1825 William W. Goyen m. Sarah Martha Bell of Mississippi

William W. Goyen b. 1825-1829 – d. June 10, 1864, m. Sarah Martha Bell

(Why all the different spellings? Click the following link for an explanation:  https://goyengoinggowengoyneandgone.com/goyen-family/ ).

William W. Goyen

William W. Goyen

Parents of William W. Goyen:

Drury B. Goyen b. abt 1800 – d.  abt 1848 m Elizabeth (unknown but possibly Chisholm maiden name of spouse)

Children of William W. Goyen and Sarah Martha Bell:

Martha Elizabeth Goyen 1854-1935
Anna Mae Goyen 1856-1895
John Bell Goyen 1860-1912
William S. Goyen 1862-1943

Siblings of William W. Goyen:

William W. Goyen – 1825-1864 m Sarah Martha Bell
John E. Going – 1828 – ? m ?
Ann Eliza Going – 1829 – 1894 m. Jason Fish
T. Elizabeth Going – 1830 – ?
Elvira Docea Goyen – 1830 – 1916 m. ?, and then m. Avens – no children
Nancy Chisholm Goyen – 1840 – 1922 m. Robert Neely Provine
Unk
Unk
Unk

FACTS:

Sarah Martha Bell w Leslie G w Martha Eliza G w Nancy T w Sammie T w Aunt Ella G w Anna G w Carrie May G w Frank w John 1898 Gilmer Tx Johns home

(1898 Family photo in Gilmer, Upshur County, Texas at the home of John Bell Goyen (son of William W. Goyen and Sarah Martha Bell) – Left to Right – Sarah Martha Bell far left (William W. Goyen’s widow), William Leslie Goyen, Martha Elizabeth Goyen Tipton (daughter of William W. Goyen and Sarah Martha Bell), Nancy Tipton, Sammie Tipton, Ella Green Parker Goyen (wife of John Bell Goyen), Anna Vernice Goyen, Carrie Mae Goyen, Frank Bell Goyen, John Parker Goyen ).

Events: Childhood:

William W. Goyen was born in 1825 in Chester County, South Carolina.  His father is Drury B. Goyen.  The name of his mother is unknown.  Fires in the Alabama and Mississippi court houses have possibly destroyed the records that would identify the mother.

The last name of William W. Goyen, his father Drury B. Goyen, and his great grandfather Drury Goyen spell their last name Going and Goyen at different points of time in their lives.

William W. Goyen’s father, Drury B. Goyen was living in York County, South Carolina according to the 1830 US Census when William W. Goyen would have been a young child.  At this time Drury B. Goyen was living with his wife, and 2 sons under the age of 5 (William W. Goyen b. 1825, and John E. Going b. 1828), and 1 daughter under the age of 5 (Ann Eliza Going b. 1829).

1830 US Census, York, South Carolina w Drury Goings and McCluney families on same page marked

(1830 US Census in York County, South Carolina)

By 1837 – 1839 Drury B. Goyen appears to have moved and obtained land grants in Pickens County, Alabama – near where several Goyen (several spelling their names Goyne or Going) aunts, uncles and cousins had already settled.  He and his family lives in the Pickens County, Alabama area until at least the mid 1840s.

Alabama MAP of Ranges and Townships

(Plat Map of Alabama with Drury B. Goyen’s 1837-1839 grants marked in Pickens County, Alabama – showing proximity to Lowndes County, Mississippi – where he appears next).

In 1843 Thomas B. Goyen (Drury B. Goyen’s uncle) had moved to Lowndes County, Mississippi according to Mississippi State tax records (just across the border from Pickens County, Alabama).  http://mdah.state.ms.us/arrec/digital_archives/taxrolls/Lowndes/1843/Personal%20and%20Additional/22 ; http://mdah.state.ms.us/arrec/digital_archives/taxrolls/Lowndes/1844/Personal/21

The 1845 Lowndes County, Miss. Census and tax rolls show Drury Goings with 6 females and 5 males in his household. (possibly 5 daughters and 4 sons, including William W. Goyen). http://mdah.state.ms.us/arrec/digital_archives/taxrolls/Lowndes/1845/Personal/80

1845 Lowndes County Taxes showing Drury Goyne and Thos Goyne number of people in households

By 1846 Drury B. Gowens has moved to Oktibbeha County, and shows up on the Oktibbeha County, Mississippi tax rolls.  http://mdah.state.ms.us/arrec/digital_archives/taxrolls/Oktibbeha/1846/Personal/13

Adult Life:

In 1847 Drury B. Going and William W. Going appear on the county tax rolls.   This indicating that William W. Goyen has moved out of Drury’s home.  This is the last document found with Drury B. Goyen listed.   It is assumed he must have died about this time.  William W. Goyen’s youngest sister, Nancy Goyen born 1840 (later married Provine), indicates that she was orphaned at an early age and was brought up by siblings.  Drury B. Goyen and his wife must have died some time during 1847 or 1848.  http://mdah.state.ms.us/arrec/digital_archives/taxrolls/Oktibbeha/1847/Personal/11http://mdah.state.ms.us/arrec/digital_archives/taxrolls/Oktibbeha/1847/Personal/43

After the death of his parents, William W. Goyen remains close with his grandmother (Docea Bland Goyen Plaxco) and his uncle Thompson McCluney’s family (where Docea Bland Goyen Plaxco lives).  Thompson McCluney had married Drury B. Goyen’s half sister, Elvira Plaxco.  She had died some time in the 1830s, but had several children close to William W. Goyen’s age – who were his cousins.  Additionallly, at least two of William W. Goyen’s sisters move in with the McCluney family after the death of their parents (the sisters who moved in with the McCluney family were T. Elizabeth Going and Elvira Docea Goyen).

The 1850 US Census in Yalobusha County, Mississippi pages 406 – family 424 shows William W. Goyen’s 46 year old uncle Thompson McCluney living with his grandmother 80 year old Docia Plaxco (previously Going when married to Elijah Going, and maiden name of Docia Bland):
– Thompson McCluney – age 46 – Male – head of household – Planter – born in SC
– A. McCluney – age 21 – Female – born in SC
– John McCluney – age 20 – Male – born in SC
– Samuel McCluney – age 18 – Male – born in SC
– Thadeus McCluney – age 12 – Male – born in Ala.
– Docia Plaxco – age 80 – Female – born in SC
– Hugh Forbes – age 24 – Male – Laborer – born in SC
– Jas Stephens – age 19 – Male – Laborer – born in Miss

1850 US Census Yalobusha Co w McCluneys snipped 1

1850 US Census Yalobusha Co w McCluneys snipped 1

1850 US Census Yalobusha Co w McCluneys snipped 2

1850 US Census Yalobusha Co w McCluneys snipped 2

William W. Goyen meets and marries Sarah Martha Bell in 1851.  He is working as a school teacher at the time.  William W. Goyen boards at the home of Sarah Martha Bell’s father, Hugh Bell.   The following letters written by William W. Goyen from July to September of 1851 show his relationships with those in the McCluney household – and that he is married to Sarah Martha Bell in that time:

William W. Going’s letters written to E. D. Going and A. McCluney in July 1851:

Starkville, Miss mailed to Oakland, Miss

These were letters written to William W. Going’s sister E. D. Going (Elvira Docea Going), and his cousin Adeline McCluney. William W. Going was living in Starkville, Miss. at Hugh Bell’s home as a boarder (Hugh Bell was the father of Sarah Martha Bell – future wife of William W. Going). He had just finished teaching for the year. Elvira Going and Adeline McCluney were living with Thompson McCluney and Docea Plaxco – who was Thompson McCluney’s mother in law. Thompson McCluney was Adeline’s father, and William Going and Elvira Going’s uncle. Thompson McCluney had married Elvira Plaxco – who had died by the time these letters were written. Elvira Plaxco was half-sister to Drury Going. So Thompson McCluney was William W. Going’s uncle – and Docea Plaxco (maiden name was Docea Bland – she first had married Elijah Going and had two children – Drury Going, and Thomas Baxter Going. When Elijag Going died, she remarried to John Plaxco and they had Elvira Plaxco. So Docea Plaxco was William W. Going’s grandmother (his father’s mother).

The envelope the following letters came in was addressed to: Miss E. D. Goings, Oakland, Miss. The stamp on the envelope was Aug 4, 1851 – originating from Starkville, Miss. 1) The first letter addressed to “Dear Sister” – which is Miss E. D. Goings. Miss. – Oktibbeha County, July 29, 1851:

“Dear Sister – I embrace this opportunity of answering yours of June 10th which gave me great satisfaction to hear that you were all enjoying tollerably good health. It found me in good health. My health for the last few days has been rather delicate, but it is improving. Owing to the intensity of the heat and long continuance of this drought I concluded to defer coming down until fall.

My first session closed the 18th inst, and I will resume the second the 4th of August. I had quite an interesting examination and an excellent dinner given by the patrons and friends of my school. The Rev. Mr. Presley delivered an address suited to the occasion. All that was present was well pleased. Next session I shall have sevaral new schollars. I am well satisfied and am getting along with great facility. Since my school closed I have enjoyed myself finely.

Last week I road about and became acquainted with several young ladies, some of which I am greatly distressed about. This week we have had a protracted meeting at the 16 Dist. Section. I saw the Miss Burts and Miss Rife there. I can say but little about them except they are not married as yet and I suppose there is no probability of it soon.

I am still in the notion of settling myself next Fall though; if I could always have such a boarding house as I have now I would be satisfied to board. I have all the conveniences that I could ask for and nothing to pay. I am no boarding at the house of Mr. Bell the father of the beautiful Miss Bell I alluded to some time since. I intend to make a speech to Miss Bell in good earnest soon.

If you or cousin A either are going to marry I want you to write and I will com down without delay. If not I will not com before my school is out which will be the first of Dec.

The health of the country is good so far as my knowledge extends. Crops are very short in this vicinity owing to the drought. So nothing more.

Give my best love and respect to all and more especially to Granma. Tell her I want to see her very much. I am your most affectionate Brother until death. Wm. W. Goings”

2) The following second part of this July 29, 1851 letter was from William W. Going to his cousin – A. E. McCluney. Miss A. E. McCluney

“Dear Cousin, I was greatly moved when I heard of your illness, but glad to hear that you are getting better when Sister wrote. I am sorry to say to you that owing to the delicacy of my health that I shall have to defer paying you a visit until fall. Nothing is more painful to me than to defer a visit in which I have anticipated as much pleasure. At this time I have vacation. I have enjoyed my self finely for the past week, and am getting along most admirably both in school and out of school.

I spend my evenings in conversation with a very amiable and intelligent young lady who shares the greater part of my affections and is sweet and consoling to me. I vainly cherish the hope that my love is reciprocated by her.

However, I have pledged myself not to give my hand in matrimony until I see Miss P of whom you have spoke of, and I am resolved to stick to my integrity if Miss P does not marry, which I hope she will not do before I come down. Though the time may seem long the fleeting moments will soon rool round. If it be the will of God for us to live we may then be blessed.

Think not hard of me dear cousin for not coming sooner, for I want to see you all worse than you can want to me. Write soon as this comes to hand. Give my respect to all and believe me I am your Affectionate cousin until death. Wm. W. Going to Miss McC”

W W Goyen or Goings letters written to McCluney family in Sept 1851:

September 9, 1851

Starkville, Miss mailed to Oakland, Miss

The following two-part letter was sent to T. E. Goings (T. Elizabeth Going – sister of William W. Going), and A. McCluney (Adeline McCluney – cousin of William W. Going). Also mentioned in the letter are 1) Uncle – who is Thompson McCluney, 2) Hugh Bell – father in law, 3) Sarah Martha Bell – now his wife, 4) cousin John (John McCluney), and 5) cousin Samuel (Samuel Thomas McCluney). T. E. A. McCluney is a combination greeting for T. E. (for T. E. Going) then A. McCluney (for Adeline McCluney). Contents of Letter: __________________________________ Starkville, Miss. Sept. 4th, 1851 Miss T. E. Goings

“Most Dear and affectionate Sister, it is with renewed manifestation of love that I assume the pleasant task of answering your joint letter, which I have just received by today’s mail. It found us in good health and gave us great satisfaction to learn that you were enjoing the same blessing, thanks be to our great and beneficient Preserver for his mercies and blessings. You gave me a genuine riding down for not writing. I think the whipping should come on the other hand as I wrote immediately on the reception of your last letter.

I am yet teaching and anticipate teaching the ensuing year . . . if I can get Six Hundred Dollars for my services, if not I presume that I shall settle on a farm somewhere West. I have gotten along with great ease and facility in my school this year, had but one or two graduates last session and none this. Fletcher Beard came to me part of last session and for some incident I thrashed him sorter like oats and he runaway, graduated, and absconded, which I do not regret. My present patrons express their regret as not being able to procure my service for the rival year.

Crops are very fine through this County. Corn crops are by far better than I have ever saw in this County. I am of opinion the corn may be bought at 25cents per bu. There was also a very spontaneous yield of wheat. Cotton fine except where the bole worm has infected it. The Farmer in new prospect views his spacious barns filled with the yellow antennal grain and supremely takes his ease this year in the farmers’ jubilee. Nothing more on this page turn over. Page 2.

I am highly gratified to hear of your excellent meetings, and regret much that I am not there to participate with you in your religious devotion. We have had several protracted in this vicinity, Several conversions. The health of our County is good but few deaths have occured since I last wrote you. Some marriages have taken place none of whom you were acquainted.

I am boarding at Mr. Bell’s and have been since married. You requested me to give you a description of my better half. She is of medium size, dark hair, black eyes, and indescribably hansome. she has sweet, mild and amiable disposition, and I think dear Sister when you see her and become acquainted with her that you will say that I have been happy in my choice. We anticipate paying you a visit as soon as my school is out. Sarah sends her love and respect to you. Nothing more, but remaining your affectionate brother and sister until death.”

W. W. and S. M. Goings to Miss T. E. Goings.

P. S. “Wright immediately, if not sooner.” ___________________

Sept. 9th, 1852 Miss T. E. A. McCluney

“Dear Cousin, it is with pleasure that I assume the pleasant task of answering your letter which I received the 4th inst. You will see by references to sister’s part of this letter that it was written a few days ago, the reason of the delay is that I have been sick, quite sick four or five days, but I have gotten considerable better and think by good nursing and prudence that I will soon be as well as usual hear. I will assure you that I have one on whom (Page 3) I can rely to nurse and administer to my wants whilst sick and convalessing, this is none other than my sweet and darling wife.  Sarah is well except a bad cold. I have gotten along finely with my business and have enjoyed fine health until this little spell.

I am much rejoiced to learn of your excellent meetings and regret much that we could not be there to participate with you in your religious devotion. The health of our County is tolleabl good though there is more sickness at this time than has been this season and some fatality attending it.

I shall resume my school next Monday if I do not relapse. Tell Uncle if he can find a good piece of land for sale that he thinks will soot me to some measure what it can be bought at and perhaps I will move there. I received a letter from cousin John a few days ago and he is well and better satisfied. He wrights that he is enjoying himself finely with the young ladies. You and Sister and cousin Samuel must not get married before we come out.

You must excuse me for not writing more as I am quite week this morning. You must wright as soon as this comes to hand. Give our love to all and accept the same for your self. Nothing more, but remain your affectionate cousins until death.”

W. W. and S. M. Goings To Miss T. E. A. McCluney.

Mississippi tax rolls show that William W. Goyen continues living in Oktibbeha County, Mississippi through 1856.  http://mdah.state.ms.us/arrec/digital_archives/taxrolls/Oktibbeha/1856/Personal/11

In 1860, the US Census, and Mississippi tax rolls both show William W. Goyen moving to Calhoun County, Mississippi.  http://mdah.state.ms.us/arrec/digital_archives/taxrolls/Calhoun/1860/Personal/15

1860 US Census in Calhoun Co, Miss William Goyne w Sarah wife and Martha 6 Anna 4 John 3mo

(1860 US Census – Calhoun Co, Miss – William Goyne wth wife Sarah, and 3 children).

Military Service:

From 1861 to 1864 William W. Goyen is a soldier in the Civil War.

In 1861 William W. Goyen begins his service in the Civil War according to the Official and Statistical Register of Miss 24th Reg p 641; 1861; Mississippi, USA.  William W. Goyen listed as 3rd Lieutenant of 24th Regiment Company B in 1861 (beginning of his service).

William W. Goyen in uniform

(William W. Goyen in uniform about 1863).

William W. Goyen’s service records show his service with the 24th Miss Regiment Aug 24, 1861 – March 4, 1862.  He was allowed to leave the Army in March 1862 (likely to help at the home with farming – early spring), but in 1863 was called back to duty.

William W. Goyen’s service records with the 24th Miss Regiment Aug 24%2C 1861 – March 4%2C 1862

In 1863 William W. Goyen goes back into the Confederate Army on May 9, 1863, joining Capt T P Montgomery’s Co in Mississippi as a non commissioned officer.

W W Goyen Capt T P Montgomery's Co Miss May 9, 1863_Page_1W W Goyen Capt T P Montgomery's Co Miss May 9, 1863_Page_2

Lt. W W Goyen joins Perrin’s Battalion Cavalry in Mississippi from July 1863 to October 1863.

W W Goyen Civ War Perrin's Battalion Miss Cav July - Oct 1863_Page_2W W Goyen Civ War Perrin's Battalion Miss Cav July - Oct 1863_Page_4W W Goyen Civ War Perrin's Battalion Miss Cav July - Oct 1863_Page_3

Official and Statistical Register of Miss 8th Reg Cav Miss p 824, June 10, 1864, Brice’s Crossroads, Mississippi, USA.  Description of engagement at Brice’s Crossroads, and listing of Liet. W W “Govan” killed. Misspelling of W W Goyen’s last name was caused on his last page of his service records with the 8th Cav Miss, K Co – where someone typed in “Goven” as his last name – killed at Brice’s Crossroads – where they had spelled it correctly in the previous pages on the records. Subsequently, those who marked his grave misspelled the misspelling, from “Goven”, to “Govan” being marked on the headstone at the Old Bethany Cemetery, in Lee County, Miss. (The headstone shows – Lt. W.W. Govan Co. K, 8th Mississippi Cavalry. Killed in action at the Battle of Brice’s Crossroads near Baldwyn, Ms. on June 10,1864). W W Goyen was the Lt out of Co. K with the 8th Cav Miss that was killed at Brice’s Crossroads (see his service records).

W W Goyen 8th Miss Cav Jan 19, 1864 to June 10, 1864 killed Brice's Crossroads_Page_7W W Goyen 8th Miss Cav Jan 19, 1864 to June 10, 1864 killed Brice's Crossroads_Page_5W W Goyen 8th Miss Cav Jan 19, 1864 to June 10, 1864 killed Brice's Crossroads_Page_4W W Goyen 8th Miss Cav Jan 19, 1864 to June 10, 1864 killed Brice's Crossroads_Page_3W W Goyen 8th Miss Cav Jan 19, 1864 to June 10, 1864 killed Brice's Crossroads_Page_2W W Goyen 8th Miss Cav Jan 19, 1864 to June 10, 1864 killed Brice's Crossroads_Page_1

Civil War Service and Death of W W Goyen

News Clipping W W Goyen at Brice's CrossroadsW W Goyen Grave site

In the month prior to William W. Goyen’s death at Brice’s Crossroads, he wrote two letters to his family.  The letters were found on his body and sent home to his wife Sarah Martha Bell Goyen.  Transcriptions of the letters are below:

LETTERS from William W. Goyen to his daughters during Civil War (See attached – copies of originals and transcriptions) (full transcriptions below):

Letter No. 1. – to his two daughters, Martha Elizabeth and Anna Mae Goyen.

May 9th, 1864 — CAMP NEAR VERONA, MISSISSIPPI.

“Dear Little Girls” — Your dear Papa has for the first time in his life seated himself for the purpose of writing you. This leaves me in good health and doing well and I hope it may find you in the same enjoyment.

Papa often thinks of his dear little girls and asks the Great God to keep them from harm, and I hope that he will do so. Be good and kind to all, but especially to each other. Love is only to be obtained by giving love in return, and this I enjoin upon you. Love each other and you will have the blessings of your good and kind parents and at the same time secure the blessings of our appreciating God.

Study your books diligently and learn to write soon.  Papa would like to have a letter written by you very much indeed, and I know if you mind Cousin Martha that you will soon be able to write yourself, but now you will have to get them or Cousin Doff to write for you as you are just beginning to learn. My Dear Little Girls you must have them write me how you are getting along at school and how fast you are learning and whether you are well satisfied at school or not, also what you are studying.

Let me know when you heard from Ma and how she and John Bell and Eugene were.

My dear Little Girls you must be good to your kind GrandPa and Ma and must not vex them and they will love you and bless you.

I saw your Aunt NANNIE PROVINE and her little boy (Joseph Fipdley Provine) and Kin a few days ago at Coles Creek. They were very well and would like to see you very much. They speak of visiting you this summer.

Love to you and your Grand Pa and Ma, also Cousin Doff; Uncle Frank and Aunt Liz and cousin Martha and others that you wish to, and remember to do good. Goodbye my dear little “Bettie” (Martha Elizabeth) and Anna Mae. Love to all there and remember to do good. This is from your dear Papa — W. W. GOYEN. — P. E. – Write to me soon, Direct your letter to Duff’s Regiment, Verona, Mississippi.”

Letter No 2:  dated June 7, 1864 – camp near New Albany:

“My Dear Wife: . — In haste I drop you a few lines. This leaves me in good health, and I hope it may find you in the same enjoyment.

We have been on the March two days to meet the enemy. They are at Ripley, and we expect to fight them today or tomorrow if they come on. I do not know how many there is. We have about 1500 in our Brigade. We have had a great deal of rain here. I found all the boys willing and in good spirits. I hope that we will come out all right.

Tell Billy to push ahead. I will write again as soon as we get through the scrap that we are in.

Write to me – Direct it to OXFORD, Duff’s Regiment, Company “K”.  Kiss the children for me.

God Bless all of you.  — W. W. GOYEN–“

How we know Drury B. Goyen is father of William W. Goyen: 

See the letter dated July 31, 1851. William W. Goyen is writing to his cousin Adeline McCluney and sister Elvira Going at Thompson McCluney’s home in Oakland, Mississippi. (Yalobusha County). In his letter he tells the recipients to “Give my best to all, and more especially to Granma tell her I want to see her very much”.

Looking at the 1850 Yalobusha US Census, the only woman in Thompson McCluney’s household old enough to be William W. Goyen’s “Granma” is Docia Plaxco – age 80. (see Census below).

Docia Plaxco’s maiden name was Docia Bland – she was married to Elijah Going in Chester Co, SC until he died. She had two children by him prior to his death – Drury B. Goyen, and Sarah Goen (Goyen).

After Elijah Going’s death, Docia Bland remarried to John Plaxco. John Plaxco and Docia had one child, Elvira Plaxco, who married Thompson McCluney. Elvira died some time in the 1830s. Her mother (and Drury B. Goyen’s mother) Docia Plaxco, was living at Thompson McCluney’s household with her son-in-law and grandchildren (Thompson McCluney’s kids, and Drury B. Goyen’s children as well were her grandchildren – Drury B Goyen died some time in 1847-48).

William W. Goyen’s cousins, sisters, uncle Thompson McCluney, and grandmother Docia Plaxco were all in that home. (See below – click to enlarge):

Letter from W W Goyen to cousins and sister July 29 1851 p1

Letter from W W Goyen to cousins and sister July 29 1851 p2

Letter from W W Goyen to cousins and sister July 29 1851 p3

Letter from W W Goyen to cousins and sister July 29 1851 p4

W W Goyen or Goings letters written to McCluney fam in July 1851_Page_3

(Letter and original envelope – from William W. Goyen dated July 31, 1851 addressed to cousin A. E. McCluney (Adeline), and sister E. D. Going (Elvira).  Both living at Thompson McCluney’s household in Oakland, Yalobusha County, Mississippi).  (Originals are in Events below).

1850 US Census Yalobusha, Miss Thompson McCluney fam p11850 US Census Yalobusha, Miss Thompson McCluney fam p2

(1850 US Census – Yalobusha County, Mississippi – showing Docia Plaxco age 80 living at Thompson McCluney’s home).

William W. Goyen’s letter dated September 4-9, 1851 addressed again to Adeline McCluney, and to his sister E. T. Going in Oakland, Yalobusha Co, Miss. is below.  The letter includes the fact that William W. Goyen has married Sarah Bell some time between the time this letter was written, and the last letter on July 31, 1851.   The letter additionally mention cousins John McCluney and Samuel McCluney – also on US Census report above – further confirming these letters are addressed to Thompson McCluney’s household (where grandmother Docia Plaxco / Goyen / Bland was living).

W W Goyen letter to sister and cousin Sept 1851 p1

W W Goyen letter to sister and cousin Sept 1851 p2

W W Goyen letter to sister and cousin Sept 1851 p3

W W Goyen letter to sister and cousin Sept 1851 p4

(Transcriptions of William W. Goyen’s letters dated September 4-9, 1851 addressed to his sister and cousin at Thompson McCluney household.  Originals are below under “Events”).

William W. Goyen’s children and spouse:

William W. Goyen’s children and spouse are listed in his letters and in US Census reports.

First are his letters (see above) written in July and September 1851 where he describes courting Sarah Bell and then his marriage to Sarah Martha Bell.

Next is the 1860 US Census report in Calhoun Co, Miss, showing William Goyne age 33, with wife Sarah 30 yrs, daughter Martha 6 years, Anna 4 years, and John 3 months:

1860 US Census in Calhoun Co, Miss William Goyne w Sarah wife and Martha 6 Anna 4 John 3mo

(1860 US Census – Calhoun Co, Miss – William Goyne wth wife Sarah, and 3 children).

By 1870, William W. Goyen had died in the Civil War.  His wife, Sarah Martha Bell Goyen, age 38, can be found at her mother’s home (Martha Bell age 78) in Starkville, Oktibbeha Co, Miss.    With her are her daughter Lizzie (Martha Elizabeth Goyen) age 15, Anne age 14, John (John Bell Goyen) age 10, and Willliam age 8 (William S. Goyen).

1870 US Census wth Sarah Bell Goyen w children living with mother Martha Bell in Starkville, Oktibbeha Miss

(1870 US Census – Oktibbeha County, Mississippi)

William W. Goyen’s siblings

I.  Number of Siblings:

We are able to account for 6 of the 8 or 9 children that Drury B. Goyen had.  Documentation of William W. Goyen’s known siblings is pieced together below.

First is the 1845 Mississippi State Census report – showing Drury B. Goyen with a household of 6 females and 5 males.  This indicates there were likely 4-5 female children (maybe 4, it is possible that Docia Plaxco was living with Drury B. Goyen at this time), and 4 male children.   Also on page is what appears to be his uncle, Thomas Baxter Going with just himself – 1 male.

1845 Lowndes County Taxes showing Drury Goyne and Thos Goyne number of people in households

(1845 Lowndes County, Miss state census report with Drury Going with 5 males and 6 females, and Thos Going with 1 male:  http://mdah.state.ms.us/arrec/digital_archives/taxrolls/Lowndes/1845/Personal/80).

1845 Lowndes Co Miss tax rept Drury B Goyne and Thos Goyne

(1845 Lowndes Co, Miss tax rept has Drury B. Goyne and Thos B. Goyne:  http://mdah.state.ms.us/arrec/digital_archives/taxrolls/Lowndes/1845/Personal/26 ).

a.  sibling 1, Elvira Docea Going, and 

b.  sibling 2, T. Elizabeth Going:

We know from William W. Goyen’s letters he wrote in 1851 the names of two of his sisters, E. D. Going (Elvira), and T. E. Going (T. Elizabeth). (See letters above)

c.  sibling 3, Nancy Chisholm Goyen: 

Nannie Provine Robert Neely Provine

(Photos of Nancy Goyen and husband Robert N. Provine).

Nancy Goyen with Husband R N Provine and family

(Robert Neely Provine with wife Nancy Goyen Provine, and all their children – far left is Joseph Finley Provine, next to him is John William Provine).

We know from William W. Goyen’s letters that were written in the Civil War (found on his body and delivered to his wife after his death) that his sister was Nancy Goyen who married into the Provine family.  (In letter named “Nannie Provine” with her son “Joseph Findley Provine”).

Letters from W W Goyen found on body in Civil War letter May 9 1864 transcription

Letters from W W Goyen found on body in Civil War letter June 7, 1864 letter 2

(Transcription of W W Goyen letters dated May 9, 1864 and June 7, 1864.  They were found on his body after killed at Battle of Brice’s Crossroads on June 10, 1864 – Letters were taken from his pocket and delivered to his wife Sarah Bell Goyen – Originals are listed below under “Events” – difficult to read).

Nancy Goyen is mentioned in “Biographical and Historical Memoirs of Mississippi: Embracing an Authentic and Comprehensive Account of the Chief Events in the History of the State and a Record of the Lives of Many of the Most Worthy and Illustrious Families and Individuals”.   Information from the article shows she was born in 1840 a native of Pickens, Alabama.  She was an orphan at an early age and raised by her brothers and sisters, and married Robert Neely Provine at age 20.   Nancy Goyen and Robert N. Provine had 9 children, 8 sons and 1 daughter. 

https://books.google.com/books?id=i-REAQAAMAAJ&pg=PA626&lpg=PA626&dq=R+N+Provine+and+Nancy+Goyen,+mississippi+memoirs&source=bl&ots=80eGygIx5F&sig=3eIMPhNWZHpuqXs3vC2HetQtxyc&hl=en&sa=X&ved=0ahUKEwj1q5v0tbHJAhXLJiYKHX7KCMEQ6AEIHjAA#v=onepage&q=R%20N%20Provine%20and%20Nancy%20Goyen%2C%20mississippi%20memoirs&f=false

d.  sibling 4, Ann Eliza Going, and

e.  sibling 5, John E. Going:

Ann Eliza Going married Jason Fish, and lived in Oktibbeha Co, Miss at the same time as William W. Goyen.  The 1850 US Census has her living with her husband Jason Fish in Mississippi, and their baby.  Also living with her is John E. Going – who appears to be her brother – which makes him William W. Goyen’s brother as well.

1850 US Census Goyen living in Oktibbeha County Miss (2)

(1850 US Census in Oktibbeha Co, Miss, with Jason S. Fish age 22, Ann Fish (Ann Eliza Going) age 21, Robert Fish age 1, and John Gowins age 22).

We also know from “Goodspeed History of Lincoln Co, Arkansas”  the following:  “Janson S. Fish is one of lincoln County’s leading citizens, and was born in Fairfield District, S. C., on august 23, 1826, being the son of Elias and Cynthia (McKance) Fish, native of New York and South Carolina, respectively. The father came from South Carolina, and after his marriage moved first to Georgia, and later to Alabama, then to Mississippi, back to Georgia, and finally to Texas about 1855, where he died. Janson spent his school days in Georgia, Alabama and Mississippi, and when twenty-one years old commenced farming for himself. he located in Arkansas in 1856, on the farm where he now resides. He entered 160 acres of land, and after clearing it thoroughly, began a system of improvement and cultivation that does great credit to his superior judgment. he has severed several terms as justice of the peace. During the late war he served in the Confederate army, and was dismissed at Marshall, Tex., May 5, 1865, after engaging in many of the chief battle and undergoing the hardships and deprivations necessary to a soldier’s life. January 20, 1848 he married Miss Ann Goings, daughter of Drew and Elizabeth Goings, and of its union were born eleven children, nine of whom are still living: Evelyn E., Charles A., John W., Samuel J., Eugene A., H. M., Mary J., Mattie Ann and Joseph E. Seven of the family belong to the Missionary Baptist Church, of which the father is a deacon. One of the boys, J. W. is a Baptist preacher.” http://www.argenweb.net/lincoln/goodspeed.html#Janson%20S.%20Fish

Additional information is found on Don McKinney’s website.   Don shared the following photos of Ann Going and Jason Fish

Ann Eliza Goings info on Don McKinney's website

 

Jason Fish and Ann GoingsAnn Eliza Goings

http://don.mckinney.tripod.com/jasonfish.html

John E. Going (John E. Goen) is listed on the 1856 Oktibbeha County, Mississippi State Census report side by side, on same page with William W. Goyen  (W. W. Goen).

William W. Goens or Goyen on 1856 Oktibbeha Miss taxes with John E Goens too

(1856 Oktibbeha County, Miss tax report with W. W. Goen adjacent to John E. Goen: http://mdah.state.ms.us/arrec/digital_archives/taxrolls/Oktibbeha/1856/Personal/11 ).

By 1860, Ann Eliza Going Fish moves to Arkansas with her family, and so does John E. Going.Ann Eliza Going and Jason Fish in Drew County, Ark 1860 US Census

(1860 US Census – Drew Co, Ark – J S Fish and wife E A Fish)

John E. Going had also moved to Drew County, Arkansas by 1860 – along with sister Ann Eliza Going and her husband Jason S. Fish and their family.

J E Goings with own family and children in Drew County Arkansas in 1860 US Census

(1860 US Census – Drew County, Arkansas – J. E. Goings with spouse Elizabeth Goings and their 5 children)

Finally, the following Genealogy of the Goyen family was done in 1958 by Mrs. Elmer Mathie Adams.  It traces the siblings of William W. Goyen that she knew about and their descendants. It also traces the all the children of William W. Goyen, and their descendants.  It has been helpful in piecing together family members who may still be alive.  I have redacted birth date information of those who may possibly still be living to protect privacy:

Goyen family geneaology from 1958 done by Mrs Elmer Adams page 1a

Goyen family geneaology from 1958 done by Mrs Elmer Adams page 1b

Goyen family geneaology from 1958 done by Mrs Elmer Adams_Page_2 redacted info

Goyen family geneaology from 1958 done by Mrs Elmer Adams_Page_3 redacted

Goyen family geneaology from 1958 done by Mrs Elmer Adams_Page_4

Goyen family geneaology from 1958 done by Mrs Elmer Adams_Page_5 redacted

Goyen family geneaology from 1958 done by Mrs Elmer Adams_Page_6

Civil War Service and Death of W W Goyen

News Clipping W W Goyen at Brice's Crossroads

William W. Goyen in uniform

William W. Goyen in uniform

W W Goyen Civ War Perrin's Battalion Miss Cav July - Oct 1863_Page_4W W Goyen Civ War Perrin's Battalion Miss Cav July - Oct 1863_Page_3W W Goyen Civ War Perrin's Battalion Miss Cav July - Oct 1863_Page_2W W Goyen Capt T P Montgomery's Co Miss May 9, 1863_Page_2W W Goyen Capt T P Montgomery's Co Miss May 9, 1863_Page_1W W Goyen 8th Miss Cav Jan 19, 1864 to June 10, 1864 killed Brice's Crossroads_Page_7W W Goyen 8th Miss Cav Jan 19, 1864 to June 10, 1864 killed Brice's Crossroads_Page_5W W Goyen 8th Miss Cav Jan 19, 1864 to June 10, 1864 killed Brice's Crossroads_Page_4W W Goyen 8th Miss Cav Jan 19, 1864 to June 10, 1864 killed Brice's Crossroads_Page_3W W Goyen 8th Miss Cav Jan 19, 1864 to June 10, 1864 killed Brice's Crossroads_Page_2W W Goyen 8th Miss Cav Jan 19, 1864 to June 10, 1864 killed Brice's Crossroads_Page_1W W Goyen Grave site

 

EVENTS IN William W. Goyen’s life:  

1847 – Oktibbeha County, Mississippi – county tax rolls – pg 11 lists:

William W. Going, and Drury B. Going on the tax rolls.  (see weblink):

http://mdah.state.ms.us/arrec/digital_archives/taxrolls/Oktibbeha/1847/Personal/11

10)  1847 – Oktibbeha County, Mississippi – county tax rolls – pg 43 lists:

Wm. W. Going, and Drury B. Going on tax rolls.  (see weblink):

http://mdah.state.ms.us/arrec/digital_archives/taxrolls/Oktibbeha/1847/Personal/43

William W. Going or Goyne Goyen in 1847 Oktibbeha Mississippi taxes

11)  1850 – Lowndes County, Mississippi – US Census – showing William Goen, 21 years old, living with Dailey family as a student – there are 4 students ages 17, 18, 19, 21 living with the Daileys at that time.  Only one of those students with last name of Dailey.

(see attached 1850 Census).

1850 Lowndes Miss William Goen

12)  1850 – Yalobusha, Mississippi – US Census – pages 406 – family 424:

– Thompson McCluney – age 46 – Male – head of household – Planter – born in SC
– A. McCluney – age 21 – Female – born in SC
– John McCluney – age 20 – Male – born in SC
– Samuel McCluney – age 18 – Male – born in SC
– Thadeus McCluney – age 12 – Male – born in Ala.
– Docia Plaxco – age 80 – Female – born in SC
– Hugh Forbes – age 24 – Male – Laborer – born in SC
– Jas Stephens – age 19 – Male – Laborer – born in Miss

1850 US Census Yalobusha, Miss Thompson McCluney fam p1 1850 US Census Yalobusha, Miss Thompson McCluney fam p2

– In William W. Going’s letter dated

13)  1851 – Oktibbeha County, Mississippi – county tax rolls – pg 12 lists:

Wm. W. Goings on tax rolls (Drury B. Going no longer on tax rolls – may have passed away).  (see weblink):  http://mdah.state.ms.us/arrec/digital_archives/taxrolls/Oktibbeha/1851/Personal/12

14)  1853 – Oktibbeha County, Mississippi – county tax rolls – pg 9 lists:

  1. W. Goens on tax rolls. (see weblink):

http://mdah.state.ms.us/arrec/digital_archives/taxrolls/Oktibbeha/1853/Personal/9

15)  1853 – Yalobusha County, Mississippi – county tax rolls – pg 28 lists:  http://mdah.state.ms.us/arrec/digital_archives/taxrolls/Yalobusha/1853/Personal/28

  1. a) John T. McLuny
  2. b) Thompson McLuny

16)  1857 – Yalobusha County, Mississippi – county tax rolls –  http://mdah.state.ms.us/arrec/digital_archives/taxrolls/Yalobusha/1857/Personal/28%20-%20pg%2028

  1. a) Thompson McLuney

17)  1856 – Oktibbeha County, Mississippi – county tax rolls – pg 11 lists:

  1. W. Goens and John E. Goens on tax rolls. (see weblink below):

http://mdah.state.ms.us/arrec/digital_archives/taxrolls/Oktibbeha/1856/Personal/11

  1. LETTERS written by William Walter Going (Goyen):  (underlined and bolded names of interest below): 
  1. FIRST LETTER: July 29, 1851 (summary):  Addressed to “Miss” in Oktibbeha County (Envelope is addressed to E D Going – in Oakland, Miss – Aug 4 date stamped from “Starkville”.  (See attached – copy of original and transcription).

Letter from W W Goyen to cousins and sister July 29 1851 p1 Letter from W W Goyen to cousins and sister July 29 1851 p2 Letter from W W Goyen to cousins and sister July 29 1851 p3 Letter from W W Goyen to cousins and sister July 29 1851 p4

W W Goyen or Goings letters written to McCluney fam in July 1851_Page_3 W W Goyen or Goings letters written to McCluney fam in July 1851_Page_4 W W Goyen or Goings letters written to McCluney fam in July 1851_Page_5 W W Goyen or Goings letters written to McCluney fam in July 1851_Page_6

– It starts “Dear sister
– answering her letter from “June 10th”
– his first session closed the 18 inst
– had examination and excellent dinner given by patrons and friends of his school.
– Rev. Mr. Presley delivered an address
– next session he should have several new scholars.
– Great facility
– Has become acquainted with several young ladies
– met Miss Burts and Miss Rife – They are not married, and “I suppose there is no probability of it soon.”
– William Walter Going is now boarding at the house of Mr. Bell – the father of the “beautiful     Miss Bell I alluded to some time since.”

– If you or “cousin A” are going to get married soon, let me know and I will come
– Give my best to all, and “more especially to Granma tell her I want to see her very much”

  1. SECOND LETTER: (summary): (not dated – separate from above letter – but seems like sent at same time due to details) – envelope addressed to Miss A. E. McCluney (See attached – copies of original hand-written letters and transcriptions)

– starts Dear cousin

– heard of her illness, and that she was “getting better when sister wrote”.
– due to “delicacy of my health I will have to defer paying you a visit until fall.”
– “At this time I have vacation”
– “I have enjoyed myself finely this last week” “and am getting along finely both in school and out of school”

– spends most of his time with “a very amiable and intelligent young lady who shares the greater part of my affections”

–  . . . “hope my love is reciprocated by her”

– “I have pledged myself not to give my hand in matrimony until I see Miss P of whom you spoke of”

III.  THIRD/Fourth Combined LETTER(s):  (See attached – copies of original hand-written letters and transcriptions)(Summary below):

(both below are part of same letter – one part addressed to his sister, the other to his cousin).  (Envelope for this letter is dated Sept 11 – stamped Starkville – addressed to Miss T. E. Going in Oakland, Miss

W W Goyen or Goings letters written to McCluney family in September 1851 envelope plus original ltr plus transcr_Page_1 W W Goyen or Goings letters written to McCluney family in September 1851 envelope plus original ltr plus transcr_Page_2 W W Goyen or Goings letters written to McCluney family in September 1851 envelope plus original ltr plus transcr_Page_3 W W Goyen or Goings letters written to McCluney family in September 1851 envelope plus original ltr plus transcr_Page_4

1)  Sept 4, 1851 – to Miss T. E. Goings, – addressed to “sister

– Answering your “joint letter”
– Just received it in “today’s mail”.
– “I am yet teaching and anticipate teaching the ensuing year if I can get 600 dollars for my services, if not I presume that I shall settle on a farm somewhere West.
– Describes a student of his “Fletcher Beard” who had some misdeed at his school.  Chased him out of school it appears – and he does “not regret” it.  Says “My present patrons express their regret at not being able to procure my service for the rival year.”  (wish he had chased Fletcher out the year before – in other words).
– “I am boarding at Mr. Bell’s and have been since married.”
– Gives a description of his wife ” medium build, dark hair, black eyes, and moderately                                   handsome.  She has a sweet, mild, and amiable disposition”
– “We anticipate paying you a visit as soon as school is out”.
– “Sarah sends her love and respect to you.”

– Signed “W W and S M Going to Miss T E Going

2)  Sept 9, 1851 – to T. E. A. McCluney – (Summary below):

It  starts “dear cousin” (Note:  I believe this is a combination of T E Going, and A McCluney as part of the letter was for his sister, and another part of the letter was for his cousin).

-William W. is responding to the cousin’s letters
– Asks cousin to reference to his “sister’s” letter he wrote as part of same letter – written a few                days before – but he has been sick so reason for delay.
– his “sweet and darling wife” is nursing him
– “Sarah is well except a bad cold”
– He will resume school Monday if he doesn’t relapse
– “Tell uncle if he can find a good piece of land” for William W. – “perhaps he will move there”.
– “Received a letter from cousin John a few days ago.” ” . . . enjoying himself finely with the young ladies.”
– “You and sister and cousin Samuel must not get married before I can come out”

W W Goyen letter to sister and cousin Sept 1851 p1 W W Goyen letter to sister and cousin Sept 1851 p2 W W Goyen letter to sister and cousin Sept 1851 p3 W W Goyen letter to sister and cousin Sept 1851 p4

  1. TRANSCRIBED LETTERS from Wiseman, Bell and Ware families – a couple deal with William W Goyen (Going) (See attached – transcribed copies only)(Summaries below):

1)  I G Bell letter to William R. Wiseman  – dated March 18, 1854 from Starkville, Mississippi

– says “Goings has bought Joe Valentine’s place.  He gave 600 dollars and Joe bought Dr. Watt’s place.  He gave a thousand dollars for it.”

2)  H B Ware (Hugh Bell Ware) to his aunt I E Wiseman,  – dated October 1864 from Starkville, Mississippi

– says “Mr Goings was killed on the 10th of June in an engagement in the northern part of the stateAunt Sallie has 4 children the youngest nearly 3 years old.  She is keeping house and getting on finely.

  1. LETTERS from William W. Goyen to his daughters during Civil War (See attached – copies of originals and transcriptions) (full transcriptions below):

Letter No. 1. – to his two daughters, Martha Elizabeth and Anna Mae Goyen.

May 9th, 1864 — CAMP NEAR VERONA, MISSISSIPPI.

“”Dear Little Girls” — Your dear Papa has for the first time in his life seated himself for the purpose of writing you. This leaves me in good health and doing well and I hope it may find you in the same enjoyment.

Papa often thinks of his dear little girls and asks the Great God to keep them from harm, and I hope that he will do so. Be good and kind to all, but especially to each other. Love is only to be obtained by giving love in return, and this I enjoin upon you. Love each other and you will have the blessings of your good and kind parents and at the same time secure the blessings of our appreciating God.

Study your books diligently and learn to write soon.  Papa would like to have a letter written by you very much indeed, and I know if you mind Cousin Martha that you will soon be able to write yourself, but now you will have to get them or Cousin Doff to write for you as you are just beginning to learn. My Dear Little Girls you must have them write me how you are getting along at school and how fast you are learning and whether you are well satisfied at school or not, also what you are studying.

Let me know when you heard from Ma and how she and John Bell and Eugene were.

My dear Little Girls you must be good to your kind GrandPa and Ma and must not vex them and they will love you and bless you.

I saw your Aunt NANNIE PROVINE and her little boy (Joseph Fipdley Provine) and Kin a few days ago at Coles Creek. They were very well and would like to see you very much. They speak of visiting you this summer.

Love to you and your Grand Pa and Ma, also Cousin Doff; Uncle Frank and Aunt Liz and cousin Martha and others that you wish to, and remember to do good. Goodbye my dear little “Bettie” (Martha Elizabeth) and Anna Mae. Love to all there and remember to do good. This is from your dear Papa — W. W. GOYEN. — P. E. – Write to me soon, Direct your letter to Duff’s Regiment, Verona, Mississippi.”

Letter No 2:  dated June 7, 1864 – camp near New Albany:

“My Dear Wife: . — In haste I drop you a few lines. This leaves me in good health, and I hope it may find you in the same enjoyment.

We have been on the March two days to meet the enemy. They are at Ripley, and we expect to fight them today or tomorrow if they come on. I do not know how many there is. We have about 1500 in our Brigade. We have had a great deal of rain here. I found all the boys willing and in good spirits. I hope that we will come out all right.

Tell Billy to push ahead. I will write again as soon as we get through the scrap that we are in.

Write to me – Direct it to OXFORD, Duff’s Regiment, Company “K”.  Kiss the children for me.

God Bless all of you.  — W. W. GOYEN–“

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