1760 Moses Going b. bef. 1764, living in Georgia

Moses Going b. before 1764 in Georgia

Parents: 

Unk

Possibly: 

Children:

  • Thomas Going
  • John H. Going

Siblings: 

  • Samuel Going

Possibly:

Possibly the same Moses Going of the following States and Counties: 

Possible Moses Goings that may be the same person:

FACTS and NOTES: 

(NOTE: “Moses, George and Aaron”:  This Moses Going appears to be the Moses Going from Goochland Co, Va. The name Moses Going appears in Goochland Co until 1769. In 1763 Moses Going is listed with Jubiter, on Josias Payne’s list, and what appears to be another “Mowses Gouins” is on an “unnamed list”. In 1764 there appear to be two Moses Goings again – one on Josiah Payne’s list, and the other on Valentine Wood’s list. It appears that what I consider the “elder” Moses is listed in the same “district” or list with Aaron 3 separate times – one time in the same home. Only once is Moses listed with William Going. Aaron and his father George Going are never in the same “district” or list of William Going of Goochland. Moses Going appears to be related to George and Aaron Going.

The elder Moses Going appears he may be related to William Going of Goochland – but the type relation is not confirmed). 

(NOTE: “William Going of Goochland”- and his entire family disappear from Goochland Co, Va records by 1770. This may be the same William Going that shows up in Davidson Co, TN, who’se daughter Christiana marries John Rains. They are about the same age – and this William and his family disappeared and went somewhere.  They may be related to George, Aaron, and Moses – but it is unclear).

(NOTE: James Going of Henrico Co, Va died before 1744. In 1750 a John Williamson conveys land he received from James Going in James’ “last will and testament”. James had purchased that land in 1737. The wills and estate records in Henrico are missing from 1738-1743 – so it appears that this is the time when James Going died. John Williamson may have married a daughter of James Going’s. A John Williamson shows up in Brunswick Co, Va and is in several transactions with the Rains family in Brunswick. A John Going and Thomas Going are bound out by the Church Wardens in July 1739 to a Ralph Jackson. In April 1740, Elsenor Going and Drury Going, mother’s name Mary, are bound out by the Church Wardens to Ralph Jackson as well.  A James Going moves into the Brunswick Co, Va area and appears to be related to Drury Going – likely a brother. He may have just made it to adulthood by 1738-39 when it appears his father James Going Sr appears to have died. It appears James Going is the father of James Going, John Going, and Thomas Going of Brunswick Co, Va. Despite the proximity, it does not appear to me that James Going was the parent of Moses Going). 

(NOTE: “John Going of Hanover Co, Va”… He appears in a record in Hanover Co, Va leasing land from Shurley Whatley in 1736 – his records appear to disappear after this.  Drury Going, and Elsenor Going of Brunswick Co, Va. may have been children of John Going who disappears from records in Hanover Co, Va. after leasing land there in 1734.  Due to the proximity of these people – they all could possibly be related to eachother).

(NOTE: “Agnes Going of Louisa Co, Va” – Agnes shows up in Louisa County, Va records in 1743 in a lawsuit there. Very close to Henrico Co, Va. As she is the one filing the lawsuit, she appears to be a widow. If she is a widow, she is likely using her dead husband’s surname – so we can assume she was married to a “Going” who had died.  We can guess that she is still fairly young as she is charged and punished, receiving 25 lashes to her bare back, for having a “bastard child” in 1744.  Records are missing from Lousia from 1744 to 1759, but in 1759 her son Joseph and daughter Sarah are bound out to a James Bunch in Louisa Co, Va. In 1770 the court orders all Agnes children under 21 to be bound out withuot naming them. This confirms she had multiple children under 21, and children over 21. In 1776 Agnes complains to the court about the treatment of her son Sharod by his master William Phillips – confirming Sharod to be a son of Agnes. 

The records confirm that Agnes Going was the mother of Joseph, Sharod, and Sarah Going. She may also have been the mother of Moses, Shadrack, John and David Going of Henry Co, Va. Any child of hers born after 1743 would have a different father, but the surname of Going. 

This means that Agnes older sons would have different Y-DNA than her younger ones – as they had different fathers than earlier born children she may have had with John Going of Hanover Co, Va.

Because any older sons Agnes had would have different Y-DNA than her younger sons, this would complicate modern researchers who like to rely on Y-DNA results to “prove” their “Going” is in no way related to another “Going” line. All Agnes’ sons would have considered the others as brother, and all bearing the “Going” surname. This is a limitation of relying too heavily on Y-DNA results). 

(NOTE: “Back to Moses”. Moses Going appears in Louisa Co, Va – and in filings in 1780 in Henry Co, Va, he claims he joined the militia in 1759-1760 in Louisa Co, Va.  From 1770 to 1777 Moses is found in records in Louisa Co, Va.  From 1780 to 86, Moses appears in records in Henry Co, Va.  Remember, there were 2 Moses Going’s in Goochland Co, Va. The other Moses Going, the elder Moses in Goochland,  appears to have moved to Buckingham Co, Va. He may have been a cousin or brother of James Going who died in Henrico Co, Va. The younger Moses never shows up in the household or tithe list of the elder Moses in Goochland).  

FACTS and NOTES:

Moses Going in Louisa Co, Va: 

In 1759 – 1760 Moses Going is in the service of the regular military in Col. Byrd’s Regiment out of Louisa Co, Va according to an affidavit filed in 1780 in Henry Co, Va on behalf of Moses. Moses is likely around 18-21 years of age at this time. In 1780 Captain James Gunn attests to the service of Moses Going (Henry Co.) in Col Byrd’s regiment in 1760, and to James Hopkins Jr’s (Louisa Co., Va.) service in 1759 in his own company of regulars. Henry Co, Va
http://interactive.ancestry.com/6131/VGS_2002_01_01_0386/525370754?backurl=http%3a%2f%2fsearch.ancestry.com%2fcgi-bin%2fsse.dll%3fdb%3dvgs%26gss%3dsfs28_ms_db%26new%3d1%26rank%3d1%26msT%3d1%26gsln%3dGoin%26gsln_x%3d0%26MSAV%3d1%26uidh%3dm37&ssrc=&backlabel=ReturnSearchResults&rc=510,1721,605,1750#?imageId=VGS_1996_01_01_0310
http://interactive.ancestry.com/6131/VGS_1995_01_01_0030/521700382?backurl=http%3a%2f%2fsearch.ancestry.com%2fcgi-bin%2fsse.dll%3fdb%3dvgs%26gss%3dsfs28_ms_db%26new%3d1%26rank%3d1%26msT%3d1%26gsln%3dGoing%26gsln_x%3d0%26MSAV%3d1%26uidh%3dm37&ssrc=&backlabel=ReturnSearchResults&rc=346,934,474,972;332,980,432,1018

Aaron Going files an affidavit in Goochland Co, Va in 1763 indicating that he also is living in Louisa Co, Va. at this time.  Moses Going and Aaron Going appear to be living along the border of Goochland and Louisa Co, Va at this time.

In 1761 the county map of Virginia shows Louisa County on the northwest line of Goochland County.

Some time in 1763 it appears that Moses Going moves to Goochland Co, Va where two Moses Going’s appear on tithe lists for the years of 1763-64. Unfortunately, the Order Books before 1766 in Louisa Co, Va have been destroyed (with the exception of 1742-48 and a few in ).

Goochland Co, Va: 

1763 Goochland Co Va
1763 List of Josias Payne
frame 252, Moses Going’s list } 2
Jubitter }
http://www.freeafricanamericans.com/goochcolonial.htm

1763 list, untitled – Goochland Co, Va
frame 258, Mowses Gouins 2

1764 List of Josias Payne – Goochland Co Va
frame 281, Moses Going List Will Tyler 2

1764 List of Valentine Wood (summary list)
frame 295, Going, Wm 2
Going, Moses 2
Going, Aaron 1
Going, George 1

Moses Going Moves to Georgia:

1785 – No Goin names found in 1785 list (some torn or missing pages, but none there on what is available)
Wilkes County Tax Digest, 1785
https://vault.georgiaarchives.org/digital/collection/tax/id/826/rec/187

About 1786-87 Moses Going and Agnes Going moved their family to Georgia. Moses Going appeared as a taxpayer on 575 acres of second class land in Wilkes County in Capt. William Lucas’ District.

1787 Aug when registered – 1785 April 15 (not registered with the Court until August 1787):  [WILKES COUNTY, GEORGIA] DEED BOOK “C C”–BADLY WORN
Page 7–LUMPKIN, GEORGE and wife Ann to Vinson Greer 150 acres. Land on Buffalo creek adj. Moses Going, Daniel Bankston, orig. grant 1785.  1785 April 15 Moses Going from George Lumpkin and wife Ann Lumpkin both of Wilkes County, Georgia, for 10 pounds sterling a tract of land on the branches of the Buffalow fork of Long Creek, bounded on the N by vacant land, on the E by vacant land, on the S by Vinson Greer, on the W by John Lumpkin.  Land containing 200 acres granted unto George Lumpkin on March 15, 1785. Signed: George Lumkin, Ann Lumkin. Wits: Robt Lumkin, John King.  Jno Cunningham, JP. Wilkes County, Georgia.
Wilkes County Court Records, ac. 1978-0528M, Georgia Archives  https://vault.georgiaarchives.org/digital/collection/wccr/id/16132/rec/2

1785 Georgia Moses Going court record 1 marked

1785 Georgia Moses Going court record 1 marked

1785 Georgia Moses Going court record 2 marked

1785 Georgia Moses Going court record 2 marked

1786 Dec 15 Franklin County, Georgia headright authorized surveyor John Gorham, Esq, to lay out unto Moses Gowen a tract for 684 acres for an old warrant of his own, and an old warrant of Peter Merrell. Franklin Co, Georgia.

1786 Ga Moses Gowen grant p2

1786 Ga Moses Gowen grant p2

1786 Moses Gowen headright

1786 Moses Gowen headright

1786 April 3 Land Court, p. 52.
Moses Gowen self 8 issued.
Wilkes County Land Court Records, 1785 – 1794
https://vault.georgiaarchives.org/digital/collection/tax/id/15288/rec/182

1787 Wilkes Co, Ga – Taxlist – Capt Bishops Dist taken by James Bishop receiver for the year 1787
Moses Goin mullatto – 200 acres, quality 2, Wilkes, Ogechee River, 7 rates per acre
Tax digest, 1787. Pg 17.
https://www.familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:1:3Q9M-CSKV-532Y-8?i=22&cat=307125

1789 Dec 5:  The Wilkes County Papers, 1773-1833, page 73, by Robert Scott Davis Jr.
MOSES GOING Grantor; to John Lumpkin grantee; Deed, 5 Dec 1789, Moses Going of Wilkes County to John Lumpkin 200 acres on Long Creek; adj. Lumpkin, Bankston, and Greer, (s) Moses Going in the presence of (s) Thomas Rutledge, Aron Springfield, George Lumpkin and Jesse Heard, JPWC. Recorded in Book HH, Fos. 312-13, 1 September 1791 Ref: Early Records of Georgia, Wilkes County, page 111 (Page 312) MOSES GOYNE (signed GOING) to John Lumkin, 200 acres on waters of Long Creek adj. said Lumpkin. 5 Dec 1789, Thos. Routledge, Geo. Lumpkin, Aaron Springfield, Test. Wilkes County, Georgia Deed Books A-VV. Wilkes County Court Records, ac. 1968-0162M, Georgia Archives https://vault.georgiaarchives.org/digital/collection/wccr/id/23307/rec/3

Moses Going also paid tax on 684 acres of second class land in Franklin County, Georgia in 1790. Nearby residents were:

John Going,
Reuben Going,
Aaron Going and
William Going.

All except William Going were shown as “free mulatto.”

1790:  Wilkes County, GA Tax Records, 1785-1805 – Volume One
Compiled and published by Frank Parker Hudson 1790
012 – John Going
013 – Reuben Going
014 – Aaron Going
019 – Moses Going
019A – Moses Going
020 – William Going

1791 July 23: p. 71 23 July 1791, Ignatious Few to Robert Abercrumbia, both of Wilkes Co., for £75, on bank of Ogechee River , on bank of Ryals Branch, 225 acres, E. part of 780 acres granted to said Few, 2 Mar. 1791. (signed) I. Few. Wit: Bn. Few, Moses Going. Proved by Moses Going & Benjamin Few, 15 May 1791 before Andw. Burns, J.P. Regd. 18 May 1793.

1791 July 23: p. 185 23 July 1791, Ignatius Few to Moses Going, both of Wilkes Co., for £250, west part of 780 acres, granted 2 Mar. 1790, adj. bank of Ryals Branch, Ogeche River, down river to mouth of Ryals Branch, up branch 555 acres. (signed) I. Few Wit: Bn. Few, R. Abercrombie. Proved by Robert Abercromby and Benjamin Few, 15 May 1792, before Andw. Burns, J.P. Regd. Aug. 1792.

1792 Returns:  [1792 LL] Cap^t Hubbard’s District
063 – Moses Going
3rd – 500
Co. – Wil
Waters – Ogeechee R (Ogeechee lands from Buckhead [Creek] to the head of Ogeechee)
Who Land Joins – MaCrombey, Rob^t

063A (A stands for younger) Moses Going
3rd – 686
Co. – Fra

1793 Returns:  [1793 LL] Capt Hubbert’s Distt No. 10

014 – Moses Going
2nd – 500
Co. – Wil

014A (A stands for younger) Moses Going
3rd – 684
Co. – Fra
Waters – Flat Creek

014B (B stands for one armed) Moses Going
3rd – 208p
Co. – Gre
Who Land Joins – Smith

1793 – When Warren Co, Ga was created from Wilkes Co, Ga in 1793, William GoingMoses Going, and Jesse Going were listed as taxpayers on the county’s first tax roll. Warren County, Georgia.

1793:  Ref: Wilkes County, 1793, Early Tax Digest, Capt. Neal’s District; #14, MOSES GOING; County in which the Lands are: Wilkes; 200 acres; 1 Free male white person from the age of 21 and upwards 1/9. Amount of the value of Lands & c. at 8/2 pr. F100; f136.s 4. Amount of each persons tax: s. 12. d. 11; Who the Lands adjoins or what water courses on Crumley (?). Georgia

1793 July 21 – Moses Going deeded land which was part of 780 acres originally granted to Ignatius Few in 1791 – Warren County Deed Book A, pg 606. Georgia   https://www.familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:1:3Q9M-CS4L-1SKB-W?i=336&cat=225589

1793 Oct 2:  1791 Returns Notes for District LL: Boundaries as of 2 Oct 1793: Georgia Military Affairs, Vol II, Part 1, p.55: Captain Matthew Hubert’s District, 3rd Co., 1st Bn, 4th Regt: –Beginning at Goings Mill [on the Ogeechee] running [east] along the [Upper] Trading Road to the ridged between Rocky Comfort and Long Creek, then up leading to Seal’s old place, thence and old road to Powell’s road, then along said road to the head of Clower’s Creek, then down the said creek to the mouth, then down the Oheeechee to the beginning.[1791 LL] Capt Hubbard’s District016 – Moses Going Co. – Wil  2nd – 600

1793 Oct 21 Moses Going of Wilkes Co Ga to Warren Andrews 100 acres being part of 780 acres granted to Ignatius Few on March 2, 1791.  Signed: Moses Going. Wits: Robert Abercrombie, John Oliver. Proved up Feb 10 1800. Recorded Feb 20 1800. Bk A. Pg 606.  Warren Co Ga.  https://www.familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:1:3Q9M-CS4L-1SKB-W?i=336&cat=225589

016A (A stands for younger) – Moses Going
Co. – Fra
3rd – 684

016B (B stands for one armed) – Moses Going
Co. – Gre
3rd – 100

1794-1805 William Going is on tax list of Warren County, Georgia, along with Moses Going.

1794 to 1805 William Going on tax rolls in Warren County Ga

http://search.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/sse.dll?db=gacen&gss=sfs28_ms_r_db&new=1&rank=1&gsln=Goings&gsln_x=NP_NN&MSAV=1&uidh=m37

1794 July 19 Note:  Thomas Starke of Wilkes County, Ga promises to pay Moses Going of Warren County, Ga 37 pounds 15 shillings on or before the last day of October next ensuing . . . Signed: Thomas Starke.  Witnesses:  Isaac Bankston, Moses Lucas. Warren Co, Ga.

1795 Ga Moses Going v Thomas Starke p1

1795 Ga Moses Going v Thomas Starke p1

1795 Ga Moses Going v Thomas Starke p2

1795 Ga Moses Going v Thomas Starke p2

1795 Ga Moses Going v Thomas Starke p3

1795 Ga Moses Going v Thomas Starke p3

1795 Ga Moses Going v Thomas Starke p4

1795 Ga Moses Going v Thomas Starke p4

1795 Ga Moses Going v Thomas Starke p5

1795 Ga Moses Going v Thomas Starke p5

1796 Ga judgment for Moses Going against Thomas Starke p1

1796 Ga judgment for Moses Going against Thomas Starke p1

1796 Ga judgment for Moses Going against Thomas Starke p2

1796 Ga judgment for Moses Going against Thomas Starke p2

1794 Aug 27 Thomas Felps of the County of Hancock Georgia from Moses Going of Warren County Georgia 150 acres in the County of Hancock bounded by Goings’ land. Signed: Moses Goings. Witnesses: Jacob Bankston, James Langford. Proved up in front of justice Matthew Raburn by Jacob Bankston on July 23 1796. Hancock County, Georgia.

Moses Going owned a gristmill and a sawmill on the Ogeechee River which was mentioned in a 1795 deed from Eleazer Mobley to Francis Beck. The deed refers to the “road leading from Going’s Mill to Georgetown.”

1795 Jan 16 Petition of Moses Going showing that Thomas Starke is indebted to petitioner for 37 pounds 15 shillings sterling the said Thomas on the 19th day of July and in the yar of our lord 1794 . . . Thomas assumed to pay petitioner above sum on or before the last day of October next after said date. . . . Said Thomas not paying . . . court to be held in and for the County of Wilkes. Moses Going deposeth and saith that Thomas Starke Jr stands justly indebted to him by note in the sum of thirty seven pounds, fifteen shillings sterling with interest from the last day of October 1794 until paid. Signed: Moses Going. Sworn before R Worsham JP on 16th Jan 1795.   Wilkes County, Georgia.

1795 Feb 27 Moses Going v. Thomas Stark. The defendant Thomas Stark is hereby required personally or by his attorney to be and appears before their honors the judges of this Inferior Court at a Court to be held in and for the County of Wilkes in the first Tuesday in April next then and there to answer the Plaintiff in and action on the case and go forth to his damage sixty pounds (sp?) . . . in default thereof the said Court will proceed thereon as to Justice shall appertain.  Witness: Edwin Mounger Esq clerk of the said Court at office the twenty seventh day of February in the yar of our Lord one thousand seven hundred and ninety five, and in the nineteenth year of the sovereignty and independence of the United States of America. Edwin Morninger CJC.  Wilkes County, Georgia.

Moses Going and his wife Agnes Going” gave a deed to James Cozart of Franklin County, Georgia to 648 acres of land May 29, 1795, according to Franklin County Deed Book M, page 132. Consideration was £100 sterling.

Moses Going and his wife Agnes Going” gave a deed to James Cozart of Franklin County, Georgia to 648 acres of land May 29, 1795, according to Franklin County Deed Book M, page 132. Consideration was £100 sterling.

1795 May 29 Moses Going and Agness his wife of Warren County, Georgia convey to James Cozart 684 acres in the County of Franklin, Georgia.  Signed: Moses Going, Agness Going. Witnesses: James Saunders, Prosser Haston. Recorded Aug 16, 1790. Franklin County, Georgia. pg. 132.  https://www.familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:1:3Q9M-CS3J-FJPC?i=616&cat=342823

1795 Oct 7 Moses Going and Aggy his wife of the County of Warren sell to William Stith Jr 465 acres on N side of Ogecha River in Warren County bounded by Rials Branch, the Ogechee, the western part of a tract of 780 acres granted to Ignatius Few on 2 March 1791. Signed: Moses Goings, Agness Goings. Wit: Robert Abercrombie, William Friend, William Stith. Proved up on Nov 20, 1797. Recorded Feb 21, 1798.  Warren County, Georgia.  Book A, pg 365.  https://www.familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:1:3Q9M-CS4L-1S2V-X?i=215&cat=225589

Moses Going gave a deed to William Stith, Jr. October 7, 1795 to 465 acres, “being the western portion of 750 acres granted in 1791 to Ignatius Few,” according to Warren County Deed Book A, page 365.

Moses Going gave a deed to William Stith, Jr. October 7, 1795 to 465 acres, “being the western portion of 750 acres granted in 1791 to Ignatius Few,” according to Warren County Deed Book A, page 365:
“Warren County } Georgia }
“This Indenture, made this Seventh day of October in the Year of our Lord One Thousand and Seven Hundred & ninety-five between Moses Going and Aggy, his wife of the County of Warren and State aforesaid of the one part & William Stith, Junr. of the sd. county of the other part, Witnesseth That the sd. Moses & his wife, for an in consideration of the sum of Two Thousand Dollars to them in hand and well and truly paid by the said William at or before the Sealing and delivery of these presents, the Receipt wherof is hereby acknowledged granted, bargained & sold, & by these presents do grant, bargain and sell until the said Wm. his heirs & assigns all that tract or parcel of land situate, lying and being on the North Side of Ogeechee River in the County of Warren containing, by estimation, Four hundred and sixty-five [465] acres [be the same more or less, bounded as follows, viz: Beginning at a live oak on Rials Branch running thence N34 degrees W fifteen ch. & 50 links to a pine, thence N33 degrees West 15 chains to a post oak, thence N7 degrees W 7 chains to a post oak, thence N76 degrees E 9 chains to a post oak, thence N5 degrees W 3 chains to a stake, thence S80 Deg. W 20 chains to a pine, thence S50 Deg. W 34 chains to a Sugar Tree on Ogeechee, then down the meanders of sd. River to the mouth of Ryals Branch, then up the said branch to the Beginning, being the Western part of a tract of Land containing Seven Hundred and Eighty Acres granted to Ignatius Few on the Second day of March in the Year of our Lord One Thousand Seven Hundred & Ninety One with all and Singular the rights, members and appurtances whatsoever to the Said tract or parcel of land being, belonging or otherwise appertaining & the remainder, reversions, rents, issues and profits thereof & of every part thereof. To have and to hold the sd.
tract of land & premises, and all and singular the appurtenances belonging to the said William his heirs & assigns to their only use, benefit and behoof of the said Wm, his heirs & assigns forever, and the said Moses & his wife for themselves and their heirs the tract of land & premises aforesaid & every part thereof unto the sd. Wm, his heirs & assigns, against them, the sd. Moses & Aggy & their heirs, assigns & every other person or persons, shall and will warrant forever, and by these persents, In Witness whereof the sd. Moses & wife doth herewith set their hands and seals the day & year first above written,
sealed & delivered in presence of:
Robt. Abercrombie
Moses Going [seal]
Wm. Friend
Agnes [X] Going [seal]
Wm. Stith
Georgia } Warren County }
Before me, Thomas Friend, one of the Justices of the Peace for this County, personally came & appeared Robt. Abercrombie & Wm. Stith, Senr, both of this county, Esqrs, who being duly sworn, make oath & say that they are Subscribing Witnesses to the within written Indenture of bargain and Sale & that they saw the within named Moses & Agnes Going, duly sign, seal & execute the same & acknowledge it as their act & deed.
Sworn to before me this 20th day of November 1797.
Thomas Friend, J.P.
Recorded Feb. 21st 1798
Transcribed from Book D, Folio 110-111 the 23rd of June 1853. F. W. Shivers, Recorder”

1797 Ga Moses Going land grant p1

1796 Aug 16 Moses Going judgment against Thomas Stark for 12 dollars eighty seven and an half cents which Moses Going lately in our Inferior Court of Wilkes hath recovered against him for costs also the sum of one hundred and eighty three dollars and forty one cents which the said Moses Going in the same Court were adjudged for his damages as well by reason of detaining the said debt as for his costs in that suit expended . . . to render to the said Moses Going the costs and damages aforesaid, and have then there this writ. Wit: Richd Worsham Esq. Wilkes Co, Ga

1797 Jan 2 Ethelred Thomas Esqr surveyor for Warren County, Georgia laid out unto Moses Going 60 acres in Warren County on his family head right. Warren County, Georgia

1797 Ga Moses Going land grant p1

1797 Ga Moses Going land grant p2

1797 Ga Moses Going land grant p2

1797 Georgia Moses Going headright

1797 Georgia Moses Going headright

Moses Going and Agnes Going gave a deed March 28, 1797 to Samuel Howell to 100 acres on Long Creek which had been granted in 1784 to Edmond Nugent, according to Warren County Deed Book A, page 538.

1797 March 28 Moses Going and Agness his wife of Warren County, Georgia to Samuel Howell 100 acres in Warren County on Long Creek bounded by Going’s land, Bankston’s land, Reily on the south, and Parish’s land on the west. Being part of a land granted to Edmond Newgent on Sept 5, 1784.  Signed: Moses Going and Agness Going. Wit: Isaac Bankston, Robert Johnson. Warren County, Georgia. Proved up Feb 17, 1798. Recorded Nov 27, 1799.  Bk A, pg 538.  Warren County, Georgia.   https://www.familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:1:3Q9M-CS4L-1S2Q-6?i=302&cat=225589

1797 June 23 Moses Going and Agnes his wife of Warren County, Georgia to Prior Gardner 92 acres in Warren County on the Waters of Ogechee on a Creek call Long Creek, previously granted to John Edmundson on March 6, 1793. Signed: Moses Going and Agnes Going. Wit: Reuben Winfrey, Samuel Howell.  Proved up on March 18, 1801. Book B pg 13. Warren County, Georgia.   https://www.familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:1:3Q9M-CS4L-1SKF-3?i=378&cat=225589

Moses Going and Agnes Going gave a deed to Prior Gardner June 23, 1797 to 92 acres on Long Creek, according to Warren County Deed Book 6, page 13.

1798 Returns:  [1798 I] Capt Solomon Thornton’s District
021 – Moses Goin, F.M. (Free Mulatto)
3rd – 304
Co. – Wil
Watercourse – Rockey Ck
Who Land Joins – Bell, Jn^o
Granted To – McCarta, Jn^o

[1799 I] No. 6 Captain Solomon Thornton’s District
051 – Moses Gowan
3rd – 300
Co. Wil
Watercourse – Rocky Ck
Who Land Joins – Bell, Jno
Granted To – Bell, Jno 051A (A stands for younger) – Moses Gowan
3rd – 352
Co. – Wil
Watercourse – Ogeechee
Who Land Joins – Alexander, So
Granted To – Few, Ign

1799 – Moses Going recd a Revolutionary War land grant in Warren Co, Ga.

1799 Jan 23 Moses Goins 60 acres in Warren County bounded NW by Lawrences land, SW by W Andrews, Goins land and east by Nobles land. Warren County, Georgia.

1799 March 7 Lewis Wright sheriff of County of Warren, where Moses Going of County of Wilkes used attorney Henry Candler Esq to obtain a judgment against William Sanders. Sheriff executed and seized land in Wilkes County containing 352 acres being the greater part of a survey containing 452 acres originally  granted to Ignatius Few on June 18, 1793, 100 acres sold to John Bush Esq. The land on the waters of Ogechee and bounded NE by Hails, NW and S by Alexanders SW by Wootens and Williams, NE and NW by Alexanders. Notice of public auction on first Tues in June last. Moses Going was highest bidder.   Signed: Lewis Wright. Wits: Anderson Berry, John McMurrain. Proved up on May 5, 1800. Warren County, Georgia. Bk E. pg 501.

Moses Going “of Wilkes County” received a sheriff’s deed to land sold as property of William Sanders March 7, 1799, according to Warren County Deed Book A, page 632.

Moses Going received a land grant in Warren County of 60 acres in 1799.

1800 Returns[1800 I] Captain Thompson Coleman’s District
058 – Moses Goens
SL – 2
2nd – 350
Co. – Wil
Watercourse – Ogeeche
Who Land Joins – Bush, J

Moses Going appeared as a taxpayer on 350 acres of second class land in Wilkes County on the Ogeechee River in the 1800 tax list.

1800 Oct 10:  I asign this note to Moses Going for value Rec’d this 10th off October 1800.  Received of the ____twenty three dollars.  Moses Going.  Red three Dollars.  Ten on the ___6th day of July 1801.  Thomas W Greene Clrk.  Film #0163546 Ga. Inferior Court 1801-1803, 1807-1858 – Mormon Library

1800 Oct 16 – Moses Going sold land “lying partly in Wilkes Co, Ga, and Partly in Warren Co, Ga – on the Ogeechee River. Warren County Deed Book B, page 14.

1800 Oct 16 Moses Going of Wilkes County, Ga sells to Samuel Alexander 352 acres of land on the Waters of Ogechee in Wilkes County originally part of a tract granted to
Ignatius Few on June 18, 1793 and bounded NE by Hail, NW and SW by King, SW by Watson and Williams, NE and NW by Alexander. Land was taken by Lewis Wright Esq, former sheriff of Warren County and conveyed to Moses Going. Signed: Moses Going. Wits: M Alexander, J Bankston. Proved up on June 17 1801. Recorded Aug 25 1801. Warren County, Ga. Bk F, pg 22. Also, see Book B pg 14:   https://www.familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:1:3Q9M-CS4L-1SKJ-F?i=379&cat=225589

1800 Dec:  Note***Prior page is not included in this transcription
…….procefs may Issue regairing the said Moses personally or by his Attorney to be and appear before the Honorable the Inferior Court at a Court to be held in and for the County of Wilkes on the fourth monday in february next then and their to answer your Petitioner in an Action on the case and soforth.  Amos Wright Plff.  Book A 1799 Minutes of the Inferior Court 1798-1811 Film #016345

1800 Dec 8:  State of Georgia, Warren County
Personally appeared before me Amos Wright – one of the Justices of said County and makes Oath that Moses Going Stands Justly indebted to this deponent on a note of hand the sum of One hundred dollars Due the first day of May 1800-
Amos (A his mark) Wright.  Sworn before me this 8th December 1800.  Gislia Hurt J.P. Book A 1799 Minutes of the Inferior Court 1798-1811 Film #016345

1800 Dec 26:  Georgia; To the Sheriff of Wilkes County Greeting
Amos Wright vs Moses Going – Case
The Defendant Moses Going is hereby required personally or by his Attorney to be and appear before the Honorable the Inferior Court at a Court to be held in and for the County of Wilkes on the fourth monday in February next then and there to answer the plantiff in an Action on the Case & to his damage two hundred dollars or in default thereof the said Court will proceed thereon as to Justice shall affertain.
Witnefs the Honorable Edward Butler Esq one of Our said Inferior Court Justices this 26th day of December 1800.  Natah Willis Clk. Book A 1799 Minutes of the Inferior Court 1798-1811 Film #016345

[1801 I] Captain Thompson Colemans District
003 – Moses Going, 048 – Sam’l Goings

1801:  Amos Wright vs. Moses Going.  Case. Settene at dependats Cost on information of the Clerk.  Book A 1799 Minutes of the Inferior Court 1798-1811 Film #016345.  Georgia.

1801 Feb 2:  Served 2nd Feby 1801 – Bail Taker.  Thos. W Goimes Shff.  Know all men by these presents that we Mofses Going, William Sivey and Isaac Bankston are held and firmly bound unto ____ as W Goimes Sheriff of the County of Wilkes and his succefsors in office in the Sum of two hundred dollars for the payment of which sum we bind Our selves Our heirs Executors and Administrators Jointly and Severally firmly by these presents Sealed with our Seals and dated this Second day of February 1801.
The Condition of the above obligation is such that if the above boundable Moses Going do make his personal appearances at the next Inferior Court to be held in and for the County of Wilkes on the fourth Monday of this Instant then and there to Answer the Complaint of Amos Wright in an Action on the Case & to his damage two hundred dollars then the Above obligation to be Void – else to Remain in full force and Virtue.  Moses Going (seal). William (his mark) Silvey (seal).  Isaac Bankston (seal).  Witnefs: Agnefs Going .  Book A 1799 Minutes of the Inferior Court 1798-1811 Film #016345

1801 April 29 Moses Going conveys 60 acres to William Stith adjoining land where Stith now lives, bounded NW by Lawrence’s land, SW by Warren Andrews, and Going’s, now the said Stith’s land, and E by Nobles, now Warren Andrews’ land. Signed: Moses Going. Wit: John Graves, Thos P Carnes. Recorded June 24, 1809. Warren County, Ga. Bk G, p 184.

1801 July Term:  And Now at the term (?)\ the defendant by his Attorney ___ ____ came into court and for ____ saith he hath paid the ____ of the Plantiff ___ part thereof And of ____ he put himself off upon this county.    Moses Going vs Joseph Boren – Jury
We find for the Plantiff thirty six dollars & fifty cents and Interest.   Mose Going vs Joseph Boren – Judgement 35.50 ____ ____ month Interest of 4.38.  Rec’d of the above sum of thirty dollars fifty ____ _____ _____ pf 1802.  Thomas Going for Moses Going.  Film #0163546 Ga. Inferior Court 1801-1803, 1807-1858 – Mormon Library.  Page 72
Moses Going vs Joseph Boren – Jury No, 1 – We find for the Plantiff thirty six dollars & fifty cents with Interst & cost.  Film #0163546 Ga. Inferior Court 1801-1803, 1807-1858 – Mormon Library

1801 July 3:  Pg. 292 Georgia.  To the Sherriff of Wilkes County Greeting.  Moses Going vs Joseph Boren.  The defandant Joseph Boren is hereby required personally or by his Attorney to be and appear before this court of Wilkes on the fourth Monday of July,___ the ___ ___ to answer the Plaintff in an action to the case & to his damages one hundred Dollars or difenat there of the said court will proceed thereon and Justice shall apperain
Witness the Honoraabl Edward Butler Esq One of our said Inferior Court this 3 day of July 1801.  Nathe Willis Clk.  Film #0163546 Ga. Inferior Court 1801-1803, 1807-1858 – Mormon Library

1801 July 6:  Page 148 (ibid), MOSES GOING PLF vs Joseph Boren Def. Petition of Moses Going for debt due from Joseph Boren to John Henly, Junior, but assigned to Going by Henly, (s) Walton aty. For plff. Papers served 6 July 1801. (s) Thomas W. Gaines. July Term, 1801; Found for the plaintiff; Note of debt to John Hendly, (s) Joseph Boren, 8 August 1799. On reverse side it is signed by John Henly and Moses Going before (s) Peter B. Terrell.

Moses Going filed suit July 5, 1801 against Joseph Boren for the non-payment of a note. The note in the amount of $62.50 executed August 8, 1799 was written by Joseph Boren to John Henley. John Henley assigned the note to Moses Going October 10, 1800:
“Washington, August 8, 1799 On or before the twenty-fifth day of December One Thousand Eight Hundred, I promise to pay or cause to be paid unto John Henley, Jr. or bearer Sixty-two dollars and fifty cents for value received of him, the day and date above written.
Joseph [X] Boren I assign the above note to Moses Going for value rec’d this 10th of October, 1800.
John Henley Teste: Peter B. Carroll
Received of the above twenty-three dollars. Received three dollars. Serve on the defendant. Crt. July 1801
Thomas W. Grimes, LWC Georgia To the Sheriff of Wilkes County, Greeting:
Moses Going } vs } Joseph Boren }
The defendant, Joseph Boren is hereby required personally or by his attorney to be and appear before the Honorable the Inferior Court at a court to be held in and for the County of Wilkes on the fourth Monday in July instant, then and there to answer the Plaintiff in an action on the case & to his Damages One Hundred Dollars or in default thereof the said court will proceed thereon as to Justice shall appertain. Witness the Honorable Edward Butler, Esq, one of our said Inferior Court Justices this 3rd day of July 1801. Nathaniel Willis, clk. July term 1801 And now at this term, the defendant by his attorney Peterson Thweate comes into Court and for answer saith he shall pay the demands of the Plaintiff or part thereof, and of this he puts himself upon his Country.
Jury No. 1 We find for the Plaintiff thirty-six dollars and fifty cents with interest. Wm. West. LMC
Moses Going } vs } Joseph Boren }
Judgement $35.50, eighteen months interest, 4.38. Rec’d of the above the sum of Thirty Dollars fifty eight cents, June 9, 1802. Cost $11.50, Paid 7.00
Tho. Going for Moses Going

1802 March:  Page 45 Film #0163546 March 1802.  Amos Mergar (?) vs Moses Going – Judgement. Film #0163546 Ga. Inferior Court 1801-1803, 1807-1858 – Mormon Library

1802 March 11:  Amost Wright vs Moses Going – Judgement by Default.  Thursday March 11, 1802 – pg 115.  Amos Wright vs Moses Going – Case settled at Defendants cost on the Information of the Clerk pg 66.  Film #0163546 Ga. Inferior Court 1801-1803, 1807-1858 – Mormon Library

1802 March 12:  Friday March 12th 1802.  Moses Going v Joseph Borne – Jury find for the plantiff $36.50 with Interest.  Film #0163546 Ga. Inferior Court 1801-1803, 1807-1858 – Mormon Library

1802 Jun 29:  Film #0163546 Ga. Inferior Court 1801-1803.  Moses Going vs Joseph Boren.  Judgment $35.50 Cents eighteen months interest 4:38: $40.88 Recd of the above the sum of thirty dollars fifty eight cents Jun 29th 1802.  (signed) Thomas Going for Moses Going.  Cost$11:50 Paid 7.00

GRF Newsletter May 1998:

Moses Going, a Revolutionary soldier from Virginia – in Wilkes County, Georgia

By Anna J. Going Friedman
344 Planters Way, Somerset, Kentucky, 42503, 606/677-9607

It is easy to become frustrated in researching the Going family because of the repeated usage of the same given names in generation after generation. You can be up to your neck in multiple individuals named John, Thomas, William, Moses, Nancy, Elizabeth, etc. Sometimes it requires some digging and some skill to delineate between them For three years I have been trying to decipher the Going code in Livingston and Crittenden Counties, Kentucky and their earlier residence in Wilkes, Warren and Greene Counties, Georgia. Moses Going, a Revolutionary soldier from Virginia, [Newsletter, September 1994] is regarded as the patriarch of the Going indivuals of the Wilkes County area.

Moses Going, born about 1743, is identified as a “son of Agnes Gowen” in “Free African Americans in North Carolina and Virginia” written by Paul Heinegg. He suggests that he was born in January 1743 in Louisa County, Virginia. In 1760 Moses Going “soldier under Capt. William Christian in the regiment of Col. Byrd” received a Land Bounty Certificate.

Moses Going, a Revolutionary soldier, made an oath that he had also served “as a soldier under Capt. James Gunn in Col. Byrd’s regiment in 1760,” according to “Virginia Magazine of History and Biography.” Moses Going was married about 1762, wife’s name Agnes, the same as his mother.

On April 27, 1780, Moses Going was in Henry County, Virginia on the North Carolina border, according to “Virginia Colonial Militia, 1651-1776.” When the Revolutionary war ended, the state of Georgia was opened for intensive settlement, and generous land grants were offered to Revolutionary soldiers to induce them to pioneer there. Moses Going, accompanied by Jesse Going, regarded as his son, accepted the offer, traveling there about 1786. After inspecting the farmland of the area, Moses Going returned to Virginia for his family.

Agnes Going and the younger children remained in Virginia until preparation was made for them in Georgia. She removed to nearby Henrico County about 1786. She appeared on the tax rolls there the following year. She paid tax on “one tithe, two horses and six cattle, according to “The 1787 Census of Virginia.” “Aggy Gowin, parent” was a witness at the marriage of “Elizabeth Gowin” to John Douglas January 29, 1787, according to “Henrico County, Virginia Marriage Bonds, 1780-1851.” About 1789 Moses Going and Agnes Going moved their family to Wilkes County, Georgia.

Moses Going appeared as a taxpayer on 575 acres of second class land in Wilkes County in Capt. William Lucas’ District. He also paid tax on 684 acres of second class land in Franklin County, Georgia in 1790. Nearby residents were John Going, Reuben Going, Aaron Going and William Going. All except William Going were shown as “free mulatto.”

Moses Going owned a gristmill and a sawmill on the Ogeechee River which was mentioned in a 1795 deed from Eleazer Mobley to Francis Beck. The deed refers to the “road leading from Going’s Mill to Georgetown.” Moses Going appeared as a taxpayer on 350 acres of second class land in Wilkes County on the Ogeechee River in the 1800 tax list.

When Warren County was created, primarily with land from Wilkes County in 1793, “Moses Going, William Going and Jesse Going” who seemed to be closely associated were listed as taxpayers on the county’s first tax rolls in 1793 and 1794. Moses Going deeded 100 acres in Warren County to Warren Andrews July 21, 1793 which was “part of 780 acres originally granted to Ignatius Few in 1791,” according to Warren County Deed Book A, page 606. He received a Revolutionary land grant in Warren County in 1799. On October 16, 1800 he sold land “lying partly in Wilkes County and partly in Warren County on the Ogeechee River,” according to Warren County Deed Book B, page 14.

“Moses Going and his wife Agnes Going” gave a deed to James Cozart of Franklin County, Georgia to 648 acres of land May 29, 1795, according to Franklin County Deed Book M, page 132. Consideration was £100 sterling.

They gave a deed to William Stith, Jr. October 7, 1795 to 465 acres, “being the western portion of 750 acres granted in 1791 to Ignatius Few,” according to Warren County Deed Book A, page 365.

It is believed that Moses Going died about 1817 and that Agnes Going survived him. When the “free persons of color” were required to register in Georgia in 1819, she stated to the Columbia County Court clerk that she was 66 years old and had arrived in Georgia in 1787.

Other individuals of interest to Going/Gowen chroniclers also appeared in the “free persons of color” registration. The list of “free blacks,” compiled by W. L. Kennon, county court clerk, was printed in the “Augusta Chronicle & Gazette” in its edition of March 10, 1819:

Individual Born Arrived Age Profession
William Going VA 1777 50 Millwright
William Going GA 19 Farmer [son of William]
Sally Going VA 1790 52 Weaver
Polly Going GA 25 Weaver
Wyat Going GA 28 Blacksmith
Nancey Going GA 23 Weaver
Lucinda Going GA 21 Weaver
Sally Going GA 9
Agness Going VA 1787 66
Patsey Going GA 34 Weaver
[her children]
Thomas Going GA 4
John Going GA 2
Nancey Going GA 27 Weaver
Moses Going [Jr.] VA 1789 45 Farmer
Elizabeth Going GA 8
Sherwood Going GA 11

Children born to Moses Going and Agnes Going are believed to include:

Anne Going born about 1763
John Going born about 1765
Jesse Going born about 1767
James Going born about 1768
Elizabeth Going born about 1769
Mary Going born about 1770
Sherwood Going born about 1772
Moses Going, Jr. born about 1774
Frances “Fanny” Going born about 1785

Shortly after 1800, Livingston County was the destination for a number of people from the Wilkes County area of Georgia. Miles of hostile Indians, undeveloped territory and no roads lay between these two areas of the country. Men, women and children left friends, families and homes for an arduous journey to Kentucky in order to start over again. These were strong, independent, self-reliant people looking for a better life. Free persons of color, mulattos and Melungeons in Georgia had heard that they would be free from discrimination in Kentucky.

Crittenden County, Kentucky was organized in 1842 from Livingston, and that is where I first found my g-g-grandfather, John Levi “Jack” Going [Newsletter, March 1996]. He was a small boy [born in Georgia about 1796] when he was brought to Kentucky in 1806 by John Going whom I regard as his father.

“John Gowin” was immediately in court suing Holmes Sharp for unpaid wages in the amount of $8.60 on August 5, 1806, according to Livingston Court Court Order Book B. The court decided in his favor.

John Going was described as a very determined individual in an old account of him found in the Crittenden County Library in some loose papers:

“The Goens water mill on Brushy Fork near Ripton was one of the first mills in the county. It was owned by a negro [mulatto] whose name was Goens. He came from Georgia and had some property. He and a white woman went to the magistrate to get married, but the officer refused to marry them on account of them belonging to different races.

They went away, but a few days after, they returned for marriage. The woman swore that she had Negro blood in her, which she did. Just before they started, the man cut a vein, and she drank some of his blood. She had his blood in her.”

On July 7, 1801, Garland Going, Reuben Going and Aaron Going, all from Georgia and regarded as kinsmen of John Going, acquired contiguous land in Livingston County. “Garland Gowin” received Patent No. 136 for 400 acres on Crooked Creek. “Reuben Gowin” received Patent No. 137 for 400 acres on Crooked Creek. “Aaron Gowin” received Patent No. 139 for 400 acres on Crooked Creek.

Upon each of their deaths, John Going acquired their land. The last one to die was Garland Going, and John Going paid taxes on Garland Going’s land before his own death in 1819.

Part of the land of Garland Going, 102 acres, was received by Fanny Going, regarded as his daughter. She was married to another Georgian, Isaac Gaskin who paid taxes on the 102 acres until his death. Subsequently Fanny Going Gaskin paid taxes on the 102 acres and an additional 900 acres until her death in 1837. Then John Levi “Jack” Going paid taxes on over 1,000 acres.

John Going died in 1819, and his sons were still trying to settle his estate in 1829.

Children born to John Going include:

  • John Levi Going born about 1796
  • Hiram B. Going born about 1799
  • Abner A. Going born about 1803
  • Absalom Jefferson Going born about 1805

John Levi Going, son of John Going, was born about 1796 in Georgia. He was brought to Kentucky by his father about 1806. He was married to Rebecca Harris, a white woman, and then trouble began; they were harrassed continually. Minutes of the Crittenden County Court in 1837 and 1838 show that John Levi Going was twiced charged with assault, along with his brother, Abner A. Going. There were several land disputes with their neighbors and many threats. The charges, obviously harrassment, were always dropped before reaching the courtroom.

John Levi Going received a deed from his brothers to 235 acres from his father’s estate in a deed dated September 2, 1842, according to Crittenden County, Kentucky Deed Book A, page 94:

Abner A. Going, Hiram Going and Jefferson Going, heirs of John Going, Sr, dec’d, to John L. Going, all of Crittenden County, $1 and for the further consideration of relinquishing to John L. all, claim, right, interest and title as heirs to the tract of land containing 235 acres on which John L. Going lives, including a saw and grist mill on Brushy fork of Crooked Creek. This land is a portion of a 400-acre tract granted to John Going, dec’d in his lifetime by patent July 27, 1819 and being the portion that fell to their father in a division between Mary Going, Lucy Going and Massy Going, his sisters and our aunts and being the portion by a division amongst the heirs set apart to John L. Going as a legal heir of their father, John Going, but which since his death been deeded.

Witnesses: Abner Going
Wm. H. Calvert Hiram [X] Going
S. Marble Jefferson Going”

In 1844, John Levi Going and his white wife, Rebecca Harris Going and Abner A. Going and his white wife, Matilda Jenkins Going were arrested for the crime of fornication! John and Rebecca removed to adjoining Union County, but their troubles followed them. Again their neighbors turned them in and had arrest warrants drawn up against them.

In 1847, it appears that nearly all of the Going clan in north-western Kentucky removed to Missouri and Arkansas where they were accepted and enumerated as white. There their troubles ceased and harrassment no longer plagued them.

==O==

There is much more research needed to complete the saga of the Going family in its trek from Virginia to Georgia, to Kentucky, to Missouri, to Arkansas and points west. future articles will deal with how they overcame their adversities, becoming successful and accepted. I wish to acknowledge the assistance of Brenda Joyce Jerome for her help with the Kentucky research and Mary Turpin McPhearson for her help with the Georgia research. –Anna Going Friedman

From GRF Newsletter June 1998:

Going Individuals Gained Wealth And Prestige in the Deep South

By Anna J. Going Friedman
344 Planters Way, Somerset, Kentucky, 42503, 606/677-9607

Moses Going and Agnes Going, heads of a Melungeon/Mulatto family of Louisa County, Virginia and Wilkes County, Georgia and several of their kinsmen distinguished themselves in the deep South. Despite the color barrier and ingrained prejudice, the Going individuals served in the French & Indian War and the Revolutionary War with distinction.

Moses Going became a merchant, operating a grist mill in both Virginia and Georgia. He was regarded as wagon manufacturer in Georgia and trained his sons as wagon builders. Agnes Going was identified by her sons as “Indian” which gave the family an additional handicap to overcome in Colonial America.

A brother of Moses Going, Dr. Samuel Going became a successful physician in Wilkes County and in Claiborne County, Mississippi. Dr. Going married a white woman and became a slave owner and the head of a household of 10.

The Georgia State Legislature recognized three of the sons of Moses Going as outstanding and conveyed upon them rights rarely granted to Melungeon/Mulatto individuals. Special joint legislation was enacted in the Georgia Senate and House of Representatives in 1796 to grant John Going and Reuben Going special privileges and civil rights. Three years later, a third son, Dr. Thomas Going was similarly honored.

It is interesting to follow their achievements:

In 1796 the Georgia State Legislature established that two brothers, “Reuben Going and John Going, men of color of Greene County [Newsletter, February 1994]. . . are hereby authorized and enabled to take, hold and enjoy property, both real and personal,” according to “Ambiguous Lives” by Adele Logan Alexander. Their younger brother, Thomas Going also gained his limited rights through a private legislative act, according to “Digest of the Laws of the State of Georgia, 1735-1800.”

The Georgia State Legislature provided:

“Emancipation: And being it further enacted that Reuben Going and John Going, of Greene County, be and they are hereby authorized and enabled to take, hold and enjoy property both real and personal.

Provided nevertheless, that nothing herein contained shall extend or be construed to extend, to enable the said free mulattoes and negro slaves when liberated as aforesaid to serve as justices in any case whatsoever nor to render them or either of them a witness in any cause or case where the personal right or property of any white person or persons is or are concerned, nor to entitle them or any of them to have or hold, directly or indirectly any office of trust or profit, civil or military within this state.

Thomas Stevens, Speaker of the House of Representatives
Benjamin Taliaferro, President of the Senate
Concurred February 13, 1796, Jared Irwin, Governor”

Thomas Going began a medical practice about that time. Three years later, on February 18, 1799, Thomas Going also gained his limited rights through a private legislative act, according to “Digest of the Laws of the State of Georgia, 1735-1800.”

“Emancipation: Be it therefore enacted by the Senate and House of Representatives of the State of Georgia in General Assembly met, and by the authority of the same, That from and after the passing of this act, that the aforesaid Thomas Going, of the County of Wilkes, be and is hereby vested with and entitled to all the rights and privileges and immunities belonging to a free citizen of this state; Provided nevertheless, nothing herein contained shall extend or be construed to extend to entitle the said Thomas Going, to serve in the capacity of a juror in any cause whatever nor to render him a competent witness in any cause or case where the personal rights or property of any white person are or is concerned; nor to entitle the said Thomas Going to vote at elections, nor to have or hold directly or indirectly any office of trust or emolument, civil or military, within this state.

David Meriwether, Speaker of the House of Representative
Robert Walton, President of the Senate
Attested to February 18, 1799 James Jackson Governor”

Thomas Going “received payment for Moses Going” of $36 from Joseph Boren June 9, 1802 in the settlement of a suit, according to Wilkes County court records.

During the decade, Dr. Thomas Going removed to Claiborne County, Mississippi Territory, probably settling in the town of Gallatin which is no longer found on modern maps. He was enumerated there in the 1810 census in the “Names of the Heads of Families in the Counties of Claiborne and Warren, Mississippi, Territory.” The household was composed of “1 Free Person of Color and 4 Slaves.”

By 1816, Dr. Thomas Going had influenced his uncle Dr. Samuel Going to join him as a partner in his medical practice in Claiborne County. They appeared in consecutive entries in the Mississippi State Census of that year. Thomas Going was the head of a household composed of “1 Free Person of Color and 3 Slaves. Samuel Going was the head of a household composed of “10 Free Persons of Color.”

One February 9, 1820 Thomas Going and C. Warring, his bondsman, posted a bond of $200 for a marriage license. On the following day, Thomas Going obtained a license to marry Sally Allen, a white woman:

“State of Mississippi }
Claiborne County }

To any judge, justice of the peace or minister of the gospel duly qualified to celebrate the rites of matrimony, Greeting.
You are hereby authorized and licensed to join in the Holy State of Matrimony Thomas Going and Sally Allen, both of said county, you making due return hereof to the Register of the Court of Claiborne County in the time prescribed by law with Certificate of said marriage.

Given under my hand and office this Tenth day of February, One Thousand Eight Hundred and Twenty.

P. A. Vandover, Clerk, by George Winchester”

Apparently Sally Allen was a widow with two daughters. The family appeared in the 1820 census of Claiborne County, page 7:

Thomas Going free colored
white female 26-45
white female 16-26
white female 10-16
7 slaves”

Three members of the household were engaged in agriculture.

Nearby on page 9A of the 1820 census appeared:

Samuel Going free colored
white female 26-45
9 other free colored
2 slaves”

Five members of the household were engaged in agriculture.

An obituary notice appeared in the Saturday, August 22, 1840 edition of “The Southern Star” of Gallatin, Mississippi: “Died on Saturday last, after a short illness, Mr. Thomas[?] Going for a long time a citizen of this county. Aged 65 years.” The deceased died on August 15, 1840, accordingly. If the subject were Dr. Thomas Going, then he may have succumbed to yellow fever which frequently reached epidemic proportions during hot weather periods in towns along the Mississippi River. Cities as far north as St. Louis were affected by this scourge.

Since he died without heirs it is believed that his wife and her children also died before the death of Dr. Thomas Going. Children born to Dr. Thomas Going and Sally Allen Going are unknown.

Since Dr. Thomas Going died without progeny, his siblings became his heirs, but because of the color of their skin and other dangers, they hesitated to make the trip to Claiborne County, Mississippi to claim their inheritance. Finally, after seven years, a younger brother, John H. Going of Crittenden County, Kentucky got up his nerve and decided to make the trip.

John H. Going, son of Moses Going and Agnes Going, was born about 1787, probably in Louisa County, Virginia. However, he, at the age of 63 stated to the censustaker in 1850 that he was born in Georgia. Attempting to find a better life for his family, he joined many of his siblings in a move to Kentucky about 1805.

John Going, “mulatto” appeared as a taxpayer in Livingston County, Kentucky in 1830. He was recorded in the 1840 census as “free colored” as the head of a household:

“Going, John H. Free Colored Male 55-100
Free Colored Female 36-55
Free Colored Female 20-30
Free Colored Male 10-20
Free Colored Female 10-20”

On May 26, 1847 John H. Going applied to the Crittenden Circuit Court for manumission papers in order that he might travel to Claiborne County, Mississippi to claim his portion of the estate of his brother, Thomas Going “who has been dead for some years and died without children.” John H. Going stated that he understood that he was “one of his heirs.”

In his petition, John Going stated that because of his dark skin he might be mistaken for a runaway slave. He added that he was a free man of color and had been from his birth. He declared that he had lived, “where he now lives” in Crittenden County for nearly 35 years and is well and favorably known by the residents. He also stated that his father had always been a free man of color and that his mother Agnes was “an Indian by blood.”

John H. Going presented an affidavit from Thomas S. Phillips who declared that he had known John Going for 30 years and that he is well known in the community as a free man of color and was of African and Indian blood. He further declared that the brother of John Going, Thomas Going and their uncle, Samuel Going were well-known physicians in partnership in Claiborne County, Mississippi and that Thomas Going has died, leaving an inheritance to John H. Going, thus making it necessary for him to travel to Mississippi.

A second affiant, Ira Nunn also presented a declaration to the court. Nunn was a well-known, prominent and successful man in Crittenden County, according to “Nunns of the South.” He stated that both he and the applicant were raised in Greene County, Georgia.

The Crittenden County Court approved the application May 29, 1847 and provided a document to John H. Going stating that he was a free man of color and had been since birth and was therefore entitled to all rights thereof. It is believed that with the thorough preparation John H. Going made the trip to Mississippi successfully.

The family of John H. Going was enumerated in 1850 as:

Goens, John H. 63, wagonmaker, born in Georgia
Sarah M. 24, born in Kentucky
P. S. 5, born in Kentucky
Tennessee 5, born in Kentucky
William 3, born in Kentucky
Felix A. 3, born in Kentucky
Aaron 11/12, born in Kentucky”

John H. Going, “age 73, wagonmaker, born in Georgia,” reappeared for the last time in the 1860 census as the head of a household. He did not own any land and appeared in the Belles Mine area of Crittenden and Union County, Kentucky.