1783 David Goings of Montgomery Co, Va

David Goings b. Sept 15, 1783 in Montgomery Co, Va

Parents:

Unk

Children:

Elizabeth Goings born March 29, 1804
Katherine Goings born April 21, 1805
Mary “Polly” Goings born January 29, 1807
Margaret “Peggy” Goings born February 5, 1810
Rachel Goings born November 27, 1811
Sally Goings born November 14, 1813
Frederick Goings born May 1, 1815
David Goings, Jr. born March 22, 1817
George Goings born October 4, 1818
Joseph Addison Goings born February 20, 1820
William Goings born January 1, 1822
Lewis A. Goings born June 30, 1823
John Williams Goings born December 16, 1826

Siblings:

Unk

FACTS:

1802 David Goings 1 tithe, 1 horse [frame 533] Montgomery Co Va
http://www.freeafricanamericans.com/monttax.htm

1805 David Goings 1 tithe 1 horse [frame 633] Montgomery Co Va
http://www.freeafricanamericans.com/monttax.htm

1806 David Goings 1 tithe 1 horse [frame 660] Montgomery Co Va
http://www.freeafricanamericans.com/monttax.htm

David Goings, regarded as a native of Newburn, Virginia, was born September 15, 1783 of parents unknown, according to the research of Catherine Elizabeth Strawn Olguin, a descendant of Arcadia, California. Evelyn Lee McKinley Orr, sixth-generation descendant of Omaha, Nebraska confirms, referring to the bible record kept by Susannah Williams Goings. He was married October 30, 1803 at Newburn, in Montgomery County to Susannah Williams who was born there in 1783, according to Hazel M. Wood, a descendant of San Diego, California.

In 1806 Giles County, Virginia was organized with land from Montgomery County, and the young couple found themselves in the new county. Susannah Williams Goings was born to George Henry Williams and Margaret Harless Williams Octo­ber 2, 1783 in Montgomery County. George Henry Williams was described as a German, originally known as Georg Heinrich Wilhelm, according to Elke Hall, a descendant.

George Henry Williams was born April 8, 1747 and died March 7, 1820 in Giles County. His will provided that his widow was to receive one-third of “the land I live on and adjoining land on the south side of Sinking Creek.” Five daughters, “Elizabeth Albert, Margaret Burk, Polly Hatfield, Susannah Goins and Catherine Stafford” were mentioned in the will. He also mentioned the children of a daughter-in-law, Widow Williams. He referred to them as children that she had by my son, Michael Williams. He bequeathed to his son, Frederick Williams the “plantation on the north side of Sinking Creek, where he now lives.” He also mentions his son, George Henry Williams, Jr. whose land “adjoined David Goins.”

George Henry Williams also devised to his grandson, Henry Williams, “son of Susannah Goins,” one beast when he comes of age. He also stated that “it is my desire that David Goins and his wife take Henry.” George Henry Williams, Jr. was named executor. The will was proven in May 1822 by witnesses, John Burk, Christian Snidow and Isaiah Givens.

Susannah Williams was further identified by Elke Hall as a cousin of Daniel Harless who was married to Elizabeth Nash in 1797. Their daughter, Polly Harless was married in 1819 in Giles County to James Hall.

Susannah Williams was apparently the mother of two sons when she married David Goings. According to her bible record, she had two sons, “Henry Williams born October 30, 1801 and James Williams born March 29, 1802,” before her marriage to David Goings. “The birth years are probably cor­rect, but the months must be in error,” wrote Evelyn Lee McKinley Orr. Catherine Elizabeth Strawn, a descendant of Arcadia, California, suggests that the sons were fathered by Jacob Williams, unidentified.

Elizabeth Williams was married to Jacob Allen Albert who was born in 1757 in Pascotank, North Carolina, according to Elke Hall.

Evelyn McKinley Orr wrote, “In April of 1807, David’s father-in-law, George Henry Williams, gave him 150 acres of land. The Giles County Deed Book 1 records on the 3rd day of April 1807:
“For consideration of love and affection and the further consideration of $1.00, a parcel of land containing 150 acres in the County of Giles on the waters of Sinking Creek, a branch of New River being all that part of two tracts of land that lies eastward of a line beginning at three white oaks on the line of the last patent survey which old line runs from a Spanish oak and white oak N 71 degrees W 180 poles to two white oaks and a black oak on a ridge the dividing line beginning 70 poles from the east corner of said old line and running 24 1/2 degrees west 42 poles to an Ash & white oak thence S 52 degrees W 25 poles to three little white oaks thence S 7 degrees E 188 poles to an elm by the creek side thence S 43 degrees W 75 poIes to a chestnut oak and Spanish oak survey which line runs from two black oaks N 85 degrees E 188 to these white oaks and black oak by a path thence round to the eastward to contain all the land that lies to the eastward of the above described line which is combined in two patents, one patent paid to Henry Sharp assignee of James Salles and is for one hundred twelve acres of land and bears the date 1786 the other patent is paid to George Williams, assignee of Henry Sharp for 370 acres of land which bears the patent date 17 of January 1793.”
David Goings was listed as a resident of Giles County in the census of 1810, according to “Index to 1810 Virginia Cen­sus” by Madeline W. Crickard.
The 1815 Giles County tax roll included “David Goens, white male, over age 16, no slaves, 3 horses, 4 cattle, with land along Sinking Creek near Salt Pond Mt, Doe Creek and Knob Mt.” His land was located adjacent to the home place of his father-in-law, George Henry Williams.
He reappeared as the head of a household in the 1820 census of Giles County, page 116:
“Goings, David white male 26-45
white female over 45
white male 16-26
white male 16-26
white female 10-16
white female 10-16
white male 0-10
white male 0-10
white male 0-10
white female 0-10
white female 0-10
white female 0-10”
Three members of the household were engaged in agriculture.
On June 21, 1824 David Goings sold one parcel of land to Guy French for $380 and another parcel to Guy French July 22, 1824 for $550. Other land records in Giles County in 1824 show indenture agreements between David Goings and some creditors to pay off debts. One agreement was made the 5th day of July 1824 with Henry Williams, the first born son of Susannah Williams Goings.
Sometime after 1824 and before December of 1825 when their daughter Katherine was married, David Goings removed to Montgomery County, Virginia. Marriage records for his first five daughters are in Montgomery County.
“David Goaings” appeared as the head of a household in the 1830 census of Montgomery County, page 67:
“Goaings, David white male 40-50
white female 40-50
white male 15-20
white female 15-20
white female 15-20
white male 10-15
white male 10-15
white male 10-15
white male 5-10
white male 0-5”
Williams family researcher, Ethel Walters of Pembroke, Vir­ginia suggested in 1989 that David Goings had family in Montgomery County, which may have motivated him to move there.
Evelyn Lee McKinley Orr wrote:
“In 1831 and in 1832, two of the married daughters of David and Susannah left the mountains of the New River area of southwestern Virginia and moved to Indiana. Word had reached Virginia that land was available in Delaware County. Members of the Goings family were among the very first to purchase land from the federal government in Liberty Township.”
On December 24, 1831, David sent the following letter to his daughter, Elizabeth Goings Campbell, shortly after she had moved to Indiana. It isn’t known if he wrote it or had some else write it for him. The original was written on a large sheet of paper, half of it being used for the correspondence and the other half turned over and sealed with wax to form an envelope:
‘Dear Children,
I take the present opportunity of writing a hasty line to you. We were glad to hear by Mr. Ribble that you were all well or nearly well. I truly hope that you may enjoy good health and also that you may be pleased with that fine rich country. Your letter by Mr. Cecil last fall brought us the distressing news of the death of your daughter, Sally. It is needless for me now to turn back to notice the afflicting circumstance. It is our duty to be resigned.
My family and all your other relations in this country are well as far as I know. I will mention the death of one of your aunts, Mrs. Elizabeth Albert which took place several months ago. Mr. Ribble can tell you more of the news of our neighborhood than I can write. I expect to come and see you next fall.
Your loving father,
David Goings.
My daughter Rachel and all my family joins in love to you.’
“The letter was sent with a Mr. Ribble who was also moving to Indiana. Many friends and neighbors of the Goings left the rocky hills of Virginia for cheap and fertile land in Indiana. In 1939 the original letter was in the possession of Anna Campbell Powers, granddaughter of Elizabeth Goings Campbell.
David Goings wrote in the letter of December of 1831 that he would be coming to visit that next fall. David Susannah and their sons came to Indiana to live about 1833. The eldest son, Frederick, may have come in 1832 with the East family. Three married daughters remained in Virginia. In 1832 a cabin on the farm of Ashel Thornburg was converted into a school house, and Anderson R. East, son-in-law of David and Susannah, taught there during that and the succeeding winter. After arriv­ing in 1833, the younger Goings sons probably attended this school and were taught by Anderson East or Samuel Campbell. Schooling in Indiana was paid for by individual subscription until public law provided free schools in 1851-52.
On February 21, 1835, “David Goings” purchased land in sec­tion 17 of Liberty township, Delaware County. It was located 1.25 mile west of Selma, Indiana. The tract book of original land entries lists 40 acres in Sec. 17, twp 20, Range 11E on “1/Nov/1826.” The year “1826” is an obvious typing error in the book and was possibly “01/Nov/1836” the recording date for the February 1835 purchase.
It is uncertain whether David Goings or David Goings II en­tered this land. They were among the first to settle in Liberty township, and section 17 of Liberty township was entered as early as 1833 and as late as 1837. The first road built in Delaware County was built in 1829. It crossed the township and ran from Windsor, Indiana in Randolph County, due east to Muncitown, [now Muncie] Indiana. The county had 2,272 in­habitants in 1830. The area was described as generally level with the soil part loam mixed with sand and very productive. Heavy stands of timber consisting chiefly of walnut, ash, hick­ory, buckeye, beech, popular, and oak with an undergrowth of redbud, sassafras, and spice. The chief staples raised were wheat for flour, corn, pork, potatoes and livestock. Muncie­town had recently been established and was the seat of justice. The largest rush of settlers came during the years 1835-40.
According to Norman Haskell Goings, the original Goings farms in Section 17 were still owned by the Goings family in 1939. On a visit to Muncie in 1989, I learned from a local his­torian, Ira Bailey, that the Goings were all gone from Delaware County at that time. Some Campbells and Easts were still in the Muncie area. A few years after the family came to Indiana, David Goings returned to Virginia.
He rode horseback the approximate 300-mile distance to visit his daughter, Katherine Goings Surface, near Newbern, Vir­ginia in Pulaski County. On his way back to Indiana he visited his daughter, Rachel Goings Burton in Pearisburg, Virginia, where he became sick and died April 26, 1840. He was 57 years old. This was before telegraph or mail service, and if friends or family were not traveling to and from, there was no way of getting news. According to Norman Haskell Goings’ history, the family did not know for sometime what had happened to David Going. He was reportedly buried in an old cemetery there in an unmarked grave. Descendants made unsuccessful trips there in 1908, 1916, and 1933 in attempts to find his grave and to place a tombstone on it.
In a codicil of her will dated January 24, 1846 Susannah Williams Going specified “William Chapman of Virginia to be paid the amount that David Goings went [on] his father’s bail.” The meaning of the bequest is obscure, but it is suggested that court records of Delaware County, Indiana or Montgomery County, Virginia might reveal something more about the pur­pose of the trip of David Goings to Virginia.
Susannah Williams Goings purchased land from her son Fred­erick Goings and his wife, Hannah Hoover Goings December 29, 1837. The transaction was recorded in May 1838. She paid $125 for 40 acres located in the northeast quarter of Section 17, township 20, Range 11 of Delaware County. This land was adjacent to the original Goings land and to the East and Campbell farms, as shown on the 1861 atlas of the county.
In November 1839, Susannah Williams Goings sold land in Section 17 to A. R. East. The farms of the Easts, Campbells and Goings were all located northwest of Smithville, Indiana, the oldest village in Liberty township. It originated with a small group of houses along the White River. All of the early settlers settled near the rivers first. In the early 1850s a rail­road, the Bellefontaine & Indianapolis, came through the county near Selma a few miles away, and this sounded the death-knell for Smithfield.
On the 18th day of March 1843 Susannah Williams Goings wrote her will:
‘I, Susannah Goings of the County of Delaware in the State of Indiana do make and publish this my last will and testament in manner and form following that is to say,
First, it is my will that after my decease all my just debts and funeral expenses be fully paid and satisfied.
Second, I give, devise and bequeath to my two sons Lewis Goings and John Williams Goings the farm on which we now reside known and described as follows to wit, all the North West fourth of the North West quarter of Section No. Sixteen in Township No. Twenty North of Range North Eleven East and all of the North East fourth of the North East quarter of Section No. Seventeen in Township No. Twenty North of Range Eleven East. The whole estimate to contain eighty acres share and share alike.
Third, it is my will that my three sons William Goings, Lewis Goings and John Williams Goings shall each have a horse after they arrive at the age of twenty one years and that John Williams Goings shall have my bed, bedding and bedstead and one cow.
Fourth, it is my will that the balance of my personal property be sold and divided equally amongst my chil­dren, the heirs of those who are deceased to have the share of their deceased parent, namely Henry Williams, James Williams, Elizabeth Campbell, Catherine Surface, Mary East, Margaret Brown, Rachel Burton, Frederick Goings, David Goings, Joseph Addison Goings, William Goings, Lewis Goings, and John Williams Goings. In testimony I have appointed John Richey of the County of Delaware to be the Executor of this My Last Will and Testament hereby annulling all former wills by me at any time heretofor made or executed.
In witness whereof I have here unto set my hand and seal this eighteenth day of March AD Eighteen Hundred and Forty Three.
Susannah [X] Goings
Witnesses:
John Richey
Elizabeth Richey”
On the 24th day of January, 1846 she added a codicil to the will, whereby she specified that,
‘My youngest son, John Williams Goings shall have the North forty, dividing the land East and West and also all the grain and meat that may remain on hand at the time of my decease and also a horse beast worth sixty dollars or its equivalent in cash or other property worth sixty dollars, also the table linen. It is my will that after my decease, my son Lewis Goings shall have the bay mare and shall have a share of the fruit of the orchard for ten years. John Burton of Virginia to be paid $16.00 and William Chapman of Virginia to be paid the amount that David Goings went his father’s bail. Elizabeth East, my granddaughter to have my clock and Susannah Goings, daughter of my son Joseph Addison to have my table cloth’.
“Susannah Goings sold a parcel of land to her son, William Goings October 20, 1843.
On the 1850 Federal census she listed a $1,000 value for her farm. Her youngest son, John Williams Goings, was still living at home. Susannah Williams Goings died September 29, 1855 at age 71. Her will was probated October 30,1855.
In 1989, I visited Truitt Cemetery near Selma where Susannah is buried. The main road that once passed alongside the cemetery was overgrown with tall grasses. The cemetery, on private land, is completely overgrown with trees and brush. Vandals and time have destroyed or buried almost all of the headstones. County officials are aware of this. The approximate location is marked on the 1861 Land Atlas. In 1939, Norman Haskell Goings wrote that Susannah had a well preserved marker and a good location in the graveyard.”
Hazel M. Wood wrote October 31, 1989, “David Goings was one of those persons with swarthy skin and fine features, sometimes regarded as Melungeons. Some of his descendants resembled people of Afghanistan or India. His descendants moved on to Illinois, Iowa, Missouri, Kansas and a few to Texas.”
Two sons were born to Susannah Williams before her marriage to David Goings, according to her bible record:
Henry Williams born October 30, 1801
James Williams born March 29, 1802 ?
Henry Williams, son of Susannah Williams, was born in Mont­gomery County October 30, 1801. He was married May 14, 1824 to Juliet Lucas in Giles County.
They appeared as heads of a household in the 1850 census of Giles County:
“Williams, Henry 49, born in Virginia
Juliet
Percilla 22, born in Virginia
Margaret A. 20, born in Virginia
Andrew 17, born in Virginia
Sarah 15, born in Virginia
James H. 11, born in Virginia
John R. 9, born in Virginia
Rachel E. 3, born in Virginia”

Norman Haskell Goings wrote in 1939, “before grandmother died Henry, the oldest, got his family together and moved west. They left their wagons in northern Indiana and came south to Delaware County to visit grandmother Goings, the Easts and the Campbells.” Norman’s father rode his horse with them and they joined Henry’s people in Hannibal, Missouri. They journeyed on to Johnson County, Missouri and settled around Knobnoster, Missouri and Montserrat, Missouri. The Delaware County Goings never heard from them again. He died at Knobnoster, Missouri in Johnson County, according to the research of Catherine Elizabeth Strawn Olguin.
James Williams, son of Susannah Williams, was born March 29, 1802, according to his mother’s bible record. “James Williams” was married October 26, 1818 to Anna Echols, ac­cording to Giles County marriage records. Surety was George Williams, regarded as his grandfather. Peter Echols and Susana Echols, apparently her parents, gave permission for the marriage and witnessed the ceremony.
James Williams was security at the marriage of his half-sister Mary “Polly” Goings and Anderson East October 30, 1829 in Montgomery County.

Fourteen children were born to David Goings and Susannah Williams Goings. Included were:

Elizabeth Goings born March 29, 1804
Katherine Goings born April 21, 1805
Mary “Polly” Goings born January 29, 1807
Margaret “Peggy” Goings born February 5, 1810
Rachel Goings born November 27, 1811
Sally Goings born November 14, 1813
Frederick Goings born May 1, 1815
David Goings, Jr. born March 22, 1817
George Goings born October 4, 1818
Joseph Addison Goings born February 20, 1820
William Goings born January 1, 1822
Lewis A. Goings born June 30, 1823
John Williams Goings born December 16, 1826

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