1787 Winn Bearden Gowen

On July 12, 1819, at age 32, Winn Bearden Gowen was married to Elizabeth Hunt in Spartanburg County, SC. She, 29, was born February 27, 1790. About 1821 Winn Bearden Gowen removed to Alabama and made his home in Talledega and St. Clair Counties.

Parents: 

John Gowen b. abt. 1732 – 1736 – d. ? , m. Lettice Winn Bearden in 1759

Children: 

Elizabeth Gowen born about 1820
Nancy Gowen born about 1822
William Bradford Gowen born about 1828
Amanda T. O. Gowen born about 1829

Siblings:  

William Gowen                              born about 1762
Lettice “Letty” Gowen                   born about 1763
Elizabeth Gowen                            born about 1765
James M. Gowen                            born in 1767
John B. Gowen                               born about 1769
Sarah Gowen                                   born June 5, 1774
Mary Gowen                                   born about 1776
Minerva Gowen                              born about 1780
Winn Bearden Gowen                   born October 18, 1787

FACTS and SOURCES:

See the following pages on this site for additional information:

Spartanburg County, South Carolina
Greenville County, South Carolina
St. Claire County, Alabama

1792 July 5 – John Gowen sold 340 acres located “on George’s Creek on the south side of the Saluda River” that had been granted to his sister, Ann Gowen Easley in 1785 by Gov. Guerrard.  This land had passed through the hands of Edmund Bearden, brother-in-law to John Gowen, then to “Mr. Jamison,” then back to the State of South Carolina and finally was granted to John Gowen by Gov. Pinckney.  James Easley, believed to be his nephew; Jesse Moss and Winn Bearden, brother-in-law to the major, witnessed the deed. SC.   http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~gowenrf/Gowenms007.htm

1808 Oct 1 John Gowen Sr of Spartanburg Dist to John Gowen Jr of Spartanburg Dist land in Greenville Dist SC on the Middle Fork of Saluda River, containing by estimation 24 acres being part of a tract of land containing 400 acres granted by patent on Oct 15, 1784 to John Gowen Sr. Signed: John Gowen. Wits: W B Gowen, John Lucas. Proved up on Feb 6, 1809 by Winn B. Gowen. Recorded Feb 9, 1809. Greenville Co, SC. Bk H, pg 210, 211

1809 Aug 20 – John Gowen – Will:
http://interactive.ancestry.com/9080/007649575_00018?pid=642662&backurl=http%3a%2f%2fsearch.ancestry.com%2f%2fcgi-bin%2fsse.dll%3findiv%3d1%26db%3dUSProbateSC%26gss%3dangs-d%26new%3d1%26rank%3d1%26gsln%3dGoin%26gsln_x%3d0%26msypn__ftp%3dSouth%2bCarolina%252c%2bUSA%26msypn%3d43%26msypn_PInfo%3d5-%257c0%257c1652393%257c0%257c2%257c3245%257c43%257c0%257c0%257c0%257c0%257c%26msypn_x%3d1%26msypn__ftp_x%3d1%26MSAV%3d0%26uidh%3dm37%26pcat%3dCLP_WILLS%26fh%3d37%26h%3d642662%26recoff%3d%26ml_rpos%3d38&treeid=&personid=&hintid=&usePUB=true
Probate Court Minutes:
Index 1809:
https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.3.1/TH-1-19473-57335-8?cc=1919417&wc=M6N4-S3D:210905501,211169101
Will Proven:
https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.3.1/TH-1-19473-56875-45?cc=1919417&wc=M6N4-S3D:210905501,211169101
Inventory of Appraisement:
https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.3.1/TH-1-19473-57104-13?cc=1919417&wc=M6N4-S3D:210905501,211169101
Pay Debts:
https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.3.1/TH-1-19473-57405-35?cc=1919417&wc=M6N4-S3D:210905501,211169101
Index 1810
https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.3.1/TH-1-19473-57562-55?cc=1919417&wc=M6N4-S3D:210905501,211169101
Sale Return:
https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.3.1/TH-1-19473-56172-5?cc=1919417&wc=M6N4-S3D:210905501,211169101
Sale Return:
https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.3.1/TH-1-19473-57183-14?cc=1919417&wc=M6N4-S3D:210905501,211169101
Sale Return:
https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.3.1/TH-1-19473-56749-54?cc=1919417&wc=M6N4-S3D:210905501,211169101
Sale Return:
https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.3.1/TH-1-19473-56599-50?cc=1919417&wc=M6N4-S3D:210905501,211169101
Spartanburg Co, SC
(Note: In 1809 – John Gowen names “Atlantic and Dorindas, daughters or Polly Sanders” as beneficiaries – leaving them a “deed of gift”. John Gowen 3 (three) years earlier had made a “deed of gift” to Thany Sanders as the “daughter of a woman by the name of Polly Sanders at her birth, but who now bears the name of Polly Gentry”. )
(- Is Polly possibly a sister? – married at first to a Sanders, then remarried later to a Gentry)
(HERE: James Sanders Sr – is a purchaser at Alexander Going’s estate in 1775, Orange Co, NC. – maybe the husb?)
On August 20, 1809 John Gowen being in ill health, wrote his will. It was recorded in Spartanburg County Will Book A, pages 2-3 November 10, 1809. Apparently he died shortly after writing his will and was probably buried in Spartanburg District.  The will reads:
“In the name of God, Amen.  I, John Gowen, being afflicted by the hand of Almighty God and knowing it is once ordained for all men to die, do ordain, constitute and appoint this my last Will and Testament, hereby re­voking all other Wills by me made, excepting such property, this is, viz: as I have already bestowed to my children.
I pray God who gave it to take my soul, my body to return from whence it came and be buried in a Christian manner, by direction of my executors to be hereinafter named
First: I bequeath unto my son, Winn B. Gowen, a tract of land lying and being in Greenville District on both sides of middle Tygar River, the line to begin at the mouth of a Branch emptying into the said river on the north side below the mill–thence a direct line to the up­per end of the big cove and to the line of land–then my line to the opposite, to the beginning.  Also two negroes called Zed and Spence, together with a stock of cattle and hogs now on the premises before mentioned, one bed and furniture; also my part of a bay gelding that he rides.
Second: I bequeath unto my daughter, Lettie, a plantation by Ann Easley’s place, three negroe girls known by the names of Vina, Ede and Harriot; one bed and furniture and two cows and calves.
Third: I bequeath unto my Daughter, Minerva, a tract of land lying on the south side of Saluda where my son, James Gowen, attended; Two Ne­groes, names Cresa and Asa, one bed and furni­ture, One Hundred Dollars to purchase a horse­beast, two cows and calves and her mother’s sattle [saddle].
Fourth: I bequeath unto my daughter, Elizabeth Wood­son, a tract of land on Tyger River called Sulsias place.
Fifth: I bequeath unto my son, James Gowen, 800 acres to begin at the ford of the river on the South Pacolet, now used between here and where he lives, and thence a North course so to include the school house spring where Davis taught, and then ’round to a line to be made for John Roddy; thence, to the beginning so as to include the Jamison fields.
Sixth: I give and bequeath to my Grandson, John Gowen, son of William, deceased, all the land between what I have given Winn and Letty that I own, also one Girl named Hannah; to my granddaughter, Mahulda, a negro boy called Buck; unto Matilda, a negroe boy called Sip; a negroe boy named Ben unto Letty, my granddaughter.
If any of these legatees died without lawful issue, the property to be returned and equally divided be­tween my children the living.  I hereby appoint John and Winn Gowen, my sons, and James Blassingame and Street Thurston, my sons-in-law to be the executors of this, my last will and testament: to sell on a credit of twelve months all the real and personal property that I have not before bequeathed, except two hundred acres of land to be laid off, agreeable to deed of gift made to Atlantic and Dorindas, Daughters of Polly Sanders.  My debts to be paid and, if any balance left, to be equally divided between all of my children living, borne of my wife, Lettie, deceased.  In witness whereof I have set my hand this 20th day of August, Anno Domini, 1809.                                John Gowen, In the presence of: Theron Earle, C. W. McVay, Willus G. Brown”
Spartanburg Co, SC

1813 May 22 John Gowen, WB etal to Henry Grogan 100 acres on Beaverdam Cr.  John Gowen, James Blasingame, Street Thurston, and Winn B. Gowen all of Greenville Dist, SC executors of the last will and testament of John Gowen decd by Henry Grogan of Spartanburg Dist, convey a tract of land in Spartanburg Dist to Henry Grogan on both sides of Beaver Dam Creek, a branch of South Pacolatte River on the N bank of the River at John Grogan’s corner . . . on Bartholomew Grogan’s line, to Dounda’s corner . . . containing est 100 acres . . . part of a tract of 450 acres granted to Peter Vidion and certified on Oct 6, 1772 whereon the said Henry now lives. Signed: John Gowen, James Blasingame, Street Thurston, W B Gowen. Wits: Willey Brown, John Lucas. Proved up Nov 20, 1813.  Spartanburg Co SC, Bk O, pg 47

1814 May 24 John Gowen, WB etal to Bartholomew Grogan 100 acres on S Pacolet River.  John Gowen, James Blasingame, Steet Thurston, and Winn B Gowen to Bartholomew Grogan of Spartanburg Dist . . . a tract of land in Spartanburg Dist, on the S side of South Pacolate River known by James Bradens plantation . . . Rui Ross’ corner . . . along John Lucas’ land . . . containing 100 acres formerly belonged to John Gowen decd, now with John Gowen, James Blasingame, Street Thurston, and Winn B Gowen. Signed: John Gowen, W B Gowen, Street Thurston, James Blasingame. Wits: Henry Wolf, Henry Grogan. Proved up Feb 16, 1815. Spartanburg Co SC, Bk O, pg 219

1814 Aug 3 Winn B Gowen and Nancy his wife both of Greenville Dist to John Holcombe of Greenville Dist, a tract of land in Greenville Dist, SC part of a tract of land granted to Benjamin Barton, and from him to John Gowen, from him to Winn B Gowen, and bounded on a corner of Gowen’s Mill tract, along Gowen’s line, then along Thomas Barton’s line, along Littleberry Holcombe’s line, then to the road that leads from Littleberry Holcombe’s to Laban Loftis’, along said road to Gowen’s line, containing 95 acres. Signed: W. B. Gowen, Nancy Gowen. Wits: Jordan Holcombe, Wm H Holcombe. Proved up on Feb 1, 1815. Recorded Feb 1, 1815. Greenville County, SC. Bk I, pg 342.

1815 Sept 14 Winn B Gowen to Sterling Harris a tract of land in Greenville Dist, SC on both sides of the Sink Hole Fork of Tyger River, along William Holcomb’s corner, along Hannah Ballew’s fence, along Laban Loftis’ corner, containing 188 acres, part of a survey of land granted to John Gowen deceased and by his last will bequeathed to Winn B Gowen. Signed: W. B. Gowen. Wits: Thomas Jackson, Joseph Barton. Proved up on Sept 14, 1816. Recorded April 6, 1816. Greenville Co, SC. Bk I, pg 494.

1815 Oct 18 Winn B Gowen of Greenville Dist to Jonathan Stokes of Spartanburg Dist a tract of land in Greenville Dist on both sides of the Beaver Dam Creek of Tygar on the N side of the Creek near the mouth of my Mill house branch, along William Holcomb’s corner, along Harris’ corner, along Harris’ fence, to the bank of the Creek below my Grist Mill, containing estimated 320 acres, survey originally made to Edmund Bearden for 640 acres on Oct 15, 1784 and conveyed to my father John Gowen, and him willed unto Winn B Gowen whereon is erected a grist mill. Also one other tract of land in Greenville Dist, joining the above on the S side at the Buncomb road, then along Littleberry Holcomb’s line, containing 16 acres part of my Father’s land and willed to Winn B Gowen. Signed. W. B. Gowen. Wits: George Miller, John Dill. Proved up on Nov 4, 1817. Recorded March 30, 1818. Greenville County, SC. Bk K, pg 178.

1815 Nov 17 Winn B Gowen of Greenville Dist to William Holcombe Sr of Greenville Dist, a tract of land in Greenville Dist on the head waters of Middle Tyger River, part of a tract of land granted to John Gowin containing 45 acres. Signed: W. B. Gowen. Wits: Darius Holcombe, Jesse Gosnell. Proved up March 1816. Recorded April 6, 1816. Greenville County, SC. Bk I, pg 493.

1816 Dec 4 Winn B Gowen of Greenville Dist, SC to Joseph Barton and William Barton each of Greenville Dist, SC, a tract of land containing 15 acres in Greenville Dist, SC on both sides of the Sink Hole Fork of Tiger River, along the corner of land granted to Edmond Bearden and conveyed by Bearden to John Gowen, and from Gowenbequethed to his son Winn B Gowen. Signed: Winn B. Gowen. Wits: John Goodlett, John Gowen. Proved up Dec 7, 1816. Recorded Oct 1, 1817. Greenville County, SC. Bk K, pg 88.

1818 March 31 The executors of John Gowen, decd viz John Gowen Jr, Winn B. Gowen, Street Thruston, and James Blassingame sell to Rice F Ross of Greenville Co, SC, a tract of land in Greenville Dist on the S side of South Packolate River, below the waggon ford of the Togaloo road on the S side of S Pockolate River, on Bates’ old line, along the old corner made for Pleasant Early, containing by estimate 132 acres the principal part of said tract known by the name of Moses Span’s old plantation. Originally granted to James B(sp?), and from him to said Span, and from him to John Gowen Sr. Signed: John Gowen, Street Thruston, W B Gowen, James Blassingame. Wits: Asa McCrowder, Minor W Brown. Proved up on Jan 26, 1819. Recorded Jan 26, 1819. Greenville Co, SC. Bk K, pg 338.

1818 March 31 John Gowen, WB etal to Thomas Grogan 100 acres on S Pacolet River.  John Gowen, Winn B Gowen, Street Thurston, and James Blassingame (all of Greenville Dist) appointed by the last will and testament of John Gowen, decd,convey to Thomas Grogan of Spartanburg Dist . . . convey land in Spartanburg Dist on the N side of South Pacolate River, on the North side thereof . . . to Brown’s corner . . . to a branch known as Pennington’s Mill House (or Still House) . . . est 100 acres including the house where the said Thomas now lives . . . part of a tract originally granted Henry Bruneau for 1000 acres . . . part of the estate of said John Gowen decd. Signed: John Gowen, W B Gowen, Street Thurston, James Blasingame. Wits: Asa Crowder, Minor Brown. Proved up Sept 12, 1818.  Spartanburg Co SC, Bk Q, pg 118

1819 Sept 7 Winn B Gowen conveys to Thomas Barton both of Greenville Dist, SC, a tract of land in the Greenville Dist, SC on the E side of the Sink Hole Fork of Tyger River, on the W branch of sd Creek, along Jonathan Stokes’ corner, along the fence of Sterling Harris, containing 2 and 1/2 acres being part of a survey of land to John Gowen decdby Edmond Beardon, bequeathed to his son Winn B Gowen, and Winn B Gowen to Thomas Barton. Signed: Winn B Gowen. Wits: Robert D Talley, William A Dawson, Dyer Talley. Proved up Jan 17, 1822. Recorded Jan 17, 1822. Greenville Co, SC. Bk L, pg 300.

1821 Dec 1 John Gowen and Winn B Gowen exrs to John Lucas 1357 acres on S Pacolet River. John Gowen and Winn B Gowen two executors of the estate of our father John Gowen decd, late of Spartanburg Dist., both of Greenville Dist, convey to John Lucas a tract of land mostly in Spartanburg Dist, small part in Greenville Dist, on both sides of S Pacolate River . . . Bartholomew Grogan’s corner . . . near the District road . . . William Archer’s corner . .. W S Brown’s corner . . . containing and estimated 1357 acres being part of our father’s land including the dwelling where John Lucas now lives. Signed: John Gowen, W B Gowen. Wits: John Gowen Jr, Ambrose Williams Sr. Proved up Dec 20, 1823.  Spartanburg Co SC, Bk T, pg 246

1822 Nov 6 John Gowen and Winn B Gowen exrs to John Lucas 120 acres on S Pacolet River.  John Gowen and Winn B Gowen of Greenville Dist, SC executors of John Gowen, decd convey to John Lucas of Spartanburg Dist . . . a tract of land in Spartanburg Dist on the N side of South Pacolate . . . at a corner made by Willey S Brown on the N side of the river, for James Gowen between the Jamison’s fields, and the long bottom, thence with said Gowen’s line near Brown’s line . . . with the line of John Gowen decd’s land to Thomas Grogan’s corner . . . containing 120 acres. Signed: John Gowen, W B Gowen. Wits: B Dunham, John Stokes. Proved up May 3, 1826.  Spartanburg Co SC, Bk T, pg 246

1824 April 5, John Gowen and Winn B Gowen, John Gowen Sr decd’s heirs to Francis Adams a tract of land in Greenville Dist on the waters of the Middle Tyger River, on corner of Nancy Easley’s place, containing 65 acres and a half being part of a tract of 362 acres originally granted to Anna Easley. Signed: John Gowen, W B Gowen, Street Thurston. Wits: Julius McCreary, James Adams. Proved up on May 21, 1824. Recorded May 3, 1824. Greenville County, SC. Bk N, pg 263.

1825 Feb 24 John Gowen and Winn B. Gowen of Greenville Dist, paid by Capt John Lucas, convey unto Capt John Lucat a tract of land in the Dist of Greenville, on Motlows Cr, Spanns, McCrary, containing by estimation 250 acres, being the lower end of a tract of eight hundred thirty seven acres originally graned to Robert Goodgion, by patent bearing date May 1st, 1793, and by him conveyed to our father John Gowen by conveyande June 10, 1790. By him conveyed to our father John Gowen by conveyance bearing date June 10, 1790. Signed: John Gowen and W B Gowen.. Wt: Thomas Stanford, John Page, Jr. Greenville Co, SC. Bk O, pg 190.

1826 Oct 7 Winn B Gowen and Elizabeth Gowen of Greenville Co, SC, Duke Glenn and Anne Glenn of Pendleton Dist, William Gresham and Susan Gresham of Dekalb County, Georgia, being seized in fee simple and in a proportionable part of a certain tract or parcel of land as legatees and heirs of Philimon Bradford decd estate, land in Greenville Dist SC, where widow Bradford now lives bounded E by Davis Hunt’s land, on S by S Fork of Saluda River and on W by said River. Winn B GowenElizabeth Gowen, Duke W Glenn, Anne Glenn, William Grisham, Susan Grisham have made and appt William D Bradford of St Clair County, Alabama and Lemuel J Bradford of Greenville Dist, SC our true and lawful attorneys for us . . . to dispose of the aforesaid tract of land. Signed: W B Gowen, Elizabeth Gowen, Duke Glenn, Anne Glenn, William Grisham, Susan Grisham. Wits: Davis Hunt, John Cox. Proved up Oct 9, 1826. Recorded Nov 10, 1826. Greenville County, SC. Bk P, pg 180.

1829 Jan 2 – Winn B Gowen paid $600 to William D Bradford for land on Canoe Creek in the SW quarter of section 27 in township 14 of Range 2 east containing 161 acres. Signed: Wm D Bradford. Wits: L J Bradford, Edward Washington. – Deed bk A, p 394. St Clair County, AL
https://www.familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:1:3Q9M-CSVB-JL9R?i=347&cat=36196

1830 Fall Term – State v Winn B Gowin – Ordered that Capias issue in this case and supd for witnesses. County Court Minutes 1828-1849. pg 252. St Clair County, AL
https://www.familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:1:3Q9M-C957-CSY6-G?i=149&cat=588

1831 May 11 – State v Winn B Gowin. Ordered by the court the defendant be fined two dollars for neglect of duty as overseer of a road and that he pay the cost of this prosecution for which execution may issue. County Court Minutes 1828-1849. pg 285. St Clair County, AL https://www.familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:1:3Q9M-C957-CSBC-G?i=164&cat=588

1833 May 6 – application of William H Shotwell on request and relinquishment of claim of Elizabeth Gowen widow of Winn B Gowen decd, it is ordered that letters issue accordingly. Hnry Bradford, James Thomason, Philemon Bradford, John Washington, and Wiley Truss appt to apprais estate of Winn B Gowen decd. Orphans Court Minutes 1827-1844 item 1 pg 213. St Clair Co, AL
https://www.familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:1:3Q9M-CS42-K93B-P?i=124&cat=24528

1833 May 13 – appraise bill of Estate of Winn B Gowen – 3 pages long. Estate Ledger 1828-1837. pg 173-175
https://www.familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:1:33SQ-GB3R-6BZ?i=319&cc=1925446&cat=588

1833 July 15 – sale bill of Estate of Winn B Gowen and another on Dec 23, 1833 – 3 pages long . Estate Ledger 1828-1837. pg 176-178
https://www.familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:1:33S7-LB3R-8NT?i=323&cc=1925446&cat=588

1834 Feb 19 – Patrick Lewellin v Winn B Gowen, William H Shotwell admrs. Received in the above stated case thirty seven dollars and ninety eight cents Feb 19, 1834. Execution Docket 1833-1841 pg. 16. St Clair Co, AL https://www.familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:1:3Q9M-C957-CST2-4?i=338&cat=588

1834 March 24 – it is ordered that Elizabeth Gowen be appointed guardian for Mary Gowen, Amana Gowen, and William Gowen the heirs of Winn B Gowen decd.Orphans Court Minutes 1827-1844 item 2 pg 8. St Clair Co, AL https://www.familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:1:3Q9M-CS42-K93V-M?i=172&cat=24528

1836 March 7 – Wm H Shotwell files as admin of est of Winn B Gowan for final settlement. Orphans Court Minutes 1827-1844 item 2 pg 89. St Clair Co, AL
https://www.familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:1:3Q9M-CS42-K9QX-N?i=212&cat=24528

1839 Nov 4 – Ordered on application of James Thomason that he be appt guardian for William Gowen one of the heirs of Winn B Gowen decd. Orphans Court Minutes 1827-1844 item 2 pg 255. St Clair Co, AL https://www.familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:1:3Q9M-CS42-K9QX-7?i=298&cat=24528

1839 Nov 4 – Settlement of the Estate of Winn B Gowen decd. 4 equal shares – to widow Elizabeth Gowen, to Mary Gowan, to Amanda Gowan, to William Gowan. Orphans Court Minutes 1827-1844 item 2 pg 256 – 258. St Clair Co, AL https://www.familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:1:3Q9M-CS42-K9QX-7?i=298&cat=24528

Gowen Manuscript information from the GRF: 

Winn Bearden Gowen, [John “Buck”6. William5, John F.4, William W.3, Thomas2, Mihil1] son of John “Buck” Gowen and Lettice “Letty” Winn Bearden Gowen, was born October 18, 1787, according to the family bible in the possession of William Lister Gowen, a great-grandson, in 1972. It is be­lieved that he was born in Spartanburg District.

According to the will of his father Winn Bearden Gowen re­ceived “a tract of land lying and being in Greenville District on both sides of the Middle Tygar River, the line to begin at the mouth of a branch emptying into the same river on the north side below the mill–thence a direct line to the upper end of a big cover and to the line of my land–thence my line to the opposite, to the beginning. Also two negros called Zed and Spence, together with a stock of cattle and hogs now on the premises before mentioned, one bed and furniture; also my part of a bay gelding that he rides.”

The mill referred to in the will is possibly the one built by Prue Benson and P. I. Gowen.

Winn Bearden Gowen was qualified as an executor of his fa­ther’s estate January 8, 1810, at age 23, and served in that ca­pacity until the estate was finally liquidated January 21, 1813 when he was summoned along with the other legatees.

On July 12, 1819, at age 32, he was married to Elizabeth Hunt in Spartanburg County. She, 29, was born February 27, 1790. About 1821 Winn Bearden Gowen removed to Alabama and made his home in Talledega and St. Clair Counties. He did not appear in the 1820 census of St. Clair County. Talledega County 1820 census has not been searched for him.

Winn Bearden Gowen appeared in the 1830 census of St. Clair County, page 225, as the head of a household and the owner of 12 slaves. The family consisted of:

“Gowen, Wynn B. white male 40-50
white female 30-40
white male 30-40
white male 15-20
white female 5-10
white male 0-5
white female 0-5″

Winn Bearden Gowen died in 1883 in St. Clair County. A sale of his estate was held November 28, 1883 at his home three miles northeast of Big Spring, Alabama. William H. Shotwell who administered the estate made a final settlement of the estate April 26, 1886, according to St. Clair Count”South Carolina Historical Magazine,” y legal records.

In the May 11, 1883 edition of “Greenville [SC] Moun­taineer” there appeared the following item, according to Volume 50, page 104:

“May 11, 1883–Died in St. Clair County, Alabama on April 12, 1883, Mr. Winn B. Gowan, formerly a highly respectable citizen of this district.”

A search of the census reports of the county might reveal more of this individual. Elizabeth Hunt Gowen survived her husband for 10 years and died August 1, 1893, probably in St. Clair County. The longevity of this couple is remarkable–he lived to be 96, and she lived to be 103, according to the bible record of William Lister Gowen.

A discrepancy has appeared which suggests that the longevity of Winn Bearden Gowen is in doubt. Orphans Court Records, Vol. 1841-1844, page 176 in adjoining Jefferson County, Al­abama records the appointment February 5, 1842 of Carter T. Hamilton, son-in-law, as guardian of the minor orphans of Winn Bearden Gowen:

“Know ye that Carter T. Hamilton has this day been duly appointed Guardian of Amanda T. O. Gowen and William B. Gowen, minor orphans of Winn B. Gowen, deceased . . . . ”

John F. Forrest, Judge
County Court, Jefferson County, Alabama
Issued the 5th day of February A.D. 1842″

Children born to Winn Bearden Gowen and Elizabeth Hunt Gowen include:

Elizabeth Gowen born about 1820
Nancy Gowen born about 1822
William Bradford Gowen born about 1828
Amanda T. O. Gowen born about 1829

Elizabeth Gowen, [Winn Bearden7, John “Buck”6. William5, John F.4, William W.3, Thomas2, Mihil1] daughter of Winn Bearden Gowen and Elizabeth Hunt Gowen, was born about 1820, prob­ably in St. Clair County. On December 27, 1834, at age 14, she was married to James Thompson in St. Clair County. Of this couple nothing more is known.

Nancy Gowen, [Winn Bearden7, EzrJohn “Buck”6. William5, John F.4, William W.3, Thomas2, Mihil1] daughter of Winn Bearden Gowen and Eliz­abeth Hunt Gowen, was born about 1822 probably in St. Clair County. She was married to Carter T. Hamilton October 1, 1839 in St. Clair County. Carter T. Hamilton was named guardian to William Bradford Gowen and Amanda T. O. Gowen, “minor orphans of Winn B. Gowen, deceased.”

William Bradford Gowen, [Winn Bearden7, EzrJohn “Buck”6. William5, John F.4, William W.3, Thomas2, Mihil1] son of Winn Bearden Gowen and Elizabeth Hunt Gowen, was born July 31, 1828, accord­ing to the family bible. It is believed that he was born in St. Clair County. He appeared in the 1850 cen­sus of Talledega County, Alabama as “William B. Gowen, age 22, laborer, born in Al­abama.” It is unknown in whose house­hold he was residing at that time. He was married February 1, 1855 at Talledega, Al­abama to Laura Virginia Oden who was born April 19, 1837, accord­ing to the family bible.

William Bradford Gowen was enumerated as the head of a household in the 1860 census of Talledega County:

“Gowen, William B. 31, born in GA, farmer
L. V. 22, born in GA
Mattie 1, born in AL”

On February 27, 1862 William Bradford Gowen enlisted in the Thirtieth Alabama Infantry Regiment at Syla­cauga, Al­abama. He was named a sergeant and later second lieu­tenant. In the Battle of Champion’s Hill, just prior to Grant’s siege of Vicks­burg in May 1863, Lt. William Bradford Gowen was captured.

While languishing in a prison camp on Johnson’s Island, Lt. William Bradford Gowen, CSA who had been captured near Vicksburg, recorded his thoughts and fears in his diary. Much of the journal was addressed to his wife at home. The open­ing entry expresses the pathos the prisoner felt:

“Mournful cries of the wounded and dying which would sometimes rise above the din of battle still ring in my ears and ever and anon the livid countenances and ghastly wounds of the dead whom I passed on the field rise before my mind. Doubtless many of the poor fel­lows had wives & children at home which a few short hours before had been as precious to them as life itself, and perhaps the hearts of those wives and children were even now, while the Husband and Father lay cold in death, filled with hope that he might soon be permitted to return to the bosom of his family and all the endear­ments of home.

But, alas, who can contemplate without tears of anguish the wail of sorrow and disappointed hope that shall rise from the broken hearts of those loved ones when in a few short days the dreadful truth shall become known. My God; who can describe the desolation of one hard fought battle.

I felt a profound sense of gratitude to the God of Mercy for my life preserved and sincere and heartfelt thanks for the kind protecting hand that had brought me safely and unhurt through the dangers of that day.

In speaking of my varied thoughts, let me assure you, dear Jennie, that yourself and our precious little Dar­lings, Mat­tie & Willie, occupy by far the largest share. You are in blissful ignorance of my situation tonight, but I am tor­mented with the thought that in a few days you will hear of the Battle of Champion Hill and hear that our Regiment was in the thickest of it and perhaps will see my name among the Missing, and then you will be tortured with the intolerable suspense of not knowing whether I am killed or captured.”

The journal, maintained from May 16, 1863 until his release and arrival home in 1865, chronicled his feelings at the time of capture and imprisonment on Johnson’s Island in the conflu­ence of Sandusky Bay and Lake Erie, off Sandusky, Ohio. The jour­nal is now in the care of Lt. Gowen’s great-grand­daughter, Mary Carrington Gowen, a Foundation member of Austin, Texas. Her father, William Lister Gowen, transcribed the diary and placed a typewritten copy in the Texas State Li­brary & Archives before his death in 1972. Gowen Research Founda­tion Library recently obtained a copy of the 160-page Journal from the state library.

William Bradford Gowen, son of Winn Bearden Gowen and Elizabeth Hunt Gowen, was born July 31, 1828, accord­ing to the family bible. He was a grandson of Maj. John “Buck” Gowen, Revolutionary soldier of Spartanburg County, South Carolina and his wife, Lettice Winn “Letty” Bearden Gowen.

He appeared in the 1850 cen­sus of Talledega County, Al­abama as “William B. Gowen, age 22, laborer, born in Al­abama.” He was married February 1, 1855 at Talledega, Al­abama to Laura Virginia “Jennie” Oden who was born April 19, 1837, accord­ing to the family bible.

On February 27, 1862 William Bradford Gowen enlisted in the Thirtieth Alabama Infantry Regiment at Syla­cauga, Al­abama. He was named a sergeant and later second lieu­tenant. In the Battle of Champion Hill in Mississippi, prior to Grant’s siege of Vicks­burg in May 1863, Lt. Gowen was cap­tured.

By steamboat he was transported up the Mississippi to Cairo, Illinois and thence over­land by rail to Sandusky. During his imprisonment he recorded in a journal the fears, the hopes and the frustrations of the Confederate prisoners.

On the first day after his capture, he wrote,

“May 17, 1863: Our breakfast this morning was quite scanty, some received none at all. The water we get from holes in a branch partly dried up, it be­ing muddy and un­palatable.”

“May 18: Saw Capt. Anderson of the 30th, and he ap­peared to be doing well. I could not find a single man of my company. It was a sad and sickening sight to look upon some with amputated limbs and others with swollen faces and countenances distorted with pain and one poor fellow who had seemingly just expired; died doubtless without anyone knowing when he drew his last breath, no kind friend to offer a word of consolation or drop a tear of sympathy.”

“May 29: Our transport Boat lay over at Memphis all day. The Bar Keeper on the Boat has been doing a thriving business today exchanging money with our men, giving one dollar of Federal for four dollars of Confederate money. I had no money at all, having given my pocketbook with its contents, $215 to Par­son Underwood, the chaplain of our Regiment for safe keeping the morning before the battle in which I was captured.”

“June 1: Arrived at Cairo at the junction of the Mis­sissippi and the Ohio Rivers at 7 a.m. We were in­formed that we would travel no farther by steamboat, but would travel by railroad to our destination. I was not sorry of this, for our trip up the river which had lasted nine days & nights was anything but a pleasant one. Our only chance for sleeping was on our blankets spread down on a filthy floor.”

“June 5: Traveled all night and arrived at Sandusky City at 11:00 a.m. We got off the cars and marched down to San­dusky Bay amidst a crowd of men, women and children who had fathered at the depot to see the Rebels. I sup­pose they were looking for our horns and tails. We boarded a steam ferryboat to convey us over to Johnson’s Island, three miles out in the Bay.”

June 7: This is the holy Sabbath, God’s sacred day of rest, how little it is regarded by many here. Some have been engaged at card playing nearly all day. I have spent the day principally in my room reading the Testatment which my friend G. M. D. Patterson gave me when I first joined the army.”

July 4: This is the 87th Anniversary of American Inde­pendence, a day once hailed with delight and still proudly remembered by every Americn Citizen as the day on which our Patriotic fore-fathers, then citizens of a fee­ble colonial government proclaimed their independence of a great and powerful nation and maintained it through a war of seven years. And many of these Patriotic Sires lived to see the gov­ernment in whose defense they had struggled to be­come one of the great and powerful nations of the earth. But now, alas! What is the condition of this once proud and prosperous Nation? Convulsed with war and drenched in blood!”

“July 7: We have news today that Vicksburg has surren­dered and that Genl. Lee has been signally de­feated in the fight at Gettysburg, neither of which we are willing to be­lieve without confirmation. The Yankees are jubi­lant.”

“September 22: Glorious news in the papers this morning. They report that Rosencrans is badly beaten and is falling back from Chattanooga and ac­knowledges a loss of 3,000 killed, wounded and missing. As soon as this news was read, the Rebels on Johnson’s Island raised a yell that made the Island tremble under our feet.”

“October 13: The best news I have heard for a long time came in a letter which I rec’d from you [his wife] this morning and which gave me joy enough for one day. Af­ter being deprived of the pleasure of even hearing from you for nearly 5 months to hear that you are well was truly glad tidings of great joy.”

“October 29: Our bible class met this morning and after going through the lesson had an interesting dis­cussion, the query being, ‘Did Jeptha slay and sacri­fice his daughter, and if so, was he justified in the act?’”

“November 29: Today the ground is covered with snow. Our rations of wood are quite short, so much so that we do not have enough to keep a fire going in the stove all the time and must therefore suffer with cold.”

“December 26: Five prisoners, among them Genl. Archer, got outside the prison wall a few nights ago. They made their way to the shore of the Bay and got out some dis­tance on the ice when some of them fell through the ice. The noise reached the ears of the pickets nearby who came up and gobbled the poor fellows up again. Another Christmas has passed which makes the second one since I left home.”

“January 8, 1864: The weather continues extremely cold. The ground is covered with snow, and we have to stay in our rooms all the time. The passing from the Island to Sandusky is done altogether on the ice now. Some ladies came over from the City on skates today. It is a very beautiful sight to see them skating on the ice. Numerous attempts have been made in the last few nights by prison­ers to escape, some of which I suppose were successful.”

“April 1: A considerable religious feeling has been mani­fested in Prison for some time past and a goodly number have professed religion and joined the church. I had the pleasure on last Sabbath of wit­nessing the baptism in Lake Erie of 12 Confederate officers.”

May 24: Nature is fast becoming clothed in the green ver­due of spring; but what is all this to me, I am still a pris­oner shut up within the walls of this detested old prison. All that I can do is to look ove the wall at the few green trees left standing on the Island and wish that I was once more at home and free to roam among the old hills over which I have so often fol­lowed the merry yelp of my hounds in the exciting chase after the wild deer.”

February 19, 1865: Our rations are so curtailed that we are barely able to sustain life. I am hungry from one day’s end to another. Many of the prisoners have resorted to catch­ing & eating rats. I have seen other prisoners picking up crumbs from the ditches & slop barrels and eating them. The exchange of prisoners for which we have so long & anxiously looked is about to be consumated at last. Some have already gone, and 100 more officers are to leave here tomor­row, and I am one of that number!”

March 22: “We mounted and started for home some 10 miles distant wher we arrived a little after dark. Besides the family there was a large crowd of relatives & friends assembled to meet us. The meeting, after three years absence, I will not try to describe, but will leave it to the imagination of any who may read this.”

Lt. Gowen very soon after the war removed his family to Lin­dale, Texas. In 1888 he moved again to Tyler, Texas. His treasured journal was kept in a safe place in each household. Once his youngest daughter slipped the book down and in­scribed a poem on its frontispiece:

“Oh, if my heart was made of glass
And through its windows you could see
You’d see your picture painted there
And know the one so dear to me.”

William Bradford Gowen was enumerated in the 1900 census of Trinity County, Texas, Enumeration District 96, page 3, precinct 2 as the head of a household:

“Gowan, William B. 71, born in AL in July 1828
Laura V. 63, born in GA in April 1837
William A. 38, born in AL in Sept. 1861”

On January 19, 1907 William Bradford Gowen filed Con­federate Pension Applica­tion No. 13071. In the applica­tion he stated that he was 78, totally disabled and had been living at Tyler for 19 years. The pension was granted by the State of Texas shortly prior to his death Au­gust 8, 1908.

On February 3, 1909 Laura Virginia Oden Gowen, at age 70, applied for a wid­ow’s pension, stating in her applica­tion that she had lived at Tyler for 30 years. This pension was also granted. In the 1910 edition of the Tyler city directory Laura Virginia “Jennie” Oden Gowen, “widow of W. B. Gowen,” lived at 408 East Line Street.

Once on a visit to her daughter, Mrs. H. F. Scheen at Bi­enville, Louisiana, she became ill and extended her visit to one year. During this period she lost her Texas residency and her pension. It was later reinstated upon her application. The pension papers referred to another daughter, Mattie Gowen Ross who also lived in Tyler on January 22, 1919. The en­dorsement of her son, William Alexander Gowen, also of Tyler, dated January 24, 1919, appeared in the reinstatement application. Laura Virginia “Jennie” Oden Gowen died at Tyler February 2, 1919 and was buried at Bienville Cemetery, Bienville, Louisiana.

Children born to William Bradford Gowen and Laura Vir­ginia “Jennie” Oden Gowen include:

Mattie Gowen born about 1860 in AL
William Alexander Gowen born Sept. 1861 in AL
Minnie Estelle Gowen born about 1867 in TX”

By steamboat he was transported up the Mississippi to Cairo, Illinois and thence over­land by rail to the prisoner of war camp on Johnson’s Island near Sandusky, Ohio. Dur­ing his impris­onment he recorded in a journal the fears, the hopes and the frustration of the Johnson Is­land pris­oners. This journal has been edited and repro­duced in type­written copies by the Texas State Archives in Austin, Texas. In his journal he fondly refers to his children, “Mattie and Willie.”

Shortly prior to the end of the Civil War, Lt. William Brad­ford Gowen was ex­changed and returned to his home. He was paroled February 28, 1865 and very soon re­moved his family to Lindale, Texas. In 1888 he moved again to Tyler, Texas.

William Bradford Gowen received a deed to 2.38 acres of land from J. W. Og­burn about 1920, according to Smith County, Texas Deed Book 87, page 557. He sold the prop­erty shortly afterward to S. D. Swann, according to Smith County Deed Book 92, page 71.

He was enumerated in the 1900 census of Trinity County, Texas, Enumeration District 96, page 3, precinct 2 as the head of a household. The family was listed as:

“Gowan, William B. 71, born in AL in July 1828
Laura V. 63, born in GA in April 1837
William A. 38, born in AL in Sept. 1861”

On January 19, 1907 William Bradford Gowen filed Con­federate Pension Applica­tion No. 13071. In the applica­tion he stated that he was 78, totally disabled and had been living at Tyler for 19 years. The pension was granted by the State of Texas shortly prior to his death Au­gust 8, 1908.

On February 3, 1909 Laura Virginia Oden Gowen, at age 70, applied for a wid­ow’s pension, stating in her applica­tion that she had lived at Tyler for 30 years. This pension was also granted. In the 1910 edition of the Tyler city di­rectory Laura Virginia Oden Gowen, “widow of W. B. Gowen,” lived at 408 East Line Street.

Once on a visit to her daughter, Mrs. H. F. Scheen at Bi­enville, Louisiana, she became ill and extended her visit to one year. During this period she lost her Texas resi­dency and her pen­sion. It was later reinstated upon her applica­tion. The pension pa­pers referred to another daughter, Mattie Gowen Ross who also lived in Tyler on January 22, 1919. The endorsement of her son, William Alexander Gowen, also of Tyler, dated January 24, 1919, appeared in the reinstatement application.

Laura Virginia Oden Gowen died at Tyler February 2, 1919 and was buried at Bienville Cemetery, Bienville, Louisiana.

Children born to William Bradford Gowen and Laura Vir­ginia Oden Gowen include:

Mattie Gowen born about 1860 in AL
William Alexander Gowen born Sept. 1861 in AL
[daughter] born about 1867 in TX”

Mattie Gowen, [William Bradford8, Winn Bearden7, EzrJohn “Buck”6. William5, John F.4, William W.3, Thomas2, Mihil1] daughter of William Bradford Gowen and Laura Virginia Oden Gowen, was born about 1860 in Talledega County, Alabama. About 1880 she was married to Tom P. Ross, probably at Tyler. The couple con­tinued to live there in February 1919.

William Alexander Gowen, [William Bradford8, Winn Bearden7, EzrJohn “Buck”6. William5, John F.4, William W.3, Thomas2, Mihil1] son of William Bradford Gowen and Laura Virginia Oden Gowen, was born in September 1861 in Talledega County. Shortly after the Civil War he was brought to Smith County, Texas by his parents. On December 2, 1902 he was married to Fannie Lister at Twitty, Texas. In 1903 the couple resided at Marlin, Texas. From 1906 until 1912 they lived at Hearne, Texas, and in 1918 they were living at Tyler. In that year he was listed as a clerk in the claims department of International & Great Northern Railroad with residence at 115 High Avenue, according to the city directory. In 1923 he appeared as a cashier for the railroad living at 841 North Bois D’Arc.

William Alexander Gowen died at Tyler April 14, 1923, ac­cording to Smith County Probate File 2969. Fannie Lister Gowen continued to live in Tyler until 1925 at which time she determined to move to Waco, Texas where her children could enter college.

On May 15, 1925 she purchased a residence from J. R. Rozell at 719 James Avenue, Waco and traded her home in Tyler to him, according to McLennan County, Texas Deed Book 367, page 579 and Smith County Deed Book 172, page 386. J. R. Rozell conveyed the Tyler property back to her July 19, 1927, accord­ing to Smith County Deed Book 193, page 324. She sold the property to W. E. Beaird of Waco, Texas for $2,000 January 25, 1928, according to Smith County Deed Book 206, page 8.

Fannie Lister Gowen deeded part of her property on James Av­enue in Waco to Baylor University April 24, 1946, ac­cording to McLennan County deed records. She was listed in each edition of the Waco city directory from 1926 through 1951 at 7l9 James Avenue. She died November 28, 1952 at 1009 South 17th Street in Waco, according to McLennan County Deed Book 935, page 563.

Children born to William Alexander Gowen and Fannie Lister Gowen include:

William Lister Gowen born December 9, 1903
Emma Virginia Gowen born October 17, 1906
Mary Frances Gowen born June 17, 1912

William Lister Gowen, [William Alexander9, William Bradford8, Winn Bearden7, EzrJohn “Buck”6. William5, John F.4, William W.3, Thomas2, Mihil1] son of William Alexander Gowen and Fannie Lister Gowen, was born December 9, 1903 at Marlin, Texas. From 1906 until 1912 his family lived in Hearne, Texas. In 1919 they had moved to Tyler. He was listed as a student in the 1923 city directory of Tyler, living at 841 North Bois D’Arc Avenue. After the death of his father in that year the family moved to Waco. He was listed in the Waco city directory in editions from 1926 until 1936.

In 1926 he was listed as a student at Baylor University and was employed as an assis­tant cleaner at Lone Crow Laun­dry, resid­ing at the home of his mother at 719 James. He was again listed as a student in the 1928 edi­tion. In the 1934 edition he was shown as a laborer at Industrial Cotton Oil Mill. In 1936 he continued to live at the residence of his mother at 719 James Avenue.

He was married March 25, 1940 to Dorothy Carrington, ac­cording to Travis County, Texas Marriage Book 38, page 28. In 1947 William Lister Gowen was listed as a traveling audi­tor for the Texas State Highway Depart­ment, residing at 1108 Neches, according to the Austin, Texas city directory. He con­tinued at that address with the same employment through 1958.

On July 22, 1963 William Lister Gowen and Dorothy Car­rington Gowen gave a deed to W. S. Connor, Jr. to Lot 56, Block 138, Original City Addition, Aus­tin, ac­cording to Travis County Deed Book 2670, page 80. Dorothy Carrington Gowen received a deed from her mother, Maude C. Carrington to Lot 18, Block G, Allandale Park Addition, Austin, September 19, 1963, according to Travis County Deed Book 2670, page 192.

On January 14, 1967 William Lister Gowen and Dorothy Car­rington Gowen deeded their share of his mother’s home to his brother-in-law and sister, James A. Muckleroy and Emma Vir­ginia Gowen Muckleroy of Tulsa, Oklahoma. At that time William Lister Gowen resided at 2713 Greenlawn Parkway, Austin, which continued to be his address in May 1972 after his retirement.

William Lister Gowen died in Austin November 18, 1972, ac­cording to Travis County Probate File 34758. Dorothy Car­rington Gowen gave power of attorney to her daughter, Mary Carrington Gowen December 18, 1973, according to Travis County Deed Book 4900.

One daughter was born to William Lister Gowen and Dorothy Carrington Gowen:

Mary Carrington Gowen born July 16, 1944

Mary Carrington Gowen, daughter of William Lister Gowen and Dorothy Carrington Gowen, was born July 16, 1944 in Austin. In 1990 she, a member of Gowen Re­search Foun­dation, continued there, living in the home of her parents at 2713 Greenlawn Parkway.

Emma Virginia Gowen, [William Alexander9, William Bradford8, Winn Bearden7, EzrJohn “Buck”6. William5, John F.4, William W.3, Thomas2, Mihil1]daughter of William Alexander Gowen and Fannie Lister Gowen, was born October 27, 1906 at Hearne, Texas. In 1919 she lived at Tyler with her parents and was a student. In the 1926 and 1928 editions of the Waco city directory she was listed as a student at Baylor University, living at 719 James, the address of her widowed mother. In the 1930 and 1931 editions she was listed as a teacher.

In 1932 and 1933 she was a teacher at John B. Winn School, Austin and roomed at 300 East 9th Street, accord­ing to the city directory. She was again listed in the Waco city directory in the 1934 and 1936 editions living with her mother at 719 James Av­enue.

In the 1937 edition of the Austin city directory she was shown as a music teacher liv­ing at 306 West 13th Street. She contin­ued as a music teacher in Austin, according to the 1939, 1940 and 1941 editions of the city directory. In 1939 she lived at 102 West 13th Street, at 1207 San Jacinto in 1940 and at 1105 Enfield Road in 1941.

Emma Virginia Gowen was married to James A. Muck­leroy August 2, 1941, according to Travis County Mar­riage Book 39, page 342. In 1952 they lived at 4431 South Gary Street, Tulsa, Oklahoma.

Mary Frances Gowen, [William Alexander9, William Bradford8, Winn Bearden7, EzrJohn “Buck”6. William5, John F.4, William W.3, Thomas2, Mihil1]daughter of William Alexander Gowen and Fannie Lister Gowen, was born June 17, 1912 at Hearne, Texas. She lived with her family at Tyler, Texas in 1919. In 1925 her mother moved her family to Waco, Texas. Mary Frances Gowen appeared in the city directories of Waco from 1926 through 1936 living in the home of her mother. In the 1932, 1933 and 1934 issues she was listed as a student at Bay­lor Univer­sity.

In 1935 Mary Frances Gowen was listed as office secre­tary for Powell, Wirz, Rauhut & Gideon and lived at 1606 Congress Avenue in Austin. She was married February 6, 1937 to J. D. Hazelwood, according to Travis County Marriage Book 34, page 629. In 1952 they lived at 4528 West Amherst, Dallas, Texas.

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