Elmer Goin, a descendant of Jefferson, Oregon and a Foundation researcher.

“Thomas Going” was mentioned in “Brunswick County, Virginia Court Order Books, 1737-1749.” An index listed him in volume I, page 254. Other individuals who appeared in the index include: “Anne Going, Volume 1, pages 321, 353 and 379; Drury Going, Volume 1, page 302; Edward Going, Volume 3, page 388; Elsoner Going, Volume 1, page 302; John Going, Volume 1, page 254; Michael Going, Volume 2, pages 37 and 78; William Going, Volume 3, page 102 and 202, William Going, Planter, Volume 3, page 204 [2] and Mary Gowing, Volume 1, page 302.”

Mary Gowing, above, is identified as the mother of Drury Going and Elsoner Going by Donna V. Gowin Johnston, family researcher of Casper, Wyoming. She cites a Brunswick County Court order of April 3, 1740 in which it was “ordered that Elsoner Going and Drury Going, sons to Mary Gowing be bound as the law directs to Ralph Jackson until they shall arrive to the age of twenty-one years,” according to Order Book 1, page 302.

Four years earlier, John Going and Thomas Going, apparently brothers, possibly other sons of Mary Gowing, were also bound to Ralph Jackson on July 5, 1736, according to Order Book 1, page 254.

“Thomas Going,” living alone [or the head of a free colored household], was enumerated as the head of a household in the 1783 census of Greensville County, page 55, adjacent to Drury Going, according to “Heads of Families, Virginia, 1790.”

Drury Going was the head of a household of four, including two children. James Going was the head of a household of seven, including five children. Greensville County had been created in 1780 with land taken from Brunswick County.
==O==
Thomas Goin served in the Revolutionary War as a private in a militia company commanded by Capt. Turner Bynum, according to Varion Elmer Goin who died July 30, 1993. He quoted a letter from Thornton W. Mitchell, North Carolina State Archivist, dated October 26, 1978 who wrote, “Capt. Bynum was from Greensville County as were the majority of the men in his company.” National DAR accepted Thomas Goin as a Revolutionary War soldier from Greensville County, and assigned No. 629059 to the file. Gerry A. Elbridge, a descendant was accepted on his record. “James Going” also served in the company commanded by Capt. Bynum, according to “The State Records of North Carolina” edited by Judge Walter Clark.

Writing of her ancestor, Beverly J. Ellison Nelson, a descendant of Littleton, Colorado stated:

“Although many researchers descended from the various branches of the Thomas Goin [1755-1838] family have sought to establish his origins, to date no firm connection exists. The primary clue is in the consistent census listing of North Carolina as the birthplace of his oldest known son Levi. But, even that may simply refer to that portion of North Carolina which became Tennessee.”

The question of Thomas Goin being a negro, a mulatto or a Melungeon came up in a court case tried in Claiborne County, Tennessee in 1855. His great-grandson Elijah Goin was accused of being a mulatto, and he filed suit against his accuser. Certain information was introduced into evidence:

The “mulatto and negro” charge had serious implications. The Territory Act of 1794 and the Tennessee Constitution of 1796 declared, “all negroes, mulattos and Indians and persons of mixed blood, descended from negro or Indian ancestors to the third generation inclusive, though one ancestor of each generation may have been a white person, whether bond or free, should be held deemed to be incapable in law to be a witness in any case whatsoever, except against each other.”

The Act also forbade such persons from obtaining marriage licenses, voting, owning land, paying taxes, making wills, owning slaves or holding office. Their civil rights were denied. The state of Tennessee filed charges against several Melungeons “for voting in an election held on the seventh day of August 1845.” Some convictions were handed down in a trial held in Rogersville, Tennessee on Saturday, July 29, 1848.

Even in Revolutionary days and in the War of 1812, negroes and mulattos could not serve as soldiers. A few were utilized in non-combatant roles as cooks and teamsters.

The first proven official record for Thomas Goin is the North Carolina Land Grant No. 657 issued for 225 acres in Washington County, Tennessee “upon the waters of Cherokee Creek. joining Tiptons line,” entered June 29, 1779 and issued October 26, 1786. The Tipton Farm was owned by John Tipton, senator for Washington County in the North Carolina Assembly. On February 22, 1788 at his farm near Jonesborough, Tennessee began open warfare between Tipton and John Sevier, governor of the State of Franklin.

On that date John Sevier marched to within sight of the Tipton House [now a state-owned historic site] with a party of nearly 100 followers, “with a drum beating, colours flying in military parade and in a hostile manner,” according to Dr. James B. Jones, Jr. in “The Lost State of Franklin: Sevier, Secession and Statehood.”

Sevier sent a flag of truce and demanded that Tipton and his men surrender within half an hour and submit themselves to the laws of the State of Franklin. Tipton, who was forewarned and forearmed, holed up in his house and refused to capitulate. The attack began, and casualties that day included one horse, one wounded woman and the capture of five Tiptonites.

The battle was not yet concluded. A siege began and six days later hostilites continued between the Sevierites and the Tiptonites. Rifles were fired sporadically at Tipton’s home, but there were neither casualties nor great damage to the house.

The next day Sevier’s forces fired on a party of men coming to the assistance of the Tipton men. Two of the Tipton men, Jonathan Pugh, the Washington County sheriff and John Webb of Sullivan County were killed. Two others, Capt. William Delancy and John Allison, were wounded.

On March 1, Sevier relinquished the field in a blinding snowstorm. For all practical purposes, the State of Franklin ceased to exist from that day forward. John Sevier continued to act as governor of Franklin and had an engagement with the Cherokees and Creeks on January 10, 1789. He wrote a report of the battle addressed to “privy council of the State of Franklin:”

“Our artillery roused the Indians from their huts, and finding themselves pretty near surrounded on all sides, only tried to save themselves by flight, from which they were prevented by our riflemen posted behind the trees.

The loss of the enemy was 145 dead. Our loss was five dead and 16 wounded; amongst the latter is the brave Gen. McCarter, who while taking the scalp of an Indian was tomahawked by another whom he afterward killed. I am in hopes that this brave man will survive.”

In the Court of Pleas and Quarter Sessions held November 1, 1784 in Washington County, North Carolina [which later be-came Washington County, Tennessee] Thomas Goin was appointed constable.

He was granted 225 acres, described as Grant No. 751, on Cherokee Creek in Washington County October 26, 1786. The grant was signed by I. Glasgone Lee and R. C. Caswell.

He served on several jury panels there, according to the county court records and was in court in Jonesborough, the county seat, on the day that Andrew Jackson was admitted to the bar. In 1786 Thomas Goin received another land grant, No. 756, according to “North Carolina Land Grants in Tennessee, 1778-1791.” The land was described as 225 acres “on the waters of the Nolachucky, adjoining a bank of rocks.” This transaction was actually a purchase grant, paid for by cash or certificate. In the August term of 1787 Alex Moffatt had sworn “That he had lost a bond, the property of Thomas Goan, concerning 200 acres on Middle Creek. It was given by Isaac Taylor to Ralph Hedgepath who assigned it to John Cassady who assigned it to Goan,” according to “Washington County, Tennessee Deeds, 1775-1800.”

In 1787, “Thomas Gooin” received Grant No. 2015 for 300 acres of land on Licking Creek, “including his improvements” in Greene County, Tennessee. This grant was paid for in cash. Greene County had been formed in 1783 with land taken from Washington County.

In 1788, “Thomas Goin” applied to the County Court of Greene County for the administration of the estate of Elizabeth Bass, according to “Bulletin of the Watauga Association,” Volume 10:

“August 1788. On motion of W. Avery, Esqr. atto. for Thomas Going for obtaining letter of administration on the Estate of Elizabeth Bass, decd. ordered that the same be laid over until next term, for proof of sanguinity [kinship, blood relationship] & that a dedimus potestatem [a commission to take testimony] issue in favour of said Thomas Going to Anson & Richmond Counties & to the State of South Carolina by giving fifteen days notice to Jeremiah Bass of the time & place where such testimony will be taken, ditto for Levi Bass to South Carolina giving Thos. Going fifteen days notice at least.”

Edward Gowen of Granville County, North Carolina, regarded as a kinsman of Thomas Goin, was also named an heir of Elizabeth Bass. On October 14, 1788 he conveyed his interest in her estate to “his nephew, Thomas Gowen,” according to Granville County Will Book 2, page 79.

“October 14, 1788. Know all men by these presents that I Edward Gowen of the County of Granville for divers good causes and considerations thereunto [me] moving more especially for the sum of ú25 to me in hand paid, the receipt of which I do hereby acknowledge, hath bargained, sold & made over, and by these presents, do bargain, sell and make over to my nephew, Thomas Gowen all the estate, right and interest I have or hereafter may have to the estate of Elizabeth Bass, deceased, or any part thereof, and do hereby make over the same to the said Thomas Gowin, his heirs and assigns from the claim of me, the said Edward Gowen or any other person whatever claiming under me. In witness whereof I have hereunto set my hand & seal the 15th day of October, 1786.

Edward Going
Witnesses:
Henry Meghe
Allin Hudson
Jhn. [X] Simmons”

By 1786 Thomas had established himself in Washington County, and his name is included among those who voted in the election in August 1786 at the Courthouse in Jonesborough, Tennessee. In 1788, 1789, and 1790, Thomas Goin was No. 26 on the tax list of Washington County, North Carolina with “1 white poll,” indicating that he had located on his grant. In 1789 shown as No. 33 was Jonathan Tipton whose political problems had erupted in gunfire. “Thomas Goin, Pvt,” assigned this land in 1792 to Lardner Clark, later a prominent attorney in Nashville, Tennessee.

The land of Thomas Goin on Cherokee Creek was levied on by the sheriff and was sold at auction January 4, 1795, according to Washington County Deed Book 7, page 209-12. The entry read:

“Edmund Williams. Late sheriff of Washington County to Alexander Moffett against Thomas Goins, defendant, in 1788 levied against 275 acres on Cherokee Creek. Bid: £40, 1 shilling, 8 pence. Adjoining Jonathan Tipton, R Bayley, Bailey’s land not sold at first sale because of no bidders; second sale Feb. 1788,. Alex Moffatt. highest bidder. Signed: Edmund Williams. Witnesses: Waigh-still Avery, Andrew Greer, Amos Ball. Court Term: Sept 1795.”

In 1788, Thomas Goin sold his land in Greene County and moved westward to newly-created Hawkins County, Tennessee from which Claiborne would be created in 1801. Thomas Goin didn’t come to Claiborne County; the county came to him. He appeared there as a taxpayer, along with his sons, Levi Goin and Uriah Goin on Big Barren Creek in 1799 in “Capt. Coxes company.” The postoffice of Goin, Tennessee would be named for this pioneer’s family in 1884. Goin still exists today, but the postoffice was discontinued in 1965.

In 1802, he and his sons helped to build the road to Tazewell, Tennessee, and were appointed its overseers. On Saturday, November 1, 1803, he was instrumental in establishing the Big Barren Primitive Baptist Church. “Thomas Going” was recorded as No. 3 on the church roster of the men. No. 3 on the women’s roster was “Elizabeth Going,” possibly the wife of Thomas Goin.

He served on Claiborne County jury panels and in 1833 was listed as a “white male” taxpayer.

Thomas Goin died in 1838, according to Big Barren Primitive Baptist Church Record Book 2, and was buried in Old Big Barren Church Cemetery which adjoined the church. The site is now at the bottom of Norris Lake, and it is unknown if the graves were moved before the lake was created. His will was recorded in the Claiborne County courthouse.

Fifteen years after his death, his descendants were tormented in the community by accusations that they were descended from “niggers and mulattos.” The family had distinct Melungeon features, but attributed the mixed-blood characteristics to Indian and/or Portuguese ancestry.

Known children of Thomas Goin include:

Edwina Goin born in 1774
Levi Goin born November 2, 1779
Sarah Goin born about 1782
Uriah Goin born about 1785
Isaac Abraham Goin born about 1789

Richard Glenn Bonds, a descendant of Midland, Texas, wrote February 11, 1994 that a fourth son, William Goin was born to Thomas Goin.

Edwina Goin, daughter of Thomas Goin, was born in 1774, according to the research of Dianne Stark Thurman, family researcher of Wichita, Kansas. She was married about 1791 to Jacob Cupp.

Levi Goin, son of Thomas Goin, was born about 1778 in Washington County, North Carolina [later Tennessee]. “Levi Goans” was married November 2, 1799 in Grainger County, Tennessee to Elizabeth Stallions, according to “Grainger County, Tennessee Marriages, 1796-1850.” She was born in Virginia in 1783 to Thomas Stallions, according to the research of Clara Jane Goin Houser of Cleveland Heights, Ohio. Pvt. William Stallions was a comrade-at-arms with Jacob Gowen in the colonial militia company of Capt. Robert Stobo in 1754. They were listed consecutively in the company payroll under the command of Col. George Washington who approved their names for bounty money.

Levi Goin was clerk of Big Barren Primitive Baptist Church in Claiborne County. He appeared as the head of a household in the 1830 census of Claiborne County. She died in Claiborne County in January 1858. Levi Goin was enumerated for the last time at age 80 in the 1860 census of Claiborne County living in the home of his son, Eli Goin. Levi Goin died there June 19, 1865, according to the clerk’s book of Big Barren Baptist Church.

A grandson of Levi Goin, Phillip Goin, wrote a biographical sketch of his grandfather in 1889 which was published in “Portrait and Biographical Album of Johnson and Pawnee Counties, Nebraska.” In the article Phillip Goin stated that his grandfather died in 1863 at the age of 85 and was the father of 12 children.

Children born to Levi Goin and Elizabeth Stallions Goin include:

William Goin born about 1803
Uriah Goin, Jr. born about 1805
Isaac Goin born November 13, 1806
Pleasant Goin born about 1808
Richard D. Goin born about 1810
Thomas Goin born about 1811
Elijah Goin born about 1814
Rachel Goin born September 29, 1816
Sterling Goin born November 4, 1818
Leroy Goin born December 8, 1819
Eli Goin born March 2, 1825
Jamima Jane “Mimi” Goin born in 1827

William Goin, son of Levi Goin and Elizabeth Stallions Goin, was born about 1803. He was married about 1824 to Elizabeth. Dykes, according to “Claiborne County Historical Society Quarterly,” Volume 9, No. 3. In 1830 they removed to adjoining Bell County, Kentucky and settled near Flat Lick. Later they lived in Knox County, Kentucky, according to Beverly J. Ellison Nelson. He continued there in 1855.

Children born to William Goin and Elizabeth Dykes Goin include:

Levi Goin born about 1825 in Tennessee
Louisa B. Goin born about 1828 in Tennessee
Telthea Goin born about 1830 in Tennessee
Delila Goin born about 1832 in Tennessee
Hilda Jane Goin born about 1834 in Tennessee
Mary Jane Goin born about 1838 in Tennessee
Melvina Goin born about 1840 in Kentucky
Eli Goin born about 1842 in Kentucky

Uriah Goin, Jr. son of Levi Goin and Elizabeth Stallions Goin, was born about 1805 in Claiborne County. He was married about 1827 to Nancy Dickson, according to “Claiborne County Historical Society Quarterly,” Volume 9, No. 3. She was born in Virginia [later West Virginia] about 1804. He died about 1845, and Nancy Goin was remarried September 27, 1846 to Uriah Goin, Sr, uncle of her first husband.

For children born to them, see his section. After his death in 1863, she lived with her son Preston L. Goin. She was enumerated in his household in the 1870 census of Mercer County, Missouri at age 66.

Children born to Uriah Goin, Jr. and Nancy Goin include:

Preston L. Goin born about 1828
Elminy Goin born about 1830
Elijah “Little Lige” Goin born about 1832
Lucinda Goin born January 1, 1834
George Washington Goin born about 1838
John W. Goin born about 1848

Preston L. Goin, son of Uriah Goin, Jr. and Nancy Goin, was born in Claiborne County about 1828. He was married about 1850, wife’s name Prudica. One report shows her name as Paula S. Goin.

They appeared in the 1860 census of Claiborne County:

“Goin, Preston 32, born in Tennessee, farmer
Pinda 26, born in Tennessee
Mary 9, born in Tennessee
Francis 7, born in Tennessee, female
Richard 5, born in Tennessee”

They removed to Mercer County, Missouri in 1863 and ap-peared there in the 1870 census:

“Goin, Preston L. 42, born in Tennessee,
farmer
Prudica 38, born in Tennessee
Mary 17, born in Tennessee
George R. 14, born in Tennessee
William 12, born in Tennessee
Uriah 10, born in Tennessee
Jesse V. [twin] 6, born in Missouri
Sarah [twin] 6, born in Missouri
Preston A. 2, born in Missouri
Goin, Nancy 66, born in West Virginia”

Elminy Goin, daughter of Uriah Goin, Jr. and Nancy Goin was born about 1830 in Claiborne County. She appeared in house-hold of her step-father in the 1850 census as a 19-year-old. Of this individual nothing more is known.

Elijah “Little Lige” Goin, son of Uriah Goin, Jr. and Nancy Goin, was born in Claiborne County about 1832. He appeared in the 1850 census in the household of his stepfather as a 19-year-old. He joined his family in moving to Mercer County, Missouri. He was married there at Princeton to Mary Hamilton shortly after arrival. In the following year they left Missouri driving an oxwagon in a caravan including several relatives bound for Oregon Territory. They arrived at Jefferson, Oregon in the fall of 1864. They removed to Waldport, Oregon about 1880, according to Warren Tyndale Faulkner, a descendant.

Lucinda Goin, daughter of Uriah Goin, Jr. and Nancy Goin, was born January 1, 1834 near Goin, Tennessee, according to “The Yaden Family of America” by Dorothy M. Yaden. She was recorded as a 14-year-old in the 1850 census of the household of Uriah Goin, Sr, her step-father and uncle.

She was married in Tazewell, Tennessee August 12, 1853 to Jacob Matthew Yaden, son of William Proctor Yaden and Elizabeth Keck Yaden, according to Claiborne County Marriage Book 3, page 32. He was the grandson of Jacob Benjamin Yaden and Rachel Capps Yaden who were married March 18, 1806 in Grainger County.

The marriage ceremony of Lucinda Goin and Jacob Mattew Yaden was performed by Levi Goin, Justice of the Peace. About 1859, they removed to Kentucky.

They were enumerated in the 1860 census of Laurel County, Kentucky:

“Yadon, Jacob 22, born in Tennessee, farmer,
$100 real estate
Lucinda 22, born in Tennessee
John P. 6, born in Tennessee
` Joseph M. 3, born in Tennessee
William M. 8/12, born in Kentucky.”

Jacob Matthew Yaden enlisted in April 1864 in the Thirtieth Kentucky Volunteer Mounted Infantry Regiment, U.S.A, Com-pany K. He was a corporal under the command of Capt. Richard Reynolds. He died two months later June 8, 1864 of typhoid fever at Camp Nelson General Hospital. He was buried there in the national cemetery at Nicholasville, Kentucky.

After his death, the widow supported herself and her four chil-dren by serving as a midwife. On September 13, 1868, she was remarried to William Huff, son of Jesse Huff, according to Russell County Marriage Bond Book 3, page 80. Six children were born to her and her second husband who deserted before her last child was born. She died May 22, 1919 and was buried in the Caintown Cemetery in Pulaski County, Kentucky.

She was described by one of her grandchildren as being “so small she had to climb up on a chopping block in order to mount her horse.” She smoked a corncob pipe and continued her practice as a midwife until she was over 75 years old.Children born to Jacob Matthew Yaden and Lucinda Goin Yaden include:

John Proctor Yaden born July 17, 1854
Joseph McDowell Yaden born November 28, 1856
William Matthew Yaden born September 4, 1859
Rebecca Yaden born about 1862

Children born to William Huff and Lucinda Goin Yaden Huff include:

Ulysses S. Grant Huff born about 1866
Matilda Huff born about 1867
Wesley Huff born about 1868
James Washington Huff born about 1870
Della Huff born about 1875

George Washington Goin, son of Uriah Goin, Jr. and Nancy Goin, was born about 1838 in Claiborne County. He appeared at age 11 in the 1850 census of his step-father’s household. He was married about 1858, wife’s name Susanna. Susanna Goin was born in Tennessee in 1838. In the fall of 1859, they re-moved to Mercer County, Missouri. He was enumerated there as the head of a household in 1860. Susanna Goin died about 1875, and George Washington Goin was remarried about 1876 to Minerva J. Brummett, daughter of Rev. Calvin Brummett and Cindarila Moore Brummett, according to the research of F. M. Brummett of Long Beach, California. She was born August 4, 1856 in Mercer County, Missouri. They appeared in the 1880 census of Mercer County.

George Washington Goins died in Kansas in 1881, according to family tradition. Of the widow, Minerva J. Brummett Goins, F. M. Brummett wrote, “Her husband and only son were lost in the Kansas land grab in 1881.” Another report states that George Washington Goins went to Galveston, Texas and perished there September 8, 1900 in the Galveston Flood in which 5,000 people were drowned in the aftermath of a hurricane.

Minerva J. Brummett Goins appeared in Enid, Oklahoma in 1908 and died September 26, 1947 in Grundy County, Missouri.

Children born to George Washington Goins and Susanna Goins include:

P. A. Goins born in 1859
James Goins born about 1861
Sherman H. Goins born in 1868

One son was born to George Washington Goins and Minerva J. Brummett Goins:

Leonard Goins born in 1877

P. A. Goins, son of George Washington Goins and Susanna Goins, was born in 1859 in Claiborne County, according to the 1860 census. Darla Maxwell reports that he and his brother James Goins died in a fire in their youth.

James Goins, son of George Washington Goins and Susanna Goins, was born about 1861 in Missouri. Darla Maxwell reports that he and his brother P. A. Goins died in a fire in their youth.

Sherman H. Goins, son of George Washington Goins and Susanna Goins, was born about 1868 in Missouri. Darla Maxwell, a granddaughter, wrote September 8, 1999 that his death certificate shows his date of birth as 1870 and that his tombstone shows his date of birth as 1875.

“He told his children that he ran away from home because his stepmom was so mean to him.

Leonard H. Goins, son of George Washington Goins and Minerva J. Brummett Goins, was born in 1877 in Missouri. Leonard H. Goins is reported to have accompanied his father to Kansas and died there in 1881.

Isaac Goin, son of Levi Goin and Elizabeth Stallions Goin, was born November 13, 1806 in Claiborne County, according to Clara Jane Goin Houser. Beverly J. Ellison Nelson shows his date of birth as January 24, 1806. He was born January 26, 1806, according to “Claiborne County Historical Society Quarterly,” Volume 9, No. 3. He was married January 31, 1826 to Keziah [Boster?] Epperson who was born January 8, 1810 in Tennessee. They continued in Tennessee in 1831 when a son was born. They removed to Hamilton County, Illinois in 1841, according to the research of Anna Lee Goin of Jefferson, Oregon, settling near McLeansboro, Illinois. Isaac Goin died there November 26, 1855, and she died there April 28, 1872. They were regarded as Cherokees, but may have been Melungeons, according to Jane Gwaltney, a descendant of St. Louis, Missouri.

Children born to Isaac Goin and Keziah Epperson Goin in-clude:

John Wesley Goin born February 19, 1831
Rachel Goin born about 1833 in TN
Lucy Ann Goin born about 1835 in TN
Elijah Goin born February 7, 1839 in TN
Elizabeth Goin born about 1842 in IL
Mary Goin born about 1844 in IL
Elisha Goin born about 1846 in IL
Lydia Goin born about 1849 in IL
Charles C. Goin born about 1852 in IL

John Wesley Goin, son of Isaac Goin and Keziah Epperson Goin, was born in Claiborne County February 19, 1831. He was married in Hamilton County April 30, 1855 to Elmira Cross. She was born March 27, 1835 to Pleasant Azel Cross and Sarah Ann Cross. He died July 22, 1865 in Hamilton County. His death was caused by typhoid fever which he con-tracted during the Civil War, according to Clara Goin Houser, descendant of Cleveland, Ohio. He was buried in Middle Creek Cemetery in Hamilton County. Elmira Cross Goin was remarried Jacob Meyers. She died in Hamilton County April 13, 1902 “of neuralgia and head trouble” and was buried in Middle Creek Cemetery.

Children born to them include:

James C. Goin born March 19, 1854
John Wesley Goin, Jr. born May 8, 1856
William J. Goin born April 8, 1858
Albert A. Goin born October 21, 1860
Martin A. Goin born December 9, 1862

John Wesley Goin, Jr, son of John Wesley Goin and Elmira Cross Goin, was born May 8, 1856 in Hamilton County. He was married there December 24, 1876 in Shelton precinct to Eldarado “Rado” DeWitt. She was born April 6, 1860 at McLeansboro, Illinois in Hamilton County to Clinton DeWitt and Penelope Allen DeWitt. She died December 27, 1933 at Dahlgren, Illinois, and he died there March 7, 1948. He was buried in the I.O.O.F Cemetery.

Children born to John Wesley Goin, Jr. and Eldarado “Rado” DeWitt Goin include:

John Goin born about 1877
Korah Goin born in January 1878
Omer Goin born in January 1880
Chester A. Goin born June 15, 1884
Clara Goin born in April 1887
Charles Goin born in February 1888
Jasper Calvin Goin born September 5, 1889
Paul Goin born September 28, 1896

John Goin, son of John Wesley Goin, Jr. and Eldarado DeWitt Goin, was born about 1877 and died in infancy.

Korah Goin, son of John Wesley Goin, Jr. and Eldarado DeWitt Goin, was born in January 1878 in Hamilton County. He was married about 1898, wife’s name Annie. He died in 1899. Children born to Korah Goin and Annie Goin are un-known.

Omer Goin, son of John Wesley Goin, Jr. and Eldarado DeWitt Goin, was born in January 1880 in Hamilton County. He was married about 1903 to Olive Mitchell. Children born to Omer Goin and Olive Mitchell Goin are unknown.

Chester A. Goin, son of John Wesley Goin, Jr. and Eldarado DeWitt Goin, was born June 15, 1884 in Hamilton County. He died December 30, 1884.

Clara Goin, daughter of John Wesley Goin, Jr. and Eldarado DeWitt Goin, was born in Hamilton County in April 1887. She was married about 1905 to Theo Rhodes.

Charles Goin, son of John Wesley Goin, Jr. and Eldarado De-Witt Goin, was born in February 1888 in Hamilton County. He was married about 1911 to Rachel Hart. Children born to Charles Goin and Rachel Hart Goin are unknown.

Jasper Calvin Goin, son of John Wesley Goin, Jr. and Eldarado DeWitt Goin, was born September 5, 1889 in Hamilton County. He was married June 27, 1913 at Dahlgren to Hannah Hunter. She, the daughter of Samuel Hunter and Mary Lucy Hall Hunter, was born March 30, 1893 at Dahlgren. She died there November 11, 1965, and he died there May 4, 1967. They were buried in the I.O.O.F. Cemetery in Dahlgren. They were members of the Church of Christ.

Children born to Jasper Calvin Goin and Hannah Hunter Goin include:

Isabel Goin born July 2, 1914
Juanita Goin born December 8, 1915
Clara Jane Goin born August 19, 1923
Eileen Goin born June 2, 1928
Jasper Calvin Goin [twin] born January 16, 1930
Hunter DeWitt Goin [twin] born January 16, 1930
John Samuel Goin born March 5, 1932

Isabel Goin, daughter of Jasper Calvin Goin and Hannah Hunter Goin, was born July 2, 1914 at Dahlgren. She was married February 20, 1937 to Lewis Henry Callison who was born at Mt. Vernon, Illinois January 27, 1914.

Juanita Goin, daughter of Jasper Calvin Goin and Hannah Hunter Goin, was born December 8, 1915 at Dahlgren. She was married July 3, 1937 to Joe W. Daily of McLeansboro, Illinois. She died July 29, 1961.

Clara Jane Goin, daughter of Jasper Calvin Goin and Hannah Hunter Goin, was born August 19, 1923 at Dahlgren. She was married September 18, 1944 to Harold Byron Houser. He was born in South Bend, Indiana November 22, 1921. In 1991 they lived in Cleveland Heights, Ohio. She, a member of Gowen Research Foundation and an accomplished genealogist, has done extensive research on the Goin family.

Children born to them include:

Cristene Houser born July 6, 1944
Edgar Allen Houser born March 10, 1950
John Jasper Houser born June 8, 1952
Susan Houser born October 6, 1955
James Byron Houser born April 4, 1959

Eileen Goin, daughter of Jasper Calvin Goin and Hannah Hunter Goin, was born June 2, 1928 at Dahlgren.

Jasper Calvin Goin, twin son of Jasper Calvin Goin and Hannah Hunter Goin, was born January 16, 1930 at Dahlgren. He was married December 27, 1969 to Gila Riley who was born January 2, 1935 in Kentucky. Children born to Jasper Calvin Goin and Gila Riley Goin are unknown.

Hunter DeWitt Goin, twin son of Jasper Calvin Goin and Han-nah Hunter Goin, was born at Dahlgren January 16, 1930. He was married December 23, 1961 to Velma Elizabeth Wolf who was born in Indiana February 23, 1932. Children born to Hunter DeWitt Goin and Velma Elizabeth Wolf Goin are un-known.

John Samuel Goin, son of Jasper Calvin Goin and Hannah Hunter Goin, was born March 5, 1932 at Dahlgren. He was married about 1957 to Shirley Ann Viezer who was born July 3, 1937 in Illinois. Children born to John Samuel Goin and Shirley Ann Viezer Goin are unknown.

Paul Goin, son of John Wesley Goin, Jr. and Eldarado DeWitt Goin, was born September 28, 1896 in Hamilton County. He was married about 1927 to Nana Whited. Children born to Paul Goin and Nana Whited Goin are unknown.

Rachel Goin, daughter of Isaac Goin and Keziah Epperson Goin, was born about 1833 in Tennessee. Of this individual nothing more is known.

Lucy Ann Goin, daughter of Isaac Goin and Keziah Epperson Goin, was born about 1835 in Tennessee

Elijah Goin, son of Isaac Goin and Keziah Epperson Goin, was born February 7, 1839 in Tennessee, according to the research of Sherry Linn Goin, a great-granddaughter of Woodland, Illi-nois. He was married about 1866 to Mary Jane Cross.

Children born to Elijah Goin and Mary Jane Cross Goin in-clude:

James Harvey Goin born April 4, 1877

James Harvey Goin, son of Elijah Goin and Mary Jane Cross Goin, was born April 4, 1877. He was married about 1900 to Winnie Rich.

Children born to them include:

Leonard Goin born May 9, 1909

Leonard Goin, son of James Harvey Goin and Winnie Rich Goin, was born May 9, 1909. He was married about 1932 to Ada E. Cummings who was born July 13, 1910.

Children born to Leonard Goin and Ada E. Cummings Goin include:

Norma Louise Goin born February 4, 1934
Sherry Linn Goin born January 20, 1946

Norma Louise Goin, daughter of Leonard Goin and Ada E. Cummings Goin, was born February 4, 1934. She was married about 1956, husband’s name Johnson. In 1992 they lived in Abilene, Texas. She, a member of Gowen Research Foundation, was active in the research of her family history.

Sherry Linn Goin, daughter of Leonard Goin and Ada E. Cum-mings Goin, was born January 20, 1946. In 1992 she, a member of Gowen Research Foundation, lived in Woodlawn, Illinois.

Elizabeth Goin, daughter of Isaac Goin and Keziah Epperson Going, was born about 1842 in Illinois. Of this individual nothing more is known.

Mary Goin, daughter of Isaac Goin and Keziah Epperson Goin, was born about 1844 in Illinois. Of this individual nothing more is known.

Elisha Goin, son of Isaac Goin and Keziah Epperson Goin, was born about 1846 in Illinois. Of this individual nothing more is known.

Lydia Goin, daughter of Isaac Goin and Keziah Epperson Goin, was born about 1849 in Illinois. Of this individual nothing more is known.

Charles C. Goin, son of Isaac Goin and Keziah Epperson Goin, was born about 1852 in Illinois.

Pleasant Goin, son of Levi Goin and Elizabeth Stallions Goin, was born about 1808 in Tennessee. He was married about 1832 to Isabelle Holton, according to Charlotte Isabelle Russell Green, a descendant of Harper, Texas.

Mrs. Green wrote December 3, 1995:
“A couple of years ago, reports from various individuals, not in the direct descendancy of my g-g-grandparents Pleasant Goin and Isabelle Holton Goin, stating her name as Isabelle Norrell came to my attention. I must correct this misnomer.

We have found no one named Norrell in the East Tennessee census for 1830. However, up the creek from Levi Goin, father of Pleasant Goin, within the family of Wright Holton lived a young woman not more than 20 years of age. This may have been a sister of Wright Holton. The household of Levi Goin shows a young male, 20-30. This should be Pleasant Goin.

There are no known records for the marriage of Pleasant Goin to Isabelle Holton. Sarah Isabelle Johnson, my grandmother, was proud of her heritage and told her grandchildren, to my knowledge as early as 1935, that Pleasant Goin was Holland Dutch, and the family of her grandmother, Isabelle Holton, came from Dublin, Ireland.

Sarah Isabelle Johnson was born in 1870 in Claiborne County, TN. The 1880 census of that county shows Sarah, age 10 years old, living in the 11th Civil District. The same census shows Isabelle Goin living with her son George Goin, just two houses away. It would seem most probable that Isabelle was well known to her granddaughter, Sarah.

Pleasant and Isabelle should have been married in 1831-32 since their first child was born in 1833. In 1833, a list of “Free Male Inhabitants,” 21 years and over, living in Claiborne County, provides the following information: “#744 Uriah Goins, #745 Uriah Goins, Jr. #746 Levi Goins, #747 Levi Goins, Jr. #748 Isaac Gowin, #749 Isaac Gowin, Jr, #750 Pleasant Gowin, #751 William Goin, #752 Thomas Goin, #753 John Keck, #754 William Cupp, #755 William R. Holton, #756 James R. Holton.” We find no one named “Norell” among the males 21 years and over in 1833. There were no males named Norell in the 1839 tax list either.

The father of Pleasant Goin was Levi Goin [old]. The younger brother of Levi Goin is Uriah Goin [old]. The daughter of Uriah Goin, and cousin to Pleasant Goin, is Sarah Alice Goin. She was married to William Dykes, a close neighbor, [see 1830 census.] William and Sarah Alice Goin Dykes had 10 children. The seventh child, a son, was named “Narrel Dykes.” This suggests that the name “Norrell” came from this branch of the family.

Sarah’s parents moved in 1900 from Claiborne County to Van Zandt County, TX. Her mother, Marline Goin Johnson, died in 1927. Sarah was living in Waukegan, Illinois, so it fell to her youngest sister, Vandalee, to give information for the death certificate. In answer to the question, “what was the maiden name of the deceased’s mother, Vandalee answered, “Evie Narel.” Vandalee was born in 1893 and never knew her grandmother. Had Sarah given that information, she would have said, “Isabelle Holton.”

Pleasant Goin became a Baptist preacher. Pleasant Goin ap-peared as the head of a household in the 1840 census of Clai-borne County, page 243, enumerated as:

“Goin, Pleasant white male 20-30
white female 20-30
white male 5-10
white male 5-10
white male 0-5
white male 0-5
white male 0-5”

The household of Pleasant Goin and Isabelle Holton Goin ap-peared in the 1850 census of Claiborne County, page 602, as household 880 composed of:

“Goin, Pleasant 42, born in TN
Isabel 36, born in TN
Ralph 17
Thomas 16
Uriah 14
William 12
Isaac 11
Elizabeth 8
Timothy 6
Martha 5
Lucinda 1”

Pleasant Goin was active in the work of the Town Creek Baptist Church, according to the “Minutes of Davis Creek Church, 1797-1907,” by Lawrence Edwards.

On September 1, 1852 Pleasant Goin “of Town Creek Church” petitioned the Davis Creek Church “for the aid of the deacons of this church to attend them at their next meeting, which was granted.”

On September 1, 1857 Pleasant Goin was listed as a moderator at a meeting of Davis Creek Church. On May 1, 1858 Pleasant Goin visited Davis Creek Church and “invited church and dea-cons to visit them on May 8 and 9, 1858.”

On May 1, 1859 Pleasant Goin invited the deacons and brethren to attend “a sacremental occation” at the May meeting of the Town Creek Church.

On November 1, 1871 Pleasant Goin nominated Henry Ausmus as elder [or minister.] He was enumerated as the head of a household in Claiborne County at the age of 72 He died sometime after 1880, according to “Claiborne County Historical Society Quarterly,” Volume 9, No. 3.

Children born to Pleasant Goin and Isabelle Holton Goin include:

Ralph Goin born about 1833
Thomas Goin born about 1834
Uriah Goin born about 1836
William Goin born about 1838
Isaac Goin born about 1839
Elizabeth Goin born about 1842
Timothy Goin born about 1844
Martha Goin born about 1845
Lucinda Margaret Goin born about 1848
Marlina Jane Goin born September 11, 1849
Jefferson Goin born about 1855
George Washington Goin born about 1856
Lucetta Goin born about 1857

Ralph Goin, son of Pleasant Goin and Isabelle Holton Goin, was born about 1833. He appeared as a 17-year-old in the 1850 census of Claiborne County. He was married about 1854 to Mary A. Goodman. They were enumerated in the 1860 census of Claiborne County, Family 1433, Household No. 224-359. He died in 1864.

Children born to Ralph Goin and Mary A. Goodman Goin include:

Letela Goin born about 1855
Pleasant Goin, Jr. born about 1857
Rachel Goin born about 1859

Letela Goin, daughter of Ralph Goin and Mary A. Goodman Goin, was born in Claiborne County about 1855. She appeared in the 1860 census as a five-year-old.

Pleasant Goin, Jr, son of Ralph Goin and Mary A. Goodman Goin, was born in Claiborne County about 1857. He appeared in the 1860 census as a three-year-old. He was married December 24, 1876 to Harriett Sorrell in Claiborne. She was the daughter of Henry Sorrell and Jane Rogers Sorrell of Hawkins County, Tennessee. They moved to Kentucky and later to the state of Washington, according to the research of Dianne Stark Thurman.

Children born to them include:

Sarah Goin born about 1878
Benjamin Goin born about 1882
Birdie Mae Goin born about 1886

Sarah Goin, daughter of Pleasant Goin, Jr. and Harriett Sorrell Goin, was born about 1878.

Benjamin Goin, son daughter of Pleasant Goin, Jr. and Harriett Sorrell Goin, was born about 1882.

Birdie Mae Goin, daughter of Pleasant Goin, Jr. and Harriett Sorrell Goin, was born about 1886.

Rachel Goin, daughter of Ralph Goin and Mary A. Goodman Goin, was born in Claiborne County about 1859. She was enumerated in the 1860 census as a one-year-old.

Thomas Goin, son of Pleasant Goin and Isabelle Holton Goin, was born about 1834. He was recorded at age 16 in the 1850 enumeration of his father’s household. He was married Febru-ary 9, 1859 to Martha J. Johnson. She was a daughter of William Johnson and Sarah Jane Faulkner Johnson and a sister to James Preston Johnson, according to the research of Wilma Johnson, a descendant of Verona, Wisconsin. William Johnson died May 10, 1862 at Cumberland Ford, Kentucky during the Civil War. He was a private in Company E, 2nd Tennessee Infantry Regiment, U.S.A.

Sarah Jane Faulkner Johnson was enumerated in 1880 living in the household of Isaac Johnson, her youngest son. Included in the household was his niece, Sarah E. Goin and his nephew, Thomas Goin.

Thomas Goin died July 15, 1862, perhaps in the Civil War.

An unidentified Thomas Goin died in 1927, according to William G. Tharpe, president of Union County Historical Society. Tharpe made a search of Tennessee Valley Authority grave removal records in “Isolated Cemeteries Above Pool Level” to find the reinterment of Thomas Goin. Thomas Goin died at age 75 and was buried in Mt. Moriah Cemetery. On November 21, 1935, his body was removed and reburied in Indian Creek Cemeterey.

Children born to Thomas Goin and Martha J. Johnson Goin are unknown.

Uriah Goin, son of Pleasant Goin and Isabelle Holton Goin, was born about 1836. He appeared in the 1850 census at age 14. He was married about 1853 to Rebecca Goodman, regarded as a sister to Mary A. Goodman. He died in 1854.

Both Uriah Goin and Rebecca Goodman Goin were mentioned in “Abstract Pensions of Claiborne County, Tennessee, The Revolution, War of 1812 and All Wars Prior to 1883” compiled by Annie Walker Burns

“In Old Tazewell” written by Mary Ann Markham, contains a reference to “Mrs. Rebecca Goin” which might apply to Re-becca Goodman Goin:

“Calvin Holland, oldest son of William Holland and grandson of William Holland, Sr, is a very industrious man and follows blacksmithing as a livelihood. He lives at Lone Mountain depot at present. He has been twice married. His former wife was Miss Martha Rose. They divorced, leaving her in care of three sons, William, Alfred and Franklin. Calvin’s second wife was Mary Goins, daughter of Rebecca Goins of Goins Head of Barren. They have raised a large family.”

William Goin, son of Pleasant Goin and Isabelle Holton Goin, was born about 1838. He was recorded at age 12 in the 1850 census of Claiborne County. He was married about 1861 to Mary Jane Souders. He died in 1864.

Children born to William Goin and Mary Jane Souders Goin include:

John Goin born about 1872

John Goin, son of William Goin and Mary Jane Souders Goin was born about 1872.

Children born to him include:

William Dempsey Goin born in 1897

William Dempsey Goin, son of John Goin, was born in 1897 at New Tazewell, Tennessee.

William Parlon Goin bon in 1918

William Parlon Goin, son of William Dempsey Goin, was born in 1918 in Amity, Oregon.

Isaac Goin, son of Pleasant Goin and Isabelle Holton Goin, was born about 1839. He appeared as an 11-year-old in the 1850 census of Claiborne County. His first wife died, and he was remarried about 1862 to Julia Young. He died in 1864. Children born to Isaac Goin and Julia Young Goin are unknown.

Elizabeth Goin, daughter of Pleasant Goin and Isabelle Holton Goin, was born about 1842. She was recorded at age eight in the 1850 census of Claiborne County. She was married about 1866 to Dane E. Miracle.

Timothy Goin, son of Pleasant Goin and Isabelle Holton Goin, was born about 1844 and enumerated at age six in the 1850 census of Claiborne County. He died in 1864, perhaps in the Civil War.

Martha Goin, daughter of Pleasant Goin and Isabell Norell Goin, was born about 1845. She was recorded at age five in the 1850 census.

Lucinda Margaret Goin, daughter of Pleasant Goin and Isabelle Holton Goin, was born about 1848. She appeared as a one-year-old in the 1850 census. She was married about 1866 to S. Gilbert Miracle, regarded as a brother to Dane E. Miracle.

Marlina Jane Goin, daughter of Pleasant Goin and Isabelle Holton Goin, was born September 11, 1849 in Claiborne County, according to Wilma Joyce Gore Locke, a descendant of Portales, New Mexico. She was married June 18, 1868 at Goin, Tennessee to James Preston Johnson, son of William Johnson and Sarah Jane Faulkner Johnson. He was a brother to Martha J. Johnson who was married to Thomas Goin, her brother.

They removed to Van Zandt County, Texas in 1900. He died October 4, 1927 at Wills Point, Texas, and Marlina Jane Goin Johnson died there November 22, 1927 and was buried beside her husband.

Children born to them

William Washington Johnson born in April 1869
Vanda Lee Johnson born about 1873
Isaac Johnson born in January 1877
Anna Johnson born in March 1878
George Howard Johnson born in September 1879
Sarah Isabelle Johnson born about 1880
Marigrette Alifare Johnson born May 15, 1885
Elvin Johnson born in May 1889
Eliza Johnson born in February 1891
Annis Johnson born in May 1893
Angeline Johnson born in November 1894

Marigrette Alifare Johnson, daughter of James Preston Johnson and Marlina Jane Goin Johnson, was born May 15, 1885 in Claiborne County. She was married there about 1900 to E. A. Watson. They removed to Van Zandt County, Texas where the marriage was terminated, according to Wilma Joyce Gore Locke, a granddaughter. She was remarried October 13, 1911 in Bentonville, Arkansas to James Isaac McGee, son of James B. McGee and Phebe Adams McGee. He was born July 7, 1880 in Crawford, Arkansas. He died in Bentonville April 12, 1932.

Marigrette Alifare Johnson Watson McGee was remarried to Leo P. Gilmore February 11, 1943 at Muleshoe, Texas. He was born August 31, 1887. He died April 5, 1961 in Parmer County, Texas. She died November 24, 1965 at Muleshoe.

Children born to James Isaac McGee and Marigrette Alifare Johnson Watson McGee include:

James Isaac McGee born July 14, 1912
Mazel Avis McGee born January 12, 1914
Lionel Edison McGee born March 13, 1915
Phoebe Marlena McGee born April 6, 1917
Edgar Wayne McGee born September 16, 1918
William Howard McGee born October 1, 1921

Mazel Avis McGee, daughter of James Isaac McGee and Mari-grette Alifare Johnson Watson McGee, was born January 12, 1914 at Wills Point, Texas. She was married October 11, 1933 in Benton County, Arkansas to Lester Wayne Gore, son of William Robert Gore and Zeola Lee Kirkpatrick Gore. He was born December 17, 1910 in Wise County, Texas. She died July 14, 1986 at Muleshoe, and he died October 7, 1986 at Farwell, Texas.

Children born to Lester Wayne Gore and Mazel Avis McGee Gore include:

James William Gore born May 23, 1937
Gerald Wayne Gore born Janury 7, 1942
Wilma Joyce Gore born August 27, 1946
Larry Dale Gore born June 19, 1951

Wilma Joyce Gore, daughter of Lester Wayne Gore and Mazel Avis McGee, was born August 27, 1946 in Clovis, New Mex-ico. She was married January 30, 1965 in Muleshoe to Coy Lynn Gabbert, son of Archie Lee Gabbert and Sarah Barthena Carter Gabbert. He was born January 5, 1945 in Amherst, Texas. She was remarried April 3, 1972 to Robert Lee Camp-bell. She was married for the third time May 12, 1983 to Bar-ney Ferris Locke, son of Barney Ferris Locke and Wanda Gwendolyn Gilmore Locke. He was born August 19, 1943 in Terrell, Oklahoma.

Children born to Coy Lynn Gabbert and Wilma Joyce Gore Gabbert include:

Joy Lynette Gabbert born September 19, 1966
Melissa Dianne Gabbert born October 23, 1967

Children born to Barney Ferris Locke and Wilma Joyce Gore Gabbert Campbell Locke include:

Amanda Beth Locke born October 28, 1984

Jefferson Goin, son of Pleasant Goin and Isabelle Holton Goin, was born about 1855.

George Washington Goin, son of Pleasant Goin and Isabelle Holton Goin, was born about 1856. He was married about 1879 to Sarah Wilder. He died January 1, 1947. Children born to George Washington Goin and Sarah Wilder Goin are unknown.

Lucetta Goin, daughter son of Pleasant Goin and Isabelle Holton Goin, was born about 1857. Of this individual nothing more is known.

Richard D. Goin, son of Levi Goin and Elizabeth Stallions Goin, was born about 1810. He was married about 1834 to Elizabeth Ferguson, according to “Claiborne County Histori-cal Society Quarterly,” Volume 9, No. 3. They removed to Loudon, Kentucky in 1850. Richard D. Goin was remarried about 1875, wife’s name Sarah A.

Children born to Richard D. Goin and Elizabeth Ferguson Goin include:

Luther Goin born about 1835 in TN
Rebecca Goin born about 1843 in TN
Lucinda Goin born about 1846 in TN
Mary Jane Goin born about 1849 in TN
William S. Goin born about 1859 in KY

Children born to Richard D. Goin and Sarah Goin include:

Salina J. Goin born about 1877 in KY
Sarah A. Goin born about 1879 in KY

Thomas Goin, son of Levi Goin and Elizabeth Stallions Goin, was born about 1811. Of this individual nothing more is known.

Elijah Goin, son of Levi Goin and Elizabeth Stallions Goin, was born about 1814. He was married about 1837 to Martha Lewis, “the sixth daughter of Fielding Lewis, Sr,” according to “Old Time Tazewell,” a volume written over a period from about 1850 to about 1900 by Mary Ann Markham Hansard which was published in 1979. Fielding Lewis, Sr. was born July 17, 1725, probably in Westmoreland County, Virginia. He was married there May 17, 1750 to Elizabeth “Betty” Washington who was born June 20, 1733 in Westmoreland County. Eleven children were born to them. She was his second wife; he having been married to Catherine Washington who bore him three children. The wives are regarded as sisters.

Fielding Lewis died August 26, 1852 at Tazewell, Tennessee
And was buried in Old Big Barren Church Cemetery which adjoined the church. The site is now at the bottom of Norris Lake, and it is unknown if the graves were moved before the lake was created.

Fielding Lewis, Jr, son of Fielding Lewis, Sr. and Elizabeth “Betty” Washington Lewis, was born February 14, 1751 in Fredericksburg, Virginia. He was married about 1774 to Nancy Ann Alexander who was born in Fairfax, Virginia in 1756.

Carol Anne Ledford, of Asheville, North Carolina, a descendant of Elijah Goin, wrote for the Foundation Newsletter an account of difficulties that he encountered by the “nigger and mulatto” label and the action he took against his tormentors:

“Trouble started for Elijah Goin when his daughter, Mary Ann “Polly” Goin was married to William H. “Billy” Mayes May 23, 1853 in Claiborne County, Tennessee. Sterling Mayes, brother to the groom, took exception to the marriage, and one week later was telling everyone that his brother had married a mulatto and that the whole Goin family were mulattos and negroes. Anna Lee Goin, family researcher of Jefferson, Oregon, stated in a letter September 12, 1991 that Sterling Mayes and Elijah Goin were opposing candidates in a Claiborne County election.

Sterling even instructed his children to taunt the Goin children with the mulatto label and promised to protect them in it. By July, the whole county had heard the accusations. Sterling had gone so far as to make up a little song about blacks and mulattos which he sang to the tune of “Old Dan Tucker,” popular jig tune of the day. He even had the nerve to sing the song to Elijah Goin in front of his friends on the main street of Tazewell, the county seat.

Elijah Goin bit his tongue and turned the other cheek, hoping that Sterling would tire of his little game, but the pressure only intensified. In September, Sterling sang his doggerel verses in church. He made his rhymes fit the hymns that were being sung at the camp meeting, an evangelistic meeting held outdoors in a tent. Several rows of worshipers heard the caustic mulatto slurs drowning out the gospel words.

That was the last straw, Elijah Goin filed suit in Circuit Court for slander against Sterling Mayes September 15, 1853, requesting damages of $5,000 and a pig, a monumental sum in those days. The charges were serious and damaging to Elijah Goin who was a schoolteacher and active in community affairs. He had once been elected as constable. It was embarrassing to his family and his friends, and Elijah Goin had to take action before his reputation and standing in the county were destroyed.

Action on the suit was exceedingly slow, with continuous postponements and continuances. It would be five years before a verdict was finally handed down. When the case finally went to court July 26, 1858, the trial lasted 37 court days and involved the testimony of 43 witnesses. Tennessee law required that the loser in a suit pay the court costs and the expense of bringing in the witnesses. The witnesses were paid 25 cents a day for their appearances, and if they travelled over 20 miles, they were paid four cents a mile travel allowance. There were 22 witnesses who had to be in court 27 days of the trial, some traveling as far as 290 miles. Total court costs of the case was $720 with $669 going to the witnesses.

Each of the litigants had to post bond guaranteeing payment of the huge sum. Both were men of substance, but it was a severe obligation. Elijah Goin owned land valued at $1,000, and his personal property was valued at $350. He was 38 years old and married. His wife and six children would suffer severely if the verdict went against the plaintiff. William H. “Billy” Mayes joined his father-in-law in posting the bond.

The “mulatto and negro” charge had serious implications. The Territory Act of 1794 and the Tennessee Constitution of 1796 declared, “all negroes, mulattos and Indians and persons of mixed blood, descended from negro or Indian ancestors to the third generation inclusive, though one ancestor of each generation may have been a white person, whether bond or free, should be held deemed to be incapable in law to be a witness in any case whatsoever, except against each other.”  The Act also forbad such persons from obtaining marriage licenses, voting, owning land, paying taxes, making wills, owning slaves or holding office. Their civil rights were denied.

Even in Revolutionary days and in the War of 1812, negroes and mulattos could not serve as soldiers. A few were utilized in non-combatant roles as cooks and teamsters.

Elijah Goin’s 70-year-old father, Levi Goin was enduring great anguish. Elijah Goin had several brothers, uncles and cousins who were undergoing mental duress, not to mention all of the inlaws involved. He took some comfort in the fact his old grandfather, Thomas Goin, Revolutionary soldier and family patriarch of Claiborne County, did not have to undergo the pain and anxiety that the trial brought to the family.

The verdict? Elijah Goin won his slander suit against Sterling Mayes, and the jury awarded him $50 damages, far less than the $5,000 he sought. Sterling Mayes appealed the case to the Tennessee Supreme Court in Knoxville where the Circuit Court’s decision was reversed and remanded. He won the appeal on the grounds that it had long been common knowledge in the community that the Goin family was of mixed blood and that he was not seeking the forfeiture of the civil rights of Elijah Goin.”
==O==
Carol Anne Ledford who was born March 4, 1944 in Monroe, Michigan is a double ninth-generation granddaughter of Thomas Goin. Two of his sons, Levi Goin and Uriah Goin were her eighth-generation grandfathers.
==O==
Elijah Goin, an “illiterate” farmer, appeared as the head of a household in the 1840 census of Claiborne County, page 204, enumerated as:

“Goin, Elijah white male 20-30
white female 20-30
white female 0-5
white male 0-5”

“Elija Goin” was enumerated as the head of Household 1027-626 in the 1850 census of Claiborne County:

“Goin, Elija 36, born in Tennessee
Martha 33, born in Tennessee
Mary A. 12
Hugh H. 11
Sarah E. 8
Fielding 6
William 3
Isabel 1”

Children born to Elijah Goin and Martha Lewis Goin include:

Mary Ann “Polly” Goin born about 1838
Houston H. Goin born about 1839
Sarah E. Goin born about 1842
Fielding Lewis Goin born about 1843
William Preston Goin born September 14, 1846
Isabel Goin born about 1849
Nancy Goin born about 1852

Mary Ann “Polly” Goin, daughter of Elijah Goin and Martha Lewis Goin, was born about 1838 in Claiborne County. She was married in 1853 to William H. “Billy” Mays, son of Thomas Mays, Sr. They owned a farm adjoining that of her brother, William Preston Goin.

Mrs. Markham wrote:

“William H. Mayes was a cabinetmaker and was a good citizen. He was a consistent member of the Baptist Church. They lived happily together until the year 1878, when he died. They had no family. She was married the second time in 1880 to William McNealy of Campbell County, a man of fine property. Mr. McNealy and wife are well situated to live; have an abundance of the necessaries of life to make them comfortable, and are very kind, good citizens.”

Houston H. “Hugh” Goin, son of Elijah Goin and Martha Lewis Goin, was born about 1839 in Claiborne County. He appeared as age 11 in the 1850 census. He was enlisted as a private at age 21 in the Second Tennessee Cavalry Regiment, U.S.A. October 25, 1861 in Claiborne County.

He was captured by the Confederates at Rogersville, Tennessee November 6, 1863, along with his younger brother, Fielding Lewis Goin. He was interned at Belle Island and at Andersonville, Georgia prisoner-of-war camp. He died at the latter September 15, 1864.

Sarah E. Goin, daughter of Elijah Goin and Martha Lewis Goin, was born about 1842 in Claiborne County. She appeared as an eight-year-old in the 1850 census of the county. She was married about 1855 to Thomas Burch, son of William Burch, according to “Old Time Tazewell.” She died about 1865, leaving five children.

Fielding Lewis Goin, son of Elijah Goin and Martha Lewis Goin, was born about 1843. He was enlisted at age 18, in the Second Tennessee Cavalry Regiment, U.S.A, Company E in Claiborne County November 18, 1861. He was promoted to corporal. He was captured November 6, 1863 by the Confederates at Rogersville, Tennessee in 1864 and imprisoned at Richmond, Virginia, according to his military record.

He was admitted to Hospital 21 at Richmond February 27, 1864 and was returned to quarters March 9, 1864. He was paroled at City Point, Virginia April 16, 1864. The Union Army admitted him to Jarvis Hospital at Annapolis, Maryland. Upon release from the hospital, he was then enlisted in the 11th Tennessee Cavalry Regiment, U.S.A. He was transferred to Nashville, Tennessee June 20, 1864 and received an honorable discharge. He died at home soon after the Civil War.

His older brother Hugh H. Goin was enlisted in the Second Tennessee Cavalry Regiment a month before Fielding Lewis Goin. They were both captured in Rogersville November 18, 1861. Hugh H. Goin was imprisoned at Belle Island and in Andersonville Prison. Hugh H. Goin died in Andersonville Prison in Georgia November 6, 1863.

William Preston Goin, son of Elijah Goin and Martha Lewis Goin, was born September 14, 1846. He appeared as a three-year-old in the 1850 census. He was married about 1878 to Mary Evelyn King, daughter of Rev. David King, according to “Old Time Tazewell.” She was born December 15, 1855, ac-cording to the 1900 census, and her name was rendered as “Mary A.” in the enumerations. Richard Glenn Bonds suggests that the wife of Rev. David King was Harriett Hollingsworth.

William Preston Goin was listed in the 1880 census of Clai-borne County, Enumeration District 109, page 25, 11th Civil District 11 living in the household of Mary A, Mayes. His family was enumerated as:

“Goin, William P. 36, born in Tennessee
Mary A. 24, born in Tennessee
Lafayette 1, born in Tennessee”

William Preston Goin was enumerated as the head of a house-hold in the 1900 census of Claiborne County, Enumeration Dis-trict 11, page 12, 11th Civil District:

Goin, William P. 53, born in Sept. 1846 in TN
Mary E. 44, born in Dec. 1855 in TN
Audie F. 20, born in June 1879 in TN, son
Susan A. 19, born in April 1881 in TN
Maud A. 16, born in Oct. 1883 in TN
Edgar 14, born in Feb. 1886 in TN
Beatrice O. 12, born in March 1888 in TN
Dellie M. 9, born in July 1890 in TN
Charles M. 5, born in May 1895 in TN”

Mrs. Hansard wrote:

“William P. Goin, Esquire and his wife are members of the Baptist Church at Carr’s Branch. He is clerk of the same. He is a man of fine character and much esteemed by his neighbors. He owns and lives on his father’s old homestead on the road leading from Sandlick to Carr’s Branch Church. They have a family of seven children, three sons and four daughters.”

Sometime after 1900, William Preston Goin removed to Mon-tague County, Texas, according to Richard Glenn Bonds, a de-scendant of Midland, Texas. His date of death is unknown. Mary Evelyn King Goin died March 20, 1931 in Montague County, according to Texas BVD File 16910.

Children born to William Preston Goin and Mary Evelyn King Goin include:

Audie F. Goin born in June 1879
Susan Alice Goin born in April 1881
Maud A. Goin born in October 1883
Edgar H. Goin born in February 1886
Beatrice O. Goin born in March 1888
Della May Goin born in July 1890
Charles M. Goin born in May 1895

Audie F. Goin, son of William Preston Goin and Mary Evelyn King Goin, was born in June 1879. The census enumerator in 1880 recorded his name as “Lafayette.” Of him, Mrs. Hansard wrote, “Audie F. Goin is aged 18, is a youth of fine talents, and is attending school trying to obtain knowledge, and bids fair to fill some high station in life.”

Susan Alice Goin, daughter of William Preston Goin and Mary Evelyn King Goin, was born in April 1881. Of her Mrs. Hansard wrote, “Alice Goin, oldest daughter, aged 15, is a nice girl, sprightly looking.”

Maud A. Goin, daughter of William Preston Goin and Mary Evelyn King Goin, was born in October 1883.

Edgar H. Goin, son of William Preston Goin and Mary Evelyn King Goin, was born in February 1886 in Claiborne County.

Beatrice O. Goin, daughter of William Preston Goin and Mary Evelyn King Goin, was born in March 1888 in Claiborne County.

Della May Goin, daughter of William Preston Goin and Mary Evelyn King Goin, was born in July 1890 in Claiborne County. She appeared as a nine-year-old in the 1900 census enumeration of her father’s household. She accompanied her parents in a move to Montague County, date unknown. She was married there to Richard E. Bonds about 1908. She died there August 31, 1978.

Children born to Richard E. Bonds and Della May Goin Bonds include:

Wilma F. Bonds born about 1910
Nina Lee Bonds born about 1914
Richard Glenn Bonds born about 1920

Charles M. Goin, son of William Preston Goin and Mary Eve-lyn King Goin, was born in May 1895.

Isabel Goin, daughter of Elijah Goin and Martha Lewis Goin, was born about 1859 in Claiborne. She was enumerated there as a one-year-old in the 1850 census. She died at age 15.

Nancy Goin, daughter of Elijah Goin and Martha Lewis Goin, was born about 1852. She died at age 10.

Rachel Goin, daughter of Levi Goin and Elizabeth Stallions Goin, was born Sepember 29, 1816. She was married about 1835 to Phillip Keck who was born in 1816. He died in 1885, according to the research of Chloe S. King of Graham, Texas. She died in 1902 in Claiborne County.

Children born to Phillip Keck and Rachel Goin include:

Henry Keck born in 1838
Eli Keck born in 1840
Sarah Elizabeth Keck born in 1842
Mary Keck born in 1844
Sterling Keck born in 1845
John Harve “Sheriff” Keck born in 1847
William McKendry Keck born in 1849
Anna Keck born in 1851
Elijah Keck born in 1853
Phillip Keck, Jr. born in 1856
Rachel Keck born in 1857
Serena Keck born in 1861
Samuel Keck born about 1865

Sterling Goin, son of Levi Goin and Elizabeth Stallions Goin, was born in Tennessee, probably Claiborne County, in November 1818. “Sturling Gowin” was married October 2, 1839 to Mary Ann Keck, according to Claiborne County Marriage Book 2, page 13. She was the fourth child of John Keck and Anna Ousley Keck and was born in Claiborne County in 1819. Anna Ousley Keck was born in Claiborne County in 1793 and died there April 5, 1868.

Sterling Goin appeared in the 1840 census of Claiborne County, page 216, as the head of a household enumerated as:

“Goin, Sterling white male 20-30
white female 15-20”

They appeared in the 1850 census of Claiborne County as Household 850-597:

“Goin, Sterling 35, born in Tennessee
Mary 25, born in Tennessee
John 10
Anna 10
Rachael 8
James K. P. 6 [James Knox Polk Goin]
Phillip 5
Levi 3
Jasper 3/12”

Beverly J. Ellison Nelson wrote of the difficulties this family had during the Civil War:

“Sterling and Mary Ann’s family was one literally torn apart by the Civil War. After the oldest son John was inducted into the Confederate Army, second son Polk walked over Cumberland Mountain and signed up with the First Tennessee Artillery of the Union Army. He was soon joined by Keck cousins and next younger brother Philip.”

Shortly after the end of the war and safe return of her three sons Mary Ann Keck Goin died at Goin, Tennessee December 23, 1868. She was born in 1823 in Claiborne County, to John Keck, Sr. and Anna Owsley Keck. She had married Sterling Goin in Claiborne County October 2, 1839. Since her sixteenth child, Mary, was born on the same day that she died, it is presumed that Mary Ann’s death was from complications of childbirth. She was buried at Pleasant Point Cemetery.”

Sterling Goin was remarried May 25, 1870 to Dicy Manerva Davis who was born in 1819, according to Alice Louise Goin. Three children were born to her before she died February 6, 1875. She was buried beside the first wife. In May 1875 he was married for the third time to Melvina M. Needham Moyers, widow of Al Moyers.

Sterling Goin appeared as the head of a household in the 1880 census of Claiborne County, Enumeration District 4, page 24, Civil District 12, enumerated as:

“Goin, Sterling 63, born in TN
Melvina 32, born in TN
Catherine 18, born in TN
Grant 11, born in TN
Sherman 8, born in TN
Norvesta 4, born in TN
Edwina 2, born in TN”

He reappeared in the 1900 census of Claiborne County, Enu-meration District 12, page 3, 12th Civil District:

“Goin, Sterling 81, born in Nov. 1818 in TN
Martha M. 51, born in Jan. 1849 in TN, wife
Osker S. 18, born in Jan. 1882 in TN, son”

Nearby was recorded the household of Sterling W. Goin, be-lieved to be his son, in the 1900 census of Claiborne County, Enumeration District 12, page 3, 12th Civil District.

Sterling Goin was mentioned in “Biographical & Genealogi-cal History of Southeastern Nebraska” published in 1904. An article about his son, Phillip Goin, mentioned:

“The father is still living in Tennessee at the advanced age of 85 years of age. His political support has always been given to the Whig and Republican parties. and during the Civil War he was a strong Union man, and many sufferings was he called upon to endure on account of his loyalty to the United States, as he was surrounded on all sides by secessionists.

Sterling Goin grew to manhood in Tennessee and married Miss Mary Keck, also a native of Tennessee by whom he had 16 children, 15 of the number reaching mature years, namely John, James K, Philip, Levi, Jasper, William, Howard, Proctor, Anna, Rachel, Rebecca, Sarah, Charity, Catherine and Mary. After the death of the mother, the father married again, and by his second union had two children, one of whom is now deceased. He has been a third time married and has three more children by that union. Throughout his active life, he has followed farming and is still living in Tennessee at the age of 85 years. He is a faithful member of the Baptist Church and is a supporter of the Republican party. He was a strong Union man during the Civil War and suffered much at the hands of the rebels who took his grain and stock.”

Although Sterling was 31 years older that Melvina, she only outlived him by one year and one month. Sterling died May 10, 1910 and was buried beside his wives. When Melvina died June 20, 1911, she was buried beside Sterling and his other two wives. A picture of Sterling and Melvina appeared in “The People’s History of Claiborne County, Tennessee, 1801-1988.”

Sometime around 1900, Sterling’s children made a list of themselves and then had it printed. The following names and birth dates of the 22 are based on that list. All were born in Claiborne County.

Children born to Sterling Goin and Mary Ann Keck Goin include:

John Burton Goin [twin] born in September 1839
Anna Goin [twin] born in September 1839
Charity Goin born about 1841
Rachel E. Goin born October 7, 1843
Sarah Goin born about 1844
James Knox Polk Goin born April 10, 1845
Phillip Keck Goin born September 15, 1846
Rebecca Goin born about 1847
Levi Goin born July 14, 1848
Jasper Goin born March 6, 1850
Sarah Elizabeth Goin born April 7, 1852
William Houston Goin born September 4, 1854
Tilman Howard Goin born January 21, 1856
Rebecca Goin born March 11, 1858
Proctor Goin born February 20, 1860
Charity Jane Goin born August 15, 1862
Catherine Goin born August 15, 1865
[infant] born about 1866
Mary Goin born December 23, 1868

Children born to Sterling Goin and Dicey M. Davis Goin are believed to include:

Grant Goin born about 1871
Sherman Goin born December 31, 1872
Sterling W. Goin born in February 1873
Dicey Manerva Goin born January 1, 1875

Children born to Sterling Goin and Melvina M. Moyers Goin are believed to include:

Norvesta Goin born April 2, 1876
Edwina Goin born May 15, 1878
Oscar Sterling Goin born January 12, 18812

John Burton Goin, twin son of Sterling Goin and Mary Ann Keck Goin, was born September 1839, according to his 1900 census enumeration. He was recorded at age 10 in his father’s household in the 1850 census. He was married about 1859 to Frances “Fanny” Raney. He died about 1874. Children born to John Burton Goin and Frances “Fanny” Raney Goin are unknown. She was remarried to John R. Williams April 4, 1875, according to Claiborne County marriage records.

Anna Goin, twin daughter of Sterling Goin and Mary Ann Keck Goin, was born September 15, 1841. She was married June 25, 1875 to Martin J. Edwards as his second wife. She died February 26, 1912 in Claiborne County.

Rachel E. Goin, daughter of Sterling Goin and Mary Ann Keck Goin, was born October 7, 1843 in Claiborne County. She was married about 1856 in Kentucky to Marbel Benson Scoggins who was born in 1831 in North Carolina. They removed to Pike County, Indiana in the latter part of 1857. They were living in Crawford County, Indiana about 1865 and in 1868 were back in Pike County. In 1870 they lived in Knox County, Indiana, and two years later they resided in Rockcastle County, Kentucky. Rachel E. Goin Scoggins died in 1878 in Edgar County, Illinois.

Children born to them include:

Mary E Scoggins born about 1857
John William Scoggins June 16, 1858
Narcissa Jane Scoggins born in May 1860
Henry Thornton Scoggins born August 24, 1864
Calvin Cornelius Scoggins born about 1865
Louisa Scoggins born November 7, 1868
Frances Sarah Scoggins born February 15, 1870
Sue Ella Scoggins born Mar 20, 1872
Marbel Benson Scoggins, Jr. born July 14, 1874

Mary E. Scoggins, daughter of Marbel Benson Scoggins and Rachel E. Goin Scoggins, was born about 1857 in Kentucky.

John William Scoggins, son of Marbel Benson Scoggins and Rachel E. Goin Scoggins, was born June 16, 1858 in Pike County, Indiana.

Narcissa Jane Scoggins, daughter of Marbel Benson Scoggins and Rachel E. Goin Scoggins, was born in May 1860 in Pike County.

Henry Thornton Scoggins, son of Marbel Benson Scoggins and Rachel E. Goin Scoggins, was born August 24, 1864 in Indiana.

Calvin Cornelius Scoggins, son of Marbel Benson Scoggins and Rachel E. Goin Scoggins, was born about 1865 in Crawford County, Indiana.

Louisa Scoggins, daughter of Marbel Benson Scoggins and Rachel E. Goin Scoggins, was born November 17, 1868 in Pike Co, Indiana.

Frances Sarah Scoggins, daughter of Marbel Benson Scoggins and Rachel E. Goin Scoggins, was born February 15k, 1870 Knox Co, Indiana.

Sue Ella Scoggins, daughter of Marbel Benson Scoggins and Rachel E. Goin Scoggins, was born March 20, 1872 in Rockcastle County, Kentucky.

Marbel Benson Scoggins, Jr, son of Marbel Benson Scoggins and Rachel E. Goin Scoggins, was born July 14, 1874 in Rockcastle County. He was married about 1897 to Laura Belle “Loretta” Berry who was born November 23, 1879 in McKean County, Illinois to Samuel Sylvester Berry and Emma Jane Barrett Berry. They lived in Edgar County, Illinois until about 1904 and appeared in Pond Creek, Oklahoma in January 1905. In 1909 they lived near Hooker, Oklahoma.

Children born to them include:

Kenneth William Scoggins born May 11, 1899
Rae Marie Scoggins born October 28, 1900
John Henry Scoggins born May 16, 1902
Rachael Elizabeth Scoggins born January 24, 1905
Sylvia Mae Scoggins born June 3, 1906
Earl Edwin Scoggins born Sept. 28, 1909
Claude Marbel Benson Scoggins born October 2, 1910
Jesse Denver Scoggins born May 6, 1915
Orville Floyd Scoggins born April 25, 1918
Bernice Lorraine Scoggins born Sept. 18, 1920

Kenneth William Scoggins, son of Marbel Benson Scoggins, Jr. and Laura Belle “Loretta” Berry Scoggins, was born May 11, 1899 in Edgar County, Illinois.

Rae Marie Scoggins, daughter of Marbel Benson Scoggins, Jr. and Laura Belle “Loretta” Berry Scoggins, was born October 28, 1900 at Paris, Illinois in Edgar County.

John Henry Scoggins, son of Marbel Benson Scoggins, Jr. and Laura Belle “Loretta” Berry Scoggins, was born May 16, 1902.

Rachael Elizabeth Scoggins, daughter of Marbel Benson Scoggins, Jr. and Laura Belle “Loretta” Berry Scoggins, was born January 24, 1905.

Sylvia Mae Scoggins, daughter of Marbel Benson Scoggins, Jr. and Laura Belle “Loretta” Berry Scoggins, was born June 3, 1906 at Pond Creek, Oklahoma.

Earl Edwin Scoggins, son of Marbel Benson Scoggins, Jr. and Laura Belle “Loretta” Berry Scoggins, was born September 28, 1909 at Hooker, Oklahoma in Texas County. He was married March 5, 1932 to Mary Evaline Dickey who was born May 13, 1915 in Wayne County, Illinois to Charlie Dickey and Eunice Edna Warren Dickey. In 1932 they lived in Hamilton County, Kansas, and in 1936 they lived at St. Louis, Missouri.

Children born to them include:

Edwin Eugene Scoggins born December 30, 1932
Jesse Allen Scoggins born August 7, 1936

Claude Marbel Benson Scoggins, son of Marbel Benson Scoggins, Jr. and Laura Belle “Loretta” Berry Scoggins, was born October 2, 1910 at Hooker, Oklahoma.

Jesse Denver Scoggins, son of Marbel Benson Scoggins, Jr. and Laura Belle “Loretta” Berry Scoggins, was born May 6, 1915 at Hooker.

Orville Floyd Scoggins, son of Marbel Benson Scoggins, Jr. and Laura Belle “Loretta” Berry Scoggins, was born April 25, 1928 at Hooker.

Bernice Lorainne Scoggins, daughter of Marbel Benson Scoggins, Jr. and Laura Belle “Loretta” Berry Scoggins, was born September 18, 1920 at Hooker.

Sarah Goin, daughter of Sterling Goin and Mary Ann Keck Goin, was born about 1844.

James Knox Polk Goin, son of Sterling Goin and Mary Ann Keck Goin, was born April 10, 1845 in Claiborne County. During the Civil War, he served in the Union Army, according to “Biographical & Genealogical History of Southeastern Nebraska” published in 1904. The article stated:

“For over one-third of a century, James K. Goin has made his home in Gage County, Nebraska, and he has aided materially in the growth and development of Island Grove Township, which is his place of residence. He was born in Claiborne County, Tennessee on the tenth of April, 1845 and belongs to an old Southern family of English and Scotch extraction that was founded in Tennessee in an early day in its history. His grandfather, Levi Goin was a native of Virginia, but the greater part of his life was passed in Tennessee where our subject’s father, Sterling Goin was born in 1818.

James K. Goins was reared in much the usual manner of farmer boys of his day, and early became familiar with all the duties which wall to the lot of the agriculturist. His education was acquired in the common schools of his native state. When the country became involved in Civil War, he resolved to strike a blow in the defense of the Union cause and on the first of May, 1863, at Crab Orchard, Kentucky he enlisted in the First Tennessee Light Artillery under the command of Capt. Beebe and Col. Crawford. He took part in the Battle of Russellville, Kentucky, Loudon, Tennessee and Cumberland Gap, Tennessee, being stationed at the latter place for some time. When hostilities had ceased, he was honorably discharged at Nashville on the 20th of July, 1865.

At the age of 21 years Mr. Goin led to the marriage altar Miss Elizabeth Ann McVey who was also born, reared and educated in Claiborne County, Tennessee, and their union has been blessed by 11 children, those still living.being Josephine, Lewis, Philip, Margaret A, Eli, Della, Nellie, Lulu and Ethel. Levi and Maud are both deceased.

In 1869 Mr. Goin brought his family to Nebraska and settled on a farm west of Liberty in Gage County. In 1882 he purchased one hundred and sixty acres of rich bottom land which he has converted into a fine farm, having erected thereon a good comfortable residence at a cost of $1,400 and a barn at a cost of $800. He has an orchard and a grove upon his place, and a stream of running water adds to its beauty. Like his father, Mr. Goin in unswerving in his allegiance to the Republican Party and its principles, and he is an active church worker, serving as deacon of the Goodhope Baptist Church to which he belongs. His support is never withheld from any enterprise which he believes calculated to promote the moral, educational or social welfare of the community in which he lives, and he is recognized as a valued and useful citizen.”

James Knox Polk Goin was married December 7, 1865 to Elizabeth Ann McVey, according to a letter written October 30, 1994 by Beverly J. Nelson Ellison, a great-granddaughter of Littleton, Colorado. Elizabeth Ann McVey was a daughter of James McVey and Nancy Killion McVey and a granddaughter of William Killion and Ann Elizabeth Coleman Killion of Claiborne County. They moved to Nebraska in 1869. There he `homesteaded 160 acres under the Homestead Act of 1862. In 1872 he completed the requirements to receive the patent for his land.

Beverly J. Nelson Ellison gave some details of the life of her ancestor:

“In the statement of proof required by the government his witnesses were his brother Philip Goin and fellow Claiborne County native, Jonathan Sharp. They testified that he had built a house of lumber 15×19 feet with three doors and 2 windows and a shingled roof. Also noted were a stable and an acre of trees as well as the original log cabin 9×12 feet. This couple has been recognized by the State of Nebraska and the Nebraska State Genealogical Society as one of the Pioneer Families of Nebraska.

That first home of logs stood on that land until after 1950. Its size was prescribed by the tallest trees growing along the creek. There was one door in the front. Polk kept the old cabin in repair over the years and used it as a woodshed. According to his granddaughter, Hazel Conover Ellison who took her daughter, this writer, to visit the cabin about 1947, Polk reminded his family to look at the cabin and remember how they started their new lives in the West.

To claim homestead land Polk had to prove his loyalty to the Union during the Civil War. Included in his homestead file is a transcript furnished by the War Department at Nashville, Tennessee. Besides acknowledging his enrollment in Company B, First Regiment of Light Artillery, Tennessee Volunteers May 1, 1863, it lists his discharge as 20 July 1865 at Nashville, In ad-dition his description at age 18 was given as “five feet eight inches high, light complexion, blue eyes, light hair and by occupation when enrolled a farmer.”

After Polk enlisted at Nicklesville, Kentucky, he saw action in the Battle of Wildcat, Kentucky and the Battle of Cumberland Gap. He told his grandson Marvin Elli-son with whom he shared his home during the last years of his life that he got up that May 1st morning and just acted as if he were heading for the fields. Instead, he headed for Kentucky. Although he never mentioned his older brother’s Confederate service, some family members maintain that he joined the Northern army in response to the forced enlistment of his brother, John Goin.

At one point the Confederacy was forcibly enrolling the oldest son from each family in pro-Union East Tennessee. After escaping a Confederate group intent on conscripting them into the Confederate cause, his Keck cousins joined him in Kentucky as did his brother, Philip. Years later they also joined him in Nebraska. Polk’s service on behalf of the Union was rewarded with Civil War Pension No. 39685.

In 1915 the Bureau of Pensions requested from each pensioner personal information including data about the spouse and the children. From that list and the records of the Liberty Cemetery and individual family members a list of the children of Polk and Elizabeth Ann has been assembled.

During his early years at Liberty, Polk joined others of the numerous families from Claiborne County in forming the Good Hope Baptist Church. This large group of pioneers was linked by blood, marriage and religion as exemplified by their bringing their own preacher-teacher from Tennessee. Peter Bolinger, the minister, was the brother of Eleander Bolinger, wife of Philip Goin. Families who would continue to intermarry in Nebraska included the Cains, Johnsons, Sharps, Lynches and this writer’s paternal group, the Ellisons. Polk also carried on another family tradition by serving in Gage County in 1904 as Justice of the Peace.

Some years after Elizabeth Ann’s death in 1915, Polk sold his farm at Liberty and moved to Beatrice where his house still stands. His last three years were spent under the care of his redhaired granddaughter, Hazel Conover Ellison, this writer’s mother. Among the treasured mementos of the family are three mini-balls from the Civil War. The location of Polk’s family bible is not known. As late as 1950, it was with a daughter in Colorado Springs when Hazel Ellison copied a record of his Civil War service from it. Hopefully, it still exists and all data will be preserved.”

He died December 26, 1934 at Beatrice, Nebraska.

Children born to James Knox Polk Goin and Elizabeth Ann McVey Goin include:

Josephine Goin born December 11. 1867
Levi Goin born April 28, 1870
William Louis Goin born February 19, 1872
Phillip Goin born November 4, 1873
Margaret Ann Goin born October 27, 1875
Eli Goin born October 10, 1877
Etta Della Goin born December 22, 1879
Eleanor “Nellie” Goin born June 28, 1882
Maud Goin born April 10, 1885
Lula Bell Goin born February 6, 1889
Ethel Eldora Goin born November 10, 1891

Josephine Goin, daughter of James Knox Polk Goin and Eliza-beth Ann McVey Goin, was born December 11, 1867 at Tazewell. She was married to Harry Saddler.

Levi Goin, son of James Knox Polk Goin and Elizabeth Ann McVey Goin, was born April 28, 1870 at Liberty, Nebraska. He died there July 24, 1871.

William Louis Goin, son of James Knox Polk Goin and Eliza-beth Ann McVey Goin, was born February 19, 1872 at Liberty. He was married to Ada Mitchell. He died about 1950 at St. Helens, Oregon.

Phillip Goin, son of James Knox Polk Goin and Elizabeth Ann McVey Goin, was born November 4, 1873 at Liberty. He was married October 21, 1900 to Silby Norris. He died September 6, 1925 and was buried in Liberty Cemetery.

Margaret Ann Goin, daughter of James Knox Polk Goin and Elizabeth Ann McVey Goin, was born October 27, 1875 at Liberty, Nebraska in Gage County. She was married there September 25, 1892 to John Frank Heaston, son of John Heaston and Mariah Field Heaston, according to the research of Beverly Zuerlein. He was born October 28, 1868 in Salt Lake City, Utah. He died May 10, 1966 in Colorado Springs, Colorado. She died April 25, 1971 at Colorado Springs.

Children born to them include:

Grace Mae Heaston born July 14, 1895

Grace Mae Heaston, daughter of John Frank Heaston and Margaret Ann Going Heaston, was born July 14, 1895 in Brighton, Missouri. She was married June 11, 1913 to Thomas Earl Hart who was born January 28, 1890 in Johnson County, Nebraska to Nehemiah Hart and Susan Jane Harrington Hart. He died October 11, 1946 in Liberty, Nebraska. She died June 10, 1986 in Beatrice, Nebraska.

Children born to them include:

Kenneth Everett Hart born May 10, 1918

Kenneth Everett Hart, son of Thomas Earl Hart and Grace Mae Heaston Hart, was born May 10, 1918 in Liberty. He was married October 24, 1940 to Pauline Miller who was born February 16, 1922 in Colorado.

Children born to them include:

Sharon June Hart born about 1941
Catherine Eileen Hart born November 22, 1942

Eli Goin, son of James Knox Polk Goin and Elizabeth Ann McVey Goin, was born October 10, 1877 at Liberty. He was married to Cora Heath.

Etta Della Goin, daughter of James Knox Polk Goin and Eliza-beth Ann McVey Goin, was born December 22, 1879 at Lib-erty. She was married January 16, 1897 at Marysville, Kansas to Virgil Moses Conover. Later she was remarried to Lee Dickerson of Sterling, Colorado. She died December 29, 1940.

Eleanor “Nellie” Goin, daughter of James Knox Polk Goin and Elizabeth Ann McVey Goin, was born June 28, 1882 at Liberty. She was married to Robert Gregory. She died August 16, 1978.

Maud Goin, daughter of James Knox Polk Goin and Elizabeth Ann McVey Goin, was born at Liberty April 10, 1885. She died two years later March 1, 1887.

Lula Bell Goin, daughter of James Knox Polk Goin and Eliza-beth Ann McVey Goin, was born February 6, 1889 at Liberty. She was married to George Kiechel. She died March 3, 1926.

Ethel Eldora Goin, daughter of James Knox Polk Goin and Elizabeth Ann McVey Goin, was born November 10, 1891 at Liberty. She died May 5, 1923 unmarried at Denver, Colorado.

Philip Keck Goin, son of Sterling Goin and Mary Ann Keck Goin, was born September 15, 1846 in Claiborne County. He was married there September 22, 1866 to Elendear Bolinger. She was born February 7, 1847. They moved to Nebraska in 1869.

“Phillip Goings” appeared as the head of a house­hold in the 1880 census of Pawnee County Nebraska, Enumeration District 254, Page 12, Plum Creek Township:

“Goings, Phillip 33, born in Tennessee
Ellender 32, born in Tennessee
James Sterling 12, born in Tennessee
Florence M. 8, born in Nebraska
Emeline 6, born in Nebraska
Tilda 4, born in Nebraska
Hugh 2, born in Nebraska
Proctor 1/12, born in Nebraska
Goings, Proctor 20, born in TN, brother

She died there December 14, 1887, and he died at Liberty, Nebraska September 27, 1924. Alice Louise Goin wrote that he died in Bruce, Wisconsin in Rusk County.

He was featured in “Biographical & Genealogical History of Southeastern Nebraska:”

“Phillip Goin, who was one of the defenders of the Union cause during the dark days of tho rebellion, is now a prominent and successful farmer of Gage County, Nebraska, his home being in Island Grove Township. He came to this state in 1869 and therefore witnessed almost its entire development and upbuilding, in the work of which he has borne an important part as an agriculturist.

Mr. Goin was born in Claiborne County, Tennessee and is a worthy representative of a prominent old family of that locality, his paternal grandfather being Levi Goin, of Tennessee. His parents, Sterling and Mary Keck Goin, were natives of the same state. The latter died in 1868 at age of 45 years. She was a loving wife, a tender mother, and a kind neighbor, and was withal a true southern woman in the best sense of that term. The father is still living in Tennessee at the advanced age of 104 years. His occupation being a farmer, his political support has always been given to the Whig and Republican parties, and during tho Civil war, he was a strong Union man, and many sufferings was he called upon to endure on account of his loyalty to the United States, as he was surrounded on all sides by secessionists. In his family were sixteen children, seventeen of whom reached man-hood and womanhood. James K. Goin, one of the num-ber, who was a Union soldier in the Civil War, is now living in Island Grove Township, Gage County, Nebraska; Proctor is also a resident of this county; and one [Tilman Howard Goin] lives in Marshall county, Kansas. All of the others, with the exception of our subject, still make their home in the south.

Upon the home farm Phillip Goin passed the days of his boyhood and youth, and he received a limited education in the schools of Tennessee, but his time was mainly de-voted to the labors of the farm. On the 30th of October. 1864, at the age of eighteen years, he joined the boys in blue of Company B, First Tennessee Light Artillery, and was under the command of Capt, Beebe and Col. Craw-ford. He was in the Battle of Ball’s Bridge, Virginia, and in the engagements at Cumberland Gap and Strawberry Plains, together with others of lesser importance in Tennessee and Virginia. At the close of the war, he re-ceived an honorable discharge at Nashville, July 20, 1865, and returned home with a fine military record for so young a man, being not quite nineteen years of age.

In 1868 [1866] Mr. Goin was united in marriage to Miss Elinor Bolinger, and a year later they came to Nebraska, locating in Pawnee County. where she died in 1888, loved and respected by all who knew her for her sterling worth and many excellent traits of character. Besides her husband, nine children were left to mourn her loss, namely, Sterling, Florence M, Emmeline, Matilda, Hugh, Proctor, Lionel, Andrew and Clyde.

Mr. Goin now owns an excellent farm of four hundred and fifty acres of rich bottom land in Island Grove Township, Gage County, conveniently located one mile east of Liberty. The place is under a high state of culti-vation and is improved with good and substantial buildings, which stand as monuments to his thrift and enterprise. In connection with general farming, Mr. Goin carries on stock raising to some extent. He is a man of excellent business ability and thoroughly reli-able, his word being considered as good as his bond.

True to the principles for which he fought, he continues to support the Republican party, and he is a prominent member of Barry Post, G. A. R., in which he is serving as senior vice commander. He is also a member of the Masonic fraternity.”

Phillip Keck Goin, “a grandson of Levi Goin,” wrote a “biographical sketch of his grandfather in 1889 which was published in “Portrait and Biographical Album of Johnson and Pawnee Counties, Nebraska.” In the article Phillip Keck Goin stated that his grandfather died in 1863 at the age of 85 and was the father of 12 children.

Children born to Phillip Keck Goin and Elinor/Elendear Bolinger Goin include:

James Sterling Goin November 8, 1867
Esau Goin born December 13, 1869
Florence M. Goin born August 24, 1871
Emmeline Goin born April 22, 1874
Matilda Goin born February 7, 1876
Hugh Goin born August 23, 1877
Irving Goin born January 7, 1879
Proctor Goin born June 5, 1880
Andrew “Dan” Goin born April 1, 1882
Lionel Goin born May 27, 1884
Victor Goin born February 17, 1886
Clyde Goin born December 7, 1887

James Sterling Goin, son of Phillip Keck Goin and Elinor Bolinger Goin, was born November 8, 1867 in Tennessee. He was married December 31, 1889 in Pawnee County, Nebraska to Corah Bertha Johnston who was born in Missouri February 6, 1870 to Green Johnston and Martha Blair Johnston, accord-ing to Alice Louise Goin, a great-granddaughter. Corah Bertha Johnston Goin died in Boise, Idaho May 16, 1911. He died June 20, 1924 in Pendleton, Oregon.

Children born to James Sterling Goin and Corah Bertha John-ston Goin include:

John Robert “Jack” Goin born October 9, 1890
Georgia Fay Goin born October 30, 1892
Sterling Everett Goin born May 17, 1895
Claude DeRoy Goin born January 16, 1896
Phillip Hugh Goin born January 9, 1907

John Robert “Jack” Goin, son of James Sterling Goin and Corah Bertha Johnston Goin, was born October 9, 1890 in Gage County, Nebraska.. He was married about June 9, 1918 to Rose Ellen Rhodes at Boise. She died May 27, 1932, and he died July 19, 1937 in Los Angeles, California.

Children born to John Robert “Jack” Goin and Rose Ellen Rhodes Goin include:

Bertha Marie Bette Goin born April 2, 1919
Darlene Zoe Goin born February 11, 1925

Bertha Marie Bette Goin, daughter of John Robert “Jack” Goin and Rose Ellen Rhodes Goin, was born April 2, 1919 at Boise. She was married about 1939 to Joseph Mernik. She died in San Diego, California December 18, 1982.

Darlene Zoe Goin, daughter of John Robert “Jack” Goin and Rose Ellen Rhodes Goin, was born February 11, 1925 at Pendleton, Oregon. She was married July 26, 1947 in Portland, Oregon to Marion Otis Greener.

Georgia Fay Goin, daughter of James Sterling Goin and Corah Bertha Johnston Goin, was born October 30, 1892 in Pawnee County, Nebraska. She was married August 22, 1911 in Boise, Idaho to George B. Thomas. She died there January 3, 1919, and he died in 1944.

Children born to them include:

George B. Thomas, Jr. born about 1914

Sterling Everett Goin, son of James Sterling Goin and Corah Bertha Johnston Goin, was born May 17, 1895 in Oklahoma. He was married April 15, 1915 in Boise to Gladys Laurel Call-away who was born April 12, 1898 in Caldwell, Idaho to William Thomas Callaway and Martha Marylin Cleek Callaway. He died there October 20, 1943, and she was remarried to Frank Lovejoy. She died in 1985.

Children born to Sterling Everett Goin and Gladys Laurel Callaway Goin include:

Mona Faye Goin born October 12, 1915
Clarence Paul Goin born November 18, 1918
James Halley Goin born June 16, 1921
Shirley Delorece Goin born December 28, 1923
Frank Lyle Goin born August 24, 1926
Gene Darlene Goin born August 24, 1928
Joy LaVonne Goin born September 5, 1930
Donna Lou Goin born January 3, 1934

Mona Faye Goin, daughter of Sterling Everett Goin and Gladys Laurel Callaway Goin, was born about 1919. She fell in love with George Hartman about 1932. She died March 1, 1956.

Children born to them include:

Max Hartman born about 1934
Shirley Hartman born about 1936
Lyle “Manny” Hartman born about 1938

Clarence Paul Goin, son of Sterling Everett Goin and Gladys Laurel Callaway Goin, was born November 18, 1918 in Nampa, Idaho. He was married about 1946 to Phyllis Smith.

James Halley Goin, son of Sterling Everett Goin and Gladys Laurel Callaway Goin, was June 16, 1921 in Nampa, Idaho. He died there February 28, 1967.

Shirley Delorece Goin, daughter of Sterling Everett Goin and Gladys Laurel Callaway Goin, was born December 28, 1923 in Caldwell, Idaho. She was married October 12, 1947 in Santa Monica, Californiato Ted C. Owens who was born in 1919. He died in 1994.

Children born to them include:

Sandra Lee Owens born about 1941
Robert Paul Owens born about 1944
Roseannette Owens born about 1950

Sandra Lee Owens, daughter of Ted C. Owens and Shirley De-loreece Goin Owens, was born about 1941. She was married in 1960 to James Rodney Burgess who was born in 1940.
Children born to them include:

Michael James Burgess born about 1964
Darryl Allen Burgess born about 1966
Scott Everett Burgess born about 1972

Robert Paul Owens, son of Ted C. Owens and Shirley De-loreece Goin Owens, was born about 1944. He was married about 1967 to Kathy Brown. Later he was remarried twice more.

Children born to them include:

Robert Paul Owens, Jr. born about 1966
Dawn Marie Owens born about 1969
Jason Eric Owens born about 1973
Jessie Rae Owens born about 1975
Jill Ashley Owens born about 1978

Roseannette Owens, daughter of Ted C. Owens and Shirley Deloreece Goin Owens, was born about 1950. She was married about 1969 to John Redd who was born about 1939.

Children born to them include:

Paula Jean Redd born about 1970

Frank Lyle Goin, son of Sterling Everett Goin and Gladys Laurel Callaway Goin, was born August 24, 1926 in Nampa. He was married October 12, 1947 to Betty Oppellman who was born in 1929. Betty Oppellman Goin died October 12, 1987. Later he was remarried to Jane Chase.

No children were born to Frank Lyle Goin and Janet Chase Goin. Children born to Frank Lyle Goin and Betty Oppelland Goin include:

Debra Jane Goin born about 1952
Cheryl Dianne “Karen” Goin born about 1955

Debra Jane Goin, daughter of Frank Lyle Goin and Betty Op-pelland Goin, was born about 1952. She was married in 1991 to Mike Bergin. In 1995 they lived in Paso Robles where she, a member of Gowen Research Foundation, was active in the research of Thomas Goin and descendants.

Cheryl Dianne Goin, daughter of Frank Lyle Goin and Betty Oppelland Goin, was born about 1955.

Gene Darlene Goin, son of Sterling Everett Goin and Gladys Laurel Callaway Goin, was born August 24, 1928 in Nampa. He was married there February 5, 1950 to Marian Louise Crowther who was born about 1930. He died March 9, 1987 in Ontario, Oregon.

Children born to Gene Darlene Goin and Marian Louise Crowther Goin include:

Kim Douglas Goin born about 1952
Tamara Louise Goin born about 1957

Kim Douglas Goin, son of Gene Darlene Goin and Marian Louise Crowther Goin, was born about 1952. He was married about 1986 to Chris Helen Buss who was born about 1959.

Children born to Kim Douglas Goin and Chris Helen Buss Goin include:

Corina Faith Goin born about 1987
Angela Hope Goin born about 1990

Tamara Louise Goin, daughter of Gene Darlene Goin and Mar-ian Louise Crowther Goin, was born about 1957. She was married in 1987 to David George Stone who was born about 1953. She, a member of the Foundation, is actively researching her Goin family and has contributed much of the data for this section.

Children born to them include:

Samantha Jean Stone born about 1988

Joy LaVonne Goin, daughter of Sterling Everett Goin and Gladys Laurel Callaway Goin, was born September 5, 1930 in Nampa. She was married about 1949 to Harry Poor. She died March 1, 1968.

Children born to them include:

Walter Poor born about 1950
Harry Poor born about 1951
Mary Poor born about 1954
Gladys Jean Poor born about 1957

Donna Lou Goin, daughter of Sterling Everett Goin and Gladys Laurel Callaway Goin, was born January 3, 1934. She was married about 1953, husband’s name unknown. Later she was married twice more. Seven children were born to them.

Claude DeRoy Goin, son of James Sterling Goin and Corah Bertha Johnston Goin, was born January 16, 1896 in Blackwell, Oklahoma. He was married November 12, 1921 to Permeal Effie Hammer, daughter of William Franklin Hammer and Effie Luella Peacock Hammer. Claude DeRoy Goin died July 9, 1952 in Blackfoot, Idaho, and she died in Boise July 31, 1976.

Children born to Claude DeRoy Goin and Permeal Hammer Goin include:

Virginia Fay Goin born August 12, 1922
Howard Roy Goin born February 13, 1925
Alice Louise Goin born December 8, 1927
Margaret Beryl Goin born January 6, 1929

Virginia Fay Goin, daughter of Claude DeRoy Goin and Per-meal Effie Hammer Goin, was born August 11, 1922 in Boise. She was married about 1943 to James Casselman.

Children born to them include:

Katherine N. Casselman born about 1951
Patrick Casselman born about 1957

Howard Roy Goin, son of Claude DeRoy Goin and Permeal Effie Hammer Goin, was born February 13, 1925 in Boise. He died the following day.

Alice Louise Goin, daughter of Claude DeRoy Goin and Per-meal Effie Hammer Goin, was born December 8, 1927 in Boise. She, a member of the Foundation, was active in the study of her Goin family in July 1996.

Margaret Beryl Goin, daughter of Claude DeRoy Goin and Permeal Effie Hammer Goin, was born January 6, 929 in Boise. She was married in 1949 to Robert E. Pratt who was born in 1924. He died in June 1972. Later she was remarried to Harley Miller.

Children born to her include:

Steven Edward Pratt born about 1950
Loren W. Pratt born about 1952

Phillip Hugh Goin, son of James Sterling Goin and Corah Bertha Johnston Goin, was born January 9, 1907 in Wisconsin. He was married about 1930, wife’s name Yvonne, and it is be-lieved that they were later divorced after the birth of a son and a daughter.

Esau Goin, son of Phillip Keck Goin and Elinor/Elendear Bolinger Goin, was born December 13, 1969 in Nebraska. He died there November 27, 1871.

Florence M. Goin, daughter of Phillip Keck Goin and Elinor/Elendear Bolinger Goin, was born August 24, 1871

Emmeline Goin, daughter of Phillip Keck Goin and Elinor/Elendear Bolinger Goin, was born April 22, 1874.

Matilda Goin, daughter of Phillip Keck Goin and Elinor/Elendear Bolinger Goin, was born February 7, 1876.

Hugh Goin, son of Phillip Keck Goin and Elinor/Elendear Bolinger Goin, was born August 23, 1877.

Irving Goin, son of Phillip Keck Goin and Elinor/Elendear Bolinger Goin, was born January 7, 1879 in Nebraska. He died February 27, 1879.

Proctor Goin, son of Phillip Keck Goin and Elinor/Elendear Bolinger Goin, was born June 5, 1880.

Andrew “Dan” Goin, son of Phillip Keck Goin and Elinor/Elendear Bolinger Goin, was born April 1, 1882 at Liberty, Nebraska. He was married June 28, 1905 to Isa Frances Dotson. He died in 1966.

Children born to Andrew Goin and Isa Frances Dot-son Goin include:

Violet Isa Goin born February 27, 1924

Lionel Goin, son of Phillip Keck Goin and Elinor/Elendear Bolinger Goin, was born May 27, 1884.

Victor Goin, son of Phillip Keck Goin and Elinor/Elendear Bolinger Goin, was born in Nebraska February 17, 1886. He died January 1, 1887.

Clyde Goin, of Phillip Keck Goin and Elinor/Elendear Bolinger Goin, was born December 7, 1887.

Rebecca Goin, daughter of Sterling Goin and Mary Ann Keck Goin, was born about 1847.

Levi Goin, son of Sterling Goin and Mary Ann Keck Goin, was born July 24, 1848. He was married March 14, 1872 to Sarah Elizabeth “Lizzie” Life. They moved by wagontrain to Marshall County, Kansas.

Levi Goin, a Tennesseean, appeared in 1880 in the Franklin Township of Marshall County, Kansas as the head of a house-hold:

“Goin Levi 31, born in Tennessee
Sarah 25, born in Indiana
Oscar 7, born in Kansas
Martin 5, born in Kansas
William H. 6/12, born in Kansas
Goin, Mary 11, born in TN, sister
to householder”

In 1903 he was a farmer in Marshall County, according to arti-cles describing his brothers in “Biographical & Genealogical History of Southeastern Nebraska.” He died May 5, 1936 in Cheney, Washington.

Children born to Levi Goin and Sarah Elizabeth “Lizzie”. Life Goin include:

Oscar Goin born about 1873
Martin Goin ” born about 1875
William H. Goin born in 1880

Jasper Goin, son of Sterling Goin and Mary Ann Keck Goin, was born March 6, 1850 in Claiborne County. He appeared in the 1850 census at age three months. He was married November 17, 1872 to Rachel Hunter. He died August 30, 1933 at Gem, Kansas.

Jasper Goin was listed as the head of a household in the 1880 census of Claiborne County, Enumeration District 110, page 16, Civil District 12, enumerated as:

“Goin, Jasper 31, born in TN
Rachel 32, born in TN
Easter C. 6, born in TN
Levi J. 5, born in TN
Barbary A. 3, born in TN
Catherine J. 2, born in TN
[daughter] 1/12, born in TN”

Children born to Jasper Goin and Rachel Hunter Goin include:

Esther C. Goin born about 1874
Levi J. Goin born about 1875
Barbara A. Goin born about 1877
Catherine J. Goin born about 1878
[daughter] born in 1880

Sarah Elizabeth Goin, daughter of Sterling Goin and Mary Ann Keck Goin, was born about 1852. She was married about 1872 to Aaron Jacob Francisco who was born in 1845.

William Houston Goin, son of Sterling Goin and Mary Ann Keck Goin, was born September 4, 1854. He was married November 23, 1872 in Claiborne County to Louisa Mayes. He died April 3, 1891 at Princeton, Missouri in Mercer County. Children born to William Houston Goin and Louisa Mayes Goin are unknown.

Tilman Howard Goin, son of Sterling Goin and Mary Ann Keck Goin, was born January 21, 1856. He was married September 9, 1880 in Marshall County, Kansas to Mary Jane Day. Later he was remarried to Lola May. He died May 23, 1931 in Maury County, Tennessee. Children born to Tilman Howard Goin, Mary Jane Day Goin and Lola May Goin are unknown.

Rebecca Goin, daughter of Sterling Goin and Mary Ann Keck Goin, was born March 11, 1858. She was married to Joe Mes-sick about 1880. She died in 1905.

Proctor Goin, son of Sterling Goin and Mary Ann Keck Goin, was born in Claiborne County February 20, 1860, according to the research of Lynn Timmerman Goin, a great-grandson of Tucson, Arizona. He was married November 3, 1881 in Pawnee County, Nebraska to Emeline Ellison who was also born in Claiborne County, Tennessee. She was the daughter of McKindred Ellison and Nancy Lynch Ellison. Proctor Goin came to Nebraska in an overland wagontrain with Keck cousins in the following year. They lived at Liberty, Nebraska in Gage County near the southeastern corner of the state. He was influenced to Nebraska by two brothers, James Knox Polk Goin and Philip Keck Goin who had preceded him there. Emaline Ellison Goin died there December 24, 1940, and he died there June 16, 1946. Proctor also owned land in Canada. His descendants still lived in Gage County, Nebraska in 1995.

Children born to them include:

Arthur Goin born November 29, 1882

Arthur Goin, son of Proctor Goin and Emaline Ellison Goin, was born November 29, 1882 at Liberty. He was married November 20, 1907 at Oketo, Kansas in Marshall County to Frances Boyer, daughter of George Boyer and Anna Elizabeth Lytle Boyer. She was born there September 14, 1885. She died October 8, 1965 at Wymore, Nebraska in Gage County, and he died there April 25, 1966. Frances Ruth Ehlers, a grandaughter and a member of the Foundation, lived in Abilene, Kansas in 1995.

Children born to Arthur Goin and Frances Boyer Goin include:

Chester Raymond Goin born July 11, 1910

Chester Raymond Goin, son of Arthur Goin and Frances Boyer Goin, was born July 11, 1910 at Wymore. He was married at Liberty July 14, 1934 to Florence Mary Timmerman, daughter of Rollo O. H. Timmerman and Emily Ruth Morrison Timmerman. She was born August 9, 1909 at Glenwood, Washington.

Children born to Chester Raymond Goin and Florence Mary Timmerman Goin include:

Lynn Timmerman Goin born April 27, 1941

Lynn Timmerman Goin, son of Chester Raymond Goin and Florence Mary Timmerman Goin, was born April 27, 1941 in Gage County. He was married December 28, 1962 at Ft. Mor-gan, Colorado to Nancy Eileen Ross. In 1991, Lynn Timmer-man Goin and Nancy Eileen Ross Goin, were residents of Tuc-son, Arizona.

Charity Jane Goin, daughter of Sterling Goin and Mary Ann Keck Goin, was born August 15, 1862. She was married De-cember 11, 1879 to Jefferson Edmondson who was also born in 1862. “Old Time Tazewell” written by Mary Ann Markham Hansard records, somewhat erroneously, their marriage, “Jefferson Edmondson, oldest son of James Edmondson, youngest son of James Edmondston, Sr, was born about 1861. He was married to “Miss Goin, daughter of Eli Goin.” She died December 9, 1937 in Bakersfield, California.

Catherine Goin, daughter of Sterling Goin and Mary Ann Keck Goin, was born August 15, 1865. She was married November 1, 1884 to William L. Edmondston who was also born in 1864. He is regarded as a brother to Jefferson Edmondson. Mrs. Markham identified him as the “second son of James Edmondson.”

An infant, name unknown, was born about 1866 to Sterling Goin and Mary Ann Keck Goin. The child died in infancy.

Mary Goin, daughter of Sterling Goin and Mary Ann Keck Goin, was born December 23, 1868. Her mother died on the same date in childbirth. She was recorded as an 11-year-old living in the home of her brother, Levi Goin in the 1880 census of Marshall County, Kansas, Franklin township and enumerated as his sister. She was married November 14, 1889 to Robert Edmondson. She died September 27, 1926 in Claiborne County.

Mary Ann Markham also wrote, “Robert Edmondson, third son of James Edmondson, was born about 1867. He was married to another daughter of Eli Goin. I have no acquaintance with their families and therefore cannot mention the names of either one of them.”

Sherman Goin, son of Sterling Goin and Dicy Manerva Davis Goin, was born December 3, 1871. He was married to Flora Hopkins about 1895. Children born to Sherman Goin and Flora Hopkins Goin are unknown.

Sterling W. Goin, son of Sterling Goin and Dicy Manerva Davis Goin, was born in February 1873 in Claiborne County. He was recorded as the hear of a household, adjoining that of Sterling Goin, in the 1900 census of Claiborne County, Enumeration District 12, page 3, 12th Civil District:

“Goin, Sterling W. 27, born in February 1873 in TN
Minie B. 24, born in March 1876 in TN
Alta A. 4, born in May 1896 in TN
Perlie 1, born in October 1898 in TN”

Grant Goin, son of Sterling Goin and Dicy Manerva Davis Goin, was born about 1874.

Dicy Manerva Goin, daughter of Sterling Goin and Dicy Man-erva Davis Goin was born January 1, 1875. She died June 20, 1911.

Norvesta Goin, daughter of Sterling Goin and Dicy Manerva Davis Goin was born April 2, 1876 in Claiborne County. She was married about 1893 to William Fortner. She died April 6, 1942.

Edwinea Goin, daughter of Sterling Goin and Dicy Manerva Davis Goin was born was born May 15, 1878. She was married about 1897 to Dr. Nelson Stone. She died in 1973.

Oscar Sterling Goin, son of Sterling Goin and Melvina Need-ham Moyers, was born January 12, 1881. He was married to Hattie Garland December 31, 1902. Later he was remarried to Myrtle Lynch. He died in 1965. Children born to Oscar Ster-ling Goin, Hattie Garland Goin and Myrtle Lynch Goin are un-known.

LeRoy Goin, son of Levi Goin and Elizabeth Stallions Goin, was born December 8, 1819. He was married February 13, 1840 to Rebecca Fuson. They removed from Claiborne County to Mercer County, Missouri in 1850. In 1864 they moved again, with his cousin William James Goin, to Linn County, Ore gon. In 1868 they moved again to Stanislaus County, California. Eleven children were born to LeRoy Goin and Rebecca Fuson Goin, names unknown.

Eli Goin, son of Levi Goin and Elizabeth Stallions Goin, was born March 2, 1825. He was married August 9, 1849 to Rachel Edwards. He was politically active and an office holder in Claiborne County.

On May 17, 1855, he wrote a letter to his brother in Illinois, according to “Goin and Variants” by Dianne Stark Thurman:

“May 27th, 1855, State of Tenneffe, Claborn County

Dear Brother and syster. I one time more take my pen in hand to write few lines to inform you that we ar all well at this time but mother she is un well at this time an has bein very un well but is some better. Hoping that these few lines may find you well and doing well. We received your letter some time in Aprile in the year 1855, bearing mark of Sept. the 4th., 1854, which made us glad to hear that you was all well an sorry to hear of your bad crops and sorry times. I have nothing strange to write to you. I believe the connecutions are all well as before as I now. You requested us to ancer your letter and give full satisfaction. I will do soe with pleasure.

William Goin livs in Kantucky an is doing tolerby well. Pleasant lives on the river where he did wen you left this contry an he is doings vary wel. R.D. Going livs in Larel County Kantucky he is doing vary well. Elijah lives on the creek yet. Phillip Keck livs over on Little Baren Creek. Leroy livs in Missouri, Janma and her man livs on the ridge, Sterling and Eli livs on the same old place an we ar doing as well as now how. This contry altered mitey sense you lefte it. Thay is houses now where you could not believe people would liv. I think pepol is doing beter now tan thay was when youleft this contry.

You requested to now something about Unkle Uriah and his sons and sons nlaws. Uncle an his family livs at the same place whar they did when you lefte this contry. Levi Goin Esq. he livs whare he did. Nelson he livs on the same place. Righte Holten he has moved to Kantucky, Belusky [sic* Pulaski] County. I suppose he is doing vary well in that contry. Riley Holton he livs in that little home there above the Kecks. Wm. Aykes lives on the old Capps place. Wm. Keck he is dead. He died laste fall. The wider n her family lives on the creek just below Wane lige lives. John Green that Mehalys man he livs ner the wider Keck on branch caled Currs branch. The old man Keck livs on the same place. His children is all married. Matthew livs with the old man. Spencer Edwards he is dead. He had been dead 5 or 6 years. His family lives on the same place whare they did. The Harpers, Hesekiah livs on the ridge. Jessie Harper livs at the same place whar he did. Thomas Harper he lives in Kantucky. John Harper livs on the Coots place below old Jesse Livingston. Harper lives with his son Huston. Old Granny Harper she is dead. She died last fall. Isaac Goin livs ware he did. John and Martin and William Goins ar all in Masouri. Omee married a man by the name of Raney.

Old George Ford he still livs at the same old place. All his children is maried but one that is Richard he still stays with the old man. Wila livs on the ridge at the big house. Elijah lives in Kantucky. Spense livs in Arknsas. George Linch and Greenbery livs thar to. Richard Harper his wife died and he maried on of Thomas Harpers gurels and went to Massouri. William and James and Isaac livs on the Harper place.

Crops was vary sorrey in ths contry is worth from 50 to 75 centes per bushel. Wheate is worth $1.00 per bushel. All other produce acording to that. Good Horses is wort $100, mules sels very high, cows and calvs went from 12 to 18 dollars.

I wante you to rite to me as soone as you get this letter. Your leter was a long time coming to hand. I got it at last. Directe your nex leter to Tazwell for thay ar more apt to get miss layd when thay ar sente to the little post offices. I have ancered the biger parte of your leter if thay is anybody heer that you wante to know anything about let me now it an I will tell you.

Rite soone from Eli Goin an family to Isaac Goin.

Eli Goin died December 22, 1903 and was buried in Pleasant Point Cemetery beside his wife.

Ten children were born to Eli Goin and Rachel Edwards Goin, including:

Uriah Goin, Jr. born about 1846
Elijah “Lige” Goin born about 1847

Elijah “Lige” Goin, son of Eli Goin and Rachel Edwards Goin, was born in Claiborne County about 1847. He was married about 1860 to a second cousin, Sarah Raney, daughter of Ezekial “Zeke” Raney and Naomi “Oma” Goin Raney. She was a daughter of Isaac Abraham Goin and Temperance Alice “Tempie” Gray Goin.

Elijah “Lige” Goin and Sarah Ramey removed to Jefferson, Oregon. Later they lived in Waldport, Oregon on the Pacific coast. They reared a grandson, Fielding V. “Bob” Goin who in 1991 lived in Bellevue, Washington. Fielding V. “Bob” Goin died January 10, 1995.

Jamima Jane “Mimi” Goin, daughter of Levi Goin and Eliza-beth Stallions Goin, was born about 1827, according to her enumeration in the 1850 census . She was married about 1848 to Calvin Sparks.

They were enumerated in the 1850 census of Claiborne County:

“Sparks, Calvin 21, born in KY
Jemima 34, born in TN
Elizabeth 1”

They reappeared in the 1860 census of Claiborne County. She was recorded as “Gemima.” He served in the military during the Civil War. They were enumerated there in the 1870 census.

Jamima Jane “Mimi” Goin Sparks apparently died after the 1870 census, and Calvin Sparks was remarried about 1875, wife’s name, Sacchi.

Seven children were born to Calvin Sparks and Jamima Jane “Mimi” Goin Sparks, including:

Elizabeth Goins born about 1849
==O==
Harriet M. Soard, daughter of Henry Soard and Mary Jane Rodgers Soard, was born about 1846. She was married December 24, 1876 in Claiborne County to Pleasant Goins, Jr, a grandson of Rev. Pleasant Goins, Sr. Pleasant Goins, Jr. was born about 1832. Harriet Soard Goins died about 1884 leaving one son and two daughters.

Children born to Pleasant Goins, Jr. and Harriet Soard Goins include:

Sarah Goins born about 1878
Benjamin Goins born about 1880
Birdie Goins born about 1883

Of the children, Mrs. Hansard wrote, “Sarah Goins, oldest daughter of Pleasant and Harriet, married Charles Washam and moved to Illinois. Birdie, youngest daughter and Benjamin, only son, are still unmarried and live in Kentucky with their father.”

“William Murphy married Betsie Goins, and seven children were born to them,” according to “Old Time Tazewell.”
==O==
Sarah Goin, daughter of Thomas Goin, was born about 1782 in North Carolina. She was married about 1800, husband’s name Bullard.

Uriah Goin, son of Thomas Goin, was born about 1785, proba-bly in Washington County. He was brought to Claiborne County by his father. He was married about 1808, wife’s name unknown.

He appeared as the head of a household in the 1830 census of the county:

“Goin, Uriah white male 40-50
white female 40-50
white female 15-20
white female 10-15
white male 5-10″
white female 5-10”

His family reappeared in the 1840 census of Claiborne County:

“Goin, Uriah white male 50-60
white female 50-60
white female 15-20
white female 5-10”

The household of Uriah Goin was flanked by those of his sons, Levi Goin and Nelson Goin, in the 1840 census. “Uriah Gowins” was remarried September 27, 1846 to “Nancy Gowins,” according to “Claiborne County, Tennessee Mar-riages, 1821-1850.” She was Nancy Goin, widow of his nephew, Uriah Goin, Jr, son of his brother, Levi Goin and Eliz-abeth Stallions Goin. Levi Goin, Justice of the Peace, performed the ceremony, according to Claiborne County records.

His household was recorded in the 1850 census of Claiborne County:

“Goin, Uriah 65, born in Tennessee, farmer
Nancy 46, born in Virginia
Preston 21, born in Tennessee
Elminy 19, born in Tennessee
Elija 15, born in Tennessee
Lucinda 14, born in Tennessee
George W. 11, born in Tennessee
John W. 2, born in Tennessee”

The children listed above in the household are the children of Nancy Goin Goin and her husband Uriah Goin, Jr.

Uriah Goin was recorded as the head of Household 1525 in the 1860 census of Claiborne County:

“Goin, Uriah 74, farmer, born in Tennessee
Nancy 56, born in West Virginia”

Uriah Goin died about 1863, according to Anna Lee Goin.

Children born to Uriah Goin and his first wifeinclude:

Martha Goin born about 1808
Levi Goin born in 1810
Sarah Alice Goin born October 11, 1812
Nancy Goin born about 1814
Elizabeth “Betsy” Goin born about 1815
Rachel Goin born September 29, 1816
Nelson Goin born January 18, 1818
Mahaly Goin born in 1824

Children born to Uriah Goin and Nancy Goin Goin include:

John W. Goin born about 1848

Martha Goin, daughter of Uriah Goin and his first wife, was born about 1808. She was married about 1824 to James Wright Holton, according to a letter written May 14, 1999 by Clyde Leon Meyers of Arroyo Grande, California.

James Wright Holton had removed to Pulaski County, Kentucky by 1858, according to a letter written by Eli Goin May 28, 1855.

“Martha Gowen Holton, of Pulaski County, daughter of Uriah and Nancy Gowen died July 19, 1856 at age 45 of consumption,”, according to “Pulaski County Vital Statistics, Death Record, 1856.” Clyde Leon Meyers turned up this bit of research in the Kentucky State Archives.

Children born to James Wright Holton and Martha Goin Holton are unknown.

Levi Goin, son of Uriah Goin and his first wife, was born in 1810, according to the research of Ann Lee Goin of Jefferson, Oregon. He was married to Elizabeth Prichard in 1829. He died in 1865 and was buried in Pleasant Point Cemetery in Claiborne County. After his death, his widow and two of his sons, Caleb Goin and Nelson Goin, with their families, removed to Mercer County, Missouri in covered wagons in 1867. In the following year they moved again to Forrest City, Missouri where Elizabeth Prichard Goin died and was buried.

Children born to Levi Goin and Elizabeth Prichard Goin in-clude:

Elmina Goin born about 1830
David Goin born April 19, 1832
Nancy Goin born about 1834
Caleb Goin born June 7, 1836
Joshua Goin born April 23, 1839
John Goin born June 27, 1842
Permelia Goin born October 17, 1843
Le Roy Goin born about 1845
James Goin born in June 1849
Nelson Watson Goin born May 1, 1853

Elmina Goin, daughter of Levi Goin and Elizabeth Prichard Goin, was born about 1820. She was married January 31, 1846 to Matthew Keck, eighth child of John Keck and Anna Ousley Keck.

They were enumerated in the 1860 census of Claiborne County as Household 1554:

“Keck, Mathew 32, born in TN, farmer, $1,500
real estate
Almina 30, born in TN
John 13, born in TN
William P. 10, born in TN
James L. 7, born in TN
Elizabeth 5, born in TN
Newton 1/12, born in TN”

Matthew Keck and Elmina Goin Keck were buried in Pleasant Point Cemetery in Claiborne County.

Children born to them include:

John David Keck born March 14, 1847
William P. Keck born about 1850
James L. Keck born about 1853
Elizabeth Keck born about 1849
Joshua Keck born about 1855
Newton Keck born in 1860
Litha Keck born about 1864

David Goin, son of Levi Goin and Elizabeth Pritchard Goin, was born April 19, 1832 in Claiborne County. He was married about 1853 to Sarah Rosson. He became the postmaster of Fincastle, Tennessee and was employed as a teacher there. He enlisted in the Union troops during the Civil War and fought for the North in the Battle of Gettysburg. Because of his Spencerian penmanship the U. S. Army assigned him to write discharge papers at the end of the war. Later he taught music and was the postmaster at Jacksborough, Tennessee.

He removed along with other members of his family to Mercer County, Missouri in 1869. There he built the second house, a log cabin, at Goshen, Missouri.

He was enumerated as the head of a household July 25, 1870 at Princeton, Missouri in Mercer County:

“Goin, David 39, born in TN, blacksmith, $50 real
estate, $500 personal property
Sarah 30, born in TN
William 17, born in TN, blacksmith
Rachel 15, born in TN,
Martha 12, born in TN
Nancy A. 10, born in TN
Joseph 6, born in TN
Thomas 3, born in TN
Lula E. 1, born in TN”

From 1871 to 1885 operated a blacksmith shop, a general store, and became postmaster at Goshen. David Goin and Sarah Rosson Goin were buried in the First Church Cemetery at Goshen.

Children born to David Goin and Sarah Rosson Goin include:

Eliza A. Goin born in 1852
William J. Goin [twin] born about 1853
Levi Goin [twin] born about 1853
Rachel Goin born about 1855
Martha Goin born about 1858
Nancy A. Goin born about 1860
Mary L. Goin born in 1862
Joseph Goin born in 1864
Thomas Goin born in 1867
Lula E. Goin born in 1869
Cary J. Goin born in 1871
Reamy Goin born in 1873
Jonnie Goin born in 1875
Maggie Goin born in 1877
Charles Russell Goin born October 3, 1879

A relative reared by David Goin and Sarah Rosson Goin is:

Todd O. Goin born July 20, 1884

Eliza A. Goin, daughter of David Going and Sarah Rosson Goin, was born in 1852. She died in infancy.

Levi Goin, twin son of David Going and Sarah Rosson Goin, was born about 1853 and died at birth.

Mary L. Goin, daughter of David Going and Sarah Rosson Goin, was born in 1862 and died in infancy.

Jonnie Goin, son of David Goin and Sarah Rosson Goin, was born in 1875. He died in infancy.

Nancy Goin, daughter of Levi Goin and Elizabeth Pritchard Goin, was born about 1834 in Claiborne County, Tennessee.

Caleb Goin, son of Levi Goin and Elizabeth Pritchard Goin, was born June 7, 1836 in Claiborne County.

Joshua Goin, son of Levi Goin and Elizabeth Pritchard Goin, was born April 23, 1839.

John Goin, son of Levi Goin and Elizabeth Pritchard Goin, was born June 27, 1842, according to the research of Leon Myers. He was married to Charlotte Jane Keck June 30, 1863, according to Claiborne County marriage records. Children born to John Goin and Charlotte Jane Keck Goins are unknown. She was remarried to Jeremiah M. Williams May 21, 1871, according to Claiborne County marriage records.

Permelia Goin, daughter of Levi Goin and Elizabeth Pritchard Goin, was born October 17, 1843.

Le Roy Goin, son of Levi Goin and Elizabeth Pritchard Goin, was born about 1845 in Claiborne County.

James Goin, son of Levi Goin and Elizabeth Pritchard Goin, was born in June 1849.

Nelson Watson Goin, son of Levi Goin and Elizabeth Pritchard Goin, was born May 21, 1853 in Claiborne County. He was married in Mercer County, Missouri about 1878 to Catherine Brummett who was born there in November 1859. She was the daughter of Caswell Brummett and Charlotte Harless Brummett of Princeton, Missouri, according to the research of F. M. Brummett of Long Beach, California. In 1879 they lived at Concordia, Kansas. In 1882 they had returned to Princeton. In 1886 and in 1888, they lived in Cloud County, Kansas. In 1891 he farmed in Sumner County, Kansas. By 1894 they had removed to Kay County, Oklahoma and lived at Nardin. Nelson Watson Goin died in 1930.

Children born to Nelson Watson Goin and Catherine Brummett Goin include:

Emery Coleman Goin born March 2, 1879
Earnest Goin born September 4, 1882
Elmer Francis Goin born January 23, 1886
Louise Talmadge Goin born October 8, 1888
Ruby A. Goin born June 19, 1891
Ethel Luhaney Goin born January 5, 1894
Lora Goin born May 7, 1896
Daisy Goin born September 16, 1897
Virgie Ola Goin born July 28, 1901
Odie Edgar Goin born March 8, 1904

Emery Coleman Goin, son of Nelson Watson Goin and Catherine Brummett Goin, was born March 2, 1879 at Con-cordia, Kansas. He was married April 29, 1908 to Jessie L. Sutton. He died November 16, 1945. Children born to Emery Coleman Goin and Jessie L. Sutton Goin are unknown.

Earnest Goin, son of Nelson Watson Goin and Catherine Brummett Goin, was born September 4, 1882 at Princeton, Missouri. He was married December 23, 1903 to Gertrude Elizabeth Moisington. He died October 4, 1958. Of Earnest Goin and Gertrude Elizabeth Moisington Goins nothing more is known.

Elmer Francis Goin, son of Nelson Watson Goin and Catherine Brummett Goin, was born in Cloud County, Kansas January 23, 1886. He was married April 5, 1937 to Eva Ganer. He died December 18, 1953. It is believed that no children were born to Elmer Francis Goin and Eva Gainer Goin.

Louise Talmadge Goin, daughter of Nelson Watson Goin and Catherine Brummett Goin, was born October 8, 1888 at Con-cordia. She died March 15, 1931

Ruby A. Goin, daughter of Nelson Watson Goin and Catherine Brummett Goin, was born June 19, 1891 in Cloud County. She was married September 1, 1913 to Enos Ray Fauchier.

Ethel Luhaney Goin, daughter of Nelson Watson Goin and Catherine Brummett Goin, was born January 5, 1894 at Nardin, Oklahoma. She was married to Rest Vasso Quillen March 15, 1915.

Lora Goin, daughter of Nelson Watson Goin and Catherine Brummett Goin, was born May 7, 1896 in Kay County. She died there July 28 of that year.

Daisy Goin, daughter of Nelson Watson Goin and Catherine Brummett Goin, was born September 16, 1897 at Nardin. She was married June 4, 1917 to Bearl Wesley Coffelt.Virgie Ola Goin, daughter of Nelson Watson Goin and Cather-ine Brummett Goin, was born July 28, 1901 in Kay County. She was married October 18, 1926 to Glenn Coffelt.

Odie Edgar Goin, son of Nelson Watson Goin and Catherine Brummett Goin, was born March 8, 1904 at Nardin. He was married June 19, 1929 to Freda Smith. Children born to Odie Edgar Goin and Freda Smith Goin are unknown.

Sarah Alice Goin, daughter of Uriah Goin and his first wife, was born October 11, 1812 in Claiborne County, according to Anna Lee Goin. She was married in 1831 to William R. Dykes who was born in Virginia September 8, 1812, according to a letter written December 31, 1995 by Jerry Wayne Jones, of Earlham, Iowa. William R. Dykes was a son of William Dykes who was born in Virginia in 1781 and Elizabeth Brasher Dykes who was born in Tennessee in 1806. William Dykes was a son of John Dykes and Jeanette Gableline, according to Jerry Wayne Jones.

In 1855, William R. Dykes lived “on the old Capps place,” ac-cording to a letter written May 27, 1855 by Eli Goin to his much older brother, Isaac Goin, Jr. Isaac Goin, Jr. had removed before 1850 to Hamilton County, Illinois and located on Middle Creek.

Sarah Alice Goin Dykes appeared as a witness in the suit of Elijah Goin vs Sterling Mayes. The case was first tried in Claiborne County Circuit Court in 1853, but was not settled until 1858.

William R. Dykes removed to Mercer County, Missouri in 1860. He died at Princeton, Missouri in Mercer County and was buried in Tennessee Cemetery. She died 25 years later, on December 25, 1898, and was buried beside her husband.

Children born to William R. Dykes and Sarah Alice Goin Dykes include:

Martha J. Dykes born in 1832
William Riley Dykes born in 1833
James Canady Dykes born October 1834
Fiddiller Dykes born February 2, 1837
Christopher Palestine Dykes born in 1839
Jesse Voy Dykes born September 22, 1842
Luretta Dykes born in 1844
Norrell Doctor Dykes born October 9, 1848
Kirkpatrick Dykes born in April 1850
Samantha Sarah Dykes born in 1853
Lamanda Caroline Dykes born in 1855

Martha J. Dykes, daughter of William R. Dykes and Sarah Alice Goin Dykes, was born in Claiborne County in 1832. She was married there to Franklin Brogans March 4, 1857.

William Riley Dykes, son of William R. Dykes and Sarah Alice Goin Dykes, was born in Claiborne County in 1833, according to the research of Marjorie Bainter Howell of Springfield, Oregon, Don B. Dykes of Whittier, California and F. M. Brummett of Long Beach, California.

He was married October 5, 1851 in Claiborne County to Pheba Jane Rouse. After three children, they were divorced June 2, 1860. He was remarried to Nancy Emmeline Harrison, daugh-ter of John Harrison and Elizabeth Harrison, shortly afterward and removed to Mercer County, Missouri. They were divorced in 1885, and he was married a third time to Adeline “Polly” Worley April 28, 1888. Nancy Emmeline Harrison Dykes died August 4, 1899 in Concordia, Kansas. He died November 15, 1908 in St. Joseph, Missouri and was buried in Upper Tennessee Cemetery in Mercer County.

No children were born to Adeline “Polly” Worley Dykes. Children born to William Riley Dykes and Phoebe Jane Rouse Dykes include:

Pennile N. Elizabeth Dykes born in 1852
James David Dykes born in 1854
Palestine Dykes born in 1857

Children born to William Riley Dykes and Nancy Emmeline Harrison Dykes include:

John Wesley Dykes born August 11, 1861
Sarah Alice Dykes born April 19, 1863
Mary Frances Dykes born March 21, 1867
Enos Patten Dykes born May 9, 1868
Lewis Napoleon Bonaparte Dapner born January 10, 1872
William A. Dykes born February 1, 1874

John Wesley Dykes, son of William Riley Dykes and Nancy Emmeline Harrison Dykes, was born August 11, 1861 in Mer-cer County. He was married about 1892 to Emma Ferris. He died in Stillwater, Oklahoma December 14, 1951.

Children born to John Wesley Dykes and Emma Ferris Dykes include:

Hetty M. Dykes born in 1894
Wesley E. Dykes born in 1898
Ollie Arvel Dykes born in 1900
John Albert Dykes born in 1902
Sam Harold Dykes born in 1906
Don Burnett Dykes born in 1909

Sarah Slice Dykes, daughter of William Riley Dykes and Nancy
Emmeline Harrison Dykes, was born April 19, 1863. She was married to John Albert Cox who was born in 1856 in Missouri. Later she was remarried to his brother, Sigel Cox who was born there in 1863. They were sons of John Melton Cox who was born in Ohio in 1832 and Nancy Jane Parker Cox who was
born in Tennessee in 1828.

Mary Frances Dykes, daughter of William Riley Dykes and Nancy Emmeline Harrison Dykes, was born March 21, 1867 in Mercer County. She was married November 14, 1882 to Charles Franklin Brown. She died May 5, 1949 in Garfield County, Colorado.

Enos Patten Dykes, son of William Riley Dykes and Nancy Emmeline Harrison Dykes, was born May 9, 1868 in Mercer County. He was married there March 3, 1900 to Lydia Eliza-beth Opdyke. He died there August 19, 1926 and was buried in Pleasant Ridge Cemetery.Lewis Napoleon Bonaparte Dapner Dykes, son of William Riley Dykes and Nancy Emmeline Harrison Dykes, was born January 10, 1872 in Mercer County. He was married January 3, 1900 to Margaret J. Blowfield. He died April 9, 1936.

William A. Dykes, son of William Riley Dykes and Nancy Emmeline Harrison Dykes, was born February 1, 1874 in Mer-cer County. He died April 14, 1940 in Garfield County, Col-orado.

James Canady Dykes, son of William Dykes and Sarah Alice Goin Dykes, was born in October 1834 in Claiborne County. He was married there to Mrs. Orlean Brogan Keck, widow of Matthew Keck in 1857. They removed to Mercer County where he died February 10, 1908. He was buried there in Ten-nessee Cemetery.

Fiddiller Dykes, son of William Dykes and Sarah Alice Goin Dykes, was born February 5, 1837 in Claiborne County, ac-cording to Frances Moore Brummett of Long Beach, California. He was married there October 11, 1855 to Elizabeth Ann Harri-son, sister to Nancy Emmeline Harrison who was married to William Riley Dykes. Elizabeth Ann Harrison was born February 18, 1836. They lived in Nashville, Tennessee prior to the Civil War. Fiddiller Dykes served in the Civil War in Company M, 12th Missouri Cavalry Regiment. Later he went blind. He died in Cloud County, Kansas July 13, 1886 and was buried in Pleasant Grove Cemetery..

Children born to Fiddeller Dykes and Elizabeth Ann Harrison Dykes include:

Martha Adeline Dykes born May 10, 1857
Sarah S. Dykes born April 11, 1859
Eliza Clementine “Lydia” Dykes born March 14, 1861
Wesley Van Buren Dykes born July 16, 1863
Sherman Doctor Dykes born March 20, 1865
Amanda N. Dykes born April 5, 1867
Salena M. Dykes born May 1, 1868
George Dykes born Sept. 12, 1871
Mary E. Dykes born October 22, 1873
Theodore Dykes born Dec. 23, 1878

Martha Adeline Dykes, daughter of Fiddeller Dykes and Eliza-beth Ann Harrison Dykes, was born May 10, 1857 in Nashville, Tennessee. She was married at Princeton, Missouri to Francis Marion Brummett. She died July 12, 1940 at Concordia, Kansas.

Sarah S. Dykes, daughter of Fiddeller Dykes and Elizabeth Ann Harrison Dykes, was born April 11, 1859 in Nashville. She was married to Lafayette Brummett at Princeton November 15, 1879. He was born in 1847 and died in 1913. She died November 15, 1879 at Concordia.

Eliza Clementine “Lydia” Dykes, daughter of Fiddeller Dykes and Elizabeth Ann Harrison Dykes, was born March 14, 1861 at Princeton. She was married November 15, 1879 to James Calaway Alderson, son of Calaway H. Alderson and Louisa Brummett Alderson. She died March 28, 1936 in Jewel County, Kansas.

Wesley Van Buren Dykes, son of Fiddeller Dykes and Eliza-beth Ann Harrison Dykes, was born July 16, 1863 atPrinceton. He was married September 28, 1884 to Sadie Hickman. He died December 14, 1959.

Sherman Doctor Dykes, son of Fiddeller Dykes and Elizabeth Ann Harrison Dykes, was born March 20, 1865 at Princeton. He died after 1935.

Amanda N. Dykes, daughter of Fiddeller Dykes and Elizabeth Ann Harrison Dykes, was born April 5, 1867. She was married March 2, 1889 to James Goins, unidentified. Children born to James Goins and Amanda N. Dykes Goins are unknown.

Salena M. Dykes, daughter of Fiddeller Dykes and Elizabeth Ann Harrison Dykes, was born was born May 1, 1868. She was married March 20, 1883 to Thomas Greenwood.

George Dykes, son of Fiddeller Dykes and Elizabeth Ann Har-rison Dykes, was born was born September 12, 1871 in Cloud County, Kansas. He did nine months later, May 12, 1872.

Mary Dykes, daughter of Fiddeller Dykes and Elizabeth Ann Harrison Dykes, was born October 22, 1873 in Kansas. She was married about 1891 to Blaton Hutchison.

Theodore Dykes, son of Fiddeller Dykes and Elizabeth Ann Harrison Dykes, was born December 23, 1878 in Kansas. Of this individual nothing more is known.

Christopher Palestine Dykes, son of William Dykes and Sarah Alice Goin Dykes, was born in 1839 in Claiborne County. He was married about 1866, wife’s name Alice.

Jesse Voy Dykes, son of William Dykes and Sarah Alice Goin Dykes, was born September 22, 1842 in Claiborne County. He was married September 18, 1864 to Almira E. Wiggins who was born in 1846 to Elijah G. Wiggins and Rhoda Collins Wiggins. Jesse Voy Dykes was enumerated as the head of a household in the 1880 census of Mercer County. He died May 22, 1912 and was buried in Pleasant Hill Cemetery, according to Norma Thackery, family researcher of Princeton, Missouri.

Children born to Jesse Voy Dykes and Almira E. Wiggins Dykes include:

Green Dykes born January 14, 1867
Leona Dykes born in 1869
Lucetta Sophrona Dykes born in 1871
Eldora Elizabeth Dykes born April 27, 1874
Francis V. Dykes born August 14, 1879
Victoria E. Dykes born June 1, 1881

Green Dykes, son of Jesse Voy Dykes and Almira E. Wiggins Dykes, was born January 14, 1867 at Princeton, Missouri. He was married about 1890 to Flora Ragan. He died May 23, 1928.

Children born to Green Dykes and Flora Ragan Dykes include:

Voy Dykes born about 1892
Victor Dykes born about 1894
Audrey Dykes born about 1897
Chloe Dykes born about 1900

Leona Dykes, daughter of Jesse Voy Dykes and Almira E. Wiggins Dykes, was born in 1869 in Mercer County. She died in 1892.

Lucetta Sophrona Dykes, daughter of Jesse Voy Dykes and Almira E. Wiggins Dykes, was born in 1871 in Mercer County. She was married about 1890 to Virge Moore. She died in 1920.

Eldora Elizabeth Dykes, daughter of Jesse Voy Dykes and Almira E. Wiggins Dykes, was born April 27, 1874 in Mercer County. She was married there March 7, 1891 to Joseph Barnes Ogle who was born in 1867 to Joseph B. Ogle and El-dora E. Ogle. Eldora Elizabeth Dykes Ogle died May 1, 1944 and was buried in St. Paul Cemetery.

Francis V. Dykes, son of Jesse Voy Dykes and Almira E. Wiggins Dykes, was born August 14, 1879 in Mercer County. He died there January 16, 1883.

Victoria E. Dykes, son of Jesse Voy Dykes and Almira E. Wiggins Dykes, was born June 1, 1881 in Mercer County. She was married December 31, 1899 to Frank E. Willis who was born October 8, 1876 in Harrison County, Missouri. He died there March 26, 1960. She died May 11, 1977 in Decatur County, Iowa.

Children born to them include:

Lenid Moyle Willis born March 11, 1901
Kenneth R. Willis born January 25, 1903
Herman F. Willis born April 25, 1905
Thelma Justine Willis born June 26, 1908
Shelby W. Willis born September 17, 1911

Lenid Moyle Willis, daughter of Frank E. Willis and Victoria E. Dykes Willis, was born March 11, 1901 in Wayne County, Iowa. She was married there November 9, 1919 to George Fletcher McCarty who was born there March 11, 1899. She died February 4, 1989 in Decatur County, Iowa. He July 8, 1989 in Des Moines.

Children born to them include:

Cloyd Moyle McCarty born September 7, 1921

Cloyd Moyle McCarty, son of George Fletcher McCarty and Lenid Moyle Willis McCarty, was born September 7, 1921 in Wayne County, Iowa. He was married February 15, 1948 in Allerton, Iowa to Nellie Mae Gibson who wa born February 16, 1921 in Mercer County, Missouri.

Children born to them include:

Patricia Jo McCarty born October 30, 1950
Diane Gaye McCarty born December 30, 1954
Barbara Vale McCarty born June 29, 1956

Patricia Jo McCarty, daughter of Cloyd Moyle McCarty and Nellie Mae Gibson McCarty, was born October 30, 1950 in Appanoose County, Iowa. She was married November 10, 1968 in Wayne County, Iowa to Jerry Wayne Jones who was born December 12, 1948 in Princeton, Missouri. In 1996 they, members of Gowen Research Foundation, lived at Earlham, Iowa.

Children born to them include:

Dacni Charlene Jones born November 15, 1972
Denika Mae Jones born June 23, 1976

Diane Gaye McCarty, daughter of Cloyd Moyle McCarty and Nellie Mae Gibson McCarty, was born December 30, 1954 in Appanoose County. She was married July 30, 1972 in Lineville, Iowa to Edwin Leonard Cline who was born there February 5, 1952. She was remarried August 29, 1987 in Indi-anola, Iowa to Richard Allen Adair who was born in Decatur County April 5, 1953.

Children born to Edward Leonard Cline and Diane Gaye Mc-Carty Cline include:

Delana Gail Cline born December 4, 1972
Natalie Jo Cline born October 6, 1978
Sammi Vale Cline born September 21, 1982

Barbara Vale McCarty, daughter of Cloyd Moyle McCarty and Nellie Mae Gibson McCarty, was born June 29, 1956 in Ap-panoose County. She was married October 23, 1977 in Wayne County to Terry Lynn McMurry who was born November 1, 1952 in Lucas County, Iowa.

Childlren born to them include:

Laci Gaye McMurry born October 15, 1979
Gibson Lee McMurry born March 19, 1983
Lincoln Chase McMurry born April 13, 1995

Thelma Justine Willis, daughter of Frank E. Willis and Victoria
E. Dykes Willis, was born June 26, 1908 in Harrison County, Missouri. She was married about 1940 to Fred Gannon. He died March 17, 1972 in Florida.

Children born to them include:

Vicki Jane Gannon born September 16, 1942

Shelby W. Willis, son of Frank E. Willis and Victoria E. Dykes Willis, was born September 17, 1911. He was married in 1938 to Greta Hawkins. He died October 30, 1963.

Children born to them include:

Francis Willis born in 1942

Francis Willis, son of Shelby W. Willis and Greta Hawkins Willis, was born in 1942. He was married December 21, 1963 to Elaine Seymour.

Children born to them include:

Craig Wayne Willis born about 1965

Luretta Dykes, daughter of William Dykes and Sarah Alice Goin Dykes, was born in 1844 in Claiborne County. She was married about 1866 to Isaac Walls.

Norrell Doctor Dykes, son of William Dykes and Sarah Alice Goin Dykes, was born October 9, 1848 in Claiborne County. He died November 26, 1869 in Mercer County and was buried in Tennessee Cemetery.

Kirkpatrick Dykes, son of William Dykes and Sarah Alice Goin Dykes, was born in April 1850 in Claiborne County. He was married about 1874 to Margaret Ellen Brummett.

Samantha Sarah Dykes, daughter of William Dykes and Sarah Alice Goin Dykes, was born in 1853 in Claiborne County. She was married to William Cottrell. She smoked a pipe.

Lamanda Caroline Dykes, daughter of William Dykes and Sarah Alice Goin Dykes, was born in 1855 in Claiborne County. She was married about 1873 to J. R. Hunt and lived in Mercer County, Missouri.

Nancy Goin, daughter of Uriah Goin and his first wife, was born about 1814 in Claiborne County. Of this individual nothing more is known.

Rachel Goin, believed to be a daughter of Uriah Goin, was born September 29, 1816. She was married about 1836 to Phillip Keck, second child of John Keck and Anna Ousley Keck.

Children born to them include:

Henry Keck born in March 1838
Eli Keck born in 1840
Elizabeth Keck born in 1842
Mary Keck born about 1844
Sterling Keck born about 1845
John Keck born about 1847
William Keck born about 1849
Anna Keck born in 1851
Elijah Keck born in 1853
Phillip Keck born in 1854

Nelson Goin, son of Uriah Goin, was born November 18, 1818 in Claiborne County. He obtained a license October 8, 1839 to marry Mary Ann “Polly” Pritchard who was born about 1818, according to Harold Martin Wasson, a great-great-grandson of Severna Park, Maryland. She is regarded as a daughter of Jesse Pritchard of Virginia and a sister of Elizabeth Pritchard who was married in 1829 to Levi Goin, his brother. “Nelson Gowin” was married October 10, 1839 to Polly Pritchard, according to “Claiborne County, Tennessee Marriages, 1821-1850.”

Nelson Goin was enumerated as the head of Household 836-595 in the 1850 census of Claiborne County:

“Goin, Nelson 30, born in Tennessee
Mary 33, born in Tennessee
Malinda 10
Mahala 8
James S. 5
Rachael A. 7/12”

They accompanied the Dykes family in moving to Mercer County, Missouri in 1860. Nelson Goin died September 28, 1888 in Fall River, Kansas in Greenwood County, according to a petition for the administration of his estate which was esti-mated at $400. Mary Ann “Polly” Pritchard Goin died in Dover, Oklahoma Territory in Kingfisher County July 4, 1894.

Children born to Nelson Goin and Mary Ann “Polly” Pritchard Goin include:

Malinda Goin born July 18, 1840
Mahala Goin born about 1842
James Sylvester Goin born about 1848
Rachel A. Goin born about 1849
Levi Goin born March 30, 1856

Malinda Goin, daughter of Nelson Goin and Mary Ann “Polly” Pritchard Goin, was born July 18, 1840 in Claiborne County. She was married November 3, 1855 to William Jackson Raney, according to Dianne Lee Stark Thurman of Wichita, Kansas. In 1869 they were living in Mercer County, Missouri.

Children born to William Jackson Raney and Malinda Goin Raney include:

Sarah Elizabeth Raney born June 30, 1869

Sarah Elizabeth Raney, daughter of William Jackson Raney and Malinda Goin Raney, was born June 30, 1869 in Mercer County. She was married June 19, 1885 to Josiah H. Stark, son of Josiah McGuire Stark and Nancy Deen Stark. They lived in Fall River, Kansas in the following year. Josiah H. Stark died March 23, 1919 in Bellefonte, Arkansas, and Sarah Elizabeth Raney Stark died July 21, 1919 in Wichita.

Children born to them include:

Harvey Allen Stark born April 3, 1886
Walter Oliver Stark born July 9, 1892

Harvey Allen Stark, son of Josiah Stark and Sarah Elizabeth Raney Stark, was born April 3, 1886 in Fall River. He was married June 21, 1911 to Lottie Johnson who was born August 27, 1888 in Osage County to Hiram Jackson Johnson and Nancy J. Sinsabaugh Johnson. In 1915 they lived in Green-wood County, Kansas. Harvey Allen Stark died March 10, 1960 in Severy, Kansas, and she died January 24, 1963 in Os-sowatimie, Kansas.

Children born to them include:

Roy Allen Stark born October 25, 1915

Roy Allen Stark, son of Harvey Allen Stark and Lottie Johnson Stark, was born October 25, 1915 in Greenwood County. He was married November 19, 1936 to Eva Marguerite Leckliter, daughter of Christian Baker Leckliter and Hazel Beatrice Nichols Leckliter. She was born May 11, 1918 at Great Bend, Kansas.

Children born to them include:

Dianne Lee Stark born November 14, 1937

Dianne Lee Stark, daughter of Roy Allen Stark and Eva Mar-guerite Leckliter Stark, was born November 14, 1937 in Inde-pendence, Kansas. She was married August 8, 1958 to James Robert Thurman, a Gowin descendant. In 1991, they lived in Wichita where they were active in the research of the Goin and Gowin branches of the family.

Walter Oliver Stark, son of Josiah H. Stark and Sarah Elizabeth Raney Stark, was born July 9, 1892. He was married December 22, 1917 to Virginia May Nicholson who was born October 3, 1896.

Children born to them include:

William Joseph Stark born May 26, 1922

William Joseph Stark, son of Walter Oliver Stark and Virginia May Nicholson Stark, was born May 26, 1922. He was married February 2, 1951 to Eula Jean Earnhardt who was born January 25, 1923. In 1995 they lived in Houston where they were active in the Foundation and in the research of the Goin family.

Mahala Goin, daughter of Nelson Goin and Mary Ann “Polly” Pritchard, was born about 1842. She was married about 1860 to Jackson T. Day who was born in 1835 to Colbert Day. He died during the Civil War, according to Warren Tyndale Faulkner, a grandson. Mahala Goin Day was remarried about 1866 to Wiley Cox.

Children born to Jackson Day and Mahala Goin Day include:

Mary Jane “Polly” Day born about 1859
George Washington Day born bout 1861
William Jackson Day born October 30, 1862

The five children born to Wiley Cox and Mahala Goin Day Cox include:

Effie Louvenia Cox born about 1876

James Sylvester Goin, son of Nelson Goin and Mary Ann “Polly” Pritchard Goin, was born about 1848 in Claiborne County, according to Harold Martin Wasson. He was married about 1867 to Mary Elizabeth Stroud who was born January 18, 1847 in Iowa, according to the death certificate of their son George Milton Goin. She was a daughter of John Haun Stroud and Lavisa Leak Stroud. He was born May 17, 1817 and died January 24, 1880. Lavisa Leak Stroud was born December 5, 1819 and died November 14, 1878.

James Sylvester Goin pre-empted 80 acres at Independence, Kansas in 1883. On October 15, 1889, James Sylvester Goin applied for a homestead at “Kingfisher Stage Station, Indian Territory for 160 acres. He stated in his homestead claim that he established actual residence there April 3, 1890 when he built “a box house, 14’x14′, shingle roof, two doors and two windows,” and that he was a widower at that time. He received his patent January 7, 1898.

Mary Elizabeth Stroud Goin died May 12, 1896 in Kingfisher County, Oklahoma Territory and James Sylvester Goin died March 20, 1899 at Dover, Oklahoma Territory. Both were buried in Banner Cemetery in Kingfisher County. Charles Green, his son-in-law, applied for administration of the estate, according to Kingfisher County Probate Book 1, page 96.

Known children at the time of the death of James Sylvester Goin and Mary Elizabeth Stroud Goin include:

George Milton Goin born August 13, 1868
Lavisa Jane “Jennie” Goin born about 1870
Mary Alice Goin born October 4, 1872
Henry O. Goin born about 1876
Gertrude Goin born about 1878
James Albert Goin born about 1879
Anna Goin born about 1880

George Milton Goin, son of James Sylvester Goin and Mary Elizabeth Stroud Goin, was born August 13, 1868 in Greene County, Missouri, according to his death certificate. He was married March 20, 1887 to Frances A. Kolb who was born April 3, 1872 in Greenwood, Kansas, according to the family bible. He died in Greene County, Missouri August 16, 1925 at age 56 of traumatic peritonitis as the result of a fall from a house on which he was working as a carpenter. She died January 17, 1956 in Decatur, Illinois.

Children born to George Milton Goin and Frances A. Kolb Goin include:

Rosetta Lavieci “Zettie” Goin born March 24, 1888
Sarah Elizabeth “Bessie” Goin born March 26, 1890
Florence Alta Goin born April 12, 1892
William Ralph Goin born February 27, 1895
Carrie LoMattie Goin born November 8, 1897
Roy Frederick Goin born October 17, 1900
Beulah Pearl Goin born May 17, 1903
Ethel Lena Goin born January 21, 1907
Orville Earl Goin born March 10, 1909
Gladys Goin born October 17, 1911

Rosetta Lavieci Goin, daughter of George Milton Goin and Frances A. Kolb Goin, was born March 24, 1888. She was mar-ried about 1905 to William Cole who was born April 14, 1875. She died June 8, 1973.

Sarah Elizabeth “Bessie” Goin, daughter of George Milton Goin and Frances A. Kolb Goin, was born March 26, 1890. She was married April 28, 1907 to George Ellis Walker. He was born July 16, 1881 and died February 25, 1956.

Florence Alta Goin, daughter of George Milton Goin and Frances A. Kolb Goin, was born April 12, 1892. She died Fre-brury 25, 1920.

William Ralph Goin, son of George Milton Goin and Frances A. Kolb Goin, was born February 27, 1895. He was married about 1918, wife’s name Augusta “Gussie.” He die January 24, 1977. Children born to William Ralph Goin and Augusta “Gussie” Goin are unknown.

Carrie LoMattie Goin, daughter of George Milton Goin and Frances A. Kolb Goin, was born in Greene County November 8, 1897, according to the family bible. She was married there December 25, 1916 to John Franklin Wasson who was born June 23, 1889 in Page County, Iowa. He was a son of John Charles Freemont Wasson and Florence Arvilla Brooks Was-son. In 1925 they lived in Indiana. She died in Macon County January 9, 1975, and he died there May 4, 1978. Both were buried in Greenlawn Cemetery at Springfield, Missouri.

Children born to them include:

[son] born September 26, 1917
[daughter] born December 21, 1919
[son] born June 1, 1923
Harold Martin Wasson born March 29, 1925
[son] born November 22, 1926
[daughter] born January 5, 1932
[daughter] born May 24, 1934

Harold Martin Wasson, son of John Franklin Wasson and Car-rie LoMattie Goin Wasson, was born March 29, 1925 in Ham-mond, Indiana. He was married August 29, 1947 in Macon County, Illinois to Elizabeth Eileen Randsall. She was born November 20, 1921 in Christian County, Illinois to Irl Randall and Audrey Colclasure Randall. In 1950 they moved to Cam-den, New Jersey from Illinois and in 1951 located at Wood-bury, New Jersey. In 1959 they moved to Severna Park, Mary-land where they remained in 1995. They have been in the pur-suit of family history and are Foundation members.

Children born to them include:

Harold Randall Wasson born November 3, 1950
Caryl Lynne Wasson born April 15, 1954

Harold Randall Wasson, son of Harold Martin Wasson and Elizabeth Eileen Randall Wasson, was born November 3, 1950 at Camden, New Jersey. In 1995 he remained unmarried.

Caryl Lynne Wasson, daughter of Harold Martin Wasson and Elizabeth Eileen Randall Wasson, was born April 15, 1954. She was married July 30, 1977 at Annapolis, Maryland to Leon Marcus Wilson who was born February 24, 1951 at Elkton, Kentucky. Following a divorce, she was remarried to Rodney Liptak at Norfolk, Virginia September 29, 1989.

Roy Frederick Goin, son of George Milton Goin and Frances A. Kolb Goin, was born October 17, 1900. He was married about 1923 to Ethel Smith Garrison. He died November 29, 1954. Children born to Roy Frederick Goin and Ethel Smith Garrison Goin are unknown.

Beulah Pearl Goin, daughter of George Milton Goin and Frances A. Kolb Goin, was born May 17, 1903. She was mar-ried October 20, 1923 to Timothy Burgess. He died August 12, 1993.

Ethel Lena Goin, daughter of George Milton Goin and Frances A. Kolb Goin, was born January 21, 1907. She was married June 8, 1924 to Troy Best who was born in 1903. She died October 14, 1992 and was buried in Greenlawn Cemetery in Springfield.

Orville Earl Goin, son daughter of George Milton Goin and Frances A. Kolb Goin, was born March 10, 1909. He was married about 1932 to Elsie Friend. Children born to Orville Earl Goin and Elsie Friend Goin are unknown.

Gladys Goin, daughter of George Milton Goin and Frances A. Kolb Goin, was born October 17, 1911 and died the same day..

Rachel A. Goin, daughter of Nelson Goin and Mary Ann “Polly” Pritchard Goin, was born about 1849. She was married about 1867, husband’s name Boyd.

Levi Goin, son of Nelson Goin and Mary Ann “Polly” Pritchard Goin, was born March 30, 1856. He was interviewed July 23, 1937 by the Works Progress Administration Indian-Pioneer History Project for Oklahoma in Dewey County, Oklahoma by Ethel E. Palmer:

“I came to Oklahoma July 4, 1889 from Kansas; we moved in a covered wagon, drove horses and were about six days on the road. I came to Stillwater where they tried to sell me a lot and a house; this house was built on rollers. I stayed around Payne’s Fort which was a big log house built on a large hill. Payne was trying to get Oklahoma settled up. I moved on to Kingfisher and filed on land there.

I was at the Cheyene-Arapaho opening in 1892, and there were soldiers all on the inside of the Cheyene-Arapaho land. The soldiers were trying to keep the “Sooners” from going in; however, a great number of people had already gone in. Everyone got all fixed on the line, and because the Sooners had scared the deer and the antelope out here, they came up among this crowd of people.

I was at the opening of the Cherokee Strip, and I made the race for it. I went to Hennessey to register, and I was in line just one week. There were thousands of people there, and if a man left his place in the line for a minute, he would lose out and would have to go to the end of the line. If a person had been in the Cherokee Strip, he or she would not be allowed to enter.

At twelve o’clock, the guns were fired, and there was a freight train on the line; people had tied themselves on the side of the boxcars, but the horses outran the train. Dozens of horses were found dead after the race, which had been run to death. The train did not stop at Enid as it should have, and people burned the railroad bridges, and then the war between Enid and North Enid began. Congress had to put a stop to the trouble. I was just too slow, so I didn’t get a place as I was looking for town
property.

The next drawing was at Lawton in August. I got on the train at Kingfisher, and the train was so crowded that the conductor could not get through to take the tickets, and it was so hot that a fellow could scarcely live. I waited a day and a night before I registered there. They put all the tickets in a barrel, but I was unlucky as there were too many people for the land numbers.

I filed on a relinquishment at Kingfisher and lived in a stockade log house. We drove logs down into the ground; they were standing up pretty high off the ground, then we took logs and laid them the other way until the building was up pretty high, then took hay and covered that, then covered the hay with dirt, and we also had dirt floors. We had one big goods box for our table and two or three cane bottomed chairs. The toad frogs would get thick under our bed, then the rattlesnakes would get under and run the frogs out.

When I first came to Oklahoma, there was only one family within 12 miles of me. We raised broomcorn, kaffircorn, and wheat, and we would bind our wheat, then tie the bundles by hand. We would get from 25 to 40 cents per bushel for wheat and from $25 to $30 per ton for our broomcorn.”

Lavisa Jane “Jennie” Goin, daughter of James Sylvester Goin and Mary Elizabeth Stroud Goin, was born about 1870. She was married about 1888 to Charles Green and lived at Dover, Oklahoma, Territory. He applied administration of the estate of James Sylvester Goin September 9, 1901.

Mary Alice Goin, daughter of James Sylvester Goin and Mary Elizabeth Stroud Goin, was born October 4, 1872. She died August 7, 1891 and was buried in Banner Cemetery.

Henry O. Goin, son of James Sylvester Goin and Mary Eliza-beth Stroud Goin, was born 1876. He was married about 1900, wife’s name Margaret, and lived at Dover, Oklahoma Territory. Children born to Henry O. Goin and Margaret Goin are unknown.

Gertrude Goin, daughter of James Sylvester Goin and Mary Elizabeth Stroud Goin, was born about 1878. She was married about 1898, husband’s name Keniston and lived near Dover.

James Albert Goin, son of James Sylvester Goin and Mary Elizabeth Stroud Goin, was born about 1879. He was married about 1902, wife’s name Stella, and lived at Dover. Children born to James Albert Goin and Stella Goin are unknown.

Anna Goin, daughter of James Sylvester Goin and Mary Eliza-beth Stroud Goin, was born was born about 1880. She was married about 1900 to Thomas Clark and lived at Dover.

Elizabeth “Betsey” Goin, daughter of Uriah Goin and his first wife, was born about 1820 in Claiborne Colunty. She was married about 1839 to William Riley Holton. In 1855, Eli Goin wrote that the Holtons were living “on that little place above Keck” in Claiborne County. Seven children were born to them.

John W. Goin, son of Uriah Goin and Nancy Goin Goin, was born about 1848 in Claiborne County. He was recorded there in the 1850 census as a two-year-old. He did not reappear in the 1860 census of his parents’ household, suggesting that he died during the decade.

Isaac Abraham Goin, son of Thomas Goin, was born about 1789, probably in Hawkins County. He was married March 24, 1809 to Temperance A. “Tempey” Gray in Claiborne County. On November 8, 1814 he enlisted in Capt. John Brock’s company of Tennessee militia. He was discharged as a private May 18, 1815. His name was later listed in “War of 1812, Index of Pensioners.” They also appeared in “Abstract Pensions of Claiborne County, Tennessee, The Revolution, War of 1812 and All Wars Prior to 1883” compiled by Annie Walker Burns

In the 1830 census of Claiborne County, Tennessee, page 134, “Isaac Goin” was enumerated as the head of a household:

“Goin, Isaac white male 30-40
white female 30-40
white male 15-20
white male 10-15
white female 10-15
white female 10-15
white female 5-10
white female 5-10”

In the 1840 census of Claiborne County, page 248, “Isaac Goin” was enumerated as the head of a household composed of:

“Goin, Isaac white male 40-50
white female 40-50
white male 15-20
white female 15-20
white female 15-20
white male 0-5
white female 0-5”

“Isaac Goin” was enumerated as the head of Household 839-596 in the 1850 census of Claiborne County:

“Goin, Isaac 57, born in Tennessee
Tempey 57, born in Tennessee
Naomi 30
Sally 25
Martha 18
Alfred 17
Lucretia 15
Polly J. 13
Christopher 11

Abraham Isaac Goin received Bounty Land Warrant 22273 for 80 acres of land in 1850. He appeared as a witness for 17 days in 1853 in the trial of the slander suit filed by his nephew Elijah Goin against Sterling Mayes. In 1855 he received Bounty Land Warrant 27521 for 80 acres of land.

Abraham Isaac Goin died December 26, 1875 in Claiborne County and was buried in Pleasant Point Cemetery. Temper-ance A. “Tempey” Gray Goin lived at Speedwell, Tennessee at that time. She died at Compensation, Tennessee in 1888.

It is believed that children born to Abraham Isaac Goin and Temperance A. “Tempey” Gray Goin include:

Isaac Goin born about 1810
John A. Goin born December 22, 1812
Martin Van Buren Goin born about 1818
Naomi “Oma” Goin born about 1820
Anna Goin born about 1823
Sarah “Sally” Goin born about 1825
William James “Big Bill” Goin born March 26, 1826
Martha Goin born about 1832
Alfred Goin born about 1833
Lucretia Goin born about 1835
Mary Jane “Polly” Goin born about 1837
Christopher “Kit” Goin born about 1839
Hulda Goin born about 1843

Isaac Goin, son of Abraham Isaac Goin and Temperance A. “Tempey” Gray Goin, was born about 1810, probably in Clai-borne County. He appeared as the head of a household in the 1830 census of Claiborne County, page 134, adjoining the household of his parents. The family was enumerated as:

“Goin, Isaac white male 20-30
white female 20-30
white female 0-5”

Isaac Goin reappeared as the head of a household in the 1840 census of Claiborne County, still in an adjacent location to the household of his parents. The family was enumerated as:

“Goin, Isaac white male 30-40
white female 20-30
white female 10-15
white female 5-10
white male 0-5
white female 0-5”

An Isaac Goin, age 45, volunteered for the Second Tennessee Cavalry Regiment, U.S.A. on October 26, 1861 in Claiborne County. He was recorded with “permanent desertion” December 4, 1862.

John A. Goin, son of Abraham Isaac Goin and Temperance A. “Tempey” Gray Goin, was born December 22, 1812 in Clai-borne County. He was married about 1835 to Jane “Jenny” Haynes. They removed to Mercer County, Missouri before 1851. In June 1863 they removed to Decatur County, Iowa. He was remarried to Elmira Cox. John A. Goin died in Decatur County in May 1900 at age 77. Children born to John A. Goin, Jane “Jenny” Hynes Goin and Elmira Cox Goin are unknown.

Martin Van Buren Goin, son of Abraham Isaac Goin and Tem-perance A. “Tempey” Gray Goin, was born about 1818 in Clai-borne County. He removed to Mercer County, Missouri in 1850 with his brother William James Goin. Martin Van Buren Goin died August 10, 1866 and was buried in Eagleville, Missouri in Harrison County.

Naomi “Oma” Goin, daughter of Isaac Abraham Goin and Temperance Gray Goin, was born about 1820 in Claiborne County. She appeared at age 30 in the 1850 census of her fa-ther’s household. She was married February 1, 1853 to Ezekial “Zeke” Raney in Claiborne County.

Children born to them include:

Sarah “Sally” Raney born about 1857

Sarah “Sally” Raney, daughter of Ezekiel “Zeke” Raney and Naomi “Oma” Goin, was born about 1857 in Claiborne County. Sarah “Sally” Raney was married about 1877 to Elijah “Lige” Goin, son of Eli Goin and Rachel Edwards Goin. Fielding V. “Bob” Goin, grandson of Elijah “Lige” Goin and Rachel Edwards Goin, was resident of Bellevue, Washington in 1991.

Anna Goin, daughter of Abraham Isaac Goin and Temperance A. “Tempey” Gray Goin, was born about 1823 in Claiborne County. She was married October 12, 1842 to Abraham May-ers. Later she was remarried to Jefferson Myers.

Sarah “Sally” Goin, daughter of Abraham Isaac Goin and Tem-perance A. “Tempey” Gray Goin, was born about 1825. She appeared as a 25-year-old in the 1850 census of Claiborne
County. She remained unmarried.

William James “Big Bill” Goin, son of Abraham Isaac Goin and Temperance A. “Tempey” Gray Goin, was born March 26, 1826 in Claiborne County. By 1850, he was living in Knox County, Kentucky with his brother, Martin Van Buren Goin. They were influenced to move to Mercer County Missouri in that year by their cousin, Leroy Goin who had preceded them to Missouri in 1849..

Shortly after arrival in Mercer County, William James Goin was married there December 1, 1850 to Regina Constable, daughter of Annanias Constable and his second wife, Anna Gochenour Constable, according to Anna Lee Goin, family history researcher of Jefferson, Oregon. They bought a farm in northern Missouri, five miles south of the Iowa state line.

In 1864, as the Civil War swirled through Missouri, William James Goin and his mother-in-law, Anna Gochenour Constable moved by covered wagon to Linn County Oregon. Accompanying them were the families of his cousins, LeRoy Goin and Elijah “Little Lige” Goin. The party joined a wagontrain at St. Joseph, Missouri on the Missouri River.

Mary Ann Goin, oldest daughter of William James Goin, kept an account of trek up the Oregon Trail which was retained by Varion Elmer Goin, late member of the Foundation. He submitted it to the “Jefferson Review” 115 years later, and it was published in its edition of July 12, 1979. The account also appeared in “Goin & Variants” published in 1997 by Dianne Stark Thurman.

The account read:

“We bought and traded for our oxteams in Missouri. We fed out our corn and moved to Iowa on April 10, 1864. We stopped four miles south of Leon, Iowa, county seat of Decatur County, and there we finished our preparations. We made our tents and wagonsheets and bought our outfit. We started west On the 10th day of May. In our family there was Mother, Father, Mary, Sarah, George, Charlie and Alfred.

At some place between Leon and the Missouri River, we met the rest of the train. Capt. Patrick Willis and family had two wagons and a carriage; Jake Breeding, 1 wagon; The Camel family, 3 wagons; Henry King, 1 wagon; the Elkins family, 1 wagon; Ivans, 1 wagon; Perkaphile, 1 wagon; Lewellings, related to the Camels, 2 or 3 wagons and LeRoy Goin, 2 wagons.

We crossed the Missouri River at Omaha City and bought our supplemental food supply there, consisting of rice, flour and dried apples. We had started with flour, bacon, honey, lard,preserves, syrup, beans and rice. We had our milk and butter.

We had 2 wagons, Elijah Goin, wife and 2 children started with us and came until one of our wagons broke down just before entering the Black Hills. We busted a hubcap and should have brought it on until it broke, but as it was, we distributed our stuff between the wagons. Elijah Goin went on with LeRoy Goin.

The Lewellings and Camels dropped out soon on the trip. The Lewellings pulled out before we got to the Rockies.

We had started to California, but changed our minds at Ft. Bridger* and continued with the rest of the train to Oregon. The Perkaphile family left the train at Ft. Bridger and went to California. We didn’t see a single dwelling between Omaha City and Ft. Bridger.

At a Mormon settlement in Utah, we traded soap and linen towels for radishes, and I think, lettuce. At another Mormon settlement on Bear River, we caught lots of fish, salted some down and added them to our supplies. About two or three hundred miles east of Boise, we drew out alone from the wagontrain because of trouble with Jim Estes. Leroy’s [family] came on to Oregon and stayed there.”

*Ft. Bridger had been established on the Green River in southwestern Wyoming in 1843 by Jim Bridger, fur trader and frontiersman. His family arrived in St. Louis in 1812, and at the age of 18, he joined Gen. William H. Ashley’s fur-trapping expedition up the Missouri River to the mouth of the Yellow­stone. He was the first explorer into the area of Yellowstone National Park and was the first to report the Great Salt Lake in Utah.

The Goins were joined by another member of the party, Phoebe Ellen Goin, September 29, 1864, just as they arrived in Oregon. She, their eighth child, was born in the John Day Campgrounds at the end of the Oregon Trail.

In October of 1864, the party arrived in Linn County, Oregon and went to a farm that his cousin Thomas Jefferson Goin had obtained for him. William James Goin paid $50 for the farm to a man who was abandoning the place. The purchase cleared the title, and the family found itself in possession of a farm with a one-room house with a lean-to kitchen. The kitchen roof leaked, and the constant Oregon rain turned the kitchen into a “loblolly.” Eight years later, the family had a new home built from lumber which had been hand-planed by the house­holder. This farm still remains in the possession of the Goin descendants in 1998.

An article was written about the house in 1933 by “G.A.S.”

“Out at the Sterling Henry Goin ranch on the Greens Bridge Road still stands the old frame house build in 1872 by Mr. Goin’s father, William Goin. Sunday, while at the Goin’s, we enjoyed walking through the old rooms, and in our imagina­tion, reconstructed the rooms, once more making them livable.

Old houses hold a fascination to us who visit them years after their usefulness is gone. They speak of the joys and sorrows, marriages, births and deaths–the whole scale of human experiences and emotions–retaining the personality of those who once called it home.

We crossed the old and worn threshold into the largest room, or the livingroom. The ceiling was boarded and stripped, and lookingly closely, we observed that each strip had been hand-beveled. For that matter, Mr. Goin told us that all the lumber in the house had been hand planed and was taken from trees felled on that place.

Centered at one end of the room was the fireplace with a wooden mantle showing marks of services done in its day. This end of the room was wood-paneled, with a row of shelves across one corner. At the other corner was the stairway lead­ing to the three rooms above, with the narrowest, steepest steps I’ve ever climbed. And having climbed them, I wonder how the eight Goin children escaped breaking their necks.

In the little room to the left of the livingroom downstairs, we found a goldmine of old papers that had been used for paper­ing the walls. There were copies of ‘The Commoner’ edited by William Jennings Bryan in Nebraska in 1902, copies of the Claiborne, Tennessee paper, the Goins’ hometown, early Albany papers. One was a copy of ‘The Jefferson Review’ of 1903 [which we brought home.]

I almost forgot to tell you about an old rocking chair in one of the upstairs rooms. It was made by “Big Bill” Goin years ago. The chair has a high ladder back, rockers and a twin-laced seat. The rockers, arms and all parts plainly show the hand-shaping of the wood. Can’t you see this rocker pulled in front of the fireplace and a rag rug or two on the floor–a home established in a new country, so different from Tennessee.”

William James “Big Bill” Goin died February 24, 1903 in Linn County and was buried in the Miller Cemetery. Regina Constable Goin survived until May 9, 1913 and was buried beside her husband.

Children born to William James “Big Bill” Goin and Regina Constable Goin include:

[son] born and died April 7, 1851
Mary Ann Goin born March 13, 1853
John Lafayette Goin born January 13, 1855
Charles Thomas Goin born December 16, 1855
Alfred Newton Goin born April 24, 1858
George Riley Goin born August 7, 1860
Sarah Lucette Goin born July 28, 1862
Phoebe Ellen Goin born September 29, 1864
Jasper Lee Goin born February 21, 1867
[daughter] born August 7, 1869
Sterling Henry Goin born November 25, 1870

Martha Goin, daughter of Abraham Isaac Goin and Temperance A. “Tempey” Gray Goin, was born in July 1834, according to her enumeration in the 1900 census in Claiborne County. She appeared there in the 1850 census at age 18 living in the household of her parents. “Martha Goin, 65, “born in Tennessee in July 1834,” was enumerated in the 1900 census of Knox County, Tennessee, Civil District 1, Enumeration District 58, page 11, living with her daughter, Mrs. Tempia A. Cheatham at 503 Cumberland Street in Knoxville.

Children born to Martha Goin include:

Tempia A. Goin born about 1852

Tempia A. Goin, daughter of Martha Goin and an unknown father, was born about 1852 in Claiborne County. She was shown as “age 7” in the 1860 census of the home of her grandfather, Isaac Abraham Goin.

She was married October 31, 1866 [at age 14?] in Claiborne County to John W. Cheatham, according to the research of Leon Meyers. “Mrs. Tempia A. Cheatham” was enumerated as the head of a household in the 1900 census of Knox County, living at 503 Cumberland Street in Knoxville. Children born to the Cheathams are unknown.
==O==
Alfred Goin, son of Abraham Isaac Goin and Temperance A. “Tempey” Gray Goin, was born about 1833 in Claiborne County. He appeared at age 17 in the 1850 census. He served in a Confederate regiment in the Civil War, was captured and died of smallpox in Ft. Delaware, Delaware while a prisoner of war. He died unmarried. Dianne Thurman, family reseacher of Wichita, Kansas wrote December 8, 1996 that Alfred Goin died in a New Jersey prison March 26, 1864 and was buried there.

Lucretia Goin, daughter of Abraham Isaac Goin and Temper-ance A. “Tempey” Gray Goin, was born about 1835 in Clai-borne County. She appeared as a 15-year-old in the 1850 cen-sus. She was enumerated in the 1870 census of her parents’ household. She did not marry.

Mary Jane “Polly” Goin, daughter of Abraham Isaac Goin and Temperance A. “Tempey” Gray Goin, was born about 1837. She appeared at age 13 in the 1850 census. She died at age 17, leaving a child, Temperance “Tempey” Goin, according to Anna Lee Goin.

Temperance “Tempey” Goin, daughter of Mary Jane “Polly” Goin, was born about 1852 in Claiborne County and was reared by her grandparents. She was married to John Cheatham there October 31, 1866.

Christopher “Kit” Goin, son of Abraham Isaac Goin and Temperance A. “Tempey” Gray Goin, was born about 1839 in Claiborne County. He appeared at age 11 in the 1850 census. He was married January 24, 1862 to Mary Ann Lewis. He served in a Confederate regiment during the Civil War and was a prisoner of war in Camp Chase, Illinois. He died there August 5, 1863.

“Mary, a daughter of Isabel Lewis and a granddaughter of Fielding Lewis, Sr, was married to Christopher Goins, a son of Isaac Goins,” according to “In Old” Tazewell.” “He died in a few years, leaving her in charge of one son who also died. She then married John McCrary, a son of George McCrary of Pow-ell Valley. They emigrated to Texas some time in the 80s and are living there at the present.”
==O==
Edmund Clair Calavan, a descendant of Thomas Goin of Brunswick County, Virginia, was born January 13, 1913 in Linn County, Oregon. In his autobiography published in 1992, he wrote:

“The first person I remember, outside our immediate family, was Thomas Jefferson “Uncle Jeff” Goin, my great uncle, an older brother of my deceased grandmother, Amanda Red “Mandy” Goin. Uncle Jeff loved children, but had none of his own. The San Francisco earthquake and fire of 1906 had wiped out Uncle Jeff’s considerable fortune in a few hours. He felt himself unable to face his wealthy friends, so returned to Oregon to teach school, as he had done many years before. My parents had bought the farm owned by Dad’s father and were living there when I was born. Uncle Jeff was teaching school about 15 miles away, but for some nostalgic reasons he frequently visited my parents’ Bilyeu Den home. He enjoyed playing with my sister and me; even had pet names for us [Rip for my sister, 15 months younger than I, and Tear for me]. But in his old age, Uncle Jeff developed Parkinson’s disease and died in July 1915 when I was only two and one-half years old. He was buried in the Bilyeu Den Cemetery overlooking the beautiful valley where I was born. I have visited his grave, next to that of my grandmother, at every opportu-nity.”

Descendant Researchers

Jane “Debbie” Goin-Bergin. Bergin Const, 77165 Calle Monterey, La Quinta, CA, 92253, 805/239-7925
Debra Richard Glenn Bonds, Box 5124, Midland, TX, 79704, 915/687-6211
F. M. Brummett, 4409 Greenbrier, Long Beach, CA, 90808
Anna Lee Goin, 13811 Jefferson Highway 993, Jefferson, OR, 97352
Lynn & Nancy Goin, 9357 E. Harrison Park, Tucson, AZ, 85749, 602/749-5722
Sherry Linn Goin, 401 Castleton Ave, Mt. Vernon, IL, 62864, 618/242-5570
Clara Jane Goin Houser, 10409 E. Windflower Ct, Sun Lakes, AZ, 85248.
Norma Louise Goin Johnson, 1317 S. 26th St, Mt. Vernon, IL, 62864, 618/244-6507.
Jerry Jones, 1805 335th Lane, Earlham, IA, 50072
Carol Anne Ledford, 89 Wendover, Asheville, NC, 28806
Clyde Leon Meyers, CA, leon.meyers@worldnet.att.net
Beverly J. Ellison Nelson, 3391 Aksarben Avenue, Littleton CO, 80123, 303/794-1727
Pat Goins Rice, 300 Cooper Run Road, Shepherdsville, KY, 40165
Louise Goins Richardson, 2207 E. Lake Street, Paragould, AR, 72450, 501/239-4763
Mary Melvina Burns Stark, 239 Deerfield Street, Houston, TX, 77022, 713-697-7874
William J. & Jean E. Stark, 13034 Rummel Creek, Houston, TX, 77079, 713/465-4261
Tamara Louise “Tammy” Goin-Stone, Box 738, Ontario, OR, 97914 503/889-2292
Dianne Lee Stark Thurman, 4201 Wildflower Circle, Wichita, KS, 67210, 316-529-0438
Harold M. Wasson, 104 Lochleven Road, Severna Park, MD, 21146.
Kenny Ann Gibson Wood, 8718 S. 68th E. Avenue, Tulsa, OK, 74133, 918/481-1661

Gowen Manuscript:  http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~gowenrf/Gowenms133.htm

BRUNSWICK COUNTY, VIRGINIA

Drury Going was born in 1749 in Brunswick County, Virginia, according to the research of Sandra Going Morgan, a descendant of Stone Mountain, Georgia. He was born in an area of Brunswick County which in 1781 became Greensville County, Virginia, according to Mary Elizabeth Motley Beadles, a descendant and DAR Member 474911. His family removed to Camden District, in north central South Carolina and settled in an area which later became Union and Chester Counties.

Col. Carroll Heard Goyne, Jr, researcher of Shreveport, Louisiana states that the Drury Going of Greensville County and the Drury Going of Camden District could not be the same man. He cites that Drury Going of Greensville County received payment on a military voucher March 12, 1782 for items furnished to the Federal government during the Revolutionary War. The Drury Going of Camden District was there as early as 1767 and served in the South Carolina militia under Col. John Winn.
Drury Going was married in Camden District in 1767 to 17-year-old Sarah “Sallie” Baxter who was born about 1750 in Granville County [later Orange County, later Caswell County], North Carolina.

On November 28, 1783, Drury Going and Samuel Torbert were witnesses to a lease executed by Mary McCullough of Camden District, St. Mark’s Parish, to Robert Elliot for £50 sterling for 941 acres on the north side of Broad River which had been granted to her January 31, 1772. The lease was proved in Camden District December 29, 1784 by the oath of Samuel Torbert before Frame Woods, J.P.

Drury Going, attracted by the daring exploits of Marion’s Brigade, volunteered in 1781 to ride with Revolutionary Brig-Gen. Francis Marion in his slashing attacks on the British. Marion had taken raw frontiersmen, trained them to be fearless riders and expert marksmen and formed them into an efficient guerilla force that became the pride of the Colonists’ southern campaign. He served in the regiment commanded by Col. John Winn of Winnsboro, South Carolina, according to the research of Carroll Heard Goyne, Jr.

The “Swamp Fox” repeatedly led his rapid-deployment brigade in daring raids against the superior British forces, exacted heavy losses upon them and then escaped into the swamps where the English were unable to follow. They had remarkable successes in battles at Georgetown, Ft. Watson, Ft. Motte and Eutaw Springs, lifting the morale of the Americans who were generally being defeated everywhere else. Their spectacular success in the Battle of Parker’s Ferry in 1782 resulted in a Congressional medal for Marion’s men.

In a letter addressed to Alfred Elijah Going, Evelyn Somerville, a descendant, wrote:

“In the first federal census of South Carolina, 1790, the Goings lived on one side, the Loves on the other of Col. Aaron Lockert at Lockert Shoals, East Bank, then in Chester County, South Carolina. The community was known as early as 1755 as Love’s Ford on Broad River, a mile and a half from Turkey Creek, then Craven County, North Carolina. Capt. James Love, Jr. married Col. Lockert’s second daughter, Janet. Job Going married the Colonel’s third daughter, Rebecca, while Drennan Love, son of James Love, Jr, married a daughter of Sarah Going Cook, sister to Job Going.

We are unable to find bible or other records of the parents of your ancestor, Job Going [and my ancestor, Sarah] except the death of their mother, April 22, 1822. Sarah Baxter, thought to be the daughter of Thomas Baxter as the Christian name “Thomas Baxter” occurs over again in her numerous descendants. The 1790 census gives the head of this family as “Drury Goins,” which must have been the name of “Sally” Baxter’s husband unless he had died and there was a son named Drury.

Anyhow this family of Drury Goins was the only one of the name in Chester in 1790 census and none in the counties of York and Union, adjoining this neighborhood, and the family consisted of 2 white males over 16, 4 white females and 6 slaves. In Caswell County, North Carolina tax lists was a Thomas Baxter, who could have either a father or a brother to “Sally” Baxter. Her son, Thomas Baxter Going, became a clergyman, according to Day C. Love who went to school with his sons at Crawford, Mississippi in the early ’50s and went from there to Texas.

Goings were natives of Ireland where the name was ‘Goyne.’

Isaac Mack Going is buried at the Franconia Cemetery in the Going row. His was the second grave in the cemetery, my mother’s eldest sister, Sophia Miles Hughes, aged 3 years, being the first.

Evelyn Somerville”

Drury Going was mentioned as a landowner in a land grant to William Long dated November 5, 1771. The description of Long’s land, “200 acres on Wateree Creek in Craven District,” mentioned that it was bounded on the east by that of Drury Going. The grant also mentioned that “the road to Rocky Mount crosses the northeast corner,” suggesting that the road also crossed the property of Drury Going.

Drury Going served as a private in a South Carolina militia regiment commanded by Col. Winn during the Revolutionary War. The regiment was under the overall command of Gen. Francis Marion, the “Swamp Fox.” Indent No. 98, Book O was issued January 26, 1785 to “Mr. Drury Goins, L18:6:8 3/4 Sterling for militia duty in 1781 and 1782,” according to “Stub Entries to Indents” edited by A. S. Salley, Jr, Secretary of the Historical Commission of South Carolina. Additionally, the indent had earned interest in the amount of ú1:16:5.

“Drury Goins” was a purchaser at the estate sale of Moses Cherry in Camden District [later York County, South Carolina] in 1783, according to York County probate records, Apartment 15, package 483.

On September 1, 1787 “Drury Gowing of Chester County” received a deed to 319 acres” located on the south side of Broad River from Merry McGuire, “Planter of Union County, South Carolina,” according to Union County Deed Book A&B, page 469. Consideration was “£100 current money.” In the body of the deed the grantee’s name was also spelled “Gowen” and “Going.” The land had been received by McGuire June 5, 1786 in a grant from Gov. William Moultrie.

Drury Going received a deed July 8, 1788 to “land on the waters of Turkey Creek” for ú50, according to Chester County Deed Book B, page 69. “Job Going,” possibly a kinsman of Drury Going, was a witness to the transaction.

Job Goin, owner of three slaves, was recorded as the head of a household in the 1800 census of Chester County, page 90:

“Goin, Job white male 26-45
white male 16-26”

The household of “Job Goyen” was recorded September 14, 1810 in the federal census of Chester County, page 262:

“Goyen, Job
white female over 45
white male 0-10
white male 0-10
white female 0-10
white female 0-10”

The enumerator apparently regarded Job Goyen himself as “free colored” and did not record his entry. The family owned eight slaves.

An unidentified “Richard Gowan” was also recorded September 14, 1810 in the federal census as the head of a household, page 277:

“Gowan, Richd. white male over 45
white female over 45
white female 10-16
white female 10-16
white male 0-10
white female 0-10
white male 0-10”

“Drury Going, being charged with having begotten an ille-gitimate Infant on the Body of Sarah Golden came into court and Confessed the fact, whereupon it is considered by the Court that they make their fine by paying the sum of five pounds Proclamation Money, and the said Goings acknowledged himself bound to pay the said Sarah’s fine and all costs accruing, and that he is liable for the maintenance of the said infant and stay of Execution until next court.” was the entry dated July 8, 1788 in Chester County Court Order Book A, page 358.

“On the motion of the Clerk, Ordered that all the money that Drury Going was fined in for Bastardy is to be paid to him in discount of what the county owes him,” read an entry dated January 8, 1790 in Chester County Order Book B, page 29.

“Deed of conveyance from John Long to Drury Going that was proven before a Singel Justice was produced in open court and ordered to be recorded,” read an entry dated April 6, 1789 recorded in Chester County Court Order Book B, page 160.

William Gaston conveyed 200 acres “line [lying] on Mill Creek” to Drury Going in 1789, according to Chester County Deed Book B, page 73. Consideration was “3 pounds, 14 shillings, 4 pence.” The land was part of a tract granted to Gaston September 3, 1787. The deed was not witnessed.

According to “Heads of Families, South Carolina, 1790” “Drury Goins” was enumerated in Camden District, Chester County, page 14 as the head of a household composed of:

“Goins, Drury white male over 16
white female
white male over 16
white male over 16
white female
white male under 16
white male under 16
white female
white female
[6 slaves]”

Neighbors enumerated in the 1790 census who had an influence on the Going family include: Josiah Cook, Aaron Lockert, John McCool, James Love, Capt. James Love, Jr, Asa Tindall and Thomas Winn.

Drury Going bought 350 acres of land from Robert Elliott and his wife Jean Elliott January 14, 1791 for £1,000, according to Chester County Deed Book B, page 553. Job Going was a witness to the transaction.
Drury Going deeded his Turkey Creek farm to his son-in-law Asa Tindall October 11, 1791, according to Chester County Deed Book B, page 541:

“For the love & affection I bear for my son-in-law Assa Tindall and for his better support, I give, grant and convey 100 acres on a branch of Turkey Creek, the waters of Broad River, originally granted to John Long June 6, 1785, adjoining James Kirkpatrick and Clayton Rogers, all other sides vacant.
Drury [X] Going
Witnesses: Buttrick Rogers,
Sarah Rogers, Isaac Rogers”

In December 1791, “Drewry Goyen, et al” conveyed 195 acres to William Love, according to Chester County Deed Book D, page 250.

Shortly afterward Drury Going sold two tracts of land to Robert Elliott that he had purchased from him a year earlier, according to Chester County Deed Book B, page 542. The deed read:

“This indenture made between Drury Going of Chester County and Robert Elliott of Union County, dated January 13, 1792, acknowledges the sum of 1,000 pds. lawful money for two tracts of land, one containing 250 acres on the Broad River where Going now lives. This tract adjoins Aron Locquert’s land and was granted unto Benjamin Love February 3, 1754 and by him conveyed to Robert Elliott who sold it to Drury Going. The other tract of 100 acres, including the Elliott old field, adjoins Joseph Robertson. It was granted unto Mary McCullough January 23, 1752 and by her conveyed to Robert Elliott who sold it to Drury Going.

Drury [X] Going
Witnesses: Job Going, John Hill, Isaac Going”

Drury Going was appointed to serve as juror for the January 1793 term, according to an entry dated June 25, 1792 in Chester County Order Book B, page 179.

On June 13, 1794 Drury Going corraled an estray, according to Chester County Order Book 1795-1799, page 425. The entry read, “Drury Going Tolls a Sorrell horse about 7 years old, paced natural, Brand unknown, about 14 hands high, his hind feet white, said Estray appraised to L8.”

Drury Going died February 22, 1796 “in the 47th year of his age,” according to a letter written March 16, 1879 by Thomas Baxter Going, his grandson. “He died on the road coming home from Charleston with his wagon and team. He lacked three days drive of reaching home when he died. He was hauled home and buried at home.”

The Chester County Court Order Book 1795-1799, page 350 reveals:

“Citation having issued to shew cause why Letters of Administration should not be Granted to Clayton Rogers, Esqr. and Elijah Goings as administrators of the Estate of Dewey Goings Deceased and no objections made to direct the court to the contrary, but Clayton Rogers not appearing to join the said Administration, Ordered that be granted to the said Elijah Goings and Sarah Goings as admr. and admox of the said Decedent’s Estate upon their complying with what the law in that case requires.”

The citation was made public by having it read in a church as-sembly:

“State of South Carolina, Chester County} Be it remembered that I Joseph Brown was personally present when Joseph Alexander, a minister of the Presbyterial [sic] Profession publickly read the within Citation at a meeting held at Bullock’s Creek for the purpose of Publick Worship. Dated at Chester this 25th day of July 1796. J. A. Brown”

The estate of “Drury Goings” was introduced into probate in Chester County Court July 26, 1796, according to the Order book, page 319. On that date the court appointed appraisers to fix the value of the estate:

“State of South Carolina }
County of Chester }

To Wit: To Aaron Lockheart, Charles Gilmore, Warren Beauford, Clayton Rogers & Francis Kirkpatrick. Greeting Gentlemen, You or any three of you after being sworn before a Justice of the Peace are appointed to appraise & make out an Inventory & Appraisement of the Estate of Drewry Going, Deceased & make due return thereof into the Office of Chester County Agreeable to Law.

Witness: Samuel Lacey, Clerk of Chester County Court, this 26th day of July in the Year of our Lord One thousand Seven hundred & Ninety-six and of the Independence of the United States of America the Twenty-first.

Sam’l Lacey, CCC”

“A Sale Bill and Inventory of the Estate of Drewry Going Decd was produced in open court and ordered to be recorded,” January 24, 1797, according to the Order Book, page 362. On September 19, 1796 the court “Ordered that an order of Sale do issue of the Estate of Drury Goings such part thereof as the Admors. thereof shall think necessary on a credit of twelve months,” according to the Order Book, page 359.

An accounting of the estate sale which totaled 546 pounds, 4 shillings was delivered to the Chester County Court March 3, 1797 by Elijah Going, administrator:

Purchaser Item Price

Sarah Going Pewter 18
Sarah Going Books 4
Sarah Going Table 7
Sarah Going Small trunk 7
Elijah Going Small trunk 12
Sarah Going Looking glass 5
Sarah Going Trunk 3
Sarah Going Bed & furniture 7 1
Sarah Going Bed & furniture 4 12
Sarah Going Bed & furniture 4 3
Sarah Going Spinning wheel & reel 14
Isaac Going Rifle gun 3 12
Elijah Going Bed & furniture 4 10
Sarah Going Bed & furniture 3 4
Sarah Going Coverlet 19
Sarah Going Cask feathers 15
Sarah Going Cutting box & knife 6
Sarah Going Cross cut saw 7
Sarah Going 28 hogs 15 15
Sarah Going Waggon, saddle,
& lockchain 6 15
Sarah Going Hoes, Axes, frow
& wedges 1 6
Sarah Going Plow & lines 2 6
Sarah Going 2 Shovel plows 15
Sarah Going Grindstone 11
Sarah Going Stove 4
Sarah Going Lot of tools 10
Sarah Going Six siccles 8
Sarah Going Side leather 7
Sarah Going Side leather 7
Sarah Going Side leather 7
Sarah Going Leather 1 2
Sarah Going Side leather 4
Sarah Going Side leather 6
Sarah Going 6 siccles 2
Sarah Going Cow 2 6
Sarah Going Cow & yearling 2 7
Sarah Going Fiddle 8
Sarah Going 2 Casks 2
Elijah Going Cask 3
Sarah Going 4 Bells 4
Sarah Going 9 Casks 9
Sarah Going Beehive 6
Job Going Lot of hoes 1
Job Going 4 Axes 12
Sarah Going Brown cow 1 1
Sarah Going Bay horse 15 1
Andrew Walker Sorrel mare 10 10
Sarah Going Brown horse 6 1
Sarah Going Sorrel horse 15 1
Sarah Going Bay mare 7 3
Sarah Going Bay colt 8 3
Elijah Going Bay mare & colt 9 10
Sarah Going Bay horse 15 15
Job Going Slave named Dinah
& child 60
Sarah Going Slave named Jean 31 10
Sarah Going Negroe, Mary 31 5
Sarah Going Negroe, Jim 46 10
Sarah Going Negroe, Daphne 60
Isaac Going Slave named Joe 22 10
Elijah Going Slave named Will 53 10
Sarah Going Slave named Jean 10 15
William Fiary ——- —— 1 5
Sarah Going Slave, Gustine 7 3
Clayton Rogers Stoker 7
Elijah Going ——- 5
Elijah Going Still 13
Robert Elliot ——- 7
Sarah Going Cow & calf 8
Sarah Going Cow & yearling 5
Sarah Going Cow & yearling 5
Isaac Going Cow & yearling 8
Sarah Going Steer 6
Sarah Going Heifer 1
William Fiary Cow 3
Job Going Heifer 4
Isaac Going Heifer 4
Job Going Pot
Sarah Going Large pot
Clayton Rogers Dutch oven
Sarah Going Pot
Sarah Going Dutch oven
Sarah Going 2 Skillets
Sarah Going Washing tub & 3 pots
Sarah Going Big wheel
Sarah Going Woman’s saddle 1
Sarah Going Sieve
Sarah Going Sieve
Sarah Going Loom, wheel & spools
Sarah Going Churn
William Brown Shovel plow
Robert Elliot Lot of tools
Clayton Rogers Box of old iron
Sarah Going Steelyards
Sarah Going Smoothing irons
Sarah Going Irons
Sarah Going 3 pair Cards
William Fiary 7 white Plates
& pewter coffeepot
Andrew Walker 2 Basins, 2 pewter plates
Sarah Going Sugar box
Elijah Going Slate
Robert Elliot Slate
Job Going Slate
Clayton Rogers Books
Sarah Going Pewter 8 1
Sarah Going Books & 8 tablets 17
Sarah Going Trunk 19
Sarah Going Looking glass, 4 trunks 1 2″

“Sarah Goyen,” the owner of four slaves, was enumerated as the head of a household in the federal census taken September 14, 1810 in Chester County, page 255:

“Goyen, Sarah white female over 45
white female 16-26
white female 16-26
white male 10-16
white male 0-10”

Sarah “Sallie” Baxter Going wrote her will November 4, 1814:

“State of South Carolina }
Chester District }

I, Sarah Going of said state and district aforesaid, being in a low state of helth, but sound in mind and memory make this, my last will and testament.”

I give to my daughter Mary Going one feather bed and furniture, one cow named Harty and heifer, and I give to my daughter Rebekah Going one feather bed and furni-ture which my above daughters Mary and Rebekah claim, and I give to my daughter Rebekah one cow named Liby and I give to my son Thomas B. Going the tract of land or plantation where I, Sarah Going now live containing One hundred and seven acres in the state and district aforesaid, and it is my will and desire that my daughters Mary and Rebekah should live with my son Thomas on the said plantation while [they] remain unmarid, and I give to my daughter Rebekah one woman Saddle and pine table, one big wheel, and I give to my son Thomas Going one walnut table and one feather bed and furniture, one cow named Whiteface and dun cow I give to my daughter Mary.

All the rest of my property, my will is, to be sold and pay all my just debts except one large trunk I give to my daughter Rebekah, and after paying my just debts to be equally divided amongst my children.

And I do make my son Thomas B. Going sole Executor of my Estate as witness my hand and seal in the year of our Lord one Thousand eight hundred and fourteen, November 4 Day 1814.

Witnesses: Sarah [X] Going
Thomas Weir
Isaac Going
Sarah Tindall”

Sarah “Sallie” Baxter Going died in Union County April 22, 1820, at age 69, according to the research of Linda Sue Betts Essary, a descendant of Floyd, New Mexico. Her will was probated in the June 1820 court session, according to Chester County Deed Book H, page 9.

Children born to them include:

Martha Going born about 1768
Elijah Going born in 1770
Job Isaac Going born September 5, 1772
John Going born January 10, 1774
Isaac Going born April 28, 1775
James Going born in 1777
Mary “Polly” Going born in 1779
Elizabeth Going born about 1781
Rebecca Going born about 1782
Thomas Baxter Going born in 1784
Sarah Baxter Going born April 3, 1786

Linda Sue Betts Essary discovered another possible child of Drury Going in “South Carolina Magazine of Ancestral Research,” Volume 10. The item read, “Marion District, SC, Minutes Book of the Ordinary, 1806, Oct. 25, ‘Letters of Guardianship granted to Ann Adams, guardian for Selander Strother, supposed daughter of Drura Gowings, a minor aged about 14 years, late of Peedee.'”

Martha Going, daughter of Drury Going and Sarah “Sallie” Baxter Going, was born about 1768, probably in Chester County, according to Mary Virginia Rogers Boyles, a de-scendant of El Paso, Texas. She was married about 1790 to Larkin Asa Tindall, according to “Gateway to Texas” by Carolyn Ericson. “Essa Tindall” appeared as the head of a household in the 1790 census of Chester County. The Tindalls moved to Warren County, Georgia in the eastern part of the state where members of the Going family lived.

Moses Going and “Agness, his wife” of Louisa County, Virginia sold their land June 9, 1777 and later turned up in Warren County, Georgia.
When Warren County, Georgia was created, primarily with land from Wilkes County in 1793, “William Going, Moses Going and Jesse Going” were listed as taxpayers on the county’s first tax rolls in 1793 and 1794. Moses Going deeded 100 acres in Warren County to Warren Andrews July 21, 1793 which was “part of 780 acres originally granted to Ignatius Few in 1791,” according to Warren County Deed Book A, page 606. He received a Revolutionary land grant in Warren County in 1799. On October 16, 1800 he sold land “lying partly in Wilkes County and partly in Warren County on the Ogeechee River,” according to Warren County Deed Book B, page 14.

Moses Going and his wife Agnes Going gave a deed to James Cozart of Franklin County, Georgia to 648 acres of land May 29, 1795, according to Franklin County Deed Book M, page 132. Consideration was 100 pounds sterling.

They gave a deed to William Stith, Jr. October 7, 1795 to 465 acres, “being the western portion of 750 acres granted in 1791 to Ignatius Few,” according to Warren County Deed Book A, page 365. They gave a deed March 28, 1797 to Samuel Howell to 100 acres on Long Creek which had been granted in 1784 to Edmond Nugent, according to Warren County Deed Book A, page 538.

Moses Going and Agnes Going gave a deed to Prior Gardner June 23, 1797 to 92 acres on Long Creek, according to Warren County Deed Book 6, page 13. Moses Going “of Wilkes County” received a sheriff’s deed to land sold as property of William Sanders March 7, 1799, according to Warren County Deed Book A, page 632. Moses Going received a land grant in Warren County of 60 acres in 1799.

The name of William Going who was the progenitor of a large family began to appear as “William Goyne” in the records of Warren County. His descendants who spread across the south to Texas generally adopted the latter spelling.

“Asa Tindall” received a deed from Sarah Hill, “both of Warren County, Georgia” February 7, 1799 to “30 acres where the grantor lives,” according to Warren County Deed Book B, page 74. Witnesses were John Hill and Stephen Lawrence.

Larkin Asa Tindall and his family returned to South Carolina after a short time in Georgia. He was enumerated in the 1810 census of Chester County, September 14, 1810 as the owner of five slaves and the head of a household, page 255:

“Tindal, Asa white male 26-45
white female 26-45
white male 30-40
white male 16-26
white male 16-26
white female 10-16
white male 10-16
white female 10-16
white male 0-10
white female 0-10
white male 0-10”

“Martha Tindall” was a witness to the will of her mother written November 4, 1814.

Later the Tindalls removed to Limestone County, Alabama, according to Cynthia Holsomback McMullen, a descendant of Huntington, Texas. Larkin Asa Tindall died there December 10, 1841, according to Limestone County Will Book 5. Martha Going Tindall died there in 1842, according to the research of Fredrick W. Tucker, a descendant of Duncan, South Carolina.

Children born to them include:

Larkin Tindall born about 1791
John Tindall born about 1792
William Tindall born about 1794
Sarah Tindall born March 4, 1797
James G. Tindall born about 1800
Robert J. Tindall born May 8, 1802
Lucinda Tindall born November 22, 1803
Rutha Tindall born in 1806

Larkin Tindall, son of Larkin Asa Tindall and Martha Going Tindall, was born about 1791. Of this individual nothing more is known.

John Tindall, son of Larkin Asa Tindall and Martha Going Tindall, was born about 1792. Of this individual nothing more is known.

William Tindall, son of Larkin Asa Tindall and Martha Going Tindall, was born about 1794, probably in Union County. He was married about 1816, wife’s name Susanna L. They contin-ued in South Carolina in 1819. In 1836 they lived in Limestone County, Alabama. William Tindall died about 1848 in Nacogdoches County, Texas. Susanna L. Tindall died in Cherokee County, Texas about 1861.

Children born to them include:

Margaret C. Tindall born about 1819

Margaret C. Tindall, daughter of William Tindall and Susanna L. Tindall, was born in South Carolina about 1819. She was married to Azmond Rucker Easter February 17, 1836 in Lime-stone County, according to Linda Sue Betts Essary. He died about 1853, and she died in the spring of 1859 in Cherokee County, Texas.

Children born to them include:

Sackville E. Easter born November 2, 1850

Sackville E. Easter, son of Azmond Rucker Easter and Margaret C. Tindall Easter, was born November 2, 1850 in Cherokee County. He was married December 5, 1878 to Nancy Elizabeth Dunaway who was born June 26, 1858 in Texas to Clemmie Dunaway and Eliza Ann Cross Dunaway. In 1880 they lived in Johnson County, Texas. He died June 18, 1928 at Hollis, Ok-lahoma, and she died June 23, 1941 at Elmore, Oklahoma.

Children born to Sackville E. Easter and Nancy Elizabeth Dunaway Easter include:

John Cooper Easter born March 25, 1880

John Cooper Easter, son of Sackville E. Easter and Nancy Eliz-abeth Dunaway Easter, was born March 25, 1880 in Johnson County. He was married December 18, 1898 to Mollie Kate Killman who was born December 17, 1880 in Tarrant County, Texas to Henry Dizer Killman and Tena Elizabeth Bandy Kill-man. In 1907 they lived at Duke, Oklahoma. She died May 17, 1953 at Portales, New Mexico, and he died there December 1, 1961.

Children born to John Cooper Easter and Mollie Kate Killman Easter include:

Mamie Lou Easter born September 11, 1907

Mamie Lou Easter, daughter of John Cooper Easter and Mollie Kate Killman Ester, was born September 11, 1907. She was married August 24, 1923 to James Arthur Betts, son of James Isaac Betts and Lorena Ivy Betts. He was born January 3, 1886 in Pontotoc County, Mississippi. He died January 30, 1969 in Portales, and she died there April 10, 1980.

Children born to them include:

Linda Sue Betts born February 14, 1946

Linda Sue Betts, daughter of James Arthur Betts and Mamie Lou Easter Betts, was born February 14, 1946 at Portales. In 1991, she, a teacher, lived at Floyd, New Mexico.

Sarah Tindall, daughter of Larkin Asa Tindall and Martha Going Tindall, was born March 4, 1797 in Warren County, Georgia, according to Cynthia Holsomback McMullen. She was married about 1816 in Chester County, South Carolina to William P. Gaston who was born about 1797 to William Gaston and Ann Porter Gaston. He died there about 1822, and she was remarried about 1826 to Charles Cunningham who was born April 9, 1794. He died September 28, 1862. She died September 2, 1879 at age 82 and was buried in Cunningham Cemetery in Limestone County, Alabama.

Children born to William Porter Gaston and Sarah Tindall Gaston include:

Trusvan Cheives Gaston born about 1818
Asa Harper Gaston born about 1819
Martha Caroline Gaston born August 4, 1822

Children born to Charles Cunningham and Sarah Tindall Gaston Cunningham include:

Sarah Ann Cunningham born June 15, 1828
Margaret Isabel Cunningham born in 1830
Elizabeth C. Cunningham born about 1832
Charles Cunningham born March 17, 1835

Trusvan Cheives Gaston, son of William Porter Gaston and Sarah Tindall Gaston, was born about 1818 in Chester County. He was married about 1840 to Katherine Tindall Johnson who was born November 23, 1822 in North Carolina. He died in Limestone County, Alabama July 20, 1888. She died there August 10, 1892, according to Yvette Alanne Disbrow Wilson, a descendant of Ocala, Florida.

Children born to Trusvan Cheives Gaston and Katherine Tindall Johnson Gaston include:
William Harper Gaston born June 13, 1853

William Harper Gaston, son of Trusvan Cheives Gaston and Katherine Tindall Johnson Gaston, was born June 13, 1853 at Gilbertsboro, Alabama. He was married February 18, 1885 at Athens, Alabama to Virginia Dickson who was born August 11, 1850 to Col. Robert Dickson and Rowena A. Paine Dickson. She died June 3, 1892 in Limestone County, and he died there March 22, 1921.

Children born to them include:

Langdon Lee Gaston born April 2, 1891

Langdon Lee Gaston, son of William Harper Gaston and Vir-ginia Dickson Gaston, was born April 2, 1891 in Limestone County. He was married August 18, 1912 at Athens to Willie Wise who was born June 14, 1892. He died at Apopka, Florida July 16, 1961, and she died there September 18, 1966.

Children born to Langdon Lee Gaston and Willie Wise Gaston include:

Ruby Lee Gaston born April 21, 1915

Ruby Lee Gaston, daughter of Langdon Lee Gaston and Willie Wise Gaston, was born April 21, 1915 in Limeston County. She was married December 15, 1938 to George Henry Disbrow who was born November 13, 1907 in LaPorte, Indiana to Lewis Henry Disbrow and Ida May McNees Disbrow. George Henry Disbrow died January 21, 1981 at Eustis Lake, Florida.

Children born to them include:

George Allen Disbrow born October 31, 1939

George Allen Disbrow, son of George Henry Disbrow and Ruby Lee Gaston Disbrow, was born October 31, 1939 at Apopka. He was married December 14, 1958 at Newport, Rhode Island to Barbara Ann Sparks who was born May 22, 1937 in Cocke County, Tennessee to George Herbert Sparks and Essie Belle Ramsey Sparks.

Children born to them include:

Yvette Alanne Disbrow born July 30, 1963

Yvette Alanne Disbrow, daughter of George Allen Disbrow and Barbara Anne Sparks Disbrow, was born July 30, 1963 at Orlando, Florida. She was married October 3, 1987 to David Irving Wilson at Tavares, Florida. In 1996 they lived in Ocala where she, a member of the Foundation was active in the re-search of her Going family.

Martha Caroline Gaston, daughter of William P. Gaston and Sarah Tindall Gaston, was born August 4, 1822 in Chester County. She was married May 28, 1839 in Limestone County to George Winston Booth, son of Charles Booth and Lucy Ann Abernathy Boothe, according to Cynthia Holsomback Mc-Mullen. He died November 24, 1850 in Paducah, Kentucky “en route to Nacogdoches, Texas.” She died in Cherokee County, Texas May 10, 1877 and was buried in Mt. Zion Cemetery near Alto, Texas.

Children born to them include:

Thomas Trusvan Booth born August 12, 1840
Sarah Elizabeth Booth born in 1841
Lucy Ann Booth born April 23, 1842
William Porter Booth born in 1843
George Winston Booth, Jr. born August 11, 1845
Catherine Adele Booth born in 1847
Mary “Mollie” Booth born in 1848
Mattie C. Booth born November 21, 1850

Thomas Trusvan Booth, son of George Winston Booth and Martha Caroline Gaston Booth, was born August 12, 1840 in Limestone County. He was married there September 20, 1860 to Ann Elisah Vinson, daughter of Allen Vinson. He died October 31, 1910 in Cherokee County and was buried in Providence Cemetery, near Jacksonville. She died January 14, 1929 in Tarrant County, Texas and was buried beside her husband.
Thomas Trusvan Booth meticulously kept a bible record of his family and a journal in which he noted other information about his family. These records were the inspiration which prompted Cynthia Holsomback McMullen to undertake a study of the family history.

Children born to Thomas Trusvan Booth and Ann Elisah Vinson Booth include:

Lucy Alice Booth born August 15, 1861
Eudora Jane Booth born November 14, 1867
George Allen Booth born April 28, 1869
Zuela Salena Booth born December 19, 1870
Jennie Roxana Booth born October 13, 1872
Eunice Elvira Booth born July 16, 1874
Thomas Trusvan Booth, Jr. born July 28, 1876
Henry LaFayette Booth born March 11, 1879
Hubbard Jehu Booth born June 23, 1880
Leona Belle Booth born September 16, 1882
Birdie May Booth born January 16, 1887

Eunice Elvira Booth, daughter of Thomas Trusvan Booth and Ann Elisah Booth, was born July 16, 1874 in Texas. She was married September 15, 1895 to James Thomas Holsomback who was born October 1, 1870 to Thomas Newton Holsomback and Eleanor Odom Holsomback. She died April 14, 1899 in Cherokee County and was buried in Providence Cemetery.

A son was born to them:

James Otis Holsomback born March 25, 1899

James Otis Holsomback, son of James Thomas Holsomback and Eunice Elvira Booth Holsomback, was born March 25, 1899 in Cherokee County. He was married February 15, 1925 to Ethel Pryor.

James G. Tindall, son of Larkin Asa Tindall and Martha Going Tindall, was born about 1800. He was married about 1827 to Patience Rainbolt. They emigrated to Texas and settled at Nacogdoches. They were buried in Old North Church Cemetery there.

Rutha Tindall, daughter of Larkin Asa Tindall and Martha Going Tindall, was born in 1806. She was married about 1825, husband’s name McKinney. They settled in Parker County, Texas where her family was killed by Indians. She returned to Nacogdoches to live with her brother, James Tindall and his family.

Cynthia Holsomback McMullen on October 21, 1992 wrote, ” I have visited Old North Church Cemetery in Nacogdoches, and “Rutha McKinney, 1806-1865″ is buried next to James Tindall and Patience Rainbolt Tindall.”

Elijah Going, son of Drury Going and Sarah “Sallie” Baxter Going, was born in 1770 in Chester County. He was married to the “widow Docea” [believed to be Mary Docea] about 1793. Fredrick W. Tucker shows here name as Doshea Bland. Elijah Going was named co-administrator of the estate of his father July 26, 1796, along with his mother. He was a witness to the will of Aaron Lockert which was produced in Chester County Court January 30, 1799.

“Elijah Goin,” owner of three slaves, was enumerated as the head of a household in the 1800 census of Chester County, page 94:

“Goin, Elijah white male 26-45
white female 16-26
white male 16-26
white female 0-10”

Elijah Going filed his accounting on the estate of his father with Chester County Court: “Paid to Jobe Going July 17th day, 1802, 72:2; Paid to Asa Tindall July 17th day, 1802, 72:2; Paid to Isaac Going July 17th day, 1802, 72:2; Paid to James Going July 17th day, 1802, 72:2.

By me, Elijah Going this 19th day April 1803.Returned on oath by Elijah Going 19th day April 1803

J[oseph] A. Brown, Ordinary”

Elijah Going filed a receipt with the Chester County Court showing payments to Mary Going, “September 20th day 1805, paid to Mary Going Seventy-five Dollars; April 9th day, 1806 paid to Mary Going Two hundred and sixty-five dollars; paid to Mary Going February 16th day 1807 Twenty-nine dollars by me.
Elijah Going To[tal] $369”

It is believed that Elijah Going died about 1808. “Isaac Going, Administrator of the Estate of Elijah Going” received a receipt for a three dollar payment from James Anderson, January 11, 1809, according to Chester County probate records. Two children, names unknown, were born to Elijah Going and Doshea Bland Going, according to Fredrick W. Tucker.

Job Isaac Going, son of Drury Going and Sarah “Sallie” Baxter Going, was born September 5, 1772 at Flat Rock, South Carolina. Although the community of Flat Rock can no longer be located, it is believed to have been in Chester County. He was married there about 1805 to Rebecca Lockert who was born April 19, 1776 to Col. Aaron Lockert and Sarah Miles Lockert.

Job Isaac Going owned 100 acres which lay between the property of Isaac Going and Aaron Lockert, according to Chester County Deed Book M, page 199.

An entry dated January 30, 1799 in the Chester County Order Book 1795-1799, page 409 read, “The Last Will & Testament of Aaron Lockert Decd. was produced in open court and proved by the oaths of Joseph Brown, Charles Gilmore and Elijah Going, witnesses thereto, and ordered to be recorded, and at the same time came John Lockert, an executor nominated in the said will and took the oath of executor, according to law.”Isaac Goin” was enumerated as the head of a household in the 1800 census of Chester County page 90:

“Goin, Isaac white male 16-26
white female 16-26
white female over 45
white male 16-26
white female 10-16
white female 10-16
white male 0-10”

The “white female over 45” in the above enumeration is be-lieved to be his mother.

Col. Walter F. Going, Jr, Foundation member of Columbia, South Carolina, wrote February 23, 1996:
“I have in my possession the original certificate of the Grand Lodge of Charleston, SC [Royal Arch excellent Lodge of Masonry] declaring “Bro. Isaac Going Master of the Chair of the Lodge in Union, SC. This certificate is dated November 6, 1813 and states that the time of the admission of Isaac Going to the Lodge was March 10, 1800. This seems to establish that this Isaac Going was at least 21 years old and lived in Union County in 1800.”
“Isaac Going” was a witness to the will of his mother in Chester County November 4, 1814, according to Chester County Deed Book H, page 9.

They removed to Tuscaloosa County, Alabama in 1823. “Job Gowing” received a land grant there in that year. The land grant was recorded in “Tuscaloosa Land Office Register,” ac-cording to “Old Tuskaloosa Land Office Records & Military Warrants, 1821-1855,” page 18, by Marilyn Davis Barefield. “Joe Gowing” joined David Reid on February 22, 1823 in the purchase of land in Section 9, Township 21, Range 10 W in Tuscaloosa County.

He was listed as the head of a household there in 1830, ac-cording to “Alabama, An Index to the 1830 Census.” by Gandrud. The household of Job Isaac Going appeared on Page 330 as:

“Going, Job white male 50-60
white female 40-50
white male 20-30
white female 15-20
white female 15-20
white male 10-15
white male 10-15
Twelve Slaves”

Also enumerated in Tuscaloosa County was “Thomas Goings,” unidentified. His farm was located on the site of present-day Northport, Alabama, according to the research of Col. Carroll Heard Goyne. “Thomas Goings, white male, 40-50,” was recorded on Page 328, living alone.

Job Isaac Going died April 23, 1834, according to “Pioneers of Tuscaloosa County, Alabama Prior to 1830.” He was buried in Robertson Chapel Cemetery which in 1995 no longer existed. Col. Goyne located the cemetery in the southwest quarter of Section 12, Township 21S, Range 10W, presently on the golf course of a country club. Only one of the older graves [those marked with reddish-brown fieldstones] has a name to identify it: “Mary T. Cook, born June 14, 1805, daughter of R. Cook & S. Cook, dec’d. May 24, 1826.”

Rebecca Lockert Going petitioned the county court May 10, 1834 for letters testamentary on the administration of the estate of Job Isaac Going. William H. Terrell, Robert Walker, James Cardwell, William Findley and William Robertson were appoint appraisers of the estate by the court. Robert Cook, her brother-in-law was appointed co-administrator by the court. The estate was settled June 11, 1836.

Afterward, Rebecca Lockert Going removed to Pickens County, Alabama in the extreme western part of the state, apparently accompanying other members of the Going family. “Rebecca Gowing” received land in Section 5, Township 22, Range 15 West in Pickens County, Alabama October 6, 1834. The land grant was recorded in “Tuscaloosa Land Office Register,” according to “Old Tuskaloosa Land Office Records & Military Warrants, 1821-1855.”

“Pioneers of Tuscaloosa County, Alabama Prior to 1830” states that his Rebecca Lockert Going was remarried to John Lang March 15, 1826. According to Tuscaloosa County Or-phans Court Book 1, page 84, the heirs of Job Isaac Going were identified as “Rebecca Goyne Lang and John Lang, Polly Mc-Clure of Indiana, wife of Joseph McClure, Martha A. Going, Jane Evelyn Going, Eli Going and Alfred Going.”

“Rebecca Goyne” received 1/5 of the estate valued at $9,740.475, and the remainder was divided among the five children. Each child received $1,100.365 in cash and property for his share. Joseph McClure and Polly McClure, living in a non-slavery state, received cash in lieu of slaves.

Apparently the second marriage for Rebecca Lockert Going failed or John Lang also died. She resumed using the name “Going.”

Rebecca Lockert Going was recorded as a charter member of Oak Grove Presbyterian Church of Franconia, Alabama on May 20, 1837. Her land lay immediately north of the church site. Later this church became the First Presbyterian Church of Aliceville, Alabama, according to “Early Churches of Al-abama.” All of the 32 charter members of the congregation came from Kershaw, Union and Chester Districts of South Carolina.

Rebecca Lockert Going reappeared on the roster of the Oak Grove Presbyterian Church in April 1843. She appeared as the head of a household in the 1850 census of Pickens County, Household 1538:
“Going, Rebecca 73, born in South Carolina
Martha A. 40, born in South Carolina”

Rebecca Lockert Going died May 2, 1855 at the age of 79. She was buried in Franconia Cemetery in Pickens County.

Seven children were born to Job Isaac Going and Rebecca Lockert Going. Additionally, they reared Drennan Love, son of Capt. James Love. Their children included:

Mary “Polly” Going born about 1809
Martha A. Going born January 25, 1811
Jane E. Going born July 29, 1813
Eli Thomas Going born June 29, 1816
Alfred Elijah Going born March 4, 1819
Rebecca Going born about 1822

Mary “Polly” Going, daughter of Job Isaac Going and Rebecca Lockert Going, was born about 1809 at Flat Rock. She was brought to Tuscaloosa County, Alabama in 1823. She was married about 1830 to Joseph McClure. When her father died in 1834, they received $1,100.365 in cash. Since at that time they lived in Indiana, a “free” state, they were unable to inherit any of her father’s slaves.

Martha A. Going, daughter of Job Isaac Going and Rebecca Lockert Going, was born January 25, 1811 at Flat Rock, in Chester County. She was brought by her parents to Tuscaloosa County in 1823 She was mentioned as an heir when her father’s estate was administered in 1834. She was received into Oak Grove Presbyterian Church October 1, 1838, according to the church records. She also appeared on the church roster in April 1843.

She was recorded in the 1850 census at age 40, living in the household of her mother. She was married to Elder Archibald Hood May 4, 1854, according to the church records. He was born April 3, 1797, and she was his third wife. He was the tenth child of William Hood and Jane Wiggins Hood and had married first, about 1780, Annie Somerville, daughter of James Somerville and Elizabeth Fletcher Somerville. He remarried about 1831 to Mary Miller, daughter of Eli Miller and Ellen Knox Miller. He died March 25, 1871, and Martha A. Going Hood died September 30, 1873. They were buried in Franconia Cemetery.

Jane E. Going, daughter of Job Isaac Going and Rebecca Lockert Going, was born July 29, 1813, probably in Chester County. She was brought to Tuscaloosa County in 1823. She was mentioned as an heir in the settlement of the estate of her father. She was married about 1837 to Benjamin J. Hughes who was born December 4, 1804. Benjamin J. Hughes died May 4, 1878, and Jane E. Going Hughes died March 26, 1880. Both were buried in Franconia Cemetery in the Going section. They had seven or eight children, according to a letter written August 11, 1947 by Walter S. Going of Birmingham, Alabama.

Known children are:

Ben Jolly Hughes born about 1840
Rufus L. Hughes baptized April 10, 1842
Martha C. Hughes baptized April 23, 1844
Ann Foster Hughes baptized April 2, 1847
Mary T. Hughes born March 5, 1849

Evelyn Somerville, identified as a granddaughter of Benjamin J. Hughes and Jane E. Going Hughes, was born in 1885. Her obituary reveals much about the Going family:

“Evelyn Somerville, 73, died May 19, near Aliceville, Alabama at ‘Ingleside,’ home of her grandparents, Benjamin J. and Jane Going Hughes, in which pillared house she was born. Graduate of the University of Alabama, where she was a Phi Beta Kappa in 1906, she received a M.A. degree at Drexel Institute in New York City. For a generation she followed her beloved library work at Troy College and at Livingston State Teachers College. She was also a librarian at Tuscaloosa, Fayette and Birmingham, Alabama and at Columbus, Ohio.

Prominent in state and local patriotic societies, she was also a leader in Presbyterian “Women of the Church” at all levels. Her only survivor is a nephew, James S. Somerville with family, except for numerous cousins. Her Revolutionary ancestors appeared in the 1790 census of Chester County, South Carolina at Lockert Shoals of the east bank of Broad River. Living there in adjoining households were Capt. James Love III [1763-1807], Drury Going and Col. Aaron Lockert who changed the spelling of his name [Lockhart] since his parents and brothers in Pennsylvania were all Tories.

Capt. James Love and his brother, William Love were married to daughters of Col. Lockert, as did Drury Go-ing who reared the captain’s orphan son, Drennan Love as a foster brother to his daughter, Jane E. Going Hughes. Drennan Love in 1827 was married to Betsy Cook, granddaughter of Drury Going. Twelve children, nine sons and three daughters, were born to the couple. Moreover, John Lockert was guardian of nephews, the captain’s sons Aaron Love, John Love and David Love, hence the close connection of these pioneer families for over 100 years, notably in the area they helped to develop along the Alabama-Mississippi state line. There they prospered as cotton planters with ante-bellum mansions and where Evelyn Somerville is buried in Franconia churchyard in Pickins County, Alabama.”

Eli Thomas Going, son of Job Isaac Going and Rebecca Lockert Going, was born at Flat Rock June 29, 1816. He was brought to Tuscaloosa County in 1823. He was mentioned in the Tuscaloosa County Orphans Court Book 1, page 84 as an heir in his father’s estate. He removed with his mother to Pick-ens County in 1835. On October 14, 1838 he was received into Oak Grove Presbyterian Church. He was baptized November 25, 1838.

On January 18, 1839 he was married to Jane M. Somerville, third child of John Somerville and Sarah Hood Somerville, who was born April 5, 1815 in South Carolina. John Somerville was one of three brothers who lived in Kershaw District. He was born in South Carolina December 11, 1780 and died in Pickens County August 14, 1857, according to Mrs. Eddie R. Reed, Aliceville, Alabama who later owned John Somerville’s bible. Sarah Hood Somerville was born in South Carolina June 30, 1785 and died in Pickens County February 25, 1867. Both were buried at Oak Grove Presbyterian Church Cemetery near Aliceville.

John Somerville was a brother to Hugh Somerville who was born in 1780. Both married daughters of William Hood of Beaver Creek Township, Kershaw County. William Hood left a will in Kershaw County signed October 5, 1827, according to the research of Leonard Andrea, Columbia, South Carolina.

In 1842 Eli Thomas Going was a deacon at Oak Grove Presbyterian Church. He and his wife were carried on the church roll in April 1843.

Eli Thomas Going and Jane M. Somerville in 1852 continued to live at Pleasant Grove. In 1868, Rev. Eli Thomas Going was shown as a visiting minister at the First Presbyterian Church at Carrollton, Alabama, some eight miles north of Aliceville. During the Civil War and for many years afterward he was a U. S. mail contractor, according to “Notable Men of Alabama” published in 1876. He appeared as a bondsman for the marriage of his son, William Samuel Going to S. E. Johnston April 19, 1887, according to Pickens County marriage records.

Eli Thomas Going died at Benevola, Alabama June 28, 1889, and Jane M. Somerville Going died September 16, 1892, ac-cording to “Records of Pickens County, Alabama,” Vol. III by Mrs. C. P. McGuire, Sr. They were buried in Franconia Cemetery.

Children born to Eli Thomas Going and Jane M. Somerville Going include:

Sarah Asenath “Sallie” Going born Dec. 7, 1839

James Alfred Going born January 8, 1842
Mary Sophia “Mollie” Going born December 31, 1843
Martha Jane Going born January 4, 1846
John S. Going born April 5, 1848
William Samuel Going born January 22, 1851
Job Going born November 29, 1852

Eli Lockert Going born February 18, 1855

Sarah Asenath “Sallie” Going, daughter of Eli Thomas Going and Jane M. Somerville Going, was born December 7, 1839 in Pickens County. She died March 21, 1863 unmarried and was buried in Franconia Cemetery.

James Alfred Going, son of Eli Thomas Going and Jane M. Somerville Going, was born January 8, 1842 in Pickens County. He was baptized April 10, 1842 at Oak Grove Presbyterian Church. He attended the University of Alabama for a short time prior to the Civil War. He enlisted in the Second Alabama Infantry Regiment and later served as the color bearer for Company D, Forty-second Alabama Infantry Regiment. He was listed as third corporal in the 42nd, according to “History of Pickens County, Alabama.”

Brig. Gen. John C. Moore, CSA, wrote a report on Corp. James Alfred Going who participated in the Battle of Corinth and the Battle of Hatchie Bridge. Gen. Moore commanded Moore’s Brigade of Maury’s Division in the Battle of Holly Springs, Mississippi October 13, 1862, according to “War Department Series,” Vol. 17. He wrote, “Subject deserves special notice. He was color bearer, and though once shot down, he gallantly bore the flag through the fight on the 4th.” After he was wounded in the Battle of Corinth he participated in the Battle of Vicksburg.

James Alfred Going was married about 1867 to Myrtis Billups, daughter of Col. Richard Billups and Eliza Humphries Billups of Pickens County. Col. Billups was born in 1796 in South Carolina, and his wife was born there in 1801.

He was remarried January 25, 1888 to Ella Gaines Parker, daughter of Socrates Parker of Livingston, Alabama in nearby Sumter County. He was later engaged in insurance, real estate and the mercantile business in Birmingham, Alabama. He died there December 29, 1911.

Children born to James Alfred Going and Myrtis Billups Going include:

William Rufus Going born about 1869
Henry S. Going born about 1871
Richard B. Going born about 1874

Children born to James Alfred Going and Ella Gaines Parker Going include:

Richard B. Going born April 20, 1872
Elizabeth Pryor Going born about 1880

Richard B. Going, son of James Alfred Going and Ella Gaines Parker Going, was born April 20, 1872. First Lt. Richard B. Going served in the First Alabama Infantry Regiment during the Spanish-American War. Later he served in the Forty-fourth U.S. Infantry Regiment. His first term of military service reached from April 21, 1898 to 1903. Then He became a career officer with the U.S. Army. In 1946 Col. Richard B. Going, retired lived in Philadelphia.

Elizabeth Pryor Going, daughter of James Alfred Going and Ella Gaines Parker Going, was born about 1880. She was mar-ried about 1900, husband’s name Boykin. About 1946 she lived at 3214 Cliff Road, Birmingham.

Children born to them include:

Rhodes Boykin born about 1905
Elinore Boykin born about 1908
Betty Boykin born about 1911

Mary Sophia “Mollie” Going, daughter of Eli Thomas Going and Jane M. Somerville Going, was born December 31, 1843 in Pickens County. She was baptized July 11, 1844 at Oak Grove Presbyterian Church, according to church records. She was married about 1870 to G. W. Hughes. Mary Sophia “Mollie” Going Hughes died September 28, 1872. G. W. Hughes, who was born July 30, 1842, died November 11, 1915. Both were buried in Franconia Cemetery.

Children born to them include:

Mary Going Hughes born September 19, 1875

Mary Going Hughes, daughter of G. W. Hughes and Mary Sophia “Mollie” Going Hughes, was September 19, 1875. She was married about 1896, husband’s name Morrow. In 1946 she lived at Tuscaloosa, Alabama.

Children born to them include:

Thomas A. Morrow born about 1898
Mary Morrow born about 1900
James Morrow born about 1903

Martha Jane Going, daughter of Eli Thomas Going and Jane M. Somerville Going, was born in Pickens County January 4, 1846. She died at age two November 7, 1848 and was buried in Franconia Cemetery.

John S. Going, son of Eli Thomas Going and Jane Somerville Going, was born in Pickens County April 5, 1848. He appeared on the roster of the Oak Grove Presbyterian Church between 1863 and 1873. He was married about 1871 to Nannie Wilson. He was a bondsman for the marriage of his brother, William Samuel Going to E. S. Johnston April 9, 1887, according to Pickens County marriage records. He died in Birmingham in September 1922.

Children born to John S. Going and Nannie Wilson Going include:
Howard Wilson Going born November 14, 1884
Evelyn Going born June 6, 1889
Augusta Going born about 1895

Howard Wilson Going, son of John S. Going and Nannie Wil-son Going, was born November 14, 1884. He was married about 1907, wife’s name Rose. In 1946 they lived in Oak Park, Illinois.
Children born to Howard Wilson Going and Rose Going in-clude:
Paul Going born about 1910
Mariam Going born about 1915

Augusta Going, daughter of John S. Going and Nannie Wilson Going, was born about 1895. She was married about 1918 to Paul Sherman.

Children born to them include:

Jane Sherman born about 1921

Evelyn Going, daughter of John S. Going and Nannie Wilson Going, was born June 6, 1889. She was married about 1910, husband’s name Webster. In 1946 she lived in Hamilton, On-tario.

William Samuel Going, son of Eli Thomas Going and Jane Somerville Going, was born in Pickens County January 22, 1851. “W. S. Going” was married to Elizabeth S. Johnston April 9, 1887. Signing the marriage bond was John S. Going, Alfred Elijah Going and Eli Lockert Going, his brothers. He was an early-day member of the First Presbyterian Church of Birmingham, according to “Some Early Alabama Churches.” He died in Birmingham.

Children born to William Samuel Going and Elizabeth S. Johnston Going include:

Clarence Johnston Going born January 25, 1888

Clarence Johnston Going, son of William Samuel Going and Elizabeth S. Johnston Going, was born in Birmingham January 25, 1888. He was married about 1912 to Louise Thornbury. He continued there in 1946 at 1117 S. 10th Street.

Children born to Clarence Johnston Going and Louise Thorn-bury Going include:

William Going born about 1914
Alan Going born about 1917

Job Going, son of Eli Thomas Going and Jane M. Somerville Going, was born at Pleasant Grove November 29, 1852. A biographical sketch of him is included in “Notable Men of Alabama” by Dubose. According to the sketch, he was a name-sake of his grandfather, Job Isaac Going. He appeared on the roster of Oak Grove Presbyterian Church from 1863 to 1873.

On December 9, 1880, Job Going was married to Maude Slaughter, daughter of Samuel Slaughter and Mary Slaughter of Petersburg, Tennessee. In 1882 he went to work for Drennan & Company, a mercantile firm in Birmingham.

In 1890, Job Going removed to Pratt City, Alabama, later ex-tinct, where he became a merchant and an elder in the Presbyte-rian church. Maude Slaughter Going died January 26, 1920, and he died in Birmingham December 2, 1927.

His obituary was published in a Birmingham newspaper:

“Job Going, 75, pioneer citizen of Birmingham, died at his residence, 1125 Louise Street, South at 7:30 a.m. Friday. He was ill two weeks, following a breakdown.

Surviving are four sons: Walter and Hugh Going of Birmingham; Raymond and Herbert of California; one brother, W. S. Going and several nephews. His wife, Maude Slaughter Going died January 26, 1920.”

Job Going was born at Pleasant Grove, Pickens County, Alabama, November 30, 1852. He came to Birmingham in 1883 and had lived here since. For years he engaged in the merchandising business in Pratt City, making many friends.

He manifested an interest in the affairs of this section and was elected to the Jefferson County Board of Rev-enue in 1904 and was reelect for a second term, being chosen president of the board. He was an ardent worker in the position, and many developments started at that time throughout the county are to be credited to his vi-sion. At the time of his death, he was engaged with his sons in the road machinery business, being president of Going Road Machinery Company, Inc.

Mr. Going was an elder of the Second Presbyterian Church of Birmingham, a member of the Knights of Pythias and Woodmen of the World. The funeral will be conducted at 11 a.m. Saturday at the Second Presby-terian Church, 12th Street at 10th Avenue, South, with burial in Oak Hill Cemetery. Active pallbearers will be Henry S. Going, Clarence J. Going, Rhodes Boykin, nephews; Gardner Sommerville, W. G. Spence, James D. Duncan, R. B. Coleman, Dr. John Douglass and Charles Morgan. Honorary pallbearers are the elders and deacons of the Second Presbyterian Church and members of the Pratt City Knights of Pythias Lodge.”

Children born to Job Going and Maude Slaughter Going in-clude:

Herbert Watson Going born October 8, 1882
Walter Somerville Going born December 2, 1884
Raymond Eli Going born August 8, 1889
Hugh Campbell Going born Sept. 15, 1892

Herbert Watson Going, son of Job Going and Maude Slaughter Going, was born about 1882, probably in Birmingham. He was a partner with his father in Pratt City in a mercantile business. He was married to Ruth Danahoe September 10, 1915. In 1917 they lived in Calexico, California.
Children born to Herbert Watson Going and Ruth Danahoe
Going include:

Betty Edmunds Going born in 1917

Walter Somerville Going, son of Job Going and Maude Slaughter Going, was born December 2 1884, probably in Birmingham. He attended Auburn College. He was married January 1, 1919 to Helen Margaret Newhall.

Children born to Walter Somerville Going and Helen Margaret Newhall include:

Walter Sommerville Going, Jr. born October 1, 1919
Grace Margaret Going born November 16, 1923

Raymond Eli Going, son of Job Going and Maude Slaughter Going, was born August 8, 1889, probably in Birmingham. He was married about 1926 to Jessie Woodward Jones. He died September 18, 1929. No children were born to Raymond Eli Going and Jessie Woodward Jones Going.
Hugh Campbell Going, son of Job Going and Maude Slaughter Going, was born September 15, 1892, probably in Birmingham. He was married July 2, 1921 to Alice B. Wheeler. He died December 23, 1929 in Birmingham.

Children born to Hugh Campbell Going and Alice B. Wheeler Going include:

Hugh Campbell Going, Jr. born October 16, 1925

Eli Lockert Going, son of Eli Thomas Going and Jane M. Somerville Going, was born February 10, 1855 in Pickens County. He was a bondsman for the marriage of his brother, William Samuel Going April 9, 1887, according to Pickens County marriage records. He died January 31, 1922.

Alfred Elijah Going, son of Job Isaac Going and Rebecca Lockert Going, was born March 4, 1819 in Chester District, South Carolina. He was brought to Tuscaloosa County, Al-abama in 1823. He was mentioned as an heir in the estate of his father which was administered in 1834. His family removed to Pickens County, Alabama in 1835.

He was married to Miss Marion A. Wigginton September 5, 1841 at Princeton, Kentucky, according to Caldwell County Marriage Book 2, as abstracted in “First Caldwell County, Kentucky Marriage Books.” Marriage Record Books 1-21 were transcribed by E. Arwana Kyle for the volume. Marion A. Wigginton Going was born May 25, 1818.

“Marion S. Going” appeared on the roll of Oak Grove Pres-byterian Church in Pickins County in 1843. He appeared on the membership roster of Oak Grove Presbyterian Church be-tween 1853 and 1860.
On December 16, 1854 Alfred Elijah Going received land in Section 13, Township 22, Range 14W in Pickens County. The land grant was recorded in “Tuscaloosa Land Office Reg-ister,” according to “Old Tuskaloosa Land Office Records & Military Warrants, 1821-1855” by Marilyn Davis Barefield.

He became totally blind by 1857, according to a letter written February 3, 1857 by his uncle, Isaac Going of Union District.
Marion A. Wigginton Going died July 6, 1881 and was buried in Franconia Cemetery, Franconia, Alabama. Alfred Elijah Going joined his brothers Eli Lockert Going and John S. Going as bondsmen on a marriage application of W. S. Going and Elizabeth S. Johnston April 9, 1887. He died February 27, 1896 and was buried beside his wife.

Children born to Alfred Elijah Going and Marion A. Wigginton Going include:

Rebecca Jane Going born in 1842
Mary Bell Going born August 29, 1844
Susan Augusta Going born in 1847
John Job Going born December 25, 1848
Thomas Henry Going born January 9, 1851
Emily Augusta Going born in 1855
Martha Josephine Going born July 29, 1859

Rebecca Jane Going, daughter of Alfred Elijah Going and Marion A. Wigginton Going, was born in 1842. She was bap-tized October 25, 1842, according to the records of Oak Grove Presbyterian Church. She was married about 1866 to J. W. Bridges.

Mary Bell Going, daughter of Alfred Elijah Going and Marion A. Wigginton Going, was born August 29, 1844 in Pickens County. She was admitted to the Oak Grove Presbyterian Church about 1863. On December 26, 1871, she was married to E. G. Mobley who was born January 8, 1836. E. G. Mobley, who died September 28, 1896, and she was remarried about 1900, husband’s name Freeman. She died January 1, 1916 and was buried in Bethany Presbyterian Church Cemetery in Pick-ens County, located five miles east of Aliceville, Alabama, ac-cording to “Mississippi Cemetery and Bible Records,” Vol. 5.

Susan Augusta Going, daughter of Alfred Elijah Going and Marion A. Wigginton Going, was born September 23, 1846 and was baptized as an infant April 1, 1847 at Oak Grove Presbyte-rian Church. She died October 18, 1851 at age five and was buried in Franconia Cemetery.
John Job Going, son of Alfred Elijah Going and Marion A. Wigginton Going, was born December 25, 1848. He died at age three February 24, 1852 and was buried in Franconia Cemetery.

Thomas Henry Going, son of Alfred Elijah Going and Marion A. Wigginton Going, was born January 9, 1851 in Pickens County. He died at age 16 March 22, 1867 and was buried in Franconia Cemetery.

Emily Augusta Going, daughter of Alfred Elijah Going and Marion A. Wigginton Going, was born in 1855 in Pickens County. She was married about 1875 to Edward E. Rose who was born in 1855 in Greene County, Alabama. They removed to Fayette, Alabama before 1880. He later served as mayor of Fayette. She died there in 1943, and he died there in August 1953.

Children born to them include:

James Edward Rose born about 1877
Thomas Alfred Rose born about 1880
William Rose born in 1890
Ernestine Rose born about 1894

Martha Josephine Going, daughter of Alfred Elijah Going and Marion A. Wigginton Going, was born July 29, 1859 in Pickens County. “Josephine Going” was baptized in 1860, according to the records of Oak Grove Presbyterian Church. She was married May 12, 1886 at age 26 to James K. Martin. Martha Josephine Going Martin died July 22, 1900 and was buried in Franconia Cemetery.

Mrs. W. S. Morrow, a descendant of Alfred Elijah Going and her husband were the only members of First Presbyterian Church of Aliceville 100 years after the founding of Oak Grove

Presbyterian Church who were descendants of the charter members of the church.

Rebecca Going, daughter of Job Isaac Going and Rebecca Lockert Going, was born about 1822, probably in Chester County. It is believed that she died before 1834 because she was not mentioned as an heir in the administration of her fa-ther’s estate in that year.

Other unidentified members of the Going family appear in the records of Oak Grove Presbyterian Church:

Mahala Going was an early-day member of the church, [no dates given.]

Mrs. Maude Going were received into the congregation were received into the congregation between 1875 and 1882.

Teeny Going was received into the church September 22, 1839.

William I. Going was received into the congregation between 1853 and 1860.

Going Jay, Tyler Polk Jay, James Jay, Mary Jay and Lewis Jay were received into the church between 1863 and 1873.

Other members of the Going family appear in various Pickens County records:

Al Going was married to Mollie Wells December 24, 1886, according to “Pickens County, Alabama Marriages, 1881-1892.” Children born to Al Going and Mollie Wells Going are unknown.

On the same day and probably in a double wedding, Lewis Going was married to Rebecca Wells December 24, 1886, according to “Pickens County, Alabama Marriages, 1881-1892.” Of Lewis Going and Rebecca Wells Going nothing more is known.
==O==
“Lewis Going” was mentioned in a report of First Lt. Charles W. Stratham, Lee’s Battery, writing from prison camp. The report, carried in “War Department Series,” Volume 2, concerned an engagement fought at Rich Mountain, West Virginia. The report was dated at Rich Mountain Pass June 13, 1861. Lt. Stratham mentioned that Lewis Going was “injured in the arm in a gallant defense of his battery which was overrun by superior forces.”
==O==
John Going, son of Drury Going and Sarah “Sallie” Baxter Going, was born January 10, 1774, probably in Chester District. Linda Goings, family historian, suggests that he was born in Camden District, Fairfield County.

He may have been the John Going was married April 7, 1806 to Mildred Eubanks in Columbia County, Georgia, according to “Columbia County, Georgia Marriage Records. 1787-1863.” John Going died February 3, 1819.

Children born to John Going and Mildred Eubanks Going include:

Joseph Going born about 1790

Lucinda Going born about 1793

Joseph Going, son of John Going and Mildred Eubanks Going, was born about 1790 in Columbia County, 16 years before the marriage of his parents, according to Linda Goings.

Joseph Going was married to “Miss Jude Kindrick” No-vember 1, 1822 according to Columbia County Marri-age Book A, page 181. She is identified as the daughter of Austin Kendrick and Mary Wiley Kendrick. Joseph Going and Judith Kendrick Going lived in Columbia County until about 1850, then moved to Dougherty County, Georgia and then later to Worth County, Geor-gia.

“Judah Kendrick Going” was mentioned in “The Georgia Land Lottery Papers, 1805-1914,” page 294:

“Columbia County, Lot 56-9 Lee. Addison Hassel, formerly Addison Kendrick [illegitimate child of Judah Kendrick, now Judah Going], his name having been changed by an act of the General Assembly, 1826 session, see Dawsons Digest, page 329, appoints Dr. Nathan Crawford as att’y for himself and Littleberry A. Kendrick of Alabama, to take out a grant to lot 56, 9th Dist. Lee County. Signed: Addison Hassel before James D. Green, J.P, 15 June 1843.

Pers. app’d. Addison Hassel, formerly Addison Kendrick, to claim Lot 56-9-1 of the 1827 Lottery, drawn by Judah Greene’s illegitimate children, which was in error when entered and should have been Judah Kendrick’s illegitimate children. Signed Addison Hassel before James D. Green, J.P, June 15, 1843.”

Children born to Joseph Going and Judith Kendrick Going include:

John W. Going born in 1831

John W. Going, son of Joseph Going and Judith Kendrick Going, was born in Columbia County in 1831, according to the research of Linda Goings. He was married May 7, 1849 in Stewart County, Georgia to Nancy A. Nelson. “John W. Goins” was married to Nancy Nelson May 27, 1849, according to “Stewart County, Georgia Marriages. 1823-1864.”

John W. Going served as a Confederate soldier from Worth County, Georgia during the Civil War, according to the research of Linda Goings.

Children born to John W. Going and Nancy A. Nelson Going include:

Jessie T. Goings born March 5, 1860

William D. Goings born August 14, 1862

Jessie T. Goings, son of John W. Going and Nancy A. Nelson Going, was born March 5, 1860. He was married about 1883 to Nettie A. Smith. He died March 9, 1834 in Moultrie, Georgia.

William D. Goings, son of John W. Going and Nancy A. Nelson Going, was born August 14, 1862. He was married to Ananet Abigail Smith, according to Linda Goings. He died February 23, 1934 in Moultrie.
Miss Lucinda Going was married to Nowell Kindrick, perhaps a brother of Jude Kindrick December 29, 1826, according to Columbia County Marriage Book A, page 206. She is regarded as a brother to Joseph Going by Linda Goings.
==O==
Isaac Going, son of Drury Going and Sarah “Sallie” Baxter Going, was born April 28, 1775 in Chester District.
Isaac Going deeded 131 acres of land in April 1799 to Robert Love, according to Chester County Deed Book G, page 26.

In October 1801 Isaac Going deeded 27 acres to John Love, according to Chester County Deed Book H, page 444.

He was baptized at the June meeting of the Pacolet [later Skull Shoals] Baptist Church in 1803, and became a Mason in the same year, according to the research of Fredrick M. Tucker, a descendant of Duncan, South Carolina. He was married August 21, 1804 to Rebecca Palmer, seventh child of John W. Palmer and Martha “Patty” Williams Palmer of Union District, South Carolina. Rebecca Palmer Going was born February 1, 1789.
John W. Palmer was born September 6, 1753, according to the research of Ethel Weber Walling and Estelle Weber Dunbar. He was the son of William Palmer who was born February 18 1727 in N. Farnham Parish in Richmond County, Virginia.

William Palmer was the son of Robert Palmer and his second wife Martha Freeman who were married about 1724. Robert Palmer was the son of John Palmer who was born in Northumberland County, Virginia. John Palmer is regarded as the son of Thomas Palmer who was born in Great Britain about 1590 and emigrated to Virginia in 1621 aboard the
“Tyger.”

Children born to John W. Palmer and Martha “Patty” Williams Palmer include:

Amasa Palmer born July 22, 1774
William Palmer born July 16, 1776
Ezekiel Palmer born November 9, 1778
John Palmer born February 13, 1780
Nancy Palmer born about 1783
Sallie Palmer born October 15, 1786
Rebecca Palmer born Febuary 1, 1789
Ellis Palmer born August 22, 1792
Rhoda Palmer born August 7, 1796

Rhoda Palmer was married about 1814 to Joseph McKissick, thought to be namesake of Isaac McKissick Going who was born September 2, 1818. Rhoda Palmer McKissick died October 25, 1882 at the age of 86.

A receipt was issued by James W. Darby, deputy clerk to Isaac Going January 4, 1808, “Rec’d of Mr. Isaac Gowing One Dollar for serving done in Pinckney. Office removed to Union.”

Another receipt read, “Rec’d of Isaac Going Three Dollars in full of a debt due me by Isaac Going, Administrator of the Es-tate of Elijah Going. James Anderson, January 11, 1809.”

On the same date, Isaac Going and his brother-in-law Larkin Asa Tindall posted a bond in connection with the guardianship of Thomas Going, minor. The child is believed to be a son of his deceased brother, Elijah Going and Mary Docea Going. The bond read:

“South Carolina

Know all men by these presents that we, Isaac Going and Asa Tindall are held & firmly bound to Joseph Brown, Ordinary of Chester District in the just and full Sum of Five Thousand Dollars to be paid to said Joseph Brown or his successors ordinary of the said District or their certain attorney or assigns to which payment well & truly to be made. we bind our selves & every of our —- & every of our heirs, executors and administrators on the whole & for who jointly and severally by these presents Sealed & dated this Eleventh day of January of our Lord One thousand Eight hundred and nine, the thirty-third year of American Independence.

The condition of this obligation is such that if the above bounded Isaac Goin shall carefully & lovingly bring up Thomas Going, infant son of Mary [Nancy?] Going Dec’d and during the time of his minority with necessary food & drink —- ——- —– & — — learning, according to his degree & ——- —- —- shall be guardian & tutor to the said Ward shall preserve him —– — —– or loss of lands or goods as far as in him lies and all such portions as shall fall due to the said Ward —- of the goods chattels of any person whatsoever shall pay & deliver to him when he shall come to age, to receive the same & the said shall happen to — before that time & if the said Isaac Going do in such case pay such portion to whom-soever shall be entitled to the same by Law & Bond a just & true account of his said guardianship & I save harmless the said Ordinary on account of granting the said Letters Guardianship, then this obligation to be void or else to remain of force.

Isaac Going
Asa Tindall”

Rebecca Palmer Going was received into Skull Shoals Baptist Church in July 1804. Martha “Patty” Williams Palmer died August 19, 1813, and John Palmer died January 28, 1828, ac-cording to Thomas Baxter Going.

“Isaac Going” was a witness to the will of his mother November 4, 1814, according to Chester County Deed Book H, page 9. Isaac Going was enumerated as the head of a household in the 1830 census of Union District, page 182:

“Going, Isaac white male 50-60
white female 40-50
white male 20-30
white male 10-15
white male 10-15
white male 5-10
white female 5-10
white male 0-5
white male 0-5”

Isaac Going was shown as the owner of 11 slaves in the enu-meration, listed as:

“one female 55-100
one female 36-55
one male 36-55
four males 10-24
one female 10-24
two males 0-10
two females 0-10”

“Isaac Goings, Esquire,” reappeared in the 1840 census of Union District, page 230. Seven members of the household were engaged in agriculture:

“Goings, Isaac, Esq. white male 60-70
white female 50-60
white female 15-20
white male 10-15
white male 5-10
white female 5-10
white male 0-5”

He owned eight slaves recorded as:

“one female 55-100
one male 36-55
one female 36-55
one male 24-36
two males 10-24
one female 10-24
one male 0-10”

In his later years Isaac Going had very poor eyesight. Rebecca Palmer Going died August 31, 1855. Isaac Going wrote a letter to his nephew Alfred Elijah Going February 3, 1857:

“Union District, South Carolina
February 3, 1857
To Alfred E. Going
Dear Nephew,

It is with the kindest feeling of respect that I undertake to answer your kind letter which came safe to hand. I was truly glad that you were prompted to write me so interesting a letter respecting my relatives. I believe yours is the first letter that I have received from the family; sometime I have heard of your verbally. I feel sorrow to hear of your blindness and can sympathize with you, for I know the lack of eyesight. I have not been totally blind as you, to be led about; the roads that I have been accustomed to travel I can of a light day make my way along with a staff.

My wife died last day of August 1855 after a few hours of sickness, we lived a long life together, we had eleven children. I will give you all their names. The first is Thomas Baxter, Sarah, John Madison, Elijah, Drury, Rhoda, Isaac Mack, William, Amasa Vernon, Elisha and the youngest is Martha Keron Happuch. Elijah, John and Isaac Mack are dead. I have six grandchildren married. I am eighty-two years old the 28th day of next April–if I should live to see it.

I joined the Baptist Church and was baptized June 1803, of which I have been a member ever since. I served the church as deacon forty-five years. During the time since I became acquainted with myself and blessed Redeemer, I have met with many a sore conflict, but by the grace of God enabling me I have continued to this day. I have served as an active magistrate twenty-four years. Three of my children joined the Baptist church, Thomas Baxter, John and Rhoda. Thomas Baxter is now acting deacon and clerk of the same church to which I am a member. I have three children living with me, two boys and one girl; the rest of them are married. As to this world’s goods, their progress has not been so great as others, yet they are enabled to live.

Negro men rate from one thousand to twelve hundred dollars, likely young girls rate at nine hundred dollars. the price of land is from ten to twelve dollars an acre. We have had several bad crop years; corn brings 75c per bushel readily, flour eight dollars per barrel. Pork sells at 7c gross. Our country is nearly all cleared and worn out, but reclaimed land with proper cultivation produces tolerably well.

The settlement your father moved from does not look like the same country; the generation of people that then lived are near all dead and moved away, the country nearly cleared and covered with swarms of negroes.

Tell Joseph Cook that his old Uncle Josiah Cook is yet living and very rich without heirs, that he should do well to visit us next summer as he speaks of coming or any of the rest of the connections.

If these few lines should be so fortunate as to reach you, please write me on receipt of the same about all of the relations, who is dead and who is alive, who is rich and who is poor, and the current news of the country. I have one grandson who follows overseeing, spoke of visiting you this winter, wishes to know what he could get per year for overseeing in your country. I think he is declined going away till next winter.

I would be very glad if I could enjoy myself in your company, but I will never expect it as my days will soon be numbered according to the course of nature. I have lived a long time, can witness the assertion of the Scriptures where it says, “Many are the afflictions of the righteous, yet the Lord delivers them out of them all.”

Please to write to whether Andrew McGuire received his pension of Merry McGuire, his grandfather.

I believe I have written most of the general news. I must come to a close shortly. I am bouyed up to think that I have not much longer to stay here in a state of blindness, but I expect a day soon when I shall be received up into heaven, when I shall not need these poor blind eyes to give sight, for the Lord God in his dazzling glory is the light of that place. I must come to a close by wishing you prosperity through life, and at last be received at the right hand of God.

Give my best wishes to all of my inquiring friends, so farewell.
Isaac Going”

Rebecca Palmer Going died August 1, 1855 at age 66 and was buried in the Going family cemetery in Union District. Isaac Going was enumerated as the head of a household in the 1860 census of Union County, page 236. Isaac Going died January 27, 1861, according to a letter written by Thomas Baxter Going March 16, 1879 and was buried beside his wife..

Eleven children were born to Isaac Going and Rebecca Palmer Going:

Thomas Baxter Going born May 13, 1806
Sarah Palmer Going born July 13, 1808
John Madison Going born July 14, 1810
Elijah Bobo Going born January 15, 1813
Drury Dobbins Going born November 24, 1815
Isaac McKissick Going born September 2, 1818
Rhoda Going born August 24, 1821
William George Washington Going
born July 17, 1824
Amasa Vernon “Mace” Going born January 30, 1827
Elisha Palmer Going born December 22, 1829
Martha Kerenhappuch Going born July 4, 1835

Fredrick M. Tucker wrote, “All birthdates above came from the Isaac Going bible, now destroyed. The dates were copied from it in 1879 by Thomas Baxter Going in Alabama and sent to my great-great-grandfather William George Washington Going in a letter, copies of which still exist. Death dates for some of their children also came from this bible.”

Thomas Baxter Going, son of Isaac Going and Rebecca Palmer Going, was born May 13, 1806 in Union District. He was married February 20, 1825 to Elizabeth Vinson, his childhood sweetheart, according to Essie Clarice Joiner Oswalt, a descen-dant. She was born February 4, 1804 in Union District, ac-cording to Fredrick M. Tucker.

“Thomas B. Gowing” was enumerated in the 1830 census of Union County, page 183:

“Gowing, Thomas B. white male 20-30
white female 20-30
white female 0-5”

“Baxter Goings” was listed as the head of a household in the 1840 census of Union County, page 211, adjoining his brother “Drury Goings” and near “Nancy Goings,” “John Goings” and his father “Isaac Goings, Esquire.”

The head of the household was recorded as a “teacher and a
farmer.” The family was composed of:

“Goings, Baxter white male 30-40
white female 30-40
white female 10-15
white male 5-10
white female 5-10
white female 0-5”

In 1855 Thomas Baxter Going was “acting deacon and clerk” of the Baptist Church, according to a letter written by his father.

“Baxter Going” was enumerated as the head of a household in
the 1860 census of Union County, page 226. He was mentioned as a resident of Union District in the probate application of his brother, Amasa Vernon “Mace” Going filed there November 23, 1866.

Elizabeth Vinson Going died in Union District July 18, 1865, according to Fredrick M. Tucker.

After her death, Thomas Baxter Going joined William M. Dabbs and Jim Inman in a wagontrain to remove to Huntsville, Alabama, according to Essie Clarice Joiner Oswalt.

“When they reached Walnut Grove, Alabama, they were forced to stop because a snow storm was in progress. They never reached Huntsville. They thought Walnut Grove was the Garden of Eden.

Being well-educated, Thomas Baxter Going organized a private school and taught the children from the ‘Blue Back Speller.’ He bought land and farmed, but he never recovered in all his 90 years from the loss of his beloved Beth who had died at Skull Shoals just before their departure.”

Thomas Baxter Going wrote a letter to his brother, William George Washington Going March 16, 1879:

Walnut Grove, Etowah County, Ala.
March 16, 1879
Dear Brother,

By the Divine Providence of God, I am again permitted to write to you in answer of yours and also to send your request. We are today enjoying common health and also Dabbs and Inman are well as far as I know. We have had a very cold, wet winter with heavy freezes, but little snow. Gentle spring has come in with mild and pleasant weather. The farmers are busy engaged in preparing for another crop. There will be more guano used this year than has been any year previous. By that you can guess respecting the indebtedness of the people.

According to your request, I with pleasure send you a true list of ages as recorded in Father’s Bible. I will begin with father and mother’s. Isaac Going was born 28th day of April, 1775. Mother, Rebecca Palmer was born 1st day of February 1789 and was married the 21st day of August 1804. Father was baptized in the May meeting of the Pacolet Church in 1803, and also the same year joined the Masonic fraternity.

Thomas Baxter Going was born the 13th day of May
1806.
Sarah Palmer Going was born the 13th day of July
1808.
John Madison Going was born the 14th day of July 1810 and died the 25th day of July 1844. He lived 34 years and 10 days.
Elijah Bobo Going was born on Friday, 15th day of January, 1813 and died the 16th day of February 1827. He lived 14 years and 32 days.
Drury Dobbins Going was born on Friday, 24th day of November 1815.
Isaac McKissick Going was born Wednesday, 2nd day of September 1818. He died in Pickens County, Al-abama the 10th day of August 1840; he wanted 23 days of being 22 years old.
Rhoda Going was born Friday, 24th day of August 1821
William George Washington Going was born on Saturday, 17th day of July 1824 at 35 minutes past 8 o’clock in the morning.
Amasa Vernon Going was born Tuesday, 30th day of January 1827, 45 minutes past 6 o’clock in the evening.
Elisha Palmer Going was born on Tuesday, 22nd day of December 1829, ten minutes past 6 o’clock in the evening.
Martha Keren Happuch Going was born Thursday, 4th day of July 1835.

The death of Father and Mother stands recorded thus–Rebecca Going departed this life the first day of August 1855, aged 66 years and 6 months. Isaac Going departed this life the 27th day of January 1861, aged 85 years and 9 months and one day.

Drury Going departed this life the 22nd day of February 1796 in the 47th year of his age. He died on the road coming home from Charleston with his wagon and team. He lacked 3 days drive of reaching home when he died. He was hauled home and buried at home. Sarah Going departed this life 22nd day of April 1820 in the 69th year of her age.

Patty or Martha Palmer departed this life 19th day of August 1813 in the 59th year of her age. John Palmer departed this life 28th day of January 1828.

In looking over I find the date of Elisha P. Going’s death as 16th day of July 1864 by a cannon ball near Fussels Mill in the New Market fight, Henry County, Va. Now, dear brother, you can record the dates I have given you in your large family Bible so that your children and grandchildren may hand down their fore father’s posterity. The Going is of Irish on Mother’s side English and Dutch.

I was pleased to hear of the well doing of your children. I have not heard a word about Eva. Is she dead? Eunice sent her likeness to her. Eunice says she would like to enjoy Eva’s company again. I am getting old and feeble near 73 years old. I have not had good health since last July. When I feel able, I go out and work a little. I feel better with exercise. I gain, but the least cold throws me back.

I am what is called a Licentiate Preacher. I don’t go about much, but if it is the Lord’s will, when the weather becomes warm I wish to visit the churches around. Religion is at a very low ebb at this time owing to so many divisions of profession–three kinds of Baptists, Missionary, Primitive or commonly called Hard Shells. Two years ago they divided and called it The Church of Christ being wonderfully opposed to all benevolent institutions of the day, especially the Masonic fraternity and Sabbath Schools. Their chief doctrine is that of Election and reprobation and non-fellowship with all who do not coincide with their Views. There are two kinds of Methodists–North and South. They divided during the war–they have no fellowship with each other. Then there are the Seventh Day Adventists and Soul Sleeping Baptists. I could not give a full history of their doctrines in the space I have to write. They make proselytes owing to the unlearned and unread of many of the people. I hope you and all the boys that have grown up have made to rejoice in Jesus Christ the Savior. Let us pray for each other as all are dead of father’s family that if we never meet again, we will try to meet together with our friends in Heaven.

Farewell,
Thomas B. Going
To W.G.W. Going and children
All write soon.

P. S. I received a letter from James DuPre a few days ago who says these are hard times. All well. Intends moving back to Alabama next fall from Georgia. What has become of Walter Morehead?

died May 9, 1896 in Blount County, Al-abama, according to the “Weekly Union Times.” He was buried in Harmony Cemetery near Altoona, Alabama.

Four children were born to them:

Winnie Adeline Going born July 17, 1827
James McIsaac Going born January 4, 1832

Lucinda Christina Atlas Going born January 8, 1836
Eunice Going born in June 1839

Winnie Adeline Going, daughter of Thomas Baxter Going and Elizabeth Vinson Going, was born July 17, 1827. She was married to John Inman, Jr. of Union District, South Carolina about 1845, according to Terry Jackson. She died June 25, 1909.

James McIsaac [McKissick?] Going, son of Thomas Baxter Going and Elizabeth Vinson Going, was born January 4, 1832. A “James Going” was in the Seventh South Carolina Confederate Cavalry Regiment in the Civil War with his uncle, William George Washington Going. He died in July 1908.

Lucinda Christina Atlas Going, daughter of Thomas Baxter Going and Elizabeth Vinson Going, was born January 8, 1836 in Union District. She was married to William Dabbs February 28, 1856 in Union District. He was born there August 29, 1827. He died in 1908 at Kelton, South Carolina, and she died at Marietta, Georgia in 1915.

Children born to William Dabbs and Lucinda Christina Atlas Going Dabbs include:

Mariah Sims Dabbs born April 12, 1857

Mariah Sims Dabbs, daughter of William Dabbs and Lucinda Christina Atlas Going Dabbs, was born April 12, 1857 at Pa-colet, South Carolina. She was married January 1, 1874 to Coleman Haynes who was born February 29, 1851 at Flat Creek, Georgia. She died at Walnut Grove, Alabama December 24, 1890, and he died there January 14, 1913.

Children born to them include:

Ara Atlas Haynes born February 23, 1883

Ara Atlas Haynes, daughter of Coleman Haynes and Marian Sims Dabbs Haynes, was born February 23, 1883. She was married November 11, 1900 to Rev. Charles William Joiner who was born August 15, 1879 at Cullman, Alabama. He died January 30, 1951, and she died June 29, 1956 at Cullman.

Children born to them include:

Essie Clarice Joiner born January 5, 1908

Essie Clarice Joiner, daughter of Rev. Charles William Joiner and Ara Atlas Haynes Joiner, was born January 5, 1908 at Boaz, Alabama. She was married October 19, 1930 at Cullman to Loyd Clifton Oswalt. She affiliated with D.A.R. in 1965 on the basis of the Revolutionary service of Drury Going.

In 1992 and in 1997 Essie Clarice Joiner Oswalt, a member of Gowen Research Foundation, lived at Tuskeegee, Alabama.

Eunice Going, daughter of Thomas Baxter Going and Elizabeth Vinson Going, was born in June 1839 in Union District.

Sarah Palmer Going, daughter of Isaac Going and Rebecca Palmer Going, was born July 13, 1808 in Union District. She was married January 5, 1826 to Willis Vinson. She was mentioned in the probate application of her brother, Amasa Vernon “Mace” Going filed in Union District November 23, 1866. She, apparently a widow, lived in Chattanooga, Tennessee at that time. She died there in Hamilton County, Tennessee February 9, 1875 and was buried there in Tyner Baptist Church Cemetery. Six children were born to them.

An entry in the family bible read, “Elijah Vinson departed this life 3 day of May 1887. He died in Georgia where he lived several years. He was a son of Willis & Sariah Vinson.”

John Madison Going, son of Isaac Going and Rebecca Palmer Going, was born July 14, 1810 in Union District. “John Go-ings,” a bachelor living alone, was enumerated on page 223 of the Union County census of 1840. He was listed as a teacher, age “30-40.” He died there July 25, 1844, unmarried.

Elijah Bobo Going, son of Isaac Going and Rebecca Palmer Going, was born January 15, 1813 in Union District. He died there at age 14, February 16, 1827.

Drury Dobbins Going, son of Isaac Going and Rebecca Palmer Going, was born November 24, 1815 in Union District. He was married about 1838 to Sarah Spears.

“Drury Goings” was the head of a household in the 1840 census of Union County, page 211. He was a farmer. The household was enumerated as:

“Goings, Drury white male 20-30
white female 20-30
white female 0-5”

He was remarried about 1857 to Elizabeth Wyatt. He was enumerated as the head of a household in the 1860 census of Union County, page 226.

On November 23, 1866, he applied for the administration of the estate of his brother, Amasa Vernon Going who was killed in Civil War service in December 1864, perhaps in the Battle of Nashville. The application was refused.

Drury Dobbins Goings was married for a third time in 1870 to Mrs. Miriam Sharp Adams Fowler Bentley as her fourth husband.

Children born to Drury Dobbins Going and Sarah Spears Going include:

Eliza Doshea Going born August 21, 1839
James M. Going born about 1842
William Isaac Peeler Going born about 1844
Rebecca Going born about 1846

Children born to Drury Dobbins Going and Elizabeth Wyatt
Going include:

John Smith Going born June 21, 1859
William Beauregard Going born May 9, 1861
Elisha R. Going born March 29, 1863

Children born to Drury Dobbins Going and Miriam Sharp Adams Fowler Bentley Going include:

Mary Elizabeth Going born March 1, 1871
Jacob A. Going born August 26, 1873
Abram Egbert Going born November 11, 1875

Eliza Doshea Going, daughter of Drury Dobbins Going and Sarah Spears Going, was born August 21, 1839 in Union Dis-trict. She was enumerated in the 1840 census of her father’s household as a “white female, 0-5.” She died February 16, 1913, according to Fredrick M. Tucker.

James M. Going, son of Drury Dobbins Going and Sarah Spears Going, was born about 1842. He died August 19, 1861 in Confederate military hospital in Charlottesville, Virginia.

William Isaac Peeler Going, son of Drury Dobbins Going and Sarah Spears Going, was born about 1844. He died about 1886.

Rebecca Going, daughter of Drury Dobbins Going and Sarah Spears Going, was born about 1846. She was deceased by 1860.

John Smith Going, son of Drury Dobbins Going and Elizabeth Wyatt Going, was born June 21, 1859 in Union District. He died December 29, 1928.

William Beauregard Going, son of Drury Dobbins Going and Elizabeth Wyatt Going, was born May 9, 1861. He died July 29, 1911.

Elisha R. Going, son of Drury Dobbins Going and Elizabeth Wyatt Going, was born March 29, 1863 in Union District. He died April 24, 1932.

Mary Elizabeth Going, daughter of Drury Dobbins Going and Miriam Sharp Fowler Bentley Going, was born March 1, 1871. She died February 14, 1931.

Jacob A. Going, son of Drury Dobbins Going and Miriam Sharp Fowler Bentley Going, was born August 26, 1873. He died April 23, 1876.

Abraham Egbert Going, son of Drury Dobbins Going and Miriam Sharp Fowler BEntley Going, was born November 11, 1875. He died April 23, 1876.

Isaac McKissick Going, son of Isaac Going and Rebecca Palmer Going, was born September 2, 1818 in Union District. He died unmarried August 10, 1840, at age 21, in Pickens County, Alabama and was buried there in Franconia Cemetery.

Rhoda Going, daughter of Isaac Going and Rebecca Palmer Going, was born August 24, 1821 in Union District. She was married about 1840 to Richard Page. They were mentioned in the probate application of her brother, Amasa Vernon “Mace” Going filed in Union District November 23, 1866. She died there March 12, 1871, at age 49. She was buried at Flat Rock Methodist Church in Union County. She was the mother of four.

William George Washington Going, son of Isaac Going and Rebecca Palmer Going, was born July 17, 1824 at Kelton, South Carolina in Union District, according to his family bible.

He was married September 16, 1847 in Union County to Nancy Manerva Jane Dupree who was born in South Carolina June 3, 1827, the first of 19 children of William Griffin DuPree and Julia Ann Fields Shaw DuPree. He became a farmer and a merchant in the Pea Ridge section of Union District.

Nancy Manerva Jane Dupree joined the Baptist Church at Pa-colet Shoals, South Carolina in 1845 and was baptized in the Pacolet River, according to the family bible record published in “Old Southern Bible Records” by Memory Aldridge Lester.

“William Going” was enumerated as the head of a household in the 1860 census of Union County, page 226. Nearby was a household which included “Sarah Going,” page 277.

William George Washington Going served on a Coroner’s Jury which investigated a bizarre murder January 6, 1862, according to “The South Carolina Magazine of Ancestral Research,” Vol. 18:

“An Inquisition indented taken at Mastin Comer’s in Union District 6 January 1862 before G. S. Gregory, Magistrate, acting as coroner, upon the dead body of Mastin Comer by the oaths of John P. McKissick, Robert Lawson, Wm. Goins, Ebenezer Fowler, Stephen Fowler, Joseph Kelly, Wm. D. Gault, Jackson Hames, Augustus Wood, Smith Cook, Wm. Sprouse, and Washington Gault, being a lawful Jury of Inquest, do say from evidence herewith annexed that the deceased came to his death by a wound inflicted in the head by Seaborn Woolbright with a knife in the public road near J. P. Porter’s some 5 or 6 weeks previous to this date which caused the death of Mastin Comer.
Signed and sealed by G. S. Gregory, magistrate. acting Coroner, John P. McKissick, foreman, Robert Lawson, W. G. W. Going, Ebenezer Fowler, Stephen Fowler, Joseph Kelly, A. J. Hames, Wm. D. Gault, A. G. Wood, Smith Cook, Wm. Sprouse and G. W. Gault.

Summons issued to Franklin Vaughn, special constable, to notify the jury to appear at Mastin Comer’s between the hours of 5 and 6 oclock on 6 January 1862. Signed 6 January 1862 by G. S. Gregory, Magistrate. acting as Coroner.

The State vs Seaborn Woolbright–felony. Wiley Wood, Doct. S. P. Simpson and J. P. Porter–Witnesses on examination at Inquest.

Wiley Wood sworn says that he was with Mastin Comer the day previous to his death some 4 or 5 hours and that he complained some, witness has been with him more or less ever since he received a wound in the forehead with a knife, that the deceased would not talk and acted as tho he was an Eidet [idiot], that before he was wounded in the head he talked very freely and did not appear to be so dull. Witness was not with him when he received the wound, but found him at work in the field the next morning and persuaded him to quit and go to his house, deceased appeared to be in a great deal of misery, was bleeding freely at the nose. Dated 6 January 1862 and signed by Wiley Wood.

Doct. Samuel P. Simpson sworn, says that he opened the wound on the head of Mastin Comer, deceased, and is of the opinion that the wound caused his death. Dr. Simpson was called on by G. S. Gregory, magistrate, acting as coroner, to perform the postmortem examination. Signed 6 Jan. 1862 by S. J. Simpson.

Jidathan Porter sworn, states that he was present and saw Seaborn Woolbright stick a knife in the head of Mastin Comer deceast, and that the knife blade broke loose from the handle and remained in the wound and had to be drawn with a pair of strong nipers. Witness does not recollect the day of the month but thinks it was at least 5 or 6 weeks previous to this date. Dated 6 January 1862 and signed by J. P. Porter.”

William George Washington Going was enlisted March 10, 1863 in Company C, Seventh South Carolina Cavalry Regiment commanded by Col. A. C. Haskell in the Civil War. He wrote his family June 15, 1863:

Camp near Madden Station
in 10 miles of Richmond
Hanover County, Va.
June 15th day 1863, Monday morning

Dear wife and children,

I seat myself to write to you to let you know that I am still well and hearty as yet–hoping that when you re-ceive this letter, it may find you all well. We here of course see a hard time of it, but no more that I expected when I left home. We are falling back slowly. We come here at this [place] on the 13th of June. We don’t know how long we will stay here.

The yankees are advancing from Yorktown and Williamsburg on the roads and on James River & the Permunkey River and Chickhommana. We are falling back off the Bernenlere in order to get a chance at them. We are getting a re-enforcement here now. We have 9 calvary companies camped near here. We got four more regiments of infantry yesterday, 3 regiments of North Carolinians and one from VA.

Col. Dabb’s pickets and yankee pickets had a little fight day before yesterday. We lost one man killed and two taken prisoner. The yankees, 3 killed and one taken prisoner. I can state to you and my friends that one the 6th of June we had a sever crumber[?] at King Williams Court House, that was our squadron and the 150 infantry–the yankees which we killed were 3 and wounded 2 and taken 3 prisoners. Our loss was one man shot through the thigh. I never heard bullets whizz around me as fast as that did for a few minutes. We all thought a while back that we would not have much more fighting to do here, but now it is a daily thing. We have a heap of picket fighting here now. I take note of all the movements that is made. It is my opinion that we will have a fight close by here in a short time. Gen[?] Wise will fight if they will let him. He got orders from Gen. Ensley to fall back to this place where we are stationed now. I think that we can stand our ground
now with them.

This is a fine country for fish, we get as much fish as we want. This is a great wheat country, the best wheat I have ever saw, but the yankees down where we left are destroying everything before them. I am sorry for the women and children for it was hard before, but now it is worse. The ladies treat us well in our travels. If they have anything to eat, they generally give us some. Some of the men who are out of service here are more like hogs than men.

We have cavalry fighting here every day. I hope to God that I may live to go through safe and every man in our company. We get along like brothers. We had a fine sermon preached to us last Sunday by a Presbyterian preacher. I want you to write to me when you get a let-ter from your father and when you have heard from any of your brothers or when you have heard from A. V. Going or E. P. Going. I have not heard from any of them in some time, but it may be that some of them may be close by us.

I got $91.20 the other day. I paid $75 toward my horse. I hear that cows are selling at home from one hundred to two hundred dollars. I want you to take care of all your cows. Butter is selling here at $3 per pound, $2 per gallon for buttermilk and $4 for a common chicken. I paid $2 the other morning for my breakfast. We get at this time coarse corn meal and bacon–that is what we are drawing. But we get plenty of fish. James Going [James McKissisk Going, his nephew and son of his brother, Thomas Baxter Going] is well. He went fishing yesterday and got a fine mess of fish, and James Going found a bee tree which we got lots of honey out of it. If it was not for this war, it would be one of the best coun-tries to live in I ever saw. The land is just good anuff and the great fields of clover, this is a low, flat country, the tide water runs up all these rivers. I was on picket on the Pormunkey River last week at Treaiters Ferry. I caught 14 fine fish. I live well up here, certain.

I have to go on picket again in the morning. We have to picket near the yankees. Crops are very late here and little wheat is planted. There is not more than one half of the land planted here and what is stands a chance to be destroyed.

I want you to write to me as soon as you get this letter and write to me about your farm. I hope that you will get all of your wheat safe. Try to make all the corn you can and write how much molasses cane you planted and if you have the rice planted or not and plant all the best corn land peas and I would like to hear from your gar-den. I hope that you will make plenty to live on.

My Dear Children, you all must be good to your Mother and learn your books every Sunday and be good to each other and be good to all your friends.

Give my best respects to all inquiring friends. Write in your next letter who is set to go to the war or now is gone. I heard that was good many more had to go in service. Now is the time for every man to do his duty if he ever intends to do it for we need all we can get now. I had as bad a chance to leave as any man ever did. I am willing to do my duty as any man and do it. I know it is hard for every man to leave home, but the people don’t know anything hard times at home to what the people do here, and I hope they never will know for I have seen more fine farms and fine houses burned and destroyed
that is in Union District.

Write how George Washington [his one-year son and namesake] is and if the boy grows any or not, and if your fruit hit or not. There is lots of fruit here this year. Be sure to write when you get this letter, and if you need anything to live on, you must buy it, and write how your corn is holding out. I hope that you will have enough to do you. Put a shoat in the pen and see if you can’t make a fine hog out of it. I hope the yankees may never get in Union. Here I send you three postage stamps, ten cent stamps.

So I must come to a close. Farewell, my Dear Wife and Children, I hope to see you all again. Tell Alley Howdy and be a good boy and mind his mistress and make all he can, and when I come home I will give him a present if he will be a good boy. God bless you all.
Wm. G. W. Going
To Nancy Going & Children”

He wrote again July 11, 1863:

“Camp War Bottoms Bridge
in Henrico County
Saturday morning, July 11 day, 1863
Dear Wife,

I take my pen in hand this morning to let you know and the childrens that I am well at this time. Hopeing when you get this it may be fine with you and all the childrens well. I received your letter the other day which was dated 22nd of June. Which I was sorry to learn that Fa-ther Griffen was dead. I was in hope to see him once more in this life, but he has gone home out of this troubles some world. I just believe that he has gone to heaven. We are all got to die. I want you to take care of your self and not grieve your self two much, and try to keep up for you are all of my dependent in this world to raise my dear little children.

I hope to God that you and all of my dear little children may have good health, that I may see you and all of my dear little children once more. Of course, I see a hard time of it, but no more than any other soldier does. I have had my health as I ever did in my life, but about two weeks which I had the dysentery. I have got stout again, and I weigh more than I ever did in my life. I weigh 178 pounds.

Well, the yankeys are all gone from the white houses near this place, we have been taking several yankeys as prisoners. They say we are gaining down to York Town and to Washington City. I understand that the yankeys are got to Vicksburg. I am sorry to hear that. I heard last night that the yankeys had attacked Charleston. I understand that Lee is falling back from Tennessee. A week ago we all thought we had the yankeys whipped, but our men are low down now. I am in hopes that we will hear some good news in a few days again to help our feelings. Lee has captured a great many yankeys in Maryland and Penn. He has done a great deal of good there on our side. I have been over several battle grounds. The yankeys bones are laying like old horses bones all over the ground. I have seen several where they were shot down. All of the bones were like a horse or any beast. Dead at Gains Mill beats any place. I saw in some square pits where they threw them in, arm bones are sticking out of the ground and threw a little dirt over them. I have seen as many as three in one grave of our men, with head to their graves. It is no more to see a dead man here than to see a dead dog at home.

Tell all of the boys that it does me good that they are working so well this summer, and I am glad to hear that you have got everything growing to live on. I wish I had some of your Irish potatoes and beans and greens. Nancy, I went out yesterday to buy some vegetables for our mess. I gave for butter $2 per lb. I gave $1 per quart for Irish potatoes and $1 for one dozen cucumbers and $1 per dozen squashes, and 50 cents for a quart of butter milk, and was glad to get it at that. We get plenty of bacon. We drawed out rashings yesterday. We got crackers in place of meal. We got some rice and salt.

We are looking to hear of a march somewhere in a day or two. I want you to write to me whether you have got any salt or not. And how your corn are holding out and try to get out your wheat and have all your straw taken care of. If you haven’t got no shoat in the pen, put you one in the pen, and it will make you a good hog.

I don’t want you to be uneasy about me not having something to eat, for if it is to be had, I intend to have it. I don’t believe in dieing hungry, for I don’t know how soon it may be. I have got some cloth[e]s to send home. If I ever get a chance. I have got a nice cap to send Elijah Vernon [his third son, age 10]. I have got plenty of coats. I need a pair of cotton pants and a hat. Be sure and send my hat by Doctor Little. I understand the old regt. South Carolina are going to North Carolina. E. P. Going promised me that he would write to me before he went home. I don’t know whether he has gone home or not. I am looking for a letter from him every day now. I haven’t heard from any of your brothers in some time, or Mary Ann Page or Willis Page. I don’t know whether Mary Ann are still at Richmond or not. I got a little clipping of the people in William Fowler’s letter stating that you have heard from A. V. [Amasa Vernon, his brother] Going, but I can’t make no since out of it. If you have heard from your mother, write all the news about them all, if you please. I want you to be sure to write to me whether John McKissicks got those notes and money I left for him to get. I wrote to you before about it, and you never give me no answer about it. I see in a little peace that came in Fowler’s letter that Salley Vinson and her daughter has come in. If that is right, write to me. I don’t want you to have anything to do with old Betts, but if she come in side of the Fort, or anywhere in side of my place, fight her as long as you have breath for she is a gambler, and a devil ain’t her match. I hope to live to get to see them again. Betts is a lier.

I will write more, but I have to come to a close. From
W. G. W. Going
To Nancy Going and Family”

William George Washington Going was paroled April 10, 1865 after the surrender and was listed as a farmer at Kelton, South Carolina in 1866. Later he became a postmaster.

He was mentioned in the probate application of his brother, Amasa Vernon “Mace” Going filed in Union District November 23, 1866.

William George Washington Going was listed as the head of a household in the 1880 census of Union County, Enumeration District 158, page 21, Pinkney Township:

“Goings, William G. 55, born in SC
Nancy 52, born in SC
Evilina 30, born in SC
James D. 18, born in SC
Washington 17, born in SC
Gary 14, born in SC
Rhoda 11, born in SC
Oliver 9, born in SC
Hames, John S. 20, born in SC, nephew
Keturah 18, born in SC, niece
Louisa 16, born in SC, niece”

Nancy Manerva Jane Dupree Going died November 13, 1903 and was buried at Mt. Joy Baptist Church in Union County, according to “Union County, South Carolina Cemetery Records.” The family bible recorded her passing as “Nov 13, Friday night, 1903, ten minutes after 9 o’clock, age 76 years, 6 months and 10 days old when she died. She jine the Baptis Church at Packolet on Skulls Sholes 1845 and was babtise in Packolet River by J. G. Kindrick. W.G.W. Going and Nancy Dupree was married on 16th day of September 1847. She had 10 boys and 3 girls. Nancy Manerva Jane Going was buried at Mt. Joy church Sonday, November 15, 1903.”

William George Washington Going died October 7, 1915, at age 91, and was buried beside his wife at Mt. Joy Baptist Church, according to Fredrick M. Tucker, a great-great-grandson. The bible entry showed that his age was “91 years, 2 months & 20 days.”
Children born to William George Washington Going and Nancy Manerva Jane Dupree Going include:

Mary Ann Rebecca Evelina Going
born October 25, 1848
William Mack Isaac Going born February 7, 1850
John Thomas Richard Going born August 16, 1851
Elijah Vernon Going born March 25, 1853
Julia Ann Frances Jane Going born Dec. 26, 1854
Butler Brooks Going born Feb. 25, 1856
David Anderson Going born May 30, 1858
James Daniel Lenard Going born May 5, 1860
George Washington Going born May 16, 1862
Robert Lee Going born Dec. 26, 1864
Joseph Bight Gary Going born April 10, 1866
Rhoda Cornelia Alice Sarah Elizabeth Going
born Sept. 12, 1868
Oliver Francis Marion Going born June 16, 1870

Mary Ann Rebecca Evelina Going, daughter of William George Washington Going and Nancy Manerva Jane Dupree Going, was born October 25, 1848. She appeared as a 30 year-old spinster living in her father’s household in the 1880 census of Union County. She died unmarried August 5, 1923 and was buried in Mt. Joy Cemetery in Union County.

William Mack Isaac [McKissick?] Going, son of William George Washington Going and Nancy Manerva Jane Dupree Going, was born February 7, 1850 in Union County. He was married October 26, 1873 to Margaret Cordelia “Delie” Trubey Cole, one-half Cherokee who was born July 17, 1857 in Chero-kee County, Georgia. She died there November 9, 1912, and he was remarried September 15, 1914 at Holly Springs, Georgia to Nicy Lee Biddy. She was born June 19, 1877. He died Febru-ary 5, 1938 in Cobb County, Georgia at age 88 and was buried in New Hope Baptist Church Cemetery. Nicy Lee Biddy Going died November 18, 1960.

Children born to William Mack Isaac Going and Margaret Cordelia “Delie” Trubey Cole Going include:

Byrus Wesley Going born April 29, 1876
Nancy Elizabeth Going born November 25, 1877
Alma Louola Going born October 25, 1879
Julia Rebecca Going born April 25, 1881
Mary Susan Going born November 15, 1882
Magnolia Nora Going born August 25, 1884
John William Going born June 12, 1886
James Leonard Going born February 6, 1891

James Leonard Going, son of William Mack Isaac Going and Margaret Cordelia “Delie” Trubey Cole Going, was born February 6, 1891 in Bartow County, Georgia. He served as a cavalryman in World War I. He was married in 1909 to Lori Land, and the marriage was annulled. He was remarried about 1920 to Emma Mae Hobbs. Later he was married a third time to Mary Artimissa Chastain. He died July 19, 1956 at age 65 in Fulton County, Georgia.

Children born to James Leonard Going, Lori Land Going, and Mary Artimissa Chastain Going are unknown. Children born to James Leonard Going and Emma Mae Hobbs Going include:

William Rufus Going born January 11, 1924

William Rufus Going, son of James Leonard Going and Emma Mae Hobbs Going, was born January 11, 1924 in Fulton County. He enlisted in the U.S. Navy July 11, 1944 at Atlanta, Georgia. After a brief time at Camp Peary near Williamsburg, Virginia and Norfolk Naval Training Station, he was assigned to the U.S.S. Southerland, a destroyer.

His destroyer provided a carrier screen in the first naval air strikes on Tokyo on July 10, 1945. On July 14-15 the armada attacked Northern Honshu and Hokkaido. On July 17-18 the Task Force struck at the Tokyo Plains. On July 24, 25 and 28 the U.S.S. Southerland participated in attacks on targets in the Inland Sea.

On July 29, the Southerland was ordered to stand off the Hamamatsu area and to bombard the shore installations with its five-inch rifles. On July 30 Central Honshu felt the wrath of the Grumann Wildcat fighters, the Chance-Vought Corsairs and the Curtis Helldiver divebombers from the fleet, and the Southerland continued to provide an air defense screen for the carriers.

On August 9, the air attacks returned to Central Honshu, on August 10 to Northern Honshu. The destroyer was ordered to Sagami Wan August 27 as part of the occupation forces. On August 28, the U.S.S. Southerland was ordered to procede to Tokyo Bay to take part in the surrender ceremony.

Returning home with campaign ribbons, battle stars and naval citations, William Rufus Going was greeted by his wife, Dora Evelyn Elliott Going and baby daughter. He was employed by the Southern Railway for the next 40 years. The Goings, now in retirement, continue living in the Atlanta area. Their three children have given them eight grandchildren and step-grand-children, two grandchildren-in-law and three great-grandchil-dren.

Three children were born to William Rufus Going and Dora Evelyn Elliott Going include:

Martha Elaine Going born October 2, 1944
Donald Eugene Going born August 9, 1947
Claire Yvonne Going born February 8, 1959

Donald Eugene Going, son of William Rufus Going and Dora Evelyn Elliott Going, was born in Atlanta August 9, 1947. His sister Martha Elaine Going Thomas wrote an account of his winning the Carnegie Medal for Heroism in 1966:

“Donald Eugene Going, following an underground explosion in a cave at Trenton, Georgia in 1966, was awarded the Carnegie Medal for Heroism for his efforts in a daring rescue. The 18-year-old spelunker, with a total disregard for his own safety, was recognized for bravery in his rescue efforts.

While exploring with other members of his college spelunking club on April 16, 1966, the explosion erupted in a nearby cave. A group of 10 boy scouts with two scoutmasters had entered the ill-fated cave unaware that
a gasoline pipeline had ruptured and that the cave was being filled with gasoline fumes.

When the explosion occurred, one scoutmaster and three Boy Scouts were atop a ledge at one end of a cathedral cavern. The other members of their party were at the opposite end of the cavern. At that instant an carbide cap lamp ignited the gasoline fumes, causing a violent explosion and a huge fireball throughout the cavern.

The larger party of Scouts were able to climb a steep slope at their end of the cavern which led to the mouth of the cave and safety. The other four were in a precarious position. The smoke and noxious gasses had rendered them unconscious, and they lay atop the narrow ledge with a 40-foot drop before them and a long, hazardous 225 feet between them and the entrance.

Some would-be rescuers including an 18-year-old local boy, equipped with flashlights, pulled wet shirts over their faces, entered the cave and attempted to cross the cathedral. Don Going and his fellow spelunkers were better equipped; they entered wearing smoke masks and carrying spare masks for the victims. Dense water vapor in the cavern rendered the flashlights ineffective, and the wet shirts did little to filter out the fumes.

Two of the spelunkers reached the end of the cathedral and found the local boy, weak and dizzy, trying to climb to the ledge. Fearing that he would collapse, the spelunkers sent him back. and he started toward the en-trance. The college boys were successful in reaching the ledge. but were unable to arouse the unconscious Scouts.

The first party of would-be rescuers were having to turn back. and those entering with smoke masks were obliged to take off the masks and place them on those who were faltering. Don Going removed his mask and gave it to a companion who, becoming delirious, removed it. Going forced it back on the companion and took him back to the slope where another rescuer was being raised to the entrance on a rope. After assisting the man being raised, Going himself slumped down unconscious.

By that time, a rescue squad wearing gas masks had arrived and began to take charge. Two of them descended the slope and fastened a rope around Going who was still unconscious. He was then pulled out to the entrance. The rescue squad then brought out the rest of the people in the cave. One of the college spelunkers and the 18-year-old local boy died in the rescue attempt.

Don Going and another college friend were considered dead at the scene, but were resuscitated and regained consciousness in a local hospital and recovered. For his efforts in the rescue Don Going received the Carnegie Medal for Heroism and a cash award, as did of the res-cuers. In 1994, Don Going and his son live in Peachtree City, Georgia.”

Children born to Donald Eugene Going include:

Jay Clinton Going born November 8, 1984

John Thomas Richard Going, son of William George Washington Going and Nancy Manerva Jane Dupree Going, was born August 16, 1851 in Union County, He was married November 15, 1874 to Izora Levotia “Boshie” Cole in Georgia. She was born January 28, 1859 to John Cole and Elizabeth Whitlock Cole. He farmed in the Pea Ridge area of Union County. Later they removed to the Kelton area, “into the Baxter Going house, a log house that still stands as a hay barn on my father’s farm near Pinckneyville,” according to Jacquelyn Sanders Petty.

She died August 26, 1937, and he died September 2, 1948. They were buried at Mt. Joy Baptist Church in Union County.

Children born to John Thomas Richard Going and Izora Levo-tia Cole Going include:

Emma O’Della Going born September 20, 1876
James Thomas Going born July 12, 1878
Nannie Rebecca Jane Going born October 25, 1880
William Dilmus Going born August 11, 1882
Bessie Bell Going born March 2, 1885
Mary Leila Going born August 30, 1887
Carrie Evelina Going born August 28, 1889
Bertha Elizabeth Going born January 25, 1892
Rutha Lois Going born June 20, 1898

Emma O’Della Going, daughter of John Thomas Richard Going and Izora Levotia Cole Going, was born September 20, 1876. She died March 13, 1930.

James Thomas Going, son of John Thomas Richard Going and Izora Levotia Cole Going, was born July 12, 1878 in Union County. He became a minister. He died June 1, 1957.

Nannie Rebecca Jane Going, daughter of John Thomas Richard Going and Izora Levotia Cole Going, was born October 25, 1880. She was married about 1897 to Sumpter Sanders. She died January 18, 1973.

William Dilmus Going, son of John Thomas Richard Going and Izora Levotia Cole Going, was born August 11, 1882. He died February 27, 1907.

Bessie Bell Going, daughter of John Thomas Richard Going and Izora Levotia Cole Going, was born March 2, 1885. She was married about 1905 to James Franklin Sanders, brother to Sumpter Sanders, according to Jacquelyn Sanders Petty, a granddaughter. She died March 27, 1963.

Mary Leila Going, daughter of John Thomas Richard Going and Izora Levotia Cole Going, was born August 30, 1887. She was married about 1905, husband’s name Cudd. She died De-cember 5, 1959.

Carrie Evelina Going, daughter of John Thomas Richard Going and Izora Levotia Cole Going, was born August 28, 1899. She was married about 1909, husband’s name Levister. She died February 9, 1975.

Bertha Elizabeth Going, daughter of John Thomas Richard Going and Izora Levotia Cole Going, was born January 25, 1892. She was married about 1911, husband’s name Trammell. She died September 8, 1977.

Rutha Lois Going, daughter of John Thomas Richard Going and Izora Levotia Cole Going, was born June 20, 1898. She was married about 1918, husband’s name Farr.

Elijah Vernon “Jock” Going, son of William George Wash-ington Going and Nancy Manerva Jane Dupree Going, was born March 25, 1853, Good Friday, in Union County. He was married March 1, 1877 to Margaret Minerva Farr who was born April 12, 1853. He died July 7, 1922, and she died May 12, 1939. They were buried in Mt. Joy Baptist Church.

Children born to Elijah Vernon Going and Margaret Minerva Farr Going include:

William Isaac Going born December 29, 1877
Mace Vernon Going born December 16, 1879
Alice Mariel Going born February 26, 1882
Samuel Ratchford Going born March 16, 1884
Eddie Going born August 10, 1886
Henry Walter Going born August 11, 1887
Ben Tillman Going born July 5, 1890
Wallace Thomson Going born March 11, 1893
Joseph Arthur Going born April 29, 1885
Maggie Nannie May Going born December 17, 1897

William Isaac Going, son of Elijah Vernon Going and Margaret Minerva Farr Going, was born “Saturday night at 12:00 o’clock” December 29, 1877, according to the family bible.

Eddie Going, son of Elijah Vernon Going and Margaret Min-erva Farr Going, was born in August 1886. He died “September 14, 1886, half after ten o’clock–he was 5 weeks ole,” according to the family bible.

Julia Ann Frances Jane Going, daughter of William George Washington Going and Manerva Jane Dupree Going, was born December 26, 1854. She died “the 3rd night of March 1855, age 2 months and 5 days,” according to the family bible.

Another entry in the bible states, “Julyann Dupree departed this life the 17 day of September 1884. She was the wife of Griffin Dupree. She died in Georgia. She was the mother of Nancy Going. She was buried at New Hope Baptist Church in Barto County, Ga.”

Butler Brooks Going, son of William George Washington Go-ing and Nancy Manerva Jane Dupree Going, was born February 25, 1856 in Union County. He was married September 7, 1879 to Mrs. Sarah Ethel Farr Smith who was born October 13, 1849. She was a widow with one son, Buddy Smith.

She died “Friday morning,” February 29, 1884, according to the family bible. “Union County, South Carolina Cemetery Records” shows “Sarah Going, wife of B. B. Going: died March 28, 1884. He was remarried August 15, 1889 to Rachel “Tompie” Gordon who was born October 18, 1853. She died November 12, 1897. He was married for the third time November 23, 1918 to Beatrice Eugenia Wilburn who was born November 20, 1886. She died June 1, 1922. He died September 9, 1931 and was buried in Rosemont Cemetery in Union, South Carolina. No children were born to Butler Brooks Going, Rachel “Tompie” Gordon Going and Beatrice Eugenia Wilburn Going.

One daughter was born to Butler Brooks Going and Sarah Ethel Farr Smith Going:

Minnie Ethel Going born February 5, 1881

Minnie Ethel Going, daughter of Butler Brooks Going and Sarah Ethel Farr Smith Going, was born February 5, 1881. She attended Union County Grade School and Clifford Seminary in Union. She also attended Asheville Academy for Young Ladies, in Asheville, North Carolina. She died May 7, 1941 and was buried beside her father.

David Anderson “Bud” Going, son of William George Wash-ington Going and Nancy Manerva Jane Dupree Going, was born May 30, 1858 in Union County. He was married Novem-ber 26, 1882 to Josephine Tallulah “Lula” Stewart who was born about 1855. She died November 8, 1930, and he died July 10, 1932. They were buried in Mt. Vernon Presbyterian Church cemetery in Union County.

Two daughters were born to David Anderson Going and Josephine Tallulah Stewart Going:

Hassie Euphemia Going born September 1, 1885
Alma Nancy Going born March 20, 1888

James Daniel Lenard Going, son of William George Wash-ington Going and Nancy Manerva Jane Dupree Going, was born May 5, 1860 in Union County. He appeared in the 1880 census of Union County as a 18 year-old living in the house-hold of his father. He was married February 14, 1894 to Emma Blalock in Bartow County, Georgia. He died July 2, 1898, according to “Union County, South Carolina Cemetery Records” and was buried in Mt. Joy Cemetery. He “departed this life the first night of July, half after three o’clock in the morning 1898 and was buried July 3 by the Masons. He had the feavor, age 38 years, 1 month, 26 days,” according to the family bible. No children were born to James Daniel Lenard Going and Emma Blalock Going.

George Washington Going, son of William George Washington Going and Nancy Manerva Jane Dupree Going, was born May 16, 1862. He appeared in the 1880 census of Union County as a 17 year-old living in the household of his father. He was married January 9, 1887 to Mary Jane Vaughan. Mary Jane Vaughan Going was born May 26, 1871 and died November 24, 1899. George Washington Going was married to Mrs. Annie Gilliam Jeter Smith January 29, 1904. She was born December 12, 1868 and died December 30, 1914.

George Washington
Going maintained his home at Kelton, South Carolina until 1899 when he moved to Union, South Carolina where he operated George W. Going General Mercantile. Annie Gilliam Jeter Smith Going died December 30, 1914, and he was remar-ried November 7, 1928 to Rebecca Arabella “Belle” Crosby Spears. She was born August 10, 1880. George Washington Going died August 2, 1934. Rebecca Arabella “Belle” Crosby Spears Going died January 24, 1978 at age 97. They were buried in Rosemont Cemetery in Union County.

Children born to George Washington Going and Mary Jane Vaughan Going include:

Bernice Going born December 2, 1887
Walter Franklin Going born July 26, 1889
Paul Going born October 7, 1893
Henri Rochelle Going born November 18, 1895

Children born to George Washington Going and Annie Gilliam Jeter Smith Going include:

James Clyde Going born July 5, 1905
George Washington Going, Jr. born April 1, 1909

Bernice Going, daughter of George Washington Going and Mary Jane Vaughan Going, was born December 2, 1887 in Union County. She was married October 6, 1909 to William Hagood, Jr.

Children born to William Hagood, Jr. and Bernice Going Ha-good include:

Elizabeth Hagood born December 20,
1910
George Cleveland Hagood born June 18, 1916

Elizabeth Hagood, daughter of William Hagood, Jr. and Bernice
Going Hagood, was born December 20, 1910. She was married to David Ralph Spearman September 10, 1931.

Children born to David Ralph Spearman and Elizabeth Hagood Spearman include:

David Hagood Spearman born Nov. 16, 1932
William Benjamin Spearman born Aug. 17, 1937

Walter Franklin Going, son of George Washington Going and Mary Jane Vaughan Going, was born July 26, 1889 at Kelton, South Carolina. He was married June 12, 1912 to Jacquelin Almeda Mack, daughter of John W. Mack and Ella E. Gibson Mack of Orangeburg, South Carolina. He became a life insur-ance underwriter. He held a number of positions in Union Ma-sonic Lodge No. 75, Columbia Lodge No. 326, Columbia Commandery No. 2, Grand Council of DeMolay and Omar Temple, Charleston. He died September 26, 1952 at age 63 in Columbia, South Carolina.

His obituary, prepared by fellow Masons, read:

“Walter Franklin Going was educated in the public schools of Union, Furman University and Eastman Business College. He was married to Allie Mack of Orangeburg June 12, 1912, and to them were born three children Jacqueline, Ethel and Walter F. Going, Jr, all of whom survive him.

After a lingering illness, which he knew to be fatal, Bro. Going passed away at 10:00 a.m, September 26, 1952 at his residence, 228 Wateree Avenue, Columbia. Funeral services were held in the First Baptist Church, Columbia at 3:00 p.m. Sunday, September 28, 1952. Interment followed in Elmwood Cemetery, Columbia.

Walter’s business was insurance, a field in which he rendered signal service and attained considerable success. At the time of his passing, he was head of the Going Life Agency of Columbia. He was a devoted members of the First Baptist Church and took an active part in its activities.

Bro. Going was a man of unusual interests, energy and ability. He was president of the Columbia Lions Club and later District Governor. He was chairman of the Advisory Committee for the Division of the Blind, South Carolina State Department of Welfare. He was active in the work of the Crippled Children’s Society of South Carolina. He had a great capacity for doing good, and he used every opportunity afforded him to the fullest.”

Children born to Walter Franklin Going and Jacquelin Almeda Mack Going include:

Jacquelin Almeda Going born July 26, 1917
Walter Franklin Going, Jr. born December 25, 1919
Ethel Bernice Going born April 25, 1926

Jacquelin Almeda Going, daughter of Walter Franklin Going and Jacquelin Almeda Mack Going, was born July 26, 1917. She was married September 20, 1941 to John Keels Maxwell.

Children born to them include:

John Keels Maxwell, Jr. born October 5, 1942
Walter Going Maxwell born March 4, 1947
Lucy Earle Maxwell born July 4, 1948
Jacquelin Almeda Maxwell born September 28, 1952

Walter Franklin Going, Jr, son of Walter Franklin Going and Jacquelin Almeda Mack Going, was born December 25, 1919. He was married September 15, 1947 to Eleanore Toole.

Children born to Walter Franklin Going, Jr. and Eleanor Toole Going include:

Jacquelin Almeda Going born December 10, 1950

Ethel Bernice Going, daughter of Walter Franklin Going and Jacquelin Almeda Mack Going, was born April 25, 1926. She was married May 17, 1945 to Waddy McFall Anderson.

Children born to them include:

Waddy McFall Anderson, Jr. born February 4, 1946
Walter Going Anderson born May 31, 1948
Charles Ellis Anderson born July 27, 1949
Margaret Lucretia Anderson born March 4, 1951
John F. Anderson born February 2, 1953

Paul Going, son of George Washington Going and Mary Jane Vaughan Going, was born October 7, 1893. He died October 29, 1899.

Henri Rochelle Going, son of George Washington Going and Mary Jane Vaughan Going, was born November 18, 1895. He was married to Edith Purvis June 20, 1923. Of Henri Rochelle Going and Edith Purvis Going and descendants nothing more is known.

James Clyde Going, son of George Washington Going and Annie Gilliam Jeter Smith Going, was born July 5, 1905, at Union, South Carolina. He attended the College of Charleston in 1923, according to an alumni bulletin of the college. He received an L.L.B. degree from the University of South Carolina in 1927. He was married to Sarah Elizabeth Bell November 28, 1928. She was from Spartanburg. In 1930, James Clyde Going was an attorney at Union. Children born to James Clyde Going and Sarah Elizabeth Bell Going are unknown.

George Washington Going, Jr, son of George Washington Go-ing and Annie Gilliam Jeter Smith Going, was born April 1, 1909 at Union. He was married November 29, 1933 at Rock Hill, South Carolina to Eloise Barfield. He died in 1947. Children born to George Washington Going, Jr. and Eloise Barfield Going are unknown.

Robert Lee Going, son of William George Washington Going and Nancy Manerva Jane Dupree Going, was born December 26, 1864. He died January 2, 1865, according to the family bible.

Joseph Wright Gary Going, son of William George Washington Going and Nancy Manerva Jane Dupree Going, was born April 10, 1866 at Kelton, South Carolina. He appeared as a 14-year-old in the household of his father in the 1880 census of Union County. Later his name was rendered “Joseph Gary Going.” In 1891 he was graduated from medical school at Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia. On December 24, 1892 he was married to Mary E. Stephens of Georgia. Mary E. Stephens Going died January 20, 1904 in Union..

On December 25, 1904 Dr. Joseph Gary Going was married to Ophelia Parham Jeter who was born September 15, 1873 in Union, South Carolina. She was born September 15, 1873, ac-cording to her tombstone. In 1930 Joseph Gary Going was a physician and surgeon practicing at Union, South Carolina. Dr. Joseph Gary Going died April 26, 1950 and was buried in Rosemont Cemetery, according to “Union County, South Carolina Cemeteries” by Mrs. E. D. Whaley. Ophelia Jeter Going died January 7, 1958 and was buried beside her husband.

Children born to Dr. Joseph Gary Going and Mary E. Stephens Going include:

Ottis Earl Going born June 14, 1893
Paulette Going born April 16, 1896

Children born to Dr. Joseph Gary Going and Ophelia Parham Jeter Going include:

Gilliam Jeter Going born July 21, 1906
Nora Cleo Going born June 12, 1907
Joseph Gary Going, Jr. born December 7, 1912

Ottis Earl Going, son of Dr. Joseph Gary Going and Mary E. Stephens Going, was born June 14, 1893. He died October 23, 1933 and was buried in the family plot in Rosemont Cemetery.

Paulette Going, daughter of Dr. Joseph Gary Going and Mary E. Stephens Going, was born April 16, 1896. She died Decem-ber 18, 1948.

Gilliam Jeter Going, son of Dr. Joseph Gary Going and Ophelia Parham Jeter Going, was born July 21, 1906. He died at eight months and was buried in Rosemont Cemetery.

Nora Cleo Going, daughter of Dr. Joseph Gary Going and Ophelia Parham Jeter Going, was born June 12, 1907, at Union, South Carolina. In 1930 she was a student at Brevard Institute in North Carolina. She died June 22, 1980.

Joseph Gary Going, Jr, son of Dr. Joseph Gary Going and Ophelia Parham Jeter Going, was born at Union. In 1930 he was a student at Union High School. In 1961 “J. Gary Going” resided at Palmetto Gardens, Charleston, according to the telephone directory.
Rhoda Cornelia Alice Sarah Elizabeth Going, daughter of William George Washington Going and Nancy Manerva Jane Dupree Going, was born September 12, 1868 at Kelton. She appeared as an 11-year-old in the 1880 census of Union County living in the household of her father. She was married Sunday, October 17, 1886 to William Vaughan, born March 29, 1866, a brother to Mary Jane Vaughan, who married her brother, George Washington Going. Rhoda Cornelia Alice Sarah Elizabeth Going Vaughan died March 3, 1928 and was buried at the Phillipi Baptist Church in Union County. Her husband died three weeks later, March 27, 1928.

Mary Vaughan born September 23, 1887
James Lemuel Vaughan born March 27, 1889
Giles Franklin Vaughan born May 1, 1891
William Arthur Vaughan born March 14, 1893
Nettie Aileen Vaughan born March 7, 1895
Byron Bozell Vaughan born July 25, 1897
Charles Douglas Vaughan born October 1, 1900
Lily Marie Vaughan born July 16, 1902
Albert Sidney Vaughan born March 19, 1904
Nancy Sarah Evelina Vaughan born November 9, 1901
Lee Roy Vaughan born December 12, 1908
Janie Ruth Vaughan born November 23, 1910

Janie Ruth Vaughan, daughter of William Vaughan and Sarah Elizabeth Going Vaughan, was born November 23, 1910 in Union County. She was married July 29, 1929 to Fred Alford Cogdell. He was born in Cocke County, Tennessee January 31, 1912 to Andrew Calhoun Cogdell and Jennie Archer Cogdell. Fred Alfrod Cogdell died May 19, 1988.

Children born to them include:

Ruth Ann Cogdell born December 31, 1930

Ruth Ann Cogdell, daughter of William Vaughan and Sarah Elizabeth Going Vaughan, was born December 31, 1930 at Monarch, South Carolina in Union County. She was married March 31, 1956 to Marshall Zebual Tucker.

One child was born to them:

Fredrick Marshall Tucker born August 22, 1959

Fredrick Marshall Tucker, only child of Marshall Zebual Tucker and Ruth Ann Cogdell Tucker, was born August 22, 1959 at Greer, South Carolina. In 1996, he a Foundation member, was a teacher in Duncan, South Carolina.

Oliver Francis Marion Going, son of William George Washing-ton Going and Nancy Manerva Jane Dupree Going, was born June 16, 1870 at Kelton. He appeared in the 1880 census of Union County as a nine-year-old living in the household of his father. He was married February 10, 1897 to Ellen McPherson in Greenville, South Carolina. She was born February 21, 1876.

Oliver Francis Marion Going died December 11, 1931, and Ellen McPherson Going died July 5, 1936. They were buried in Springwood Cemetery in Greenville.

Children born to them include:

Oliver Francis Marion Going, Jr. born March 23, 1898
James William Going born April 26, 1910

Amasa Vernon “Mace” Going, son of Isaac Going and Rebecca Palmer Going and namesake of his uncle Amasa Palmer, was born in Union District, South Carolina. His birth occurred “Tuesday, 30th day of January 1827, 45 minutes past 6 o’clock in the evening,” according to the family bible..

Like Amasa, captain of the host of Judah who was treacher-ously slain by Joab in II Samuel, he became a soldier. He was a grandson of Drury Going, a Revolutionary soldier and Sarah “Sallie” Baxter Going.

Amasa Vernon “Mace” Going fled to Louisiana about 1858, to avoid being implicated in the theft of a slave, according to Fredrick M. Tucker. He is believed to have lived in St. Landry Parish. “A. M. Goins” appeared in the 1860 census of Union Parish. While there he began to court Emma Porter, daughter of Tillman Porter and probably would have married her had the Civil War not interfered. Emma Porter was born in 1843 and died in 1932, at about age 89. She was buried with her parents in Shiloh Church Cemetery in Union Parish.

Tillman Porter bought land in Union Parish November 5, 1851. His location was in Township 21 North, Range 2 West, about four miles east of present-day Bernice, Louisiana and about three miles north of Shiloh Church. George W. Bolton, a resident of the Shiloh community served in Company E with Amasa Vernon “Mace” Going and wrote letters during the War, some of which are retained by Col. Carroll Heard Goyne, Jr. of Shreveport, Louisiana.

In July 1861 Amasa Vernon “Mace” Going enlisted as a pri­vate in Company E of the “Independent Rangers” at Camp Moore, Louisiana, according to Carl H. Moneyhon, professor of history at University of Arkansas at Little Rock. At that time Camp Moore was located just north of New Orleans near the site of the New Orleans Fairgrounds.

Prof. Moneyhon researched the military career of Amasa Ver-non “Mace” Going and included his portrait in “Portraits of Conflict, A Photographic History of Louisiana in the Civil War” compiled in collaboration with Bobby Roberts. The sixth plate ambrotype, taken shortly after his enlistment, was made by a woman photographer, E. Beachabard in New Or­leans August 18, 1861. In 1993 it was owned by J. Dale West of Longview, Texas.

The “Independent Rangers” regiment was incorporated into Confederate service as the Twelfth Louisiana Infantry Regiment. Amasa Vernon “Mace” Going wrote a letter September 12, 1862 to his brother, William George Washington Going which has been retained by a Going descendant researcher, Fredrick M. Tucker of Duncan, South Carolina:
“Mississippi, Marshall County Camp
Near Holly Springs
September 12, 1862
Dear Brother,

I am well, and I hope this will find you and family with all the connection is in the same good blessing. We have just got back from a tiresome trip, we travel over 700 miles, got but little to eat and done very hard marching. We did not get into any fights. Our regiment stood it much better than I thought. I saw John Bailey and Old Jim Sams at Jackson, Miss. He was well. I also saw John Foster yesterday. He heard of me and came by to see me. He belongs to the 6th Miss. Regt. He is above 12 miles above here.

We have just received orders to cook up five days ra-tions and be ready for marching in the morning at 4 o’clock. We will go up North I think. We will have a fight at Bolivar, Tenn. before this time next week, if the yankeys don’t leave there before we can get there. They are 12,000 strong at that place. We have and can get about 20,000 I think. The general notion is to push on a fight at that place. We are camped on cold water, five miles from Holly Springs, just where the yankeys were camped 6 weeks ago. They did a great deal of mischief in this settlement.

I found some yankey letters today they lost when they left here. One young lady writing to her sweetheart said, “Oh how she would like to see the Rebels tortured a while and then killed” and others praying for him to come home for she and her children were living on bread and other one was grieving because her husband was not buried in a coffin. I see from the letters we found about here that they have hard living as well as we do in the South.

I suppose you have heard of the glorious victorys in Virg, Tenn and Ky. long before this can reach you. I have to write in a hurry. You can tell brothers that I am up here and direct there letters to Holly Springs and I will get them though they are fixing to start to Tenn. and will be there tomorrow.

I want you to keep everything strait between you and I about the Land. You do what you think is rite and that will suit me. I will wright again before long, soon as we stop or our fight is over. Tell Keran [his sister] I will wright to her before long. Tell them all that I am well. I must go to cooking.

I am your loving brother
A. V. Going
To William Going”

Amasa Vernon “Mace” Going served three years in the Twelfth Louisiana Infantry Regiment and was killed in December 1864, according to his probate application. If the probate date is correct, he may have died in the bloody Battle of Nashville.

His service record reveals that he was absent from his regiment and company after August 1864. His absence was due either to illness, capture or death. Since the horrific Battle of Atlanta was fought in August 1864, he may have died in that engagement.

His personal property in Union Parish was sold in an estate sale, and members of the Porter family purchased items from it.

Drury Dobbins Going, his older brother, filed an application for Amasa Vernon “Mace” Going in Union District November 23, 1866. The document was never properly filed and was discovered over 100 years later among scraps of paper in the Union District probate office. The document read:

“South Carolina }
Union District }

To C. Gage, Ordinary

“Your petitioner would respectfully show into your Court that A. V. Going, late of Louisiana, Union Parish, dec’d, departed this life on or about the _____ Decr. 1864, intestate, that he was seized and possessed of a personal estate in this district, to the amount of three or four hundred Dollars, also a distributive interest in the land of the real estate of Isaac Going, dec’d, late of this district, that no administration has been had on the Es­tate of said deceased, and that an administration is necessary in order that there may be some person authorized by law to re­ceive and receipt for any money coming to and due the said estate, and for a final distribution of the estate amongst his brothers and sisters, all of whom, except one, [Sarah Vincen] reside in this District, that he left kin surviving his heirs at law, Thomas B. Going, Wm. G. W. Going, Richard Page and wife Rhoda and the children of Martha K. Hames, vix. John, Eliza & Kittury Hames, minors, residents of this district & Sarah Vincen residing in Chattanooga, Tennessee.

Your petitioner would therefore pray that your Court may grant him letters of administration on the personal estate of said deceased, and he will ever pray. H H

Ex Parte }
D. D. Going }

Petition for Admin.

Petition Refused.”

Elisha Palmer Going, son of Isaac Going and Rebecca Palmer Going, was born December 22, 1829 in Union district. He en-listed in the Confederate service and was killed by a cannonball August 13, 1864, at age 24 in the Battle of Fussel’s Mill near Ft. Harrison, Virginia.

Martha Kerenhappuch [Cornucopia; second daughter of Job’s second family, Job 13:14] Going, daughter of Isaac Going and Rebecca Palmer Going, was born July 4, 1835 in Union District.

She was married there about 1854 to Isaac Hames. He died in Confederate service. She and children were mentioned in the probate application of her brother Amasa Vernon “Mace” Going filed in Union District November 23, 1866. She died in Union District in 1867. In the 1880 census of Union District their children were enumerated in the household of her brother, William George Washington Going.

Hames, John S. 20, born in SC, nephew
Keturah 18, born in SC, niece
Louisa 16, born in SC, niece”

James Going, son of Drury Going and Sarah “Sallie” Baxter Going, was born in 1777. He was married to a woman named Hughes about 1801. Children born to them are unknown. Another report shows him married to Elizabeth Cook, sister to Robert Cook who was married to Sarah Baxter Going, his sister. Elizabeth Cook was the daughter of Josiah Cook, Sr. and Mary Watson Cook who had eight children, according to his probate papers in Chester County, South Carolina. His estate was probated in 1797 by Mary Watson Cook, administrator.

In 1811 Mary Cook, Robert Cook and Nancy Cook sold their interests in the inheritance to Josiah Cook, Jr.

David Scott wrote:

“In South Carolina in a case of dying intestate, the right to inherit, if there were no children or spouse, was first to the parents, if deceased, then to the siblings. In 1858 Josiah Cook Jr. died. In his probate file was a will written in 1857 by a ne-phew and signed by him that left the follow-ing:

To Nephew Chelsea Robbins $ 1500
To Brother Robert Cook 1000
To Sister Elizabeth Goins 1000
To Sister Nancy Parks 700
To Nephew Wm. M. Robins 700
To Nephew Robert Cook 700
To Nephew Smith Cook 300

My Nephew, Chelsea Robins, administrator.
Will dated3rd Aug 1858
Admitted to court October 1858:

Since the Nephew Chelsea Robbins had written the will, Josiah’s Sister Nancy Parks contested the will and demanded proof that the will was really that of Josiah. She stated that had he died intes-tate, he would have the following heirs:

Mrs. Nancy Parks of Chester County
Robert Cook
Mrs. Elizabeth Goins [widow] of Alabama;
Smith Cook of Union District
Robert Cook and Mrs. Rachel Winn, both of whom moved westward some years ago and their residence is not known.

This leads to me to believe that Josiah had been married, his wife was deceased and there was no issue. The Robins nephews were probably ne-phews on his wife’s side of the family. Chelsea Robins in 1858 may not have realized there had been a sister who was married to Minor Winn who moved out of state between 1801 and 1810. In 1810 Sampson Cook and son Robert Cook were living in Union County, South Carolina.”

James Going received a disbursement from his father’s estate July 17, 1802 in the amount of 72 pounds, 2 shillings. Shortly afterward, James Going removed to Robertson County, Tennessee, probably about 1807. “James Goyne” and wife Elizabeth Goyne were “received by letter” June 18, 1808 by Red River Primitive Baptist Church, according to “The Warren Family of Trigg County, Kentucky.”

“James Goin” and “Jeremiah Goin” were taxpayers in Robertson County, Capt. Gabriel Martin’s Company, in 1812, according to “Taxpayer List,” Roll 7, Tennessee State Archives. During this decade, James Going removed westward to adjoining Montgomery County. In this location, the scribes began to record his surname as “Goyne.”

“James Goyne” appeared as the head of a household in the 1820 census of Montgomery County. The family was recorded as:

“Goyne, James white male 26-45
white female 26-45
white female 10-16
white male 0-10
white female 0-10
white male 0-10
white female 0-10”

James Goyne owned two slaves and three members of the family were engaged in agriculture. James Goyne reappeared as the head of a household in the 1830 census of Montgomery County. The family was recorded as:

“Goyne, James white male 50-60
white female 40-50
white male 15-20
white female 15-20
white male 10-15
white female 5-10
white male 5-10
white female 5-10
white male 0-5”

The will of “James Goyne,” written March 12, 1837, was filed in Montgomery County:

“Montgomery County, Tennessee}
March 12th day, 1837 }

The last will and Testament of James Goyne of said County and State:

1st. My will is that all my just debts be paid out of my perishable property and that my executor sell off enough of said property to do so.

2nd. My will is that my wife, Elizabeth Goyne have all the rest and residue of my estate during her natural life, upon the following terms: That is to clothe, raise and school my three children that is underage, Martha Caroline, James Robt. and Isaac Newton Goyne, and to give to each of said non age children, if the interest of said estate is sufficient to do so, the same amount that I have heretofore given my other children that is of age, reference to a written obligation between myself and said children of age will fully show. But if the interest of my estate is not sufficient to give the non age children as above, that at the death of my wife they be made equal out of the principal of my estate, and then at the death of my wife as above, that if any remain, that it be equally divided between all my children.

3rd. My will is that my wife have liberty to sell any part or all of my Estate, either real or personal, with exception of the negroes that belong to my estate, to wit: America, Henry, Ned & Siller, and the increase of said America and Siller, but that my wife keep them during her life and then dispose of as above stated by sale or division among all my children.

4th & Lastly. My will is and I do hereby appoint my wife, Elizabeth Goyne, my lawful Executrix to this my last Will and Testament. In witness whereof I do here-unto set my hand and seal the day and date first written. The said Executrix is released by me from security.

Signed, sealed & delivered and James
Goyne
Acknowledged in presence of:
William Davis Jurat 2 April 1838
John T. Bell Jurat 6 May 1838

I, Saml McFall, Clerk of the County Court of Montgomery, do certify that the foregoing is a true copy of the last will and testament of James Goyne, dcsd. as recorded in my office in Book H, page 93 & 94 and that said will was duly proven in open court according to law and ordered to be recorded. In witness whereof I have hereunto set my hand and affixed the seal of our said court at office in the Town of Clarksville this 21st day of June 1838 and 62nd year of the Independence of the United States.
Samuel McFall, clk”

In less than a month later, the will was also filed in Tuscaloosa County, Alabama, according to Tuscaloosa County Will Book 1, page 119, which covered the period of 1821-1855, according to “Index to Alabama Wills, 1807-1870.” This indicates that the widow removed to be near other family members in Alabama and filed the will to show ownership of slaves that she brought there.

“Elizabeth Gowen” was married to John Simpson July 7, 1850, according to Tuscaloosa County Marriage Book IIIA, page 99.

Elizabeth Cook Goyne received an inheritance of $1,000 from the estate of her brother, Josiah Cook, Jr, according to Chester County, South Carolina Will Book 4, page 348-349. His will was dated August 11, 1858. Isaac Going of Union District South Carolina had written a letter to his nephew Alfred Elijah Going February 3, 1857 in which he stated, “Tell Joseph Cook that his old Uncle Josiah Cook is yet living and very rich without heirs, that he should do well to visit us next summer.”
Children born to James Going and Elizabeth Cook Going include:

John C. Going born about 1815
Martha Caroline Going born about 1821
James Robert Going born about 1824
Isaac Newton Going born about 1828

John C. Going, son of James Going and Elizabeth Cook Going, was born about 1815, probably in Robertson County. He appeared in Tuscaloosa County, Alabama where he participated with his mother in a real estate transaction.

Martha Caroline Going, daughter of James Going and Elizabeth Cook Going, was born about 1821, probably in Robertson County. She was mentioned as being “non age” in the will of her father written in 1837. She was brought to Tuscaloosa County, Alabama by her mother about 1838. “Martha Goyne” was married to James Edwards July 23, 1857, according to Tuscaloosa County Marriage Book 4, page 256.

Mary “Polly” Going, daughter of Drury Going and Sarah “Sallie” Baxter Going, was born in 1779. She received a total of $369 from the estate of her father from September 20, 1805 to February 16, 1807. She was married about 1808 to Thomas Hughes. Children born to them are unknown. She died at Pickensville, Alabama in Pickens County in 1858. She was the mother of two, and possibly three, children, according to Fredrick M. Tucker.

Elizabeth Going, daughter of Drury Going and Sarah “Sallie” Baxter Going, was born about 1781, probably in Chester County. She was married to John Lockard in 1798, probably in Chester County. He was born there “about 1770 near Lockard Shoals on Broad River,” according to “History of Hall County, Georgia” by Sybil Wood McRay.

“Elisabeth Lockart,” apparently a widow, the owner of five slaves, was enumerated as the head of a household in the federal census taken September 14, 1810 in Chester County, page 262:
“Lockart, Elisabeth white female 26-45
white male 10-16
white female 0-10
white female 0-10”

Children born to John Lockard and Elizabeth Going Lockard include:

Aaron Lockard born April 26, 1801
Narcissa Lockard born about 1802
Betsy Lockard born about 1804

Aaron Lockard, son of John Lockard and Elizabeth Going Lockard, was born April 26, 1801 in Chester County. He died May 4, 1861 in Hall County.

Narcissa Lockard, daughter of John Lockard and Elizabeth Going Lockard, was born about 1802 in Chester County. She was married to Maj. John Bell about 1820. He was first married in Virginia in 1792. He removed to Georgia where he died March 2, 1850.

Betsy Lockard, daughter of John Lockard and Elizabeth Going Lockard, was born about 1804 in Chester County. She was married about 1822, husband’s name McChimney. Betsy Lockard McChimney removed to Pickens County, Alabama with the Going family.

Rebecca Going, daughter of Drury Going and Sarah “Sallie” Baxter Going, was born about 1782 in Chester County. Elijah Going, her brother and executor of their father’s estate, filed a receipt with the Chester County Court showing payments to Mary Going, “September 20th day 1805, paid to Mary Going Seventy-five Dollars; April 9th day, 1806 paid to Mary Going Two hundred and sixty-five dollars; paid to Mary Going February 16th day 1807 Twenty-nine dollars by me. To[tal] $369, Elijah Going.”

Apparently Rebecca Going was still unmarried and living with her mother when Sarah “Sallie” Baxter Going wrote her will in 1814. The will expressed a desire that Rebecca Going and her sister Mary Gowen live with their brother, Thomas Baxter Going while they remain unmarried. It also provided that Rebecca Going was to receive a feather bed and bedroom furniture “that she claimed,” a “cow named Harty and her heifer,” a woman’s saddle, a pine table and a large trunk. Rebecca Going was married about 1823 to John Annett in Chester County, according to Fredrick M. Tucker. She died during the 1850s at Tuscaloosa, Alabama. She was the mother of six.

Thomas Baxter Going, son of Drury Going and Sarah “Sallie” Baxter Going, was born in 1784, probably in Chester County. He was mentioned in the will of his mother written November 4, 1814 in which she expressed a wish that her unmarried daughters, Rebecca Going and Mary Going, live with Thomas Baxter Going while they remained unmarried.

Day C. Love has been quoted as saying that he went to school with the children of Thomas Baxter Going, “a clergyman of Crawford, Mississippi who later removed to Texas.” He may have been referring to Rev. Thomas Baxter Going, a nephew of Thomas Baxter Going. Of Thomas Baxter Going nothing more is known.

Fredrick M. Tucker reports that Thomas Baxter Going lived with Biddy Going, a free black woman in 1840 and 1850. He died during the 1850s in Tuscaloosa County, Alabama.

Sarah Baxter Going, daughter of Drury Going and Sarah “Sallie” Baxter Going, was born April 3, 1786, probably in Chester County. She was married in Union County about 1804 to Robert Cook, son of Josiah Cook and Mary Watson Cook. They continued in Union County December 23, 1816 when they joined Mary Watson Cook, his mother in deeding 55 acres, according to Union County Deed Book N, page 287. They later removed to Tuscaloosa, Alabama. Robert Cook was named co-administrator of the estate of Job Isaac Going, his brother-in-law in Tuscaloosa County May 10, 1834. She died there October 8, 1868.

Children born to them include:

Mary Tolbert Cook born June 4, 1805
Elizabeth Lovelace Cook born about 1808
Dennis Cook born about 1809
Nancy Adeline Cook born about 1811
Sarah Melissa Cook born about 1813
Joseph Sayre Cook born about 1815
Thomas Cheetom Cook born about 1818
Rebeeca Mahala Cook born about 1821
Robert March Cook born about 1825
Chelsea Monroe Cook born about 1829

Mary Tolbert Cook, daughter of Robert Cook and Sarah Baxter Going, was born June 4, 1805. She died May 24, 1826 in Tuscaloosa County, Alabama and was buried in Robertson Chapel Cemetery. Her tombstone, a reddish-brown fieldstone was the only one in the cemetery engraved with her birth and death dates: “Mary T. Cook, born June 14, 1805, daughter of R. Cook & S. Cook, dec’d. May 24, 1826.” Many other members of the Going-Cook family were buried there with unengraved fieldstones to mark their graves.

A daughter of Robert Cook and Sarah Going Cook was married to Drennan Love. Drennan Love, son of Capt. James Love, Jr. was reared by Job Isaac Going and Robert Lockert Going. John Lockert was the original guardian to Drennan Love and his brothers, Aaron Love, John Love and David Love.
==O==
Nancy Goings, a widow, unidentified, was the head of household enumerated in the 1840 census of Union County, page 203. The household was listed as:

“Goings, Nancy white female 30-40
white male 10-15
white male 10-15
white female 10-15
white female 5-10
white male 5-10
white male 0-5”
==O==
Hugh Going and Nancy Young were appointed administrators of the estate of James Young, deceased, according to an entry dated January 24, 1797 in the Chester County Court Order Book 1795-1799, page 360.

BRUNSWICK COUNTY, VIRGINIA
[Miscellaneous]

No members of the Gowen family [or spelling variations] were listed in the 1769 or 1772 tax lists, the earliest ones, for Brunswick County.
==O==
Edward Going was a resident of Brunswick County in 1784, according to “Southern Lineages” by Addie Evans Wynn.
==O==
William Going paid tax on “one poll” in Brunswick County, according to “Virginia Taxpayers, 1782-1787” by Fothergill.

 

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