1737 Anne Gowen Easley m. John Easley in Granville Co, NC and Spartanburg Co, SC

Anne Gowen Easley b. 1737 m. John Easley in Granville Co, NC and Spartanburg Co, SC

Parents:

William Gowen b. 1712 – d. April 1792, m. Sarah Allen

Children:

Millington Easley                                              born about 1767
John Easley                                                        born about 1768
James Easley                                                      born about 1769
Virginia Elizabeth “Betsy” Easley                    born in 1770
Mary Easley                                                       born about 1772
William Franklin Easley                                   born about 1774
Ann “Nancy” Easley                                          born in 1778

Siblings:

Joseph Gowen b. 1735
John “Buck” Gowen b. 1736
Anne Gowen Easley b. 1737
William Gowen Jr b. 1738
James Gowen b. 1740

FACTS:

Ann Easley m. John Easley
Virginia Genealogical Society
http://interactive.ancestry.com/6131/VGS_2002_01_01_0386/525370754?backurl=http%3a%2f%2fsearch.ancestry.com%2fcgi-bin%2fsse.dll%3fdb%3dvgs%26gss%3dsfs28_ms_db%26new%3d1%26rank%3d1%26msT%3d1%26gsln%3dGoin%26gsln_x%3d0%26MSAV%3d1%26uidh%3dm37&ssrc=&backlabel=ReturnSearchResults&rc=510,1721,605,1750#?imageId=VGS_1979_01_01_0090

1770 John Easley m Ann Gowen w daughter Eliz Easley b 1770 in South Carolina
http://interactive.ancestry.com/6131/VGS_1979_01_01_0090/513311834?backurl=http%3a%2f%2fsearch.ancestry.com%2fcgi-bin%2fsse.dll%3fdb%3dvgs%26gss%3dsfs28_ms_db%26new%3d1%26rank%3d1%26msT%3d1%26gsln%3dGowen%26gsln_x%3d0%26MSAV%3d0%26uidh%3dm37&ssrc=&backlabel=ReturnSearchResults&rc=1439,1468,1599,1497

1782 May 21 – William Gowen Edmund Bearden, Ann Gowen Easley
Land: grant 394 acres on Sink Hole Fork of the Middle Tyger River, 21 May 1782, Spartanburg, South Carolina, USA.  “The State of South Carolina granted 394 acres on Sink Hole Fork of the Middle Tyger River to William Gowen May 21, 1782. The land was surveyed for him May 26, 1782, and the surveyor noted that it lay “east of land laid out to Edmund Bearden and bounded on all other sides by vacant land.” This land was later willed to Ann Gowen Easley, his daughter. The adjoining land of Edmund Bearden was later acquired by his nephew, Maj. John “Buck” Gowen.”
Spartanburg Co., SC

1786, when Ann Gowen Easley
petitioned the government for military pay for her deceased husband and son, she requested that the payment be made to “Captain John Gowen.”  He was shortly promoted to major, and subsequently was referred to as Major John “Buck” Gowen.
SC

1792 April 10 – William Gowen – died – probate/Will:
Sarah Gowen, John Gowen, Anne Gowen Easely,
Estate: will, 10 Mar 1785, 96th District, North Carolina, USA. “William Gowen wrote his will March 10, 1785:
The will read:
In the name of God, Amen: I William Gowen of Ninety Six District in the State of South Carolina, planter, being in a low state of health, but of perfect mind and memory and calling to mind the Immortality of my Soul and That it is appointed for all men once to Die, Do make and ordain this my Last Will & Testament in manner & form following.
“1st. I recommend my soul into the hand of Him who gave it & my Body to Be Buried in a Christian Like manner at the Discretion of Executors.
“2nd. I Do Constitute and appoint my Son, John Gowen, and my wife, Sarah Gowen, Executors of this my last will and Testament. And as for my worldly goods which it has been please God to Bestow me I Dispose of them in the manner and form following: Viz:
“Item: I Give & Bequeath to my well Beloved Wife, Sarah Gowen, all my Stock of Cattle, Hogs & Horses [Except Two Cows & Calves for my Daughter, Anne Easily] which with all my household furniture, she, my said wife, is to hold as her property during her Life and after her death to be the property of my said son, John Gowen.
“Item: I Give and Bequeath to my Daughter, Anne Easily, Two Hundred and seventy acres of land, more or less, it being part of a survey of Three Hundred and Ninety-five acres Run for me on the Sink Hole fork of Tyger River, Beginning for the Dividing Line at a stump agreed upon by her and John Gowen & running a south course to the other line of said tract.”
“Item: I Give & Bequeath to my son, John Gowen, All the Remaining part of said tract of land above mentioned, and for the true performance of these presents I have hereunto set my hand and seal to this my Last Will & Testament This Tenth Day of March in the year of our Lord one Thousand Seven Hundred and Eighty-Five the Ninth year of American Independence.”
William [X] Gowen
Signed & Sealed in the presence of us the undernamed Witnesses by him, the Said William Gowen as his Last Will & Testament. Wits: David Jackson, Millington Easley”
It is reported that William Gowen died April 10, 1792. The Spartanburg County, South Carolina probate court accepted the will of William Gowen in its session of April 1792. The following entry was made in the court minutes:
Carolina Spartanburgh County April Court, 1792
“This Last Will & Testament of William Gowen, deceased, being proven by the Evidence of Millenton Easley & approved by the Court at the term aforesaid, was thereupon admitted to record, a true copy of which is this day transcribed & this Original filed in office 8 June 1792.
by M. Lancaster, S.C.S.
Wm. Gowen, decd, Last Will & Test’t. Copyed, 8 June, 1792”
96 Dist, SC
Gowen Manuscript Info:

Anne Gowen, [William5, John4, William3, Thomas2, Mihil1] daughter of William Gowen and Sarah Allan Gowen, was born about 1742, probably in Granville County, North Carolina.  Her family later lived in Stokes County, North Carolina where she met John Easley who became her husband about 1766.  He was born before 1741, according to the research of Dr. Virginia Easley DeMarce, a descendant.

He was the son of Millington Easley who was a contemporary with William Gowen in Granville County.  Millington Easley moved to Stokes County in the early 1750s.  John Easley appeared in Stokes County records in 1764.  Their marriage bond might be recorded there.  Millington Easley was a son of John Easley [1683-1746] and his second wife, Joyce Millington.  John Easley was a son of Robert Easley [1665-1711] and Ann Parker Easley [1668-1720].

Millington Easley, son of Millington Easley, apparently fol­lowed the same westward migration because he became a Gowen neighbor in District 96, South Carolina.  His son William Easley was married to Sarah Gowen, daughter of John “Buck” Gowen.  They later moved to Hickman County, Tennessee.  Around 1774 John Easley and made the westward trek to District 96.

John Easley served in the South Carolina militia during the Revolutionary War following the fall of Charleston, South Carolina to the British in 1780.  On June 18, 1781 Thomas Farrar, brigade major, gave a receipt to John Easley for “a bay mare imprest for Publick Service–Appraised to forty-five pounds to be paid in gold or silver or the value thereof in Continental money.  By Order of General Pickins.”  Miss Miriam Dozier, a descendant of Austin, Texas wrote October 27, 1961 that John Easley was a first lieutenant in Lt. Col. Benjamin Roebuck’s Regiment.  Both he and his son, Millington Easley were killed fighting the British, apparently about 1783.

On June 29, 1784 Anne Gowen Easley, a widow, was granted land on Reedy River in the Old Indian Apex Cession.  Ac­cording to District 96 Deed Book 2, page 347 her land was bounded on the northwest “by Hawkins.”  Later she sold this land to Edmund Bearden.  She was mentioned in the will of her father written March 10, 1785, as the recipient of “two cows and calves” and “275 acres of land, more or less, it being part of a survey of 395 acres run for me on the Sink Pot Fork of Tyger River,” according to District 96 will records.

On May 28, 1785 Gov. Guerrard of South Carolina granted land in District 96 to Anne Gowen Easley, according to Greenville County Deed Book B, page 28.

Anne Gowen Easley appeared in the first state census of South Carolina taken in 1786 as the head of a household in Greenville County.  According to”Heads of Households, South Carolina, 1790,” the family was enumerated as:

“Easley, Ann                           white female
white male over 16
white female
white female
white male under 16”

No slaves were reported.  The enumeration showed her to be a neighbor to Samuel Easley, William Easley, “Allen Gowin” and Gowen Clayton.  Sometime between October 14, 1805 and March 14, 1808 Gowen Clayton of Spartanburg District was witness to a deed of Austin Clayton which transferred 50 acres of land “on both sides of the Tygar River” which had been granted to Augusten Clayton, according to Deed Book L, page 208.

In 1786 Ann Gowen Easley petitioned the government for mil­itary pay for her deceased husband and son, requesting that the compensation be tendered to “Capt. John Gowen.”  The docu­ment read:

“To the Commissioners of the Publick Treasury: Gen­tlemen:  Please to send me by Captain John Gowen In­dent for the amount of the account of John Easely & Millington Easely against the Public of South Carolina, they being both deceased, and I, the administratrix of their estates, being the widow of John Easely and Mother of Millington Easely.  Your Complyance with Much Oblige.
Your humble Servant
Ann Easley
Acknowledged the 24th of May, 1786 before
Bayliss Earle, J.P.”

Apparently the affidavit was written by Bayliss Earle, an old friend of the Gowen family who should have known how to correctly spell “Easley.”  The resulting indents bore the fol­lowing endorsements:

“John Easely, Lieutenant for Militia duty in Roebuck’s Regiment since the fall of Charleston, £44, 10 shillings.  Received August 5, 1786 Full Satisfaction for interest for the within.
C. C. Schutt”

“Millington Easely, £14, 7 shillings and one penny, half penny.  Received September 1, 1786 three years interest on the within Indent.

C. C. Schutt”

On December 22, 1786 John “Buck” Gowen signed a receipt for full satisfaction for compensation from the Commissioners of the Treasury “in the purchase of land for Ann Easley.”  Apparently Ann Gowen Easley settled for land, feeling that getting payment from the hard-pressed government would be difficult and long in coming.

On January 1, 1787 Ann Gowen Easley was granted additional land on Reedy River.  When that area formally became a state May 23, 1788 she and other members of her family had been in residence there for 14 years.

On July 16, 1790 Ann Gowen Easley sold land on Reedy River that had been granted to her in 1785 to Edmund Bearden, according to Greenville County Deed Book B, page 253..  About 1790 Edmund Bearden sold the land “to Jamison, land on both sides of George’s Creek of Saluda River.”  The deed was witnessed by Winn Bearden, son of Edmund Bearden.  This tract of 340 acres in Washington District was afterwards granted to Maj. John “Buck” Gowen of District 96 by Gov. Charles Cotesworth Pinckney who was a brigadier-general in the Continental Army and a delegate to the constitutional convention.

Maj. John “Buck” Gowen sold this land July 5, 1792 as recorded in Pendleton County, South Carolina Deed Book D, page 3.  The deed was witnessed by James Easley, son of Ann Gowen Easley and Jesse Moss.  Although Pendleton County no longer exists, its records are maintained by South Carolina Historical Commission, Columbia, South Carolina.

On May 2, 1793 Ann Gowen Easley sold the land that had been granted to her in 1785 on Reedy River to Bayliss Earle, according to Greenville County Deed Book C, page 372.  John Easley was a witness to the transaction.

On November 24, 1794 Ann Gowen Easley was mentioned as an heir of James I. Hunt whose will was probated on that date.  She received a deed from the Hunt estate in 1798.

It is believed that Ann Gowen Easley was the “white female, over 45” living in the household of her son, John Easley in the 1800 census of Greenville County.

Anne Gowen Easley deeded January 21, 1801 a slave woman to her daughters, Ann Easley Barton and Mary Easley “for love and affection,” according to Greenville County Deed Book F, page 251.  John Easley and William Easley witnessed the deed.  They are believed to be her sons.

Anne Gowen Easley “of Greenville County” was referred to as “the widow Easley” in the estate account of her father-in-law Millington Easley in 1806, according to Greenville County records.  She was mentioned in the will of her brother John “Buck” Gowen written August 20, 1809.  It is believed that Anne Gowen Easley died shortly afterward and was buried in Greenville County.

Children born to John Easley and Anne Gowen Easley include:

Millington Easley                                              born about 1767
John Easley                                                        born about 1768
James Easley                                                      born about 1769
Virginia Elizabeth “Betsy” Easley                    born in 1770
Mary Easley                                                       born about 1772
William Franklin Easley                                   born about 1774
Ann “Nancy” Easley                                          born in 1778

Millington Easley, son of John Easley and Ann Gowen Easley, was born about 1767 probably in Stokes County, North Car­olina.  He was killed at about age 16, along with his father, while serving in Roebuck’s Regiment of the South Carolina militia.  His mother received military pay of “14 pounds, 7 shillings, one penny, half penny” for his services September 1, 1786.

John Easley, son of John Easley and Ann Gowen Easley, was born about 1768, probably in Stokes County.  He was brought to South Carolina by his parents about 1774.  It is not believed that he was enumerated in the 1786 census of his mother’s household.  He was married about 1791 and was enumerated as the head of Household 544 in the 1800 census of Greenville County.  A “white female, over 45” recorded in his household is possibly his mother.  “John Easley” was a witness in 1801 to a deed of his mother in which she gave a slave to her daughters.  John Easley “was temporarily in Warren County and Allen County, Kentucky, but disappears from the record by 1820,” according to the research of Virginia Easley DeMarce.

James Easley, believed to be a son of John Easley and Ann Gowen Easley, was born about 1769, probably in Stokes County.  He was brought to South Carolina by his parents about 1774.  He is believed to be the “white male, over 16” who appeared in his mother’s household in the South Carolina state census of 1786.  “James Easley” was a witness to a deed of Maj. John “Buck” Gowen July 5, 1792 in which he conveyed land that had once been owned by Anne Gowen Easley, according to Pendleton County, South Carolina Deed Book D, page 3.

Virginia Elizabeth “Betsy” Easley , daughter of Lt. John Easley and Anne Gowen Easley, was born in 1770 in South Carolina.  She was married October 11, 1786 at age 16 to William [Pleasant?] Anderson of Greenville County.  He was born in 1765 in Augusta County, Virginia to John Anderson and Ann Erwin Anderson, according to a letter written by Miss Miriam Dozier, a descendant of Austin, Texas.

In 1789 William Anderson was living in Newberry County, South Carolina, according to “Newberry County, South Carolina Deed Abstracts, 1751-1794,” Volume A, pages 707-710, by Brent H. Holcomb:

“Lease and release.  January 26 & 27, 1789, William Anderson of Newberry County and wife Elizabeth to John Floyd of same, for £300 sterling, 60 acres, part of 100 acres granted to John Lucas September 16, 1774, on a branch of Little River called Sandy Run adjoining Andrew Erwin, Robert Johnston, John Sims, James Goggans, William Anderson, also 150 acres, a part of a tract of 250 acres granted to William Anderson January 10, 1770 on south side of south fork of Sandy Run ad-joining William Pitts, making out 210 acres.

William Anderson
Elizabeth [X] Anderson
Witnesses:
John Anderson
William [X] Anderson
George Goggans”

Proved in Newberry County by the oath of George Goggans March 2, 1789 before Robert Rutherford, J.P. Recorded July 10, 1789.”

On October 1, 1794 Allan Gowen deeded property on the South Pacolet River to William Easley, his niece’s husband, according to Greenville County Deed Book D, page 72.  John “Buck” Gowen, William Gowen and William Anderson were witnesses to the deed.

In 1811 William Anderson lived in Kentucky.

They removed to Sumter County, Alabama.  She died there October 27, 1843, according to her obituary:

“Died Mrs Elizabeth Anderson, consort of William Anderson Sr. Esq. in the 73rd year of her age.  She was married to Mr. Anderson at the age of 16, having been born in South  Carolina in 1770.

Elizabeth Easley was the daughter of John Easley, 1st Lieutenant in the Revolutionary War and his wife Ann Gowen.  John’s father was John Easley and his mother was Joyce Easley; this John’s parents were Warham Easley and his wife Sara Barnes; Warham’s father and mother were Robert Easley and Ann Parker. Warham Easley’s will is in Book 1 page 84 and mentions sons Creed T, Samuel W, Christopher B, daughter Martha Easley Foreman, wife Emily, minor heirs: Catherine, Maria, Elizabeth Jane and Virginia Noble.  Warham Easley lived near Belmont.”

William Easley died February 11, 1848 at age 80.

Children born to them include:

John Erwin Anderson                   born in 1796
Caroline N. Anderson                  born in 1798
Dorcas Anderson                          born about 1799
Marian Burns Anderson               born January 28, 1800
Bailey Washington Anderson      born March 17, 1803
Huldah Virginia Anderson           born April 19, 1805
William Gowen Anderson           born in 1811
Albert Gallatin Anderson             born in 1814

John Erwin Anderson, son of William Anderson and Virginia Elizabeth “Betsy” Easley Anderson, was born in 1796 in Greenville County.  He was married August 10, 1816 in Clark County, Alabama to Cynthia D. Harper.  She was born in 1798 in Georgia.  He died in 1848 in Panola County, Texas and she died after 1870.

Children born to them include:

Mary Caroline Anderson                                born about 1820

Mary Caroline Anderson, daughter of John Erwin Anderson and Cynthia D. Harper Anderson, was born about 1820.  She was married about 1841 to Patrick C. Shahan in Harrison County, Texas.

Children born to them include:

Michael Lucian Shahan                 born about 1842

Michael Lucian Shahan, son of Patrick C. Shahan and Mary Caroline Anderson Shahan, was born about 1842.  He was married about 1866 to Georgia Ann Pyle.

Caroline N. Anderson, daughter of William Anderson and Virginia Elizabeth “Betsy” Easley  Anderson, was born in 1798 in Greenville County. She was married about 1816 to Henry Walker.  She was remarried to Elisha Lacy.

Dorcas Anderson, daughter of William Anderson and Virginia Elizabeth “Betsy” Easley Anderson, was born about 1799 in Greenville County.  She was married September 24, 1819 in Clark County, Alabama to Eli Davis.

Children born to them include:

Huldah Davis                                           born about 1821
Amanda Davis                                          born about 1823
Franklin W. Davis                                    born about 1824
John E. Davis                                            born about 1826
Elisha L. Davis                                         born about 1829
William B. Davis                                     born about 1831
Jane Davis                                                born about 1834
Eli Davis                                                  born about 1837
Dorcas Davis                                          born about 1840

Marian Burns Anderson, daughter of William Anderson and Virginia Elizabeth “Betsy” Easley Anderson, was born January 28, 1800 in Greenville County.  She was married February 18, 1819 in Marengo County, Alabama to Alexander Birdsong.  He was born in 1799 in South Carolina to James Birdsong and Elizabeth Gratsy Birdsong.  She died April 8, 1878 in Hunt County, Texas, and he died there in 1879.

Children born to them include:

Laura Gratsy Birdsong              born in 1819

Laura Gratsy Birdsong, daughter of Alexander Birdsong and Marian Burns Anderson Birdsong, was born in 1819 in Marengo County.  She was married about 1842 to William K. Elliott in Fayette County, Tennessee.

Children born to them include:

[daughter]                                                  born about 1848

A daughter born about 1848 to William K. Elliott and Laura Gratsy Birdsong Elliott, was married about 1867 to Stephen Bailey Dozier in Panola County, Texas.  He was born in West­moreland County, Virginia.

Children born to them include:

William Allen Ward Dozier                  born about 1870

William Allen Ward Dozier, son of Stephen Bailey Dozier, was born about 1870.  He was married about 1893 to Ella Nance who was born in Gainesville, Alabama.

Children born to them include:

Miriam Dozier                                 born about 1900

Miriam Dozier, daughter of William Allen Ward Dozier and Ella Nance Dozier, was born about 1900.  In 1961 she lived in Austin, Texas.  She had a great love of her family and spent many years in researching her ancestry.

Bailey W. Anderson, son of William Anderson and Virginia Elizabeth “Betsy” Easley Anderson, was born March 17, 1803 in Greenville County.  He was married January 18, 1823 in Marengo County to Olive Crook.  He was remarried March 17, 1832 in Sumter County, Alabama to Louise Burton.

Huldah Virginia Anderson, daughter of William Anderson and Virginia Elizabeth “Betsy” Easley  Anderson, was born April 19, 1905 in Greenville County.  She was married February 17, 1821 in Marengo County, Alabama to Stephen Lacy Davis.  She died October 10, 1863 in Panola County, Texas.

William Gowen Anderson, son of William Anderson and Virginia Elizabeth “Betsy” Easley Anderson, was born in 1811 in Kentucky.  He became the first probate judge in Sumter County, Alabama, organized in 1832 from the Choctaw Cesssion of 1830, according to a letter written October 27, 1961 by Miss Mariam Dozier.  He was married there August 20, 1833 to Isabel Corlin.  He was remarried about 1846 in Texas to Mrs. Elizabeth Taylor.  He died in Orange County, Texas in 1866.

After his death, Elizabeth Taylor Anderson removed to Johnson County, Texas.

Children born to William Gowan Anderson are believed to include:

Mary Leona Anderson                                born about 1835
Laura Jane Anderson                                  born about 1837
Isabella H. Anderson                                  born about 1840
Isadora M. Anderson                                  born about 1848
John Erwin Anderson                                born about 1852

Mary Leona Anderson, daughter of William Gowen Anderson and Isabel Corlin, was born about 1835.  She was married about 1853 to Preston Floyd.  After their deaths, their fourth children were brought to Johnson County, Texas.

Children born to them include:

Richard Erwin Floyd                                       born about 1855
Matlock Floyd, M.G.                                       born about 1859
Kate Henrietta Floyd                                       born about 1864

Laura Jane Anderson, daughter of William Gowen Anderson and Isabel Corlin, was born about 1837.  She was married about 1857, husband’s name Ramsey.  A daughter of Laura Jane Anderson Ramsey was “married to Dr. Nifong.”

Albert Gallatin Anderson, son of William Anderson and Virginia Elizabeth “Betsy” Easley Anderson, was born in 1814 in Kentucky.  He was elected tax collector in Sumter County.  He was married there July 23, 1834 to Mary Ann More.  He was remarried there February 9, 1844 to Mrs. Mary Devlin Drummond.

Mary Easley, daughter of John Easley and Anne Gowen Easley was born about 1772.  She was mentioned in a deed written January 21, 1801 in which her mother conveyed a slave woman to her and her sister Anne Easley Barton, according to Greenville County Deed Book F, page 251.

William Franklin Easley, son of John Easley and Anne Gowen Easley, was born in South Carolina about 1774, according to Sally Ann Easley Boswell, a granddaughter.  He was married about 1799, probably in Greenville County, wife’s name Sarah “Dillie” Dillingham].

On May 6, 1799 “William Easley,” Elizabeth Malin, Masse Arrasmith and John Dillingham posted bond as administrators of the estate of John Malin, deceased.

He was enumerated as the head of Household 545 in the 1800 census of Greenville County, adjoining the household of his brother John Easley.  In 1801 he was a witness to the deed of his mother conveying a negro slave woman to his sisters.  He was discharged from the administration of the estate of John Malin January 5, 1807, having “surrendered up the whole of the business unto Elizabeth Malin, executrix of the said estate.”

The research of Virginia Easley DeMarce traces the move­ments of William Easley and Sarah “Dillie” Easley from Greenville County to Warren County, Kentucky where he appeared as a taxpayer from 1806 to 1810.  Later they removed to Allen County, Kentucky and thence to Boone County, Missouri.  She stated that he died in 1844 in Boone County or in Barry County where some of their children had removed.

Dr. Virginia Easley DeMarce, an accomplished genealogist, in 1990 lived in Arlington, Virginia where she was president of the National Genealogical Society.

Children born to William Franklin Easley and Sarah “Dillie” Easley include:

Mahulda “Hulda” Easley                  born about 1801
Greenberry Easley                            born September 20, 1805
John Easley                                       born about 1808
Edward Easley                                  born April 4, 1810
Elizabeth Easley                               born about 1816
Mary “Polly” Easley                         born April 12, 1822

Greenberry Easley, son of William Franklin Easley and Sarah “Dillie” Dillingham Easley, was born September 20, 1805 in Greenville County, South Carolina.  He was brought by his parents to Warren County, Kentucky in 1806.  Later he lived in Allen County, Kentucky and Boone County, Missouri.

He was married about 1828 to Eveline Johnson, according to the research of Gina Myers Easley.

Children born to Greenberry Easley and Eveline Johnson Easley include:

Robert Easley                                            born about 1831

Robert Easley, son of Greenberry Easley and Eveline Johnson Easley, was born about 1831.  He was married about 1856 to Katie Froley, according to Gina Myers Easley.

Children born to Robert Easley and Katie Froley Easley include:

John Tim Easley                                                 born about 1860

John Tim Easley, son of Robert Easley and Katie Froley Easley, was born about 1860.  He was married about 1890 to Ivonnie Smith.

Children born to John Tim Easley and Ivonnie Smith Easley include:

Ray Easley                                                                  born about 1900

Ray Easley, son of John Tim Easley and Ivonnie Smith Easley, was born about 1900.  He was married about 1928 to Opal Cash.

Children born to Ray Easley and Opal Cash Easley include:

John Easley                                                                  born about 1932

John Easley, son of Ray Easley and Opal Cash Easley, was born about 1932.  He was married about 1956 to Gina Myers.  Children born to John Easley and Gina Myers Easley are unknown.

Anne “Nancy” Easley, daughter of John Easley and Anne Gowen Easley, was born in 1778, according to the research of Jason E. Barton, a descendant of Hagerstown, Maryland.  She was married about 1796 to Thomas Barton, son of David and Nancy Barrett Barton.  Anne “Nancy” Easley Barton was the recipient of a slave woman deeded to her by her mother January 21, 1801, according to Greenville County Deed Book F, page 251.  They lived in the area of Gowensville, South Carolina where Thomas Barton was a farmer.

Thomas Barton died there about 1862, at age 85, and was buried in Glassy Mountain Baptist Church Cemetery, according to Hope Coslett Pees of Seguin, Texas in a message dated April 12, 2001.  Anne “Nancy” Easley Barton lived to be 88 and died “after May 15, 1866.”  She was buried beside her husband.

Children born to Thomas Barton and Ann “Nancy” Easley Barton include:

O’Hara Barton                                 born about 1798
John Milton Barton                         born about 1799
Shapley Barton                                born about 1804
Joseph Barton                                  born about 1807
Millington Easley Barton               born about 1811
Kindness Barton [twin]                   born about 1818
Pleasant Barton [twin]                    born about 1818
Frank Barton                                   born about 1820
Rebecca Barton                               born about 1823

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s