1742 Edward Going lived in Granville Co, NC

Edward Going b. abt 1742 m. ? –

Parents: (Assumed parents, children, and siblings, based on where they lived, ages, etc).

Children:

Unk

Siblings:

  • Siblings:
    • Michael Goin 1732 mul (Granville 1753-1762)(Bute Co, NC 1771) – wife unk – died Oct 1778.
    • Edward Goin Jr 1742 mul (Granville Co, NC per rev war claim) (1770 Berkely Co, SC deed?
    • Reeps Going b. abt 1745 mul

Related Counties: 

FACTS:

(Below are different Going, Goyen, Gowen related sources for those people were in the Virginia, North Carolina, or South Carolina areas in the early 1700’s to early 1800’s)

Map of North Carolina and Virginia border area and locations of families living in those areas (click to enlarge)

Virginia Counties along or near southern border with North Carolina:

North Carolina Counties along or near Virginia’s southern border:

South Carolina:

NOTES: 

Rev War Pension Application: 

1832 NC Granville Co Edward Going pension app Rev War NOTES
Granville Co, NC
Served under Col Eaton, 5th Regiment
90 to 100 yrs of age in 1832 (b. 1732-1742)
Entered army under Capt Robt Temples at Warren Court House in North Carolina. Was in several tours and engagements during Rev War.
After war went to live in Franklin and Granville Counties in NC.
Samuel Rust of Tenn affid of honesty and reputation of Edward Going.

EDWARD GOING
GRANVILLE COUNTY
PRIVATE
5TH REGIMENT
COL. EATON
$40.00 ANNUAL ALLOWANCE
$120.00 AMOUNT RECEIVED
MAY 29, 1833 PENSION STARTED
AGE 92
State of North Carolina County of Granville
First Munday of Agt. 1832
Personly appeared in open court before the worshipful the justice of the court of Pleas and quarter sessions for the county of aforesaid mow sitting Edward Going a resident of sd. County aged between 90 and 100 years who being first duly sworn according to law doth on his oath make the following declaration in order to obtain the benefit of the act of Congress passed June 7th 1832 – that he entered the army of the United States in the war of the Revolution under the following circumstances (to wit).
He enlisted under Robert Temples as Captain at Warren Court house in the state of North Carolina at what time he does not recollect but that he did enlist in the nine months service, was marched from Warren Court house to Halifax, where he joined the regular troops in the 5th Regiment under Colonel Pink Eaton [Pinketham Eaton] & Mumford, he was stationed at Halifax about two months, he was marched from there to Kingston or Elizabeth town on Neuse River where he was stationed from six to eight weeks, from there he marched to Leesburg on Savanna River [Savannah River] where he was stationed from one to two months, then marched from there up the river to a place called the black swamp, where he was taken sick and sent from there to the Hospital in Charleston where he lay seven or eight weeks. Then he was removed over the Ashby River to Sullivan’s Island where he remained about three weeks when he was furtowed [furloughed] and directed to come home, his time of service being nearly out. After being at home a few days he went to the City of Warren to General or Colo. Guthrie Sumner [sic, Jethro Sumner] who gave him his discharge for the sd. tower of nine months. He kept his discharge several years and sold it to a W. Jno. Hall for six dollars that he does not know of any person by whom he can prove this service.
After he had been at been at home about two years he enlisted again in the three months service under Capt. Benjamin Eaves at Lewisburg in the state of North Carolina, where he imediately marched up the country, through a part of Virginia and again into North Carolina to the county of Guilford. There they joined the army commanded by General Green [Nathanael Greene] where he remained but a few days before the Guilford fight took place. He was in that fight [Battle of Guilford County Court House, March 15, 1781] and recollects that a Colo. Williams [Otho Holland Williams] on the day of the fight commanded that part of the army that he was in after the fight our company was confused and scattered. We were collected again near Rocky River, while the British army made a short stay at Ramsey’s Mill. We understood they stayed but a short time moved on towards Halifax North Carolina. We made but a short stay at Rocky River. We were marched from there to Camden town in South Carolina where we stayed but a few days. We were then marched over the Catawba River where we stayed but a few days before our term of service expired and we received our discharges but by what officer they were granted I do not now recollect. I took care of my discharge for several years & was told that it was no account and what has become of it now I know not. I know of no person now living by whom I can prove this three months service. My messmates while in the service or a part of them whose names I recollect were Ozzy Ball, Drew Jones & William Smith. I have heard of the death of Ball & Jones. I cannot tell what has become of Smith. I have continued since I left the army to live in the counties of Franklin and Granville in North Carolina. I have no documentary evidence by which I can prove any part of this service. I hereby relinquish every claim whatever to a pension or annuity except the present and declare that my name is not on the pension role of the agency of any state.
Signed and sworn to in open court.
Edward (X) his mark Going
We Samuel Rust of Weakley County of the state of Tennessee, and Anderson Paschall & Wm. M. Sneed, both of the county of Granville & state of North Carolina do testify and declare that the said Samuel Rust declares that he has been acquainted with Edward Going who has taken, subscribed & sworn to the forgoing declaration for about fifty years and that he has ever supported the character of an honest man and an industrious and good citizen & that he served as a soldier in Revolutionary war.
The said Anderson Paschall declares that Edward Going who has made the written declaration has lived on the land this applicant since 1827 and that he has been well acquainted with him during that time. That he has often heard him state his services in the Revolutionary war, that his statements have been uniformly the same or substantially the same and that they corroborate the statement made in the foregoing declaration sworn to by him. He further declares that he has ever demeaned himself so far as he knows as an honest & industrious will meaning man.
William M. Sneed declares on oath that he has been acquainted with Edward Going the maker of the within declaration for now that fifteen years that he has ever supported the character of an honest industrious well disposed man & that he considers him to be such.
Sworn to & subscribe in open court.
Saml. Rust
Anderson Purshall
W. M. Sneed
And the said court do hereby declare this opinion after investigation of the matter and after putting the interrogatories presented by the war department that the above mentioned applicant was a revolutionary war soldier and served as he testifies. And the court further certifies that Saml. Rust now of Tennessee state formerly of Granville County and Anderson Paschall and Wm. M. Sneed, who has signed the proceeding certificate are residence of the said county of Granville & are credible persons and that their statement is entitled to credit.
James Wyche, Chairman pro tem
Jacob Taylor J. P.
Lewis Green J. P.
I Stephen K Sneed clerk of the court of Pleas and Quarter Sessions of the county of Granville and State of North Carolina do hereby certify that the forgoining contains the original proceedings of the said court in the matter of the application of Edward Going for a pension.
In testimony whereas I have proceeded to set my hand and seal of office at office in Gxford this the 10th day of August A D 1832.
Step K Sneed ??
State of North Carolina Granville County: The 30th day of January 1833
This day Edward Going Personally appeared before Dennis T Paschall one of the Justices of the Peace in and for the County aforesaid, who being duly sworn deposeth & saith that by reason of old age and the Consequent loss of memory he cannot swear positively as to the precise Length of his Service but according to the best of his recollection he served not less than those periods mentioned below and in the following Grade for Eight months and fifteen days in the first Tower [tour] and fully three months in the Second Tower making the Term of Eleven months and fifteen days I served as a private, for which Term of Service I Claim a Pension.
Sworn to & subscribed before me the day & date above written
Test
S/ D. T. Paschall, JP S/ Edward Going, X his mark
[Veteran was pensioned at the rate of $40 per annum commencing March 4th, 1831, for service as a private for one year in the North Carolina Continental line.]

Edward Going enlisted from Bute County in the North Carolina Continental Line for 9 months in September 1778: Edward Going private, place of abode: Bute, born Virga, 5’7″, 35 years of age, Black Hair; black eyes [N.C. Archives, digital collection, Troop Returns, B4F35, https://digital.ncdcr.gov/digital/collection/p16062coll26/id/647]. In May 1792 he received voucher no. 300 for six pounds, 12 shillings specie, being one fourth of his pay and interest to August 1783 for military service [North Carolina Revolutionary Pay Vouchers, 1779-1782, https://www.familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:Q2WT-GZKT]. He and Jenkins Goins sold their claims for Revolutionary War pay to John Hall of Hyco, Caswell County, on 27 April 1791 [NCGSJ IX:224]. He was head of a Person County household of 6 “other free” in 1800 [NC:599]. He gave his age as 90-100 years in August 1832 and on 30 January 1833 when he appeared in Granville County court and applied for a pension for his service in the Revolution [NARA, S.6899, M804, Roll 1087, frame 192 of 1089; https://www.fold3.com/image/22780909].

Edward Going 1750s North Carolina Militia

Edward Going 1750s North Carolina Militia

1784 NC Granville state census Edward Going

1784 NC Granville state census Edward Going

1810 NC Granville Co US Census Edward Going 5 other free

1810 NC Granville Co US Census Edward Going 5 other free

1832 NC pension payments to Edward Going and William Going in NC

1832 NC pension payments to Edward Going and William Going in NC

Edward Going pension roll in 1835

Edward Going pension roll in 1835

1761 Edward Going and sons Edward and Reeps (3 black, 3 total) Granville Co Tax List of Robert Harris, Granville Co, NC
http://www.mindspring.com/~baumbach/1761tax01.htm

1761 whites/Blacks male/Blacks f/ Blacks 12-16
List of John Pope
Thomas, Moses Gowin. Refuses to List his wife 2 tithes
Michael Gowin, John Wilson. Refuses to list his wife 2
Joseph Gowin. Refuses to list his wife 1
List of Robt. Harris for Granville Parish
Edward Going sons Edwd. Reeps 0 white/3black males
Country Line District by Larkin Johnston
William Gowin, James Gowin 2
William Gowin Junr, Jesse Chandlor 2
Granville Co, NC
http://lumbeeindiansandgoinsfamily.blogspot.com/2007/12/granville-county-nc-early-records.html

1761 Thomas Gowin and Moses Gowin, refuses to list his wife – 2 tithes unk Granville Co NC
Michael Gowin, John Wilson, refuses to list his wife 2 tithes unk
Joseph Gowin, refuses to list his wife 1 tithe
Edward Going and sons Edwd, and Reeps 3 black
William Gowin and James Gowin 2 tithes unk
William Gowin Jr unk
http://www.freeafricanamericans.com/Granville.htm

1762 Michael Gowin mulattoe Granville Co NC
Thomas Gowin and Moses Gowin 2 tithes
Edward Gowin Sr, Reps Gowin, Edward Gowin 3 mulattoe
James Gowing, son William, refs to list his wife – 2 white, 0 black, 0 females, 2 over 16, 2 total
William Gowin Jr 2 white
Joseph Going refuses to list wife 1 mulattoe
James Gowen 2 insolvent
Michael Going 2 insolvent
Edward Going 2 insolvent
Jos. Going 1 insolvent
http://www.freeafricanamericans.com/Granville.htm

1763 List of Insolvents
Gowen, James 2
Going, Edward 2
Going, Wm. 1 Rong listed 1
Granville Co, NC
http://lumbeeindiansandgoinsfamily.blogspot.com/2007/12/granville-county-nc-early-records.html

1764 Joseph Gowen 1 white Granville Co NC
William Gowen 1 white
William Gowen and John Cape 2 white
Jas. Gowen, James Lunceford 2 white
Thomas Going and Moses Going 2 white
Joseph Going and James Harrison mulattoe 1 white 1 mulattoe
Edward Going and Edward Going 2 mulattoe
Jos. Gowen 2 insolvent
James Gowen 2 insolvent
http://www.freeafricanamericans.com/Granville.htm

1766 Joseph Goin 2 unk Granville Co NC
Thomas Gowin 1 unk
Joseph Gowing 1 unk
Edward Gowin 1 unk
Reps Gowin 1 unk
Joseph Gowin mulattoe has a wife and other family not listed (note)
Edward Gowin mulattoe has a wife and etc not listed (note)
http://www.freeafricanamericans.com/Granville.htm

1767 List of Philips Pryor
Joseph Gowen, Presley Harrison John Cunningham, Minor Cockram 4w, 0B
list of John Pope (white, Black male, Black female)
Thomas Gowin 2-0-0
Moses Gowin 1-0-0
Joseph Gowin 0-2-0
Edward Gowin 0-1-0
Edward Gowin Jr.0-1-0
Separate List later in reel, Philip Pryors List
Joseph Gowen Prisly Morrison John Cunningham Minor Cocer? 4 white
Granville Co, NC
http://lumbeeindiansandgoinsfamily.blogspot.com/2007/12/granville-county-nc-early-records.html

1769 Summary list from microfilm white/ Black/ Carriage wheels
Gowen, Thomas 3/0/0
Gowen, Moses 2/0/0
Gowen, William 1/0/0
Gowen, Edward 0/1/0
Granville Co, NC
http://lumbeeindiansandgoinsfamily.blogspot.com/2007/12/granville-county-nc-early-records.html

1770 Jan 12 – Edward Gowing (free negroe) purch date)(Indenture made on Jan 12, 1770) Edward Gowing (free negroe) purchased from Colin Forbiss – both of Craven County, SC – 200 acres that had been granted to Colin Forbiss – situated on the branches of the Little River on the North side of Broad River in Craven County bounded SouthWest on lands laid out to David Tenatate and all other sides vacant land – for 125 pounds paid by Edward Gowing (affid on Nov 26, 1790)
Witnessed by Jacob Gibson, and William Morris. Map shows this to be in what is present day. Fairfield Co, SC.
http://battleofcamden.org/1773sc.jpg (Map 1773)
Craven County, SC
http://www.archivesindex.sc.gov/onlinearchives/Thumbnails.aspx?recordId=107497 )
http://www.ken-shelton.com/Fairfield/Deeds/Deed_K/Deed_K_0373a.tif
http://www.ken-shelton.com/Fairfield/Deeds/Deed_K/Deed_K_0374a.tif
http://www.ken-shelton.com/Fairfield/Deeds/Deed_K/Deed_K_0375a.tif
http://www.ken-shelton.com/Fairfield/Deeds/Deed_K/Deed_K_0376a.tif

1771 Thomas Gowin 2 unk Granville Co NC.
Moses Gowin 1 unk
John Gowin 1 unk
Edward Gowin 1 unk
Joseph Gowin 2 unk
http://www.freeafricanamericans.com/Granville.htm

1778 Jun 3 – Granville Co Will Bk 1, p 193. Deed of Gift-MICHAEL GOWIN of Pr Geo Parish, Craven Co, SC, planter, for love & good will, to JENKINS GOWIN of Granville Co, NC, 80 acres being part of 600 ac lying and being in Bute Co, NC & part in Granville Co, NC at William McBees line on south side of Taylor’s Creek, EDWIN GOWIN & his wife to live on sd land until their dec’d, then to sd JENKINS GOWIN. Wits: John McKipock (McKissock), William McBee. (Johnson, NC Genealogy, Spring-Summer 1970, p 2503. Also, Gwynn, Abstracts of the Wills and Estate Records of Granville Co, NC, 1746-1808, 1973, p 60. Bk 1, p 193-4). Granville Co, NC
http://lumbeeindiansandgoinsfamily.blogspot.com/2007/12/granville-county-nc-early-records.html

1779 July 1 – Reeps Goins was taxable in the Granville County household of his father Edward Goins in 1761 (with his brother Edward). He was called Rapes Going when he enlisted in the Second South Carolina Regiment under Captain Thomas Hall on 1 July 1779 [Moss, Roster of S.C. Patriots in the American Revolution, 367]. Granville Co, NC
http://lumbeeindiansandgoinsfamily.blogspot.com/2007/12/granville-county-nc-early-records.html

1786 July 31 – Edward Goins – Page 23
Deed Book B, Page 191-3
Thomas Palmer, Jun. & Joseph Palmer both of CC, to John Wheeley of same, for 15 lbs, 72 acres on Flat R adj Daniel Malone, said Wheeley, Terrel, EDWARD GOINS, Kelly. 31 July 1786. Wit. Richard Burch Sen., EWD GOINS.
Person County, North Carolina Deeds 1792-1825
By Katherine Kerr Kendall. Person Co, NC
http://lumbeeindiansandgoinsfamily.blogspot.com/2008/04/person-county-nc-early-records.html

1786 Aug 9 –Edward Gowen who received Audited Account 3521 was also a resident of Fairfield County.  On August 9, 1786 Edward Gowen received “70 pounds, 1 shilling and 5 pence sterling for duty in Robuck’s Regiment,” according to “Stub Entries to Indents.”  His pay on one occasion was requested to be delivered to Capt. John Gowen. Fairfield Co, SC. http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~gowenrf/Gowenms007.htm

1786 Edward Gowen Rev War indents from South Carolina

1792 March – Edward Going – Page 23 John McNeill
At the first session of the Person County Court of Pleas and Quarter Sessions, March 1792, the estate records of John McNeill (Niell) were proved. A merchant, John McNeill’s store was near the Caswell-Person border and very near Leasburg. From file number C.R. 078.801.1, Department of Archives and History, Raleigh, North Carolina.
“A list of the debts which appears to be due to the estate of John McNeill, dec. according to the ledger formerly kept by the said deceased, known by the name of ledger C.”
Note: The amount of debt was omitted from the following list.
The list is very long and includes the name of EDWARD GOING.
Person County, North Carolina Compilations, 1792-1820
Land Grants; 1794-1805-1823 Tax Lists. Record Book Abstracts 1792-1820. Letters of Attorney; By Katherine Kerr Kendall. Person Co, NC
http://lumbeeindiansandgoinsfamily.blogspot.com/2008/04/person-county-nc-early-records.html

1793 June 18 Edward Goyen and Nancy Scott granted letters of admin of estate of James Scott in Fairfield Co SC
p. 96 FamilySearch
https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:1:3Q9M-CS42-G37T-P?mode=g&i=95&cat=396628
Minutes of the County Court of Fairfield from 25 July 1785 to 19 August 1786, 13 June 1791 to 25 July 1799
Authors: South Carolina. County Court (Fairfield County) (Main Author)

1795 – Edward Goins – Page 44
Tax List 1795
St. Luke’s District
Edward Goins
Person County, North Carolina Compilations, 1792-1820
Land Grants; 1794-1805-1823 Tax Lists
Record Book Abstracts 1792-1820
Letters of Attorney; By Katherine Kerr Kendall
Person Co, NC
http://lumbeeindiansandgoinsfamily.blogspot.com/2008/04/person-county-nc-early-records.html

1795 April 1 – Deed Book C, Page 61-2. Page 35. State of NC-#86-to Robert Dickens and William Waite, for 30 shillings per 100 A, 150 A on Flat R adj William Hawkins near Orange County line, said Dickens & Waite. Survey 1 Apr 1795, registered 2 Dec 1797. Chain Carriers; EDWD GOINS, Joshua Step. Person County, North Carolina Deeds 1792-1825, By Katherine Kerr Kendall. Person Co, NC
http://lumbeeindiansandgoinsfamily.blogspot.com/2008/04/person-county-nc-early-records.html

1797 Mar 4 – Dempsy Going & Mourning Goodson, 4 Mar. 1797 (Edward Going)/
Person County, North Carolina Marriages 1792-1868
By Katherine Kerr Kendall Page 35. Person Co, NC
http://lumbeeindiansandgoinsfamily.blogspot.com/2008/04/person-county-nc-early-records.html

1797 Dec 2 – Page 35: Deed Book C, Page 62-3: State of NC-#87-to Robert Dickens & William Waite, ? A on Flat R adj Elizabeth Step, James Rimmer, EDWARD GOINS. 2 Dec. 1797. Chain Carriers; EDWD GOINS, Joshua Step. Person County, North Carolina Deeds 1792-1825. By Katherine Kerr Kendall. Person Co, NC. http://lumbeeindiansandgoinsfamily.blogspot.com/2008/04/person-county-nc-early-records.html

1798 Dec – Page 54 (Names involved: George Eubanks, Betty Eubanks, Thomas Eubanks, George Eubanks, Frances Wyatt, Mary Carlton, Catherine Eubanks, Betsy Eubanks, James Eubanks, George Burch, Edward Goins). Person County Record Books, book 2, page 133. December Court 1798. George Eubanks-will-dated 15 July 1798. Wife Bettey; sons Thomas, George, daughter Frances Wyatt of King and Queen Co., Va.; daughter Mary Carlton of King and Queen Co., Va.; daughters Catherine and Betsy; James Eubanks. Exec. Wife and Thos. Eubanks. Test. George Burch and EDWARD GOINS. Person County, North Carolina Compilations, 1792-1820. Land Grants; 1794-1805-1823 Tax Lists. Record Book Abstracts 1792-1820. Letters of Attorney; By Katherine Kerr Kendall. Person Co, NC. http://lumbeeindiansandgoinsfamily.blogspot.com/2008/04/person-county-nc-early-records.html

1799 Dec 25 – Deed Book D, Page 402. Thomas Price of Orange Co to John Thomas of Person Co for $100, 120 A on Bushey Fork Flat R adj Orange Co. line, Aldridge, Wm Waite, EDWARD GOINS, Philip Burch, D. Durham, Benj Wheeley; a line intersects tract as 20 A already sold to Robert McNab; tract conveyed to Price by Daniel Malone./s/ Thos Wm Price. 25 Dec 1799. wit: Samuel Serrett, B. Douglas. Both witnesses removed from state; proved by oath of John Whitfield who was present when deed was sriten; (sic) Cary Williams proved handwriting of B. Douglas. Person County, North Carolina Deeds 1792-1825. By Katherine Kerr Kendall. Person Co, NC
http://lumbeeindiansandgoinsfamily.blogspot.com/2008/04/person-county-nc-early-records.html

1800 Goin, Allen 7 Person page 621 – US Census North Carolina – “Other Free” Census
Goin, Edward 6 Person page 599
Goin, Godrich 7 Person page 612
Goin, Hinnery 5 Moore County page 60
Goin, Levy 5 Moore County page 62
Goin, Oliva 2 Robeson County page 381
Goin, William 9 Moore County page 60
Going, Burgess 2 whites ( 1001-) Randolph page 353
Going, Isham 4 Orange County page 565
Going, Jacob 6 Stokes 495
Goins?, Judith 1 Nash County page 102
http://www.freeafricanamericans.com/1800NCa.htm

1800 – Tax List 1800
Nash District
Edward Gowin, 250 acres, 1 free poll, 0 black polls, 0 stud horses
Person Co, NC
http://www.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~ncperson/census-tax-list-branch-page.htm
http://lumbeeindiansandgoinsfamily.blogspot.com/2008/04/person-county-nc-early-records.html

1800 Person County, North Carolina
All Other Free Persons
Allen Goin (FPOC); Series: M32 Roll: 32 Page: 218
Edward Goin (FPOC); Series: M32 Roll: 32 Page: 196
Godrich Goin (FPOC); Series: M32 Roll: 32 Page: 209
Susannah Goin (white); Series: M32 Roll: 32 Page: 205
Person Co, NC
http://lumbeeindiansandgoinsfamily.blogspot.com/2008/04/person-county-nc-early-records.html

1802 Jan 8 – Page 56. Deed Book C, Page 331-2. John Thomas to Jacob Thomas, for $104, 120 A on Bushy Fork of Flat R on Orange County Line adj Aldridge, EDWARD GOINS old line, Phillip Burch, D. Durras, reserving a dividing line to 100 A to Thomas & balance to Robert McNabb and was sold to McNabb by Thos Price-tract conveyed John Thomas by Thomas Price & to Price by Daniel Malone. 8 Jan 1802. Wit: John Farrar, B. Douglas. Person County, North Carolina Deeds 1792-1825. By Katherine Kerr Kendall. Person Co, NC.   http://lumbeeindiansandgoinsfamily.blogspot.com/2008/04/person-county-nc-early-records.html

1800 NC Moore Co US Census – William Goin with 9 other free
(Next door to Hennery Going with 5 other free)

1810 NC Moore Co US Census – Wm Goyne with 6 other free
(Next door to Henry Goyne with 9 other free)
(Next to Edward Goyne with 2 other free)
(Next to Levi Goyne with 8 other free)

1810 – Edward Goyne, Henry Goyne, Levi Goyne, William Goyne
1810 US Census, Moore Co, p 64:
EDWARD GOYNE: All other free persons=2
HENRY GOYNE: All other free persons=9
LEVI GOYNE: All other free persons=8
WILLIAM GOYNE: All other free persons=6
Moore Co, NC
http://lumbeeindiansandgoinsfamily.blogspot.com/2007/11/moore-county-nc-early-records.html

From GRF Newsletter Oct 1996:

Edward Gowen Mulatto son of Edward Gowen of Granville Co, NC

Edward Gowen, Melungeon/Mulatto, son of Edward Gowen, was born about 1761, probably in Granville County, North Carolina. He was the fifth Edward Gowen in a string of four consecutive antecedents with the same name.

He was married in Granville County on a bond dated October 31, 1807 to Rebecca Anderson, daughter of Mulatto Lewis Anderson and Winifred “Winnie” Bass Anderson. Her brother, George Anderson was their bondsman.

Rebecca Anderson was the great-great-granddaughter of Kate Anderson, a Negro slave whose manumission created a great stir in the Virginia House of Burgesses. Her owner, John Fulcher of Norfolk County directed in his will of October 12, 1712 that his 15 slaves be freed. He directed his executor, Lewis Conner to give “to my Negroes, men and women and children, there freedom,” according to Paul Heinegg writing in “Free African Americans of North Carolina and Virginia.”

Kate Anderson and 14 other members of her extended family were also bequeathed by the will 640 acres of land in Norfolk County to the consternation of the Virginia legislators and planters. The House quickly moved to squelch the idea of freeing slaves in Virginia. They wrote legislation to “provide by a law against such manumission of slaves, which may in time by their increase and correspondence with other slaves . . . endanger the peace of this Colony,” according to “Henning’s Statutes,” Volume III.

The authorities could not legally undo the damage that Fulcher had done, but they felt they could discourage it from ever being repeated. Conner sought to minimize the problem for Virginia by exporting it to North Carolina. He swapped the 640 acres in Norfolk County for a section of land in Chowan County, just across the colony line. The Anderson family was reluctant to leave Virginia, so the executor “sweetened the deal” with an extra 300 acres of North Carolina land. Five years later the Andersons were still in Virginia, the deed to the promised North Carolina land not having materialized.

The family filed suit against Conner in 1717 in York County and produced Fulcher’s will in court in an effort to obtain title to the land. The Andersons won the case, the court declaring that the wishes of a dying man were inviolate. But Conner appealed to the superior court in Williamsburg, and the verdict was reversed. Edward “Ned” Anderson, one of the children freed by Fulcher was back in court in 1734 trying to get title to the North Carolina land. Twenty-two years after the date of Fulcher’s will, the North Carolina land lay in Bath County. Shortly afterward, Bath County itself was dissolved, and the Anderson family apparently gave up on the effort to secure its inheritance.

The Colony of Virginia was not victorious in the matter either. It could not long hold back manumission, either by law or by delaying tactics such as was used on the Andersons and the Gowens. When Pres. George Washington died in December 1799, he had already specified in his will that his slaves were to be given their freedom. Patrick Henry, Thomas Jefferson, John Adams, Alexander Hamilton and other statesmen took a stand against slavery. The northern states, one by one, abolished slavery beginning with Vermont in 1777 and ending with New Jersey in 1804.

Lewis Anderson and Winifred “Winnie” Bass Anderson died without inheriting any of the Fulcher land. “Edward Going” was mentioned as a purchaser at the estate sale of Mrs. Winifred Anderson February 9, 1810, according to Granville County Will Book 7, page 116. “Edward Going & wife, Rebecca Going, heirs of Lewis Anderson, deceased” were mentioned April 12, 1814 in Granville County Will Book 8, pages 365 and 366.

Two free colored families, one headed by “Edward Goins”, page 2 and another headed by “Edward Goins”, page 23, ap-peared in the 1820 census of Moore County, North Carolina. Children born to Edward Gowen and Rebecca Anderson Gowen are unknown, but there must have been an “Edward the sixth” in there somewhere.

From GRF Newsletter March 1997:

Edward Gowen Battled the British At Guilford Courthouse and Yorktown

Edward Gowen, described variously as a free Negro, a Mulatto and a Melungeon, served three [possibly four] hitches with North Carolina Revolutionary troops. He participated in the Battle of Guilford Courthouse fought March 15, 1781 between the armies of Gen. Charles Lord Cornwallis and Gen. Nathanael Greene.

The bloody battle raged all day in cornfields north of present-day Greensboro, North Carolina where the combatants fought to a draw. New Garden Monthly Meeting, a Quaker church stood near the battlefield, and as soon as the firing ceased, was converted into a hospital. Churchmembers went into the scene of carnage and brought the wounded, both British and American, to the church and began to bind up their wounds.

Both armies withdrew, but were destined to meet each other again within six months in the decisive Battle of Yorktown where Cornwallis tendered his sword to Gen. George Washington in October 1781. The war was officially over, but Edward Gowen was kept in the Continental Line for at least another year. Despite all the hazards he encountered during his lifetime, he lived to the age of 92.

Edward Gowen, son of Edward Gowen, was born about 1744, probably in Brunswick County, Virginia. He was taxable as a “black poll” in his father’s household in Granville County in the 1755 list of Robert Harris. His father, “Edward Gowing” was “sworn chain carrier” on a patent survey done for William Kinchen September 25, 1755, according to Granville County Surveyor’s Book 11, page 426.

“Edward Gowan” [Sr.] was sued by Robert Parker June 7, 1757, according to Granville County Court minutes. “Edward Gowin, Sr, mulatto, Edward Gowin, Jr. and Reps [Reeps?] Gowin” were recorded in the 1762 tax list of St. John’s Parish, Granville County.

He appeared in his own household in 1767 as “one black poll” in the tax list of John Pope. Edward Gowen, “one black poll” appeared in the 1769 tax list of Granville County. “Edward Gowin was listed in the 1771 tax list of Granville County, and . “Edward Going” appeared in the 1771 tax list of Bute County, having moved there during the year. His household included two members.

“Thomas Gowin” was listed as a purchaser at the estate sale of James McGehee November 23, 1774, according to Granville County Deed Book 1, page 49.

“Edward Going” enlisted in the North Carolina forces in Bute County in 1778. He was listed in “Balloted Men & Volunteers from Bute County to serve 9 months as Continental soldiers, beginning March 1, 1779,” page 2. Bute County was organized in 1765 and abolished in 1779, and its land used to create Franklin and Warren Counties.

Edward Going appeared in an article entitled “Continental Soldiers from Bute County, North Carolina, 1779” by Ransom McBride which was published in “North Carolina Genealogical Society Journal,” Vol. 15, May 1989. The entry read: “Edward Going, Prvt; Place of Abode, Bute; Where Born; Virga [Virginia?]; Hgt: 5’7″; Age: 35; Hair: Black; Eyes: Black.”

On August 3, 1779 “Edward Gains” received 75 acres on South Hyco Creek in nearby Caswell County. He was taxed there in 1784 on “1 black poll and 100 acres on Hyco Creek in St. Lukes District.”

“Edward Goine & wife, blacks” were enumerated about 1785 in Caswell County.

“Edward Going” was listed in the North Carolina state census of 1786, page 56:

“Going, Edward white male 21-60
white female
white male 21-60
white female
white female

In 1786, Edward Goins and John Goin were included in a list of “insolvents” in Ft. Creek District of Granville County.

Edward Gowen was listed in the Granville County Will Book 2, page 79, October 15, 1788, as “Edward Goen” when he conveyed to his nephew, Thomas Gowen, “for oe25 all my right in the estate of Elizabeth Bass, deceased.” John Simmons, Allen Hudson and Henry Meghee witnessed the deed, according to “Abstracts of Early Deeds of Granville County, 1746-1765.”

Person County, North Carolina was organized from Caswell County in 1791, and Edward Gowen found himself in the new county. Edward Gowen joined his brother Jenkins Gowen in selling their claims for Revolutionary pay to John Hall of Hyco, North Carolina in Caswell County April 27, 1791.

“Edward Gowing” reappeared in the records of Caswell County, North Carolina in 1791 and in the records of Orange County, North Carolina, its parent county, in 1792. These two counties were located a short distance west of Bute County.

“Edward [X] Goen” signed an affidavit there April 27, 1791, according to “Revolutionary War Service Records and Settlements” abstracted by Ransom McBride and published in “North Carolina Genealogical Society Journal,” Vol. 9, November 1983. He stated that he and “Jenkins Goen” sold their “claims against the United States to John Hall of Caswell County [Hico] and empowered said John Hall to draw such claims from the Treasurer.” The affidavit was witnessed by Catherine Brown and Rebeckah Blake.

“Prvt. Edward Going,” was serving in Col. William Eaton’s Fifth North Carolina Regiment of the Continental Line on May 1, 1792.

“Edward [X] Goen of Orange County, North Carolina” executed a power of attorney in the favor of Hall June 7, 1792. he document read, “I, Edward Goen, late a soldier of the Continental Line of North Carolina appoint John Hall of same county and state, attorney, to settle the claims arising from said Goen’s service as a Private in the Fifth Regiment of New Levies under the command of Gen. Thomas Sumpter in 1778 and 1779.”

Capt. Robert Temples, perhaps a company commander, certified before Samuel High, J.P. in Wake County, North Carolina July 20, 1792 “that Edward Going served as a soldier in the nine months service of North Carolina.”

“Edward Goins” was taxed on “1 black poll and 245 acres in Person County in 1793. “Ed. Goins” paid tax on “two white polls” and 246 acres of land according to the 1794 tax list of Person County. “Edward Goins” was a taxpayer in 1795 in Person County. He was enumerated as the head of a household of “6 other free” in the census of 1800.

Two free colored families, one headed by “Edward Goins”, page 2 and another headed by “Edward Goins”, page 23, ap-peared in the 1820 census of Moore County, North Carolina.

Edward Going was receiving a yearly pension of $120 on May 4, 1831. This Revolutionary pensioner, a veteran of the “Fifth Regiment under Col. William Eaton of Granville County,” was still drawing compensation in 1835, at the age of 92, according to “Report on Pensioners, 1835.”

“Edward Goen/Going/Gowing” of Orange and Caswell Coun-ties appeared several times in “Comptrollers Papers, Revolutionary War, Final Settlements” deposited in Box 15 D-G, North Carolina Archives, Raleigh. The entries are dated in the 1770s, 1780s and 1790s. Orange County was formed from Granville County in 1752, and Caswell County was formed from Orange County in 1777.

The wife of Edward Going, name unknown, received Widow’s Pension W-6899 after his death. In her application she stated that Edward Going entered the service at Warren Courthouse, North Carolina “as a captain.” He joined the Fifth North Carolina Regiment at Halifax, North Carolina. He later enlisted at Lewisburg, North Carolina and fought at Guilford Courthouse under Gen. Nathanael Greene. She mentioned that “his messmates were Ozzy Ball, Drew Jones and William Smith.” She spoke of residence in Franklin County and in Granville County.

Children born to Edward Gowen include:

Edward Gowen born about 1761
William Goins born about 1765

GRF Newsletter Apr 1998:

Edward Gowen Sold Interest In Bass Estate to Thomas Goin

Edward Gowen, Melungeon/Mulatto son of Edward Gowen, Jr. and grandson of Edward Gowen, was born about 1727, probably in Charles City County, Virginia. He was brought to Brunswick County, Virginia by his father about 1744. He was married shortly afterward, wife’s name unknown. He appeared in the 1753 tax list of adjoining Granville County, North Carolina in the list of Osborn Jeffreys. “Edward Gowen, mulatto” appeared on the October 8, 1754 muster roll of the Granville County militia under Capt. Osborn Jeffreys.

“Edward Gowen and wife, black” were taxable in the 1771 tax list of Philemon Hawkins in Bute County, along with his brother, Michael Gowen. Bute County was organized in 1764 with land from Granville County, and Edward Gowen found himself in the new county.

By June 3, 1778 Michael Gowen, brother of Edward Gowen, had removed to Craven County, North Carolina and had per-mitted Edward Gowen to move to his land in Bute County on Taylor’s Creek. On that date Michael Gowen deeded 80 acres on Taylor’s Creek to his son, Jenkins Gowen with the proviso that Edward Gowen and his wife be permitted to live there as long as they lived. Jenkins Gowen left for Revolutionary ser-vice about this time, and the sheriff sold the land for unpaid taxes August 3, 1779, according to Deed Book M, page 179. By 1782 Edward Gowen was back in Granville County where he was taxed on 90 acres on Ft. Creek District.

“Edward Going” was listed in the North Carolina state census of 1786, page 56:
“Going, Edward white male 21-60
white female
white male under 21 or over 60
white female
white female

This enumeration was adopted by the federal government as its 1790 census of North Carolina. Edward Gowen reappeared there in the 1810 census as the head of an “other free” household composed of five people.

“Edward Goen” conveyed his interest in the estate of Elizabeth Bass to his “nephew Thomas Goin” for £25 on October 14, 1788, according to Granville County Will Book 2, page 79. Elizabeth Bass is regarded as the mother of Edward Gowen who had remarried Jeremiah Bass, and Thomas Goin is re-garded as her grandson. The estate of Elizabeth Bass was administered in Greene County, North Carolina [later Tennessee] where Thomas Goin had applied for the administration.

Greene County Court Minutes reveal: “August 1788. On motion of W. Avery, Esqr. atto. for Thomas Going for obtaining letter of administration on the Estate of Elizabeth Bass, dcsd. ordered that the same be laid over until next term, for proof of sanguinity [kinship, blood relationship] & that a dedimus potestatem [a commission to take testimony] issue in favour of said Thomas Going to Anson & Richmond Counties and to the State of South Carolina . . . ”

Children born to Edward Gowen include:

Edward Gowen, born about 1745
Reeps Gowen born about 1749
Jenkins Gowen born about 1761
Jesse Gowen born about 1762
Goodrich Gowen born about 1764
David Gowen born about 1766
Isham Gowen born about 1770
Patsy Gowen born about 1772

From GRF Newsletter April 1999:

Edward Gowen Sold Interest In Bass Estate to Thomas Goin

Edward Gowen, Melungeon/Mulatto son of Edward Gowen, Jr. and grandson of Edward Gowen, was born about 1727, probably in Charles City County, Virginia. He was brought to Brunswick County, Virginia by his father about 1744. He was married shortly afterward, wife’s name unknown. He appeared in the 1753 tax list of adjoining Granville County, North Carolina in the list of Osborn Jeffreys. “Edward Gowen, mulatto” appeared on the October 8, 1754 muster roll of the Granville County militia under Capt. Osborn Jeffreys.

“Edward Gowen and wife, black” were taxable in the 1771 tax list of Philemon Hawkins in Bute County, along with his brother, Michael Gowen. Bute County was organized in 1764 with land from Granville County, and Edward Gowen found himself in the new county.

By June 3, 1778 Michael Gowen, brother of Edward Gowen, had removed to Craven County, North Carolina and had permitted Edward Gowen to move to his land in Bute County on Taylor’s Creek. On that date Michael Gowen deeded 80 acres on Taylor’s Creek to his son, Jenkins Gowen with the proviso that Edward Gowen and his wife be permitted to live there as long as they lived. Jenkins Gowen left for Revolutionary service about this time, and the sheriff sold the land for unpaid taxes August 3, 1779, according to Deed Book M, page 179. By 1782 Edward Gowen was back in Granville County where he was taxed on 90 acres on Ft. Creek District.

The household of “Edward Going” was listed in the North Carolina state census of 1786, page 56 as “white male 21-60, white male under 21 or over 60 and three white females.”

This enumeration was adopted by the federal government as its 1790 census of North Carolina. Edward Gowen reappeared there in the 1810 census as the head of an “other free” household composed of five people.

“Edward Goen” conveyed his interest in the estate of Elizabeth Bass to his “nephew Thomas Goin” for £25 on October 14, 1788, according to Granville County Will Book 2, page 79. Elizabeth Bass is regarded as the mother of Edward Gowen who had remarried Jeremiah Bass, and Thomas Goin is regarded as her grandson. The estate of Elizabeth Bass was administered in Greene County, North Carolina [later Tennessee] where Thomas Goin had applied for the administration.

Greene County Court Minutes reveal: “August 1788. On motion of W. Avery, Esqr. atto. for Thomas Going for obtaining letter of administration on the Estate of Elizabeth Bass, dcsd. ordered that the same be laid over until next term, for proof of sanguinity [kinship, blood relationship] & that a dedimus potestatem [a commission to take testimony] issue in favour of said Thomas Going to Anson & Richmond Counties and to the State of South Carolina . . . ”

Children born to Edward Gowen include:

Edward Gowen, born about 1745
Reeps Gowen born about 1749
Jenkins Gowen born about 1761
Jesse Gowen born about 1762
Goodrich Gowen born about 1764
David Gowen born about 1766
Isham Gowen born about 1770
Patsy Gowen born about 1772

From GRF Newsletter July 1999:

Revolutionary Edward Gowen Continued as Pensioner at 92

Edward Gowen, Melungeon/Mulatto son of Edward Gowen, was born about 1745, probably in Brunswick County, Virginia. He was taxable as a “black poll” in his father’s household in adjoining Granville County, North Carolina in the 1755 list of Robert Harris. “Edward Gowin, Sr, mulatto, Edward Gowin, Jr. and Reeps Gowin” were recorded in the 1762 tax list of St. John’s Parish, Granville County.

He appeared in his own household in 1767 as “one black poll” in the tax list of John Pope. Edward Gowen, “one black poll” appeared in the 1769 tax list of Granville County. “Edward Gowin was listed in the 1771 tax list of Granville County. “Edward Going” also appeared in the 1771 tax list of Bute County. His household included two members. “Thomas Gowin” was listed as a purchaser at the estate sale of James McGehee November 23, 1774, according to Granville County Deed Book 1, page 49.

“Edward Going” enlisted in the North Carolina forces in Bute County in 1778. He was listed in “Balloted Men & Volunteers from Bute County to serve 9 months as Continental soldiers, beginning March 1, 1779,” page 2. He was shown as “Edward Going, age 35, born in Virginia, 5’7″, 35 years old, black hair, black eyes.” Bute County was organized in 1765 and abolished in 1779, and its land used to create Franklin and Warren Counties.

On August 3, 1779 “Edward Gains” received 75 acres on South Hyco Creek in nearby Caswell County. He was taxed there in 1784 on “1 black poll and 100 acres on Hyco Creek in St. Lukes District.” “Edward Goine & wife, blacks” were enumerated about 1787 in Caswell County.

“Edward Going” was listed in the North Carolina state census of 1786, page 56 as the head of a household composed of “one white male, 21-60, one white male under 21 or over 60 and three white females.” In 1786, “Edward Goins and John Goin” were included in a list of “insolvents” in Ft. Creek District of Granville County.

Edward Gowen was listed in the Granville County Will Book 2, page 79, October 15, 1788, as “Edward Goen” when he conveyed to his nephew, Thomas Gowen, for oe25 “all my right in the estate of Elizabeth Bass, deceased.” John Simmons, Allen Hudson and Henry Meghee witnessed the deed, according to “Abstracts of Early Deeds of Granville County, 1746-1765.”

Person County, North Carolina was organized from Caswell County in 1791, and Edward Gowen found himself in the new county. Edward Gowen joined his brother Jenkins Gowen in selling their claims for Revolutionary pay to John Hall of Hyco, North Carolina in Caswell County April 27, 1791.

“Edward Gowing” reappeared in the records of Caswell County, North Carolina in 1791 and in the records of Orange County, North Carolina, its parent county, in 1792. These two counties were located a short distance west of Bute County.

“Edward [X] Goen” signed an affidavit there April 27, 1791, according to “Revolutionary War Service Records and Settlements” abstracted by Ransom McBride and published in “North Carolina Genealogical Society Journal,” Vol. 9, November 1983. He stated that he and “Jenkins Goen” sold their “claims against the United States to John Hall of Caswell County [Hico] and empowered said John Hall to draw such claims from the Treasurer.” The affidavit was witnessed by Catherine Brown and Rebeckah Blake.

“Edward [X] Goen of Orange County, North Carolina” executed a power of attorney in the favor of Hall June 7, 1792. The document read, “I, Edward Goen, late a soldier of the Continental Line of North Carolina appoint John Hall of same county and state, attorney, to settle the claims arising from said Goen’s service as a Private in the Fifth Regiment of New Levies under the command of Gen. Sumner in 1778 and 1779.”

“Prvt. Edward Going,” was serving in Col. William Eaton’s Fifth North Carolina Regiment of the Continental Line on May 1, 1792. Capt. Robert Temples, perhaps a company commander certified before Samuel High, J.P. in Wake County, North Carolina July 20, 1792 “that Edward Going served as a soldier in the nine months service of North Carolina.”

“Edward Goins” was taxed on “1 black poll and 245 acres in Person County in 1793. “Ed. Goins” paid tax on “two white polls” and 245 3/4 acres of land according to the 1794 tax list of Person County. “Edward Goins” was a taxpayer in 1795 in Person County. He was enumerated as the head of a household of “6 other free” in the census of 1800.

Two free colored families, one headed by “Edward Goins”, page 2 and another headed by “Edward Goins,” page 23, appeared in the 1820 census of Moore County, North Carolina.

Edward Going was receiving a yearly pension of $120 on May 4, 1831. This Revolutionary pensioner, a veteran of the “Fifth Regiment under Col. William Eaton of Granville County,” was still drawing compensation in 1835, at the age of 92, according to “Report on Pensioners, 1835.”

The wife of Edward Going, name unknown, received Widow’s Pension W-6899 after his death. In her application she stated that Edward Going “entered the service at Warren Courthouse, North Carolina as a captain.” He joined the Fifth North Carolina Regiment at Halifax, North Carolina. He later enlisted at Lewisburg, North Carolina and fought at Guilford Courthouse under Gen. Greene. She mentioned that his messmates were Ozzy Ball, Drew Jones and William Smith sidence in Franklin County and in Granville County.

Children born to Edward Gowen include:

Edward Gowen born about 1761
William Goins born about 1765

Larkin Gowen, son of Frederick Gowen and Nancy Coomer Gowen, was born in 1833 in Lee County, Virginia. Two years later his family lived in Pulaski County. In 1849 they removed to Green County, and in 1850 he appeared in Adair County in his father’s household as an 18-year-old illiterate farmer.

He was married about 1854 to Louisa C. Coffey who was born in 1829 in Adair County. In 1857 the couple lived in Carroll County, Virginia, adjoining Patrick County where he must have still had relatives. One of their sons was born there. By 1859 they had returned to Adair County.

In 1860 the family appeared in Adair County, Civil District 1 in the federal census as:

Going, Larkin 27, born in Lee County, VA, farmer, $200 real estate
Louisa C. 31, born in Adair County, KY
Matthew W. 4, born in Adair County, KY
Frederick D. 3, born in Carroll County, KY
Larkin L. 11/12, born in Adair Co, KY”

Larkin Gowen and Louisa C. Coffee Gowen did not appear in subsequent enumerations of Adair County. He was a resident of Gibson County, Indiana when his father died there in 1872, according to Gibson County Probate Book S, page 284.

Apparently Louisa C. Coffee Gowen died, and Larkin Gowen was was remarried about 1879, wife’s name unknown. His wife and their baby were burned to death at Midway, Indiana in Spencer County. A news story about their deaths appeared in the April 25, 1881 edition of the “New Albany Ledger-Standard:”

“The details of a most horrible calamity that occurred near the little town of Midway, in Spencer County, a few days ago, have been related to a Ledger-Standard reporter by a gentleman who today returned to this city from a business trip to that part of the state.

Mr. Larkin Gowen is a farmer who resides near Midway. His wife, while he was out at the barn at work, was engaged in her domestic duties, her infant lying asleep on the bed nearby. Mrs. Gowen, in passing near the open fire place, accidentally set fire to her dress, and the inflamable material was speedily in a blaze.

The unfortunate woman in her fright, leaped into the bed where her infant lay, intending to smother out the flames by covering herself with the bed clothing. Her blazing garments, however, set fire to the bed clothes, and the wretched woman leaped from the bed to the floor where she fell in a swoon, overcome by her fright and the intense pain that she suffered. She was literally roasted, all of her clothing having burned from her body.

Her screams were heard by her husband, who hastened to the house. His first care was to snatch the infant from the burning bed; but it had already been fatally burned. The poor mother lay in an insensible condition on the floor, but the agony of her suffering was not of long endurance, for death came to her relief. The calamity is one of the saddest that ever occurred in that part of the state.

Mr. Gowen had a severe struggle with the flames ignited by the burning bed before he got them suppressed. He is an excellent citizen and has the sympathy of all who know him.”

Children born to Larkin Gowen and Louisa C. Coffee Gowen include:

Matthew Melvin Gowen born October 27, 1855
Frederick Dempsey Gowen born April 14, 1857
Larkin Luther Gowen born August 7, 1859
Nancy J. Gowen born May 9, 1862
Thomas Gowen born November 21, 1864
William M. Gowen born October 25, 1868

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