South Carolina – Charleston County

FamilySearch.org info on Charleston County, South Carolina:

https://familysearch.org/wiki/en/Charleston_County,_South_Carolina_Genealogy

1704 Oct 2 – George Chicken and James Ingerson executed a bond to Governor Johnson for Chicken’s proper administration of the estate of Charles Gowing, late of Charles Town. The warrant of appraisement was directed to Wm. Gibbon, Evan McFashion and John Goodwin. (page 90). “Abstracts from the Records of the Court of Ordinary of the Province of South Carolina, 1700-1712” by A. S. Salley, Jr. Charleston, South Carolina. https://archive.org/stream/jstor-27575317/27575317#page/n5/mode/2up/search/chicken

1717 William Going signed a petition “to the Crown against the Proprietors” February 24, 1717, according to “South Carolina Historical Magazine.” The petition was signed by all of the members of the South Carolina House of Commons and many other citizens. A total of 568 signatures–one half of the white male population of colony of South Carolina–appeared on the document. South Carolina

1739 April 21: Mrs. Giles Gowan (or Govan) was the mother of John Johnston who mentioned her in his will. John Johnston died in South Carolina April 21, 1739. His will also mentioned John Gowan, merchant of London, England. Abstract of this will is printed in “Abstracts of Wills of the State of South Carolina 1670-1740,” page 265, by Caroline T. Moore. The will was re-corded in Charleston Will Book 1736-1740, page 399.  https://www.familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:1:3Q9M-C9PY-49SV?i=221&cat=236996

1739 April 21st -… will of John Johnston –
– Item I leave and will to Mr George Seaman mercht in CharlesTown 20 pounds sterling.
– Item I leave and will to Mr Alexr Robertson merch in CharlesTown 20 pounds sterling.
– Item I leave and will to Mr John Gowan mercht in London 20 pounds sterling.
– Item I leave to Mrs Giels Govan my honored mother one hundred pounds sterling.
– Item I leave and will to Jane Johnston, Giles Johnston, and Jinnel Johnston my beloved sisters 25 pounds sterling each.
– All the resideue of my effects when the above sums are paid I leave and will to Andrew Johnston, Thomas Johnston, and Archibald Johnston, my beloved bretheren to be equally divided among them share and share alike… I nominate Mr George Seaman and M Alexander Roberts… executors .. https://www.familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:1:3Q9M-C9PY-49SV?i=221&cat=236996
1736-40 – p 399.
Sarah Johnston – p 74 – : https://www.familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:1:3Q9M-C9PY-4DK7?i=319&cat=236996

Ashley River Baptist Church 1736-1764, Charleston District, South Carolina https://www.familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:1:3Q9M-CSRD-HGCP?i=631&cat=357193

1750 June 22 – … The same day was baptised a Etheopian Woman named Nelle Goeing daughter of Mercy Goeing on profession of faith and by of order of w Church Ashley River Baptist Church 1736-1764, Charleston District, South Carolina https://www.familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:1:3Q9M-CSRD-HGZR?i=649&cat=357193

1751 Feb 1 – Whereas Brother John Norman Stroud suspeneded from Comm for being guilty of lawful sin of adultry – concluded by ye Church to receive him again to communion, on his humble acknowledgment which he made this day to ye Church he confessed be god for backsliding return – Likewise at the time was baptised by order of Church, and on profession of faith John Bullen Jun and Mary Bullen, and Thomas Goeing, and was renewed into Union and full communion with the Church and likewise received .. Martha Stephens ye wife of ye Revd John Stephens ye Pastor of this Church into Union and fulll communion. Ashley River Baptist Church 1736-1764, Charleston District, South Carolina. https://www.familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:1:3Q9M-CSRD-HGZR?i=649&cat=357193

1752 Feb 4 – Thomas Going – Plat for 750 acres on the north side of Congaree, South Carolina, Pursuant to a Precept to me directed by George Hunter Esq his Majesties Survoyor Genl. directed the 4th day of February 1752. I have measured and laid out unto Thomas Going a plantation or tract of Land containing seven hundred and fifty acres situate lying and being on the North side of the Congaree otherwise Seludy River on both sides of the Creek called Collins Mill Creek butting and bounding on all sides on vacant land and hath such shape and form and marks as the above plat represents. Given under my hand this 9 of March 1752. John Fairchild; Description shows on map below to be:
Future Lexington Co, SC (county south of Fairfield Co). D.S.   http://www.archivesindex.sc.gov/onlinearchives/Thumbnails.aspx?recordId=95289 Petition for Thomas Goings indicates he has a wife and 9 children, and prays for 550 acres on or about the Congree River. Petition on Feb 4, 1752.

1752 March 9: GOING, THOMAS, PLAT FOR 750 ACRES ON THE NORTH SIDE OF CONGAREE.  Series: S213184 Volume: 0005 Page: 00171 Item: 01
Names indexed: FAIRCHILD, JOHN; GOING, THOMAS; HUNTER, GEORGE Locations: COLLINS CREEK; CONGAREE RIVER; SALUDA RIVER Document type: PLAT
http://www.archivesindex.sc.gov/onlinearchives/RecordDetail.aspx?RecordId=95289
http://www.archivesindex.sc.gov/onlinearchives/Thumbnails.aspx?recordId=95289(Image)

1752 April 24: GOINGS, THOMAS, LAND GRANT FOR 750 ACRES ON COLLINS AND MILL CREEKS.  Series: S213019 Volume: 0004 Page: 00607 Item: 000
Names indexed: GOINGS, THOMAS Locations: COLLINS CREEK; MILL CREEK Document type: LAND GRANT
http://www.archivesindex.sc.gov/onlinearchives/RecordDetail.aspx?RecordId=55145

1753 Benjamin Gowen gave a mortgage securing the purchase of five slaves bought from John Calder and Capt. William Lawton, planter of Edisto Island in March 1753, according to “South Carolina Magazine of History.” South Carolina.

1753 Aug 24 – George Gowen listed as an account owed at Robert Hill’s tavern in Edmundson, Ashepoo, South Carolina (Ashepoo, in Colleton County). The note part of Robert Hill’s estate in 1759. Tavernkeeper. Ashepoo, SC. Bk T, 1758-1761. p. 153A. South Carolina. https://www.fold3.com/image/266970938

1754 March 21: an estate sale of Robert Futhy, decd, was held and accounting was turned into the court on January 26, 1756. The 2nd page shows John Gowin appears to buy a case of Huntherd? Accounting shows cash of John Gowin by case of Andrew Johnston, 28.10. Craven County, South Carolina. bk R2, 1753-1756. p. 401. South Carolina. https://www.fold3.com/image/305665173?terms=Gowins

1754 November 9 – At our Quarterly meeting:
Was baptised on profession of faith Nathaniel Bradwell, Charles Barker Insd., Col Bedon negro fellow Cago, John Goeing, and Mr Bradwell negro wench named Dinah, and they were all reeived members of this Church. Ashley River Baptist Church 1736-1764, Charleston District, South Carolina https://www.familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:1:3Q9M-CSRD-HG4P?i=652&cat=357193

1755 Feb 1 – At our Quarterly.
Was baptised by Order of Ye Church and on Profession of faith, Elia Bradwell, Anne Winwright, An Hurst, Thomas Goeing Junr.
Concluded to excommunicate Thomas Barten Jun for the sin of adultery which he has lived in some time past.
Notwithstanding all ye admonitions of ye Church accordingly it was executed ye Sabbath following …. Ashley River Baptist Church 1736-1764, Charleston District, South Carolina https://www.familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:1:3Q9M-CSRD-HG4P?i=652&cat=357193

1759 Feb 2d was baptised Dinah Goeing and recd as a member in full. Ashley River Baptist Church 1736-1764, Charleston District, South Carolina https://www.familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:1:3Q9M-CSRD-HGZT?i=653&cat=357193

1759 Feb 4 – Henery Goins (Henry Goins): Is noted to owe on an account from Feb 1759 William Little of Craven County, SC in William Little’s probate paperwork in 1767. South Carolina. bk X, p 232. 1768-1769 Inventories of Estates. South Carolina.
https://www.fold3.com/image/1/305666087

1764 June 5 –  Thomas Gown applied for a 100 acre bounty grant in the upper Savannah River valley in Belfast township June 5, 1764, according to the records of the Charleston Treasurer. He re­ceived 35 pounds from the treasury in 1764.

1768 Mrs. Giles Gowan, apparently was married at least three times. She wrote her will as Sarah Johnston, widow, in “Charles Town, South Carolina.” She died November 29, 1768, according to Charleston County Will Book TT, page 74. The will names her sons, John McCall, Robert Collins and Robert Johnston and grandsons, John McCall, James McCall and Hext McCall, minor. John McCall, son, was named ex­ecutor of the estate.

1768 April 25: James Gowen, John Keating, and John Ohear are appraisers of the estate of James Clark, deceased, with Margaret Clark, administrator. records in Charleston, South Carolina. 1768 April 25 inventory of appraisement of effects of estate of James Clarke decd, administatrix is Margaret Clark. Wits: John Keating, John O’Hear, James Gowen. South Carolina , Inventory Bk X, pg. 347-348.
https://www.fold3.com/image/305666203  https://www.familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:1:939L-J6QD-WM?i=186&wc=MP5M-JWG%3A190562801%2C190562802%2C190713501%2C190560104&cc=1911928

1768 Oct 26 – Moses Kirkland; Found guilty of assault – fined L 200. Charlestown, SC.
https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.3.1/TH-1-19432-69700-57?cc=1919417&wc=M6N4-3TP:210905601,211220801

1769 May 1: Alexander Gowens of N Bartholows Parish in South Carolina, a carpenter sells a slave named Primus to Betty Wise.  Signed: Alexr. Gowen. Witnessed by Charles  Roberts. Proved up by Charles Roberts on May 24, 1769 who states . . . he was personally present and did see the within named Alexander Gowen a free negro sign seal and as his act and deed deliver the within instrument of writing  to Mrs Betty Wise . . . Recorded in Charleston, SC. May 26, 1769. Colleton County, South Carolina.  p. 75.  https://www.familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:1:3Q9M-C9PT-PY7S?i=401&cat=236996

1769 July 4 – An Inventory and Appraisement of the Chattles of Joseph Wood late of St Davids Parish.   Thomas Gowing balance of Act dated July 4, 1769. 4-4 (page cut off here). bk AA, 1774-1785. p. 107. South Carolina. https://www.fold3.com/image/305705255

1771 Jan 22 Inventory and appraisement of Benjamin Smith decd, with James Gowan on a note for 300 in South Carolina. Inventory Book Y, 1769-1771. p. 373. https://www.fold3.com/image/305666723

1771 Aug 9: James Gowin listed as a debt of inventory of estate of John Graves, decd on Fold3. South Carolina. bk Z, 1771-1774. p. 49.  https://www.fold3.com/image/305703903

1772 Oct 14: Jacob Gowen listed on account books of estate of Robert Weaver, decd late of Mass Bluff, taken in Charleston, South Carolina.
bk & 1772-1776, inventories, p 149. https://www.fold3.com/image/305704609

1773 April 4: Jacob Going owes estate of William Middleton, deceased. Admin is Martin Middleton. Wits: William Middleton Jr, Gidn Gibson, and Gidn Gibson Jr. South Carolina. bk Z, 1771-1774. p. 340. South Carolina. https://www.fold3.com/image/305704196

1773 April 24: William Middleton Sr. left a sizeable estate (worth about 4,000
pounds not counting land), inventoried and appraised by William
Middleton, Jr., Gideon Gibson, Sr., and Gideon Gibson, Jr. on April 24,
1773. An interesting list of debtors to the estate includes:
Wm Alston due the Estate for Pork……55″–“-
Gideon Gibson Sr Note to the Estate…157”–“-<—————————–
George Gibson due to the Estate……..26”–“-<—————————–
John Berry by Acct due the Estate…….5”–“-
Jordan Gibson Sr. Acct……………..17”–“- <—————————-
Benj. Blackmans acct…….96/3
Peter Keighleys acct…….25/
Isaac Nevils acct……….L 5
Thomas Brewintons acct…..60/
Frederick Jones acct…… L 10
Jacob Goings acct dues said Estate……7″10″- <—————————-
South Carolina  https://www.fold3.com/image/305704196

1777 Feb 17 – James Gowen on a bond in SC on a “Book of Account” in an appraisal of the Estate of Daniel DeSoussure, by Mary DeSaussure in 1798. 1777 Feb 17: James Gowen listed in warrant of appraisement of estate of Daniel DeSausoure, decd in Charleston, South Carolina. bk C, 1793-1800. p. 372. https://www.fold3.com/image/265613596/?terms=Gowen

1784 March 24: William Going owes a note for 6.9.8. Noted on inventory of the estate of Mr. Meyer Moses deceased. p. 200 to 202. Fold3. Charleston, South Carolina. bk B, 1787-1793. p. 202 South Carolina. https://www.fold3.com/image/265612250

1785 In the same year of Amos Goyen’s death, his widow was remarried in Fairfield County to Dr. John Byrns.About 1788, they relocated to Charleston where severalByrns children were born. On November 28, 1786 “John Byrns and Mary Byrns, his wife” applied for the administration of the estate of “Amos Goyen,” according to “Camden District, South Carolina Wills and Administrations, 1781-1787.”
http://www.genealogy.com/forum/surnames/topics/guynes/246/
http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~gowenrf/gowenms005.htm

1785 June 29 – On June 29, 1785 James Gowen and Mary “Polly” Keating Gowen“of Combahee” and Richard Keating signed a contract. For a consideration of five shillings paid to James Gowen by Richard Keating “the said James Gowen agreeing not to interfere with his wife’s business, but that he, his heirs or executors shall not be liable for any debt or debts which the said Mary Gowen shall, or may hereafter, contract in carrying out her sole, separate trade.” To reciprocate James Gowen gave his bond to Richard Keating “in trust to and for the said Mary Gowen in the penal sum of £200 sterling.”  The agreement was witnessed by James Lunsden and Susanna Donovan, and it was acknowledged in Charleston June 29, 1785 and recorded November 18, 1785 in Charleston Mixed Record Book, page 20. Charleston, SC  Gowen Manuscript: http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~gowenrf/gowenms014.htm
https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.3.1/TH-1-19425-31241-3?cc=1919417&wc=M6N4-7P8:210905601,211236901

https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.3.1/TH-1-19425-30648-14?cc=1919417&wc=M6N4-7P8:210905601,211236901

https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.3.1/TH-1-19425-30649-41?cc=1919417&wc=M6N4-7P8:210905601,211236901

1785 July 4: James Gowen, Richard Estes, and Benjamin Elliot are appraisers in the estate of Samuel Blinco, planter in SC on Fold3, 11v, No 47. pgs 342 to 343. Appraisement of goods and chattles belonging to estate of Samuel Blinco, planter decd, produced by Charles Smith, Richard Estes, James Gowen, and Benjamin Elliott appraisers. Charleston, South Carolina. bk A, 1783-1787. p. 342-343.
https://www.fold3.com/image/265611515/?terms=Gowen

1785 Aug 15 & 16: James Gowen of Prince Williams Parish, planter, to John Gowen, planter, for 400 pounds sterling, lot in Radnor Town, known in the plan of said town, no. 2, on Bay Street. James Gowen (LS), Wits: William Hall, Edwd Ferguson. Proved in Charleston Dist by the oath of William Hall on April 12, 1788 before Saml Elliot, JP Rec. Apr 25, 1788. Z5, p 446. Charleston Dist, South Carolina.

1785 Nov 9 –  Will of Moses Bass of Prince Georges Parish, George Town Dist, Province of SC, being indisposed in Body…. to MOURNING GOING, dau of JACOB GOING, one cow marked with a cross & over bit & undr bit in one ear and cross & whole under nick in the other ear; to SARAH GOING, dau of JACOB GOING, one cow marked in the above mentioned mark; to ELIZABETH GOING, dau of JACOB GOING, one cow marked with a cross & undr bit & over bit in each ear and branded ME; to ANNE GOING, dau of JACOB GOING, one heifer marked with a cross and under bit & over bit in each ear branded ME; to CYNTHA GOING, dau of JACOB GOING, one heifer yearling marked with a cross & over bit & under bit in each ear & branded ME; to my beloved cousin Jeremiah Bass, tract of 100 ac granted to John Smith, and one negro named Peter, one negro woman named Fann, one negro boy named Jack with their increase; my wife Elizabeth Bass to have the use of said plantation & tract of land granted to John Smith her lifetime and the use of negroes Peter, Fann & Jack & their increase her life time; to my beloved cousin Wright Bass, the plantation, mill, & tract of land containing 444 ac that I now live on, one negro woman Jane, my wife Elizabeth Bass to have the use of the plantation, mill & tract of land and negro woman her lifetime; to Henry Harison, son of James Harison, one negro woman Cate & increase, my wife to have the use of the negro woman her lifetime; to JOSEPH GOING, JUNR, one negro girl named Judah & increase, my wife to have the use her life time; to my beloved wife Elizabeth Bass, one negro man named Jack, one woman named Florah, one woman named Nan, one boy named Isum, one boy named Roger, and my cattle, about 110 head, branded ME, all my stock of horses & mares, all my household furniture & plantation tools, 26 head of sheep, and my hogs, also negro girl Violet; to JACOB GOING, a plantation of 50 ac granted to John Crawford; I appoint my wife Elizabeth Bass and my friend Luke Whitefield and James Harison, executors, dated 28 Feb 1777. Moses Bass (M) (LS), Wit: Malachi Murfee, Jeremiah Bass (x), Right Bass.

A true copy taken from the original and examined by Hugh Horry, Ordinary G Town Dist.
Whereas I, the within named Right Bass, am the eldest son of Edward Bass deceased, who was eldest brother of the within named Testator Moses Bass, which said Moses Bassdeparted this life without issue, whereby I, said Right Bass became his heir at law, and I am willing that all the several devises & bequests in the said will should have full effect, for the memory of my deceased uncle Moses Bass and for the several devisees in the within will, and five shillings, I confirm all the devises, legacies and bequests, 9 Nov 1785. Right Bass (LS), Wit: Chas Cotesworth Pinckney, Wm Smith. Proved in Charleston Dist by the oath of Charles Cotesworth Pinckney 28 Jun 1786 before Dl. Mazyck, JP. Rec 28 Jun 1786. S-5, 283-284. (Holcomb, SC Deed Abstracts, 1783-1788, Bks I-5 thru Z-5, 1996. SML 975.7 Hol) http://wc.rootsweb.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=marciamcclure&id=I19000

1787 Oct 7: James Gowen on note in Robt Branston decd estate in SC on Fold3. Charleston, South Carolina. 1787 Oct 27 goods and chattels of Mr Robert Branston decd, showing a note from James Gowen. SC bk B, 1787-1793. pg 78. South Carolina.
https://www.fold3.com/image/265612025?terms=Gowen
https://www.fold3.com/image/265612025/?terms=Gowen

1789, John Byrnes and Mary Ann Baxter Goin Byrnes appeared in Charleston in connection with the administration of the estate of “Amos Goin.”http://www.genealogy.com/forum/surnames/topics/guynes/246/
http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~gowenrf/gowenms005.htm

1790 – Bathiah Going
US Census – first head of Household
South Carolina – Georgetown District, Prince Fredericks Parish – page 51
0 males over 16, 0 males under 16, 2 females – white. 0 slaves.
http://www2.census.gov/prod2/decennial/documents/1790k-03.pdf

1790 –Lucy Gowen
US Census – first head of Household
South Carolina – Georgetown District, Prince Georges Parish – page 54
0 males over 16, 0 males under 16, 5 females – white. 0 slaves.
http://www2.census.gov/prod2/decennial/documents/1790k-03.pdf

1790 – John Gowen
US Census – first head of Household
South Carolina – Georgetown District, Prince Georges Parish – page 54
2 males over 16, 1 males under 16, 2 females – white. 0 slaves.
http://www2.census.gov/prod2/decennial/documents/1790k-03.pdf

1801 Dr. John Byrns died in Charleston in a yellow fever epidemic in 1801. About 1805, Mary Anne Baxter Goyne Byrns and her children moved to Cairo, Sumner County, Tennessee, perhaps to join other family members there. John Byrn, James Byrn and Lithey Byrn appeared in Sumner County records in 1808, 1809 and 1810.
http://www.genealogy.com/forum/surnames/topics/guynes/246/
http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~gowenrf/gowenms005.htm

1802 Feb 1 James Gowen of Prince William Parish sells slave to George Keckely in Combahee SC bk 3N, 1799-1803. Bills of Sale. p. 305.
https://www.fold3.com/image/267327237?terms=Gowen

1804 Feb 29 John Gowen from Anthony Simons, etal 1450 acres on S Pacolet Riv.  Benjamin Bonner Simons and Anthony Simons of the City of Charleston, SC, to John Gowen of Spartanburg Dist, SC, . . . convey two tracts of land containing 1450 acresin Craven County, originally granted to Henry Bonneau and Peter Cidean a tract of 1000 acres bounding on the NW on land belonging to Lord Charles Granville Montague, W on Cherokee land, S on the S Pacolate River, SE on lands of Anthony Simons, and SE on vacant land. The other tract containing 450 acres in Craven County butting and bounding NW and SW on land laid out to Henry Bonneau, NE on vacant land, and S on the South Pacolate River . . . the two tracts of land were conveyed to Henry Bonneau and Peter Cedean, then to Anthony Simons on Oct 10, 1774, and on the second and third day of April 1788. Signed: Benj B Simons, A. Simons. Wits: Jeremiah Brown, William Gowen. Proved up Feb 29, 1804. Spartanburg Co SC, Bk K, pg 16

1823 May 27 Peter Gowan purchases a slave named Richard, a taylor by trade, from Jehu Jones in Charleston SC
https://www.fold3.com/image/268913688?terms=Gowan

1824 June 17 Peter Gowan buys a slave in Charleston SC
https://www.fold3.com/image/268914016?terms=Gowan

1826 July 13 Peter Gowan buys a slave in Charleston SC
https://www.fold3.com/image/267660667?terms=Gowan

1829 May 11 Peter Gowan sells a slave in Charleston SC
https://www.fold3.com/image/267662277?terms=Gowan
https://www.fold3.com/image/267662277?terms=

1837 Nov 8 Peter Gowan buys a slave in Charleston SC
https://www.fold3.com/image/269307062?terms=Gowan

1839 Sept 28 Peter Gowan executor of estate inventory of Marie Rose Roumillat Charleston SC
https://www.fold3.com/image/265615559

1841 March 22 Peter Gowan buys a slave in Charleston SC
https://www.fold3.com/image/269368670?terms=Gowan

1844 July 2 Peter Gowan buys a slave in Charleston SC
https://www.fold3.com/image/267657857?terms=Gowan

From Gowen Manuscript:  http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~gowenrf/Gowenms100.htm

Dr. William Moreau Goins of Columbia, South Carolina is the son of Elsie Taylor Goins, Foundation member and genealogist.

William Moreau Goins was born about 1961. He was graduated in 1979 from Gonzaga College High School in Washington, D.C. He was mentioned in “Good News Gonzaga,” publication of the high school alumni:

“Bill Goins ’79 performs under his middle name, Mo-reau. As Moreau, the multi-talented Goins sings, dances and acts. Included among his acts are tradi-tional dances of Native Americans. He was chosen to represent the National Native Network of Talent to carry on a legacy started by Iron Eyes Cody, the leg-endary tearful Indian of the ‘Keep America Beautiful’ campaign. Also Moreau has performed with the Wash-ington Metropolitan Opera and authored, directed and starred in a production at Washington’s Source The-atre.”

Elsie Taylor Goins was interviewed in February 1999 by a Charleston newspaper reporter:

“Family traces roots to slavery”

By Herb Frazier
Post and Courier staff
Charleston, South Carolina

Columbia–The twisted branches of Elsie Taylor Goins’ family tree lead a black American family to its roots – an English slave trader buried in West Africa.

From there, the branches spread to two mulatto women who sailed from Africa into Charleston in 1764 as “free people of color.” They later owned slaves and rice plantations in Berkeley County.

Goins’ lineage, spanning three centuries, is meticulously drawn on a large tan canvas she created after seeing her family’s “freedom papers,” declaring that her ancestors from Africa were never held as slaves.

It is the perception that most black Americans are the descendants of enslaved Africans, said Goins, a retired budget analyst with the Department of the Navy in Washington, D.C.

Other black families probably could tell of ancestors who arrived as free people, if memories and records had not been lost in time, she said.

“My family is unique because we had the freedom papers that gave us information about four generations,” she said, sitting in the den of her home among the records she has gathered in researching her family’s history.

What sets Goins’ family history apart from other descendants of free people of color is that her ancestors came to Colonial America already free, and she has an unusual document to show it.

Dr. S. Max Edelson, an assistant professor of history at the College of Charleston, said Goins’ story is unique.

“Similar stories could be waiting for historians to uncover,” he said.

“It is an invitation for further research.”

Not all free black people had papers attesting to their freedom, said Dr. Bernard Powers, a professor of history at the college. Powers said “freedom papers” is a generic term for court documents that stated a person purchased his freedom or was given it. Real estate transactions also served as freedom papers because slaves couldn’t own property, he said.

Freedom papers were obtained depending on a person’s circumstances, he explained. Some black people felt they needed them as protection against kidnappers who’d sell them into slavery. The freedom papers in Goins’ family were issued to her great-grandfather Andrew Henry Dibble, a Camden tailor. Goins said he probably got them to reaffirm his freedom even though the importation of African slaves to the United States had been outlawed long before.

The governor and secretary of state signed Dibble’s “certificate of freedom” on Aug. 24, 1860.

Dibble’s freedom papers are unique because high-ranking state officials signed them, and it indicates he was an influential person who had a white person to vouch for him, said Dr. Mark Smith, a U.S. history professor at the University of South Carolina.

The year Dibble got his freedom papers was a tense time in South Carolina. The anti-slavery movement was rising. Abraham Lincoln was elected president in November. The next month, South Carolina seceded from the Union. On April 12, 1861, shots were fired on Fort Sumter, starting the Civil War.

Smith speculates that Dibble obtained his “certificate of freedom” because he was afraid of an anti-slavery backlash that could have affected him even though he had never been a slave.

Dibble was born Jan. 1, 1825, in Charleston. The freedom papers do more than just list four generations of his ancestors. It links Goins’ family with Africa in a way far different than most other black families.

Dibble’s freedom papers include a December 1807 affidavit that Catherine Cleveland, his great-grandmother, and Elizabeth Cleveland Hardcastle, her aunt, were free people of color. Hardcastle was the daughter of William Cleveland, a white slave trader from Devonshire, England.

In the 1730s, William Cleveland arrived on the Banana Islands just off the coast of Sierra Leone in West Africa.

He was shipwrecked, and he took refuge on the island.

King Skinner Caulker, ruler of the Sherbro people, took him in. Caulker was an African who traded in ivory, gum, redwood and slaves. Cleveland eventually got into slave trading, too.

For a white man to be an independent slave trader, he was expected to marry into an African family, said Joe Opala, a scholar-in-residence at the Penn Center on St. Helena Island.

“When you came from Europe, you were expected to attach yourself to a local king and from him you took protection,” said Opala, who lived in Freetown, Sierra Leone, for 20 years. “He gave you land and a place to do business. In return, you had to marry a girl from his family. That tied you into the system.”

Cleveland married Kate Caulker, King Caulker’s only child, Goins said. They had two children, John and Elizabeth. Cleveland died Dec. 6, 1758. He is buried on Bunce Island, Sierra Leone, the site of a former British slave-trading post.

After his death, Elizabeth Cleveland and her niece Catherine came to the South Carolina Colony. Elizabeth Cleveland later owned Wampee, Brick House, Raccoon Hill, Tucker and Pierce’s Old Field plantations in Berkeley County, Goins said. When she died in 1808, she owned about 30 slaves on the Tucker Plantation. She willed Raccoon Hill to Catherine Cleveland.

The fair-skinned Elizabeth Cleveland was identified as a white female in the 1790 and 1800 census. She was married to a white doctor, William Hardcastle.

Being a descendant of a black woman who owned black slaves is not a badge of shame, Goins said.

“I don’t feel like I have to run and hide,” she said. “It is un-fortunate they were in the slave business, but I can’t change history. They were doing what society dictated. I assume if they felt it was undesirable, they would not have done it.”

Goins and her sister, Catherine Taylor McConnell, began researching their family’s history 30 years ago. McConnell died in 1996. This year, Goins hopes to publish a book about her family.

“Most people don’t realize that some [Africans] arrived as free people. It is a part of history that should be written because so much of history has been lost.”
==O==
Perhaps the earliest recorded individual of interest to Gowen chroniclers in the state of South Carolina is Charles Gowing who died in Charleston in 1704. “George Chicken & James Ingerson executed a bond for Chicken’s proper administration of the estate of Charles Gowing, late of Charles Town. Warrant of appraisement was directed to Wm. Gibbon, Evan McFashion & John Goodwin,” according to “Abstracts from the Records of the Court of Ordinary of the Province of South Carolina, 1700-1712” by A. S. Salley, Jr.
==O==
William Going signed a petition “to the Crown against the Proprietors” February 24, 1717, according to “South Carolina Historical Magazine.” The petition was signed by all of the members of the South Carolina House of Commons and many other citizens. A total of 568 signatures–one half of the white male population of colony of South Carolina–appeared on the document.
==O==

1739 April 21 – Mrs. Giles Gowan was the mother of John Johnston who men-tioned her in his will. John Johnston died in South Carolina April 21, 1739. His will also mentioned John Gowan, mer-chant of London, England. Abstract of this will is printed in “Abstracts of Wills of the State of South Carolina 1670-1740,” page 265, by Caroline T. Moore. The will was recorded in Charleston Will Book 1736-1740, page 399.

Mrs. Giles Gowan, apparently was married at least three times. She wrote her will as Sarah Johnston, widow, in “Charles Town, South Carolina.” She died November 29, 1768, according to Charleston County Will Book TT, page 74. The will names her sons, John McCall, Robert Collins and Robert Johnston and grandsons, John McCall, James McCall and Hext McCall, minor. John McCall, son, was named ex­ecutor of the estate.

John McCall had been a witness to the will of Ann Air Sep-tember 28, 1763, according to Charleston County Will Book QQ, page 316.

James McCall had been a witness the will of Lloyd Caleb in Charleston County in 1766, according to Charleston County Will Book RR, page 98. He had also witnessed the will of Thomas Vardell in 1769, according to Charleston County Will Book SS, page 66.

Hext McCall was a witness to a deed in 1776 in Charleston County, according to Charleston Will Book TT, page 570. He was witness to a deed in 1782, according to Charleston Coun-ty Book WW, page 224. He was named a guardian in 1780, according to Charleston County Will Book WW, page 255.
==O==
Peter I. Gowan may have been the individual who was mentioned in the will of Prue Benson of Greenville County, South Carolina written October 19, 1819. Peter I. Gowan owned half interest in a “mill built between P. I. Gowan and myself,” according to the will which was recorded in Greenville County October 1, 1821. The abstract read:

“I give and bequeath unto my son-in-law, John Gowen four negroes, also half of a mill built between P. I. Gowen and myself, to my son William B. Benson, five negroes; to daughter Jane, five negroes; plantation tract of land and all the balance of my person perperty to be sold at public sale on a credit of 12 months, and the money arising from the sale therein to be divided between John Gowen, William B. Benson and Jane Benson. I do hereby appoint John B. Gowen and William B. Benson my lawful executors.
Witnesses: Prue Benson
Thomas Benson
Evalina Benson
Henry Hall”

The estate sale of Prue Benson was held December 1, 1821. John B. Gowen, William B. Benson, John H. Eas-ley and Thomas Wynn were among the purchasers.

“Peter Gowan” “took the oath of Naturalization” in Charleston November 1, 1819, according to “South Carolina Historical Magazine.” This indicates that he was foreign born.

“Peter Gowan” was married. wife’s name Sarah, date not giv-en, according to the “Charleston Observer.” The marriage date is estimated to be 1823. Children born to Peter Gowan and Sarah Gowan are unknown.

Hazel Dean Overstreet, family researcher and Foundation Member of Odum, Georgia, discovered in the South Carolina Archives abstracts of Charleston bills of sale for slaves in-volving Peter I. Gowan:

“February 28, 1823. Bill of Sale from Jehu Jones to Peter Gowan a slave named Richard, a tailor by trade. Warranted sound.

“July 15, 1824. Bill of Sale from Jacob De La Molte to Peter Gowan for a mulatto slave named Mary, about 40 years old.

July 18, 1826. Bill of Sale from Eliza Garner to Peter Gowan for a mulatto slave named Sally, about 22 years old and her two children named David and Mary.

June 14, 1828. Bill of Sale from Fleming Ross & Company to Peter Gowan for a slave named Ellen. Warranted sound.

April 9, 1829. Bill of Sale from M. A. Desoussure, ex­ecutor of estate of Alexander Gordon to Peter Gowan for a slave named Melia and her daughter Kate.”

Jehu Jones, Sr, conveyor in the first bill of sale, was a free Negro slave owner and a tailor in Charleston, according to “Black Slave Owners, 1790-1860″ by Larry Koger.

Peter I. Gowan was recorded as the head of a household in the 1830 census of the City of Charleston, Charleston County, page 38:

“Gowan, Peter white male 40-50
white female 20-30
white male 5-10
white female 0-5
white female 0-5
white male 40-50

He was the owner of six slaves, according to the enumeration:

female slave 24-36
female slave 10-24
female slave 10-24
male slave 0-10
female slave 0-10
male slave 0-10”

During the decade Peter I. Gowan continued to deal in slaves:

“March 10, 1837. Bill of Sale from Peter Gowan to Robert Walder for a mulatto slave named Betsey, with deed of assignment to Samuel Weston, a free black.

November 16, 1837. Bill of Sale from Edward Harvey to Peter Gowan, as guardian, for a slave named Maria.”

Peter I. Gowan reappeared in the 1840 census of Charleston County, page 19:

“Gowan, Peter white male 40-50
white female 30-40
white female 10-15
white male 10-15
white female 10-15
white male 5-10
white female 5-10
white female 0-5
white male 30-40
white female 20-30”

[5 slaves]

Two members of the family were engaged in trades and manufacturing.

Peter I. Gowan had two other slave transactions after the census:

“March 23, 1841. Bill of Sale from Charles Clarke, executor of John Redfern, to Peter Gowan for a slave named George.

July 3, 1844. Bill of Sale from C. Parknin to Peter Gowan for a slave named Patty.”

Peter I. Gowan later moved to Orangeburg County, South Carolina where he and his wife died at the home of their daughter, Mrs. Riggs.

According to his granddaughter, Miss Sarah Louise “Sally” children born to Peter I. Gowan include:

Alexander Gowan born about 1828
[daughter] born about 1830
John Gowan born about 1834
Peter I. Gowan, Jr. born March 13, [16?] 1843

Alexander Gowan, son of Peter I. Gowan, was born about 1828, probably in Charleston.

A daughter, name unknown, was born to Peter I. Gowan about 1830. She was married about 1847, husband’s name Riggs. Later they lived in Orangeburg County.

John Gowan, son of Peter I. Gowan, was born about 1834, probably in Charleston.

Peter I. Gowan, Jr, son of Peter I. Gowan, was born March 13 [or 16?], 1843, probably in Charleston. He became a Presby-terian minister and preached in several areas across the South.
He was married about 1874, probably in Charleston to Sarah Louise “Sally” Palmer, the daughter of Benjamin M. Palmer and Sarah “Sally” Sanneau Palmer.

On April 1, 1875 Sarah Louise “Sally” Palmer Gowan of Selma, Alabama gave a deed to A. Foster Axson, M.D. of New Orleans, Louisiana to 320 acres located on Childress Creek, tributary of the Bosque River for $800, according to McLennan County, Texas Deed Book U, page 519 and Bos-que County Deed Book O, page 422. The land lay astride the McLennan-Bosque county line, “formerly in Milam’s Dis-trict.” Sarah Louise “Sally” Palmer Gowan had inherited the property from her mother.

The deed made reference to the fact that Sarah “Sally” B. San-neau Palmer was the daughter of Bazile R. Sanneau of South Carolina who was perhaps an earlier owner of the land. The land was conveyed to Benjamin W. Palmer June 4, 1847 by James Temple Doswell, according to Bosque County Deed Book K, page 643. The deed made reference to the fact that Sarah B. “Sally” Palmer Gowan was the only living child of Benjamin M. Palmer.

It appears from the deed that her mother, Sarah B. “Sally” Sanneau Palmer had remarried, husband’s name Schindler. He, too, had died, and in 1875 she was a widow living in Nacogdoches, Texas.

Other relatives by the names of Mary J. Sanneau, Hamet W. Sanneau, Kate O. Sanneau, Alfred U. Sanneau lived in Charleston. Palmer Sanneau lived in Adams County, Missis­sippi.

Recorded in Bosque County Deed Book 19, page 392 was an affidavit of heirship of Sarah Louise “Sally” Palmer Gowan in the estate of Benjamin M. Palmer made April 30, 1892 by Alfred W. Sanneau of Charleston.

Rev. Peter I. Gowan, Jr. and Sarah Louise “Sally” Palmer Gowan were enumerated in the 1880 census of Dallas County, Alabama, Enumeration District 74, page 1, precinct 36:

“Gowan, P. 37, born in South Carolina
Sarah L. 39, born in South Carolina
Sarah L. 3, born in Alabama

This enumeration would probably reveal if his father was foreign born.

They later lived in Wesson, Mississippi. Sarah Louise “Sally” Palmer Gowan died there July 22, 1896 at the age of 55 and was buried in Wesson Cemetery, located in the extreme south-ern part of Copiah County, Mississippi. Rev. Peter I. Gowan, Jr. died there December 2, 1912, at the age of 69 and was bur-ied beside his wife.

Children born to Rev. Peter I. Gowan, Jr. and Sarah Louise “Sally” Palmer Gowan include:

Sarah Louise “Sally” Gowan born August 18, 1877

Sarah Louise “Sally” Gowan, daughter of Rev. Peter I. Gow-an, Jr. and Sarah Louise “Sally” Palmer Gowan, was born August 18, 1877, probably in Dallas County, Alabama. She appeared in the 1880 enumeration of her father’s household as a three-year-old.

She lived the remainder of her life at Wesson. She died there September 18, 1956, at age 79 and was buried beside her par­ents. She was unmarried.
==O==
Thomas Gowan, free colored, appeared in the 1830 census of Charleston Neck, Charleston District, page 128:

“Gowan, Thomas free colored male 55-100
free colored female 55-100
1 female slave 55-100
1 female slave 36-55
2 male slaves 24-36
1 female slave 24-36
3 male slaves 0-10
2 female slaves 0-10”

The household of Thomas Gowan did not reappear in the 1840 census.
==O==
Benjamin Gowen gave a mortgage securing the purchase of five slaves bought from John Calder and Capt. William Law-ton, planter of Edisto Island in March 1753, according to “South Carolina Magazine of History.”
==O==
J.[?] A. Gowen was listed as a laborer residing at 3 Mill in the 1888-90 Charleston city directories.
==O==
Sarah Gowen headed a family of nine colored people in the 1830 census of Ward 4, City of Charleston. They were listed on page 82 as:

“Gowen, Sarah free colored female 24-36
free colored female 24-36
free colored female 10-24
free colored female 10-24
free colored male 0-10
free colored male 0-10
free colored female 0-10
free colored female 0-10
free colored female 0-10”

The household of “Sarah Gowens” reappeared in the 1840 census of Charleston District, page 116. The free colored people were listed as:

“Gowens, Sarah free colored female 24-36
free colored male 24-36
free colored female 0-10
free colored male 0-10
l male slave 55-100
2 male slaves 24-36
1 female slave 24-36
1 male slave 10-24
1 female slave 10-24
1 male slave 0-10
4 female slaves 0-10”
==O==
Sarah Gowens, “free colored, aged 17 years, 4 months & 8 days,” died January 25, 1852 and was buried in Macpelah Burying Ground, according to “Private Register of Rev. Paul Trapier” published by Dalcho Historical Society of Charleston.
==O==
An unusual enumeration of a slave household headed by Ann Gowens was listed in the 1840 census of Charleston District, Ward 4, City of Charleston, page 72 as:
“Gowens, Ann female slave 24-36
male slave 10-24
male slave 10-24
female slave 0-10
female slave 0-10”
==O==
Massey Gowens, “a black woman” was married to Henry Barns May 1, 1796 in Charleston, according to “Register of St. Phillip’s Parish, 1754-1810.”
==O==
John Martin and Sally Gowens, “free persons of color” were married October 3, 1819, according to St. Phillip’s parish records and “South Carolina Marriages, 1800-1820” by Brent H. Holcomb.
==O==
Thomas Gown applied for a 100-acre bounty grant in the up­per Savannah River valley in Belfast township June 5, 1764, according to the records of the Charleston Treasurer. He re­ceived 35 pounds from the treasury in 1764.
==O==
Ann Guyone headed a household in Ward Four, city of Char-leston, page 102 in the 1830 census:

“Guyone, Ann white female 30-40
white female 15-20
white female 15-20
white female 15-20
white female 5-10
white female 5-10
white female 5-10
female slave 36-55”

This household did not appear in the 1840 census of Charleston.

==O==

Gowrie Plantation and 50 slaves were sold by the Potter family in 1833 to Charles Manigault for $40,000, according to “South Carolina Historical Magazine.” Gowrie Plantation was developed during the 1820s by the Potter family of Char-leston, Savannah and Princeton, New Jersey. The plantation included 220 acres of developed rice fields and a large water-powered rice-pounding mill.
==O==
Residing in Charleston in March 1961 were the following who were listed in the telephone directory.

Going, B. L. 26 Oreton
Going, Claude L. & Clara 65-C Legare Homes
Going, J. Gary Palmetto Gardens
Gowan, Phillip L. 205 Chase
Gowan, Carlisle W. 3 Peacock Avenue
==O==
Clelia McGowan of Charleston, age 47, arrived at Ellis Island in 1912, according to Ellis Island records.
==O==
James McGowin arrived in Charleston January 5, 1768 aboard the “Admiral Hawk, John McAdams, master, lately arrived from Londonderry with poor Irish protestants and had admin-istered the oaths.” “James McGown” was shown as age 21.

_______________________________________

Charleston SC info from Family Search pages:

Charleston city, Charleston County and South Carolina miscellaneous land records, 1719-1873; index to land records, 1719-1898
https://familysearch.org/search/catalog/361547?availability=Family%20History%20Library
(Available online)

Churches:

Christ Church Parish, Charleston, South Carolina computer printout; births or christenings, 1694-1843
Authors: Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. Genealogical Department (Main Author)
https://familysearch.org/search/catalog/123828?availability=Family%20History%20Library
(Available online)

Church records, 1736-1769
Authors: Ashley River Baptist Church (Charleston County, South Carolina) (Main Author)
https://familysearch.org/search/catalog/357193?availability=Family%20History%20Library
(Online – reviewed – info entered on page above)

Saint James Santee Parish, Charleston, South Carolina computer printout; births or christenings, 1758-1788
Authors: Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. Genealogical Department (Main Author)
https://familysearch.org/search/catalog/5060?availability=Family%20History%20Library
(Available online)

Court:

Bills of complaint, 1800-1863; indexes, 1721-1868
Authors: South Carolina. Court of Equity (Charleston District) (Main Author)
https://familysearch.org/search/catalog/403536?availability=Family%20History%20Library
(Online and available – reviewed)

Early residents of South Carolina
Format: Journal Article. A listing of some of the prominent residents of Charleston, South Carolina in January 1794.
https://familysearch.org/search/catalog/2212489
(Downloaded)

Probate:

Guardianship book, 1783-1839
Authors: Charleston County (South Carolina). Ordinary (Main Author)
https://familysearch.org/search/catalog/262822?availability=Family%20History%20Library
(Available online)

Letters of administration, testamentary and guardianship, 1775-1869, index, 1800-1927
Authors: Charleston County (South Carolina). Probate Judge (Main Author)
https://familysearch.org/search/catalog/341265?availability=Family%20History%20Library
(Available online)

Index to wills of Charleston County, South Carolina, 1671-1868
Format: Books/Monographs/Book with Digital Images
Publication: [Charleston, South Carolina : s.n.], c1950
https://familysearch.org/search/catalog/203386?availability=Family%20History%20Library
(Not uploaded yet – 11/13/18)

Indexes to probate records
Authors: Charleston County (South Carolina). Probate Judge (Main Author)
Charleston County (South Carolina). Probate Judge (Repository)
https://familysearch.org/search/catalog/340972?availability=Family%20History%20Library
(Available online – reviewed)

Abstracts of wills of the State of South Carolina recorded at Charleston/Charles Town/Charlestown
Format: Journal Article
Contains abstracts of the wills of Jean Louis Poyas probated 30 April 1756, John Dodd dated 8 March 1770, James Hunter dated 18 July 1771, and William McMeechen dated 2 August 1776.
https://familysearch.org/search/catalog/2305458
(Downloaded)

Charleston District, South Carolina estate inventories, 1732-1844
Authors: Charleston County (South Carolina). Probate Judge (Main Author)
South Carolina. County Court (Charleston County) (Repository)
https://familysearch.org/search/catalog/414353?availability=Family%20History%20Library
(Available online)

Letters of administration, testamentary and guardianship, 1775-1869, index, 1800-1927
Authors: Charleston County (South Carolina). Probate Judge (Main Author)
https://familysearch.org/search/catalog/341265?availability=Family%20History%20Library
(Available online)

Miscellaneous cases, 1783-1812
Authors: Charleston County (South Carolina). Probate Judge (Main Author)
Charleston County (South Carolina). Probate Judge (Repository)
https://familysearch.org/search/catalog/262826?availability=Family%20History%20Library
(Available online)

Miscellaneous probate record, 1696-1792
Authors: Charleston County (South Carolina). Probate Judge (Main Author)
South Carolina. County Court (Charleston County) (Repository)
https://familysearch.org/search/catalog/288737?availability=Family%20History%20Library
(Available online)

Miscellaneous record consisting of deeds, bills of sale, power of attorney, bonds, notes, contracts, pardons, commissions, accounts, indentures, etc., 1784-1789
Authors: Charleston County (South Carolina). Probate Judge (Main Author)
Charleston County (South Carolina). Probate Judge (Repository)
https://familysearch.org/search/catalog/257837?availability=Family%20History%20Library
(Available online)

South Carolina wills and related probate matters, *land and property records, *public records, some *marriage contracts, 1671, 1692-1868
Authors: South Carolina. Probate Court (Charleston County) (Main Author)
South Carolina. Probate Court (Charleston County) (Repository)
https://familysearch.org/search/catalog/236996?availability=Family%20History%20Library
(Available online)

Wills and miscellaneous probate records, 1671-1868
Statement of Responsibility: transcribed by C. W. A. (Civil Works Administration) and W. P. A.
Authors: Charleston County (South Carolina). Probate Judge (Main Author)
Charleston County (South Carolina). Probate Judge (Repository)
https://familysearch.org/search/catalog/243885?availability=Family%20History%20Library
(Available online)

Land and Property:

Charleston city, Charleston County and South Carolina miscellaneous land records, 1719-1873; index to land records, 1719-1898
Authors: Charleston County (South Carolina). Register of Mesne Conveyance (Main Author)
https://familysearch.org/search/catalog/361547?availability=Family%20History%20Library
(Available online but some still being uploaded)

Miscellaneous record consisting of deeds, bills of sale, power of attorney, bonds, notes, contracts, pardons, commissions, accounts, indentures, etc., 1784-1789
Authors: Charleston County (South Carolina). Probate Judge (Main Author)
Charleston County (South Carolina). Probate Judge (Repository)
https://familysearch.org/search/catalog/257837?availability=Family%20History%20Library
(Available online)

Public register of the province of South Carolina conveyances, 1735-1916
Authors: Charleston County (South Carolina). Register of Mesne Conveyance (Main Author)
https://familysearch.org/search/catalog/373996?availability=Family%20History%20Library
(Available online)

Dowers, citizenship petitions, etc., 1796-1905, Charleston County, South Carolina
Format: Manuscript/Manuscript on Film
https://familysearch.org/search/catalog/387457?availability=Family%20History%20Library
(Available online)

Miscellaneous record consisting of deeds, bills of sale, power of attorney, bonds, notes, contracts, pardons, commissions, accounts, indentures, etc., 1784-1789
Authors: Charleston County (South Carolina). Probate Judge (Main Author)
Charleston County (South Carolina). Probate Judge (Repository)
https://familysearch.org/search/catalog/257837?availability=Family%20History%20Library
(Available online)

Admiralty final record books and minutes, 1790-1857
Authors: United States. Court of Admiralty (South Carolina) (Main Author)
https://familysearch.org/search/catalog/210090?availability=Family%20History%20Library
(Online but not ready yet)

Charleston city, Charleston County and South Carolina miscellaneous land records, 1719-1873; index to land records, 1719-1898
Authors: Charleston County (South Carolina). Register of Mesne Conveyance (Main Author)
https://familysearch.org/search/catalog/361547?availability=Family%20History%20Library
(Available online)

Death notices in the South Carolina gazette, 1732-1775 : from the files of the Charleston Library Society, Charleston, S.C.
Title Also Known As: South Carolina gazette (Charleston, South Carolina)
Statement of Responsibility: compiled by A.S. Salley and Mabel L. Webber
https://familysearch.org/search/catalog/375595?availability=Family%20History%20Library
(Online but not ready yet 11/13/18)

Marriage notices in the South-Carolina and American general gazette from May 30, 1766 to February 28, 1781 and in its successor the Royal gazette, 1781-1782 : from the files in the library of the Charleston Library Society, Charleston, S.C.
Title Also Known As: South-Carolina and American general gazette (Charleston, South Carolina)
Royal gazette (Charleston, South Carolina)
Statement of Responsibility: compiled and edited by A.S. Salley
Authors: Salley, A. S. (Alexander Samuel), 1871-1961 (Main Author)
https://familysearch.org/search/catalog/375606?availability=Family%20History%20Library
(Downloaded)

Church records, 1734-1874
Authors: St. John’s Parish (Colleton County, South Carolina : Protestant Episcopal) (Main Author)
St. John’s Church (John’s Island, South Carolina : Protestant Episcopal) (Added Author)
https://familysearch.org/search/catalog/374430?availability=Family%20History%20Library
(Need to review at Fam Ctr – 11/13/18)

Church records, 1738-1917
Authors: St. John’s Parish (Colleton County, South Carolina : Protestant Episcopal) (Main Author)
St. John’s Church (John’s Island, South Carolina : Protestant Episcopal) (Added Author)
https://familysearch.org/search/catalog/374418?availability=Family%20History%20Library
(Need to review at Fam Ctr – 11/13/18)

Church records, 1694-1936
Authors: Christ Church (Charleston County, South Carolina : Protestant Episcopal) (Main Author)
https://familysearch.org/search/catalog/372009?availability=Family%20History%20Library
(Need to review at Fam Ctr – 11/13/18)

Church records, 1739-1885
Authors: Church of the Redeemer (Orangeburg Township, South Carolina : Protestant Episcopal) (Main Author)
Church of the Redeemer (Amelia Township, South Carolina : Protestant Episcopal) (Added Author)
Church of the Redeemer (Orangeburg, South Carolina : Protestant Episcopal) (Added Author)
https://familysearch.org/search/catalog/372390?availability=Family%20History%20Library
(Need to review at Fam Ctr – 11/13/18)

Records, 1763-1787
Statement of Responsibility: translated by Henry Sylvester Jacoby
Authors: German St. John’s Evangelical Lutheran Congregation (Charleston, South Carolina) (Main Author)
https://familysearch.org/search/catalog/259003?availability=Family%20History%20Library
(Need to review at Fam Ctr – 11/13/18)

South Carolina county records : Charleston Co. court records containing renunciation of dowers, land, probate and misc. court actions, 1740-1787
Format: Manuscript/Manuscript on Film
https://familysearch.org/search/catalog/331716?availability=Family%20History%20Library
(Need to review at Fam Ctr – 11/13/18)

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