1775 Isaac Going m. Rebecca Palmer

Isaac Going b. 1775 – married – August 21, 1804 to Rebecca Palmer

Parents:

Drury Goyen and Sarah “Sallie” Baxter

Children:

Eleven children were born to Isaac Going and Rebecca Palmer Going:

Thomas Baxter Going 1806–1896
Sarah Palmer Going 1808–1875
John Madison Going 1810–1844
Elijah Bobo Going 1813–1827
Drury Dobbins Going 1815–1878
Isaac McKissick Going 1818–1840
Rhoda Going 1821–1871
William George Washington Going 1824–1915
Amasa Vernon Going 1827–1864
Elisha Palmer Going 1829–1864
Martha Karenhappuck Going 1833–1865

Siblings:

1) Martha Going born about 1768 – d. Aug 19, 1813,  (Married 1790 to – Larkin “Asa” Tindall (d 1841)- moved to Warren County, Ga).
2) Elijah Going born in 1770 – d. 1807 (Chester, SC)
3) Job Going b. Sept 5, 1772 Chester, SC-d. April 23, 1834, Tuscaloosa Co, AL m. Rebecca Lockert – of Aaron and Sarah Miles Lockert
4) Isaac Going born April 28, 1775 (Chester, SC) – (Married on Aug 21, 1804 to Rebecca Palmer)
5) James Going born in 1777
6) Sarah Baxter Going born 1786
7) Mary Going born in 1787
8) Rebecca Going born about 1789
9) Thomas Baxter Going born in 1795

FACTS:

Isaac Going, son of Drury Going and Sarah “Sallie” Baxter Going, was born April 28, 1775 in Chester District.  This was confirmed in the following letter from Thomas Baxter Going providing the birth date of Isaac Going and birth year of Drury Going as 1749:
(The contents found at: http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~gowenrf/nl199206.pdf )

“Walnut Grove, Etowah County, Ala.  March 16, 1879 Dear Brother, By the Divine Providence of God, I am again permitted to write to you in answer of yours and also to send your request. We are today enjoying common health and also Dabbs and Inman are well as far as I know. We have had a very cold, wet winter with heavy freezes, but little snow. Gentle spring has come in with mild and pleasant weather.

The farmers are busy engaged in preparing for another crop. There will be more guano used this year than has been any year previous. According to your request, I with pleasure send you a true list of ages as recorded in Father’s Bible.

I will begin with father and mother’s. Isaac Going was born 28th day of April, 1775. Mother, Rebecca Palmer was born 1st day of February 1789 and was married the 21st day of August 1804. Father was baptized in the May meeting of the Pacolet Church in 1803, and also the same year joined the Masonic fraternity. The death of Father and Mother stands recorded thus—- Rebecca Going departed this life the first day of August 1855,  aged 66 years and 6 months. Isaac Going departed this life the 27th day of January 1861, aged 85 years and 9 months and one day.

Our Grandfather, Drury Going departed this life the 22nd day of February 1796 in the 47th year of his age. He died on the road coming home from Charleston with his wagon and team. He lacked 3 days drive of reaching home when he died. He was hauled home and buried at home. Grandmother Sarah Going departed this life 22nd day of April 1820 in the 69th year of her age.

In looking over I find the date of Elisha P. Going’s death as 16th day of July 1864 by a cannon ball near Fussels Mill in the New Market fight, Henry County, Va. Now, dear brother, you can record the dates I have given you in your large family Bible so that your children and grandchildren may hand down their fore father’s posterity. The Going is of Irish, [and Palmer] on Mother’s side English and Dutch.

I was pleased to hear of the well doing of your children. I have not heard a word about Eva. Is she dead? Eunice sent her likeness to her. Eunice says she would like to enjoy Eva’s company again. I am getting old and feeble near 73 years old. I have not had good health since last July. When I feel able, I go out and work a little. I feel better with exercise. I gain, but the least cold throws me back.

I am what is called a Licentiate Preacher. I don’t go about much, but if it is the Lord’s will, when the weather becomes warm I wish to visit the churches around. Religion is at a very low ebb at this time owing to so many divisions of profession–three kinds of Baptists, Missionary, Primitive or commonly called Hard Shells. Two years ago they divided and called it The Church of Christ being wonderfully opposed to all benevolent institutions of the day, especially the Masonic fraternity and Sabbath Schools. Their chief doctrine is that of Election and reprobation and non-fellowship with all who do not coincide with their Views. There are two kinds of Methodists–North and South. They divided during the war– they have no fellowship with each other. Then there are the Seventh Day Adventists and Soul Sleeping Baptists. I could not give a full history of their doctrines in the space I have to write. They make proselytes owing to the unlearned and unread of many of the people.

I hope you and all the boys that have grown up have made to rejoice in Jesus Christ the Savior. Let us pray for each other as all are dead of father’s family that if we never meet again, we will try to meet together with our friends in Heaven. Farewell, Thomas B. Going To W.G.W. Going and children”

Isaac Going deeded 131 acres of land in April 1799 to Robert Love, according to Chester County Deed Book G, page 26.

1800 US Census in Chester County, South Carolina has “Isaac Goin” as the head of the household with the following entries: Name: Isaac Goin
Home in 1800 (City, County, State): Chester, South Carolina
Free White Persons – Males – Under 10: 1
Free White Persons – Males – 16 thru 25: 2 (Isaac Goin – b. betw. 1775-1784)
Free White Persons – Females – 10 thru 15: 2
Free White Persons – Females – 45 and over: 1
Number of Household Members Under 16: 3
Number of Household Members Over 25: 1
Number of Household Members: 6

1800 US Census Chester SC with Isaac Going

1800 US Census Chester SC with Isaac Going

In October 1801 Isaac Going deeded 27 acres to John Love, according to Chester County Deed Book H, page 444.

He was baptized at the June meeting of the Pacolet [later Skull Shoals] Baptist Church in 1803, and became a Mason in the same year, according to the research of Fredrick M. Tucker, a descendant of Duncan, South Carolina.  He was married August 21, 1804 to Rebecca Palmer, seventh child of John W. Palmer and Martha “Patty” Williams Palmer of Union District, South Carolina.  Rebecca Palmer Going was born February 1, 1789.

John W. Palmer was born September 6, 1753, according to the research of Ethel Weber Walling and Estelle Weber Dunbar.  He was the son of William Palmer who was born February 18 1727 in N. Farnham Parish in Richmond County, Virginia.

William Palmer was the son of Robert Palmer and his second wife Martha Freeman who were married about 1724.  Robert Palmer was the son of John Palmer who was born in Northumberland County, Virginia.  John Palmer is regarded as the son of Thomas Palmer who was born in Great Britain about 1590 and emigrated to Virginia in 1621 aboard the
“Tyger.”

Children born to John W. Palmer and Martha “Patty” Williams Palmer include:

Amasa Palmer                                        born July 22, 1774
William Palmer                                      born July 16, 1776
Ezekiel Palmer                                        born November 9, 1778
John Palmer                                            born February 13, 1780
Nancy Palmer                                          born about 1783
Sallie Palmer                                           born October 15, 1786
Rebecca Palmer                                      born Febuary 1, 1789
Ellis Palmer                                             born August 22, 1792
Rhoda Palmer                                         born August 7, 1796

Rhoda Palmer was married about 1813 (according to “The McKissicks of South Carolina”, published in 1965 by descendant Margaret McKissick Davis – thanks to Fredrick Tucker for information) to Joseph McKissick, thought to be namesake of Isaac McKissick Going who was born September 2, 1818.  Rhoda Palmer McKissick died October 25, 1882 at the age of 86.

A receipt was issued by James W. Darby, deputy clerk to Isaac Going January 4, 1808, “Rec’d of Mr. Isaac Gowing One Dollar for serving done in Pinckney.  Office removed to Union.”

Another receipt read, “Rec’d of Isaac Going Three Dollars in full of a debt due me by Isaac Going, Administrator of the Es-tate of Elijah Going.  James Anderson, January 11, 1809.”

On the same date, Isaac Going and his brother-in-law Larkin Asa Tindall posted a bond in connection with the guardianship of Thomas Going, minor.  The child is believed to be a son of his deceased brother, Elijah Going and Mary Docea Going.  The bond read:

“South Carolina

Know all men by these presents that we, Isaac Going and Asa Tindall are held & firmly bound to Joseph Brown, Ordinary of Chester District in the just and full Sum of Five Thousand Dollars to be paid to said Joseph Brown or his successors ordinary of the said District or their certain attorney or assigns to which payment well & truly to be made. we bind our selves & every of our —- & every of our heirs, executors and administrators on the whole & for who jointly and severally by these presents Sealed & dated this Eleventh day of January of our Lord One thousand Eight hundred and nine, the thirty-third year of American Independence.

The condition of this obligation is such that if the above bounded Isaac Goin shall carefully & lovingly bring up Thomas Going, infant son of Mary [Nancy?] Going Dec’d and during the time of his minority with necessary food & drink —- ——- —– & — — learning, according to his degree & ——- —- —- shall be guardian & tutor to the said Ward shall preserve him —– — —– or loss of lands or goods as far as in him lies and all such portions as shall fall due to the said Ward —- of the goods chattels of any person whatsoever shall pay & deliver to him when he shall come to age, to receive the same & the said shall happen to — before that time & if the said Isaac Going do in such case pay such portion to whom-soever shall be entitled to the same by Law & Bond a just & true account of his said guardianship & I save harmless the said Ordinary on account of granting the said Letters Guardianship, then this obligation to be void or else to remain of force.

Isaac Going
Asa Tindall”

1810 US Census in Union County, South Carolina has “Isaac Gowen” as the head of household with the following entries: Name: Isaac Gowen
Home in 1810 (City, County, State): Union, South Carolina
Free White Persons – Males – Under 10: 2
Free White Persons – Males – 26 thru 44 : 1  (Isaac Gowen b. btw. 1766-1784)
Free White Persons – Females – Under 10: 1
Free White Persons – Females – 16 thru 25: 1
Numbers of Slaves: 2
Number of Household Members Under 16: 3
Number of Household Members Over 25: 1
Number of Household Members: 7

1810 US Census Union SC with Isaac Gowen

1810 US Census Union SC with Isaac Gowen

Rebecca Palmer Going was received into Skull Shoals Baptist Church in July 1804.  Martha “Patty” Williams Palmer died August 19, 1813, and John Palmer died January 28, 1828, ac-cording to Thomas Baxter Going.

“Isaac Going” was a witness to the will of his mother November 4, 1814,  according to Chester County Deed Book H, page 9.

1820 US Census in Union County, South Carolina has “Isaac Going” as the head of household with the following entries: Name: Isaac Going
Home in 1820 (City, County, State): Union, South Carolina
Enumeration Date: August 7, 1820
Free White Persons – Males – Under 10: 4
Free White Persons – Males – 10 thru 15: 1
Free White Persons – Males – 45 and over: 1 (Isaac Going b. bef 1775)
Free White Persons – Females – 10 thru 15: 1
Free White Persons – Females – 26 thru 44: 1
Slaves – Males – Under 14: 2
Slaves – Males – 14 thru 25: 1
Slaves – Males – 26 thru 44: 1
Number of Persons – Engaged in Agriculture: 3
Free White Persons – Under 16: 6
Free White Persons – Over 25: 2
Total Free White Persons: 8
Total Slaves: 4
Total All Persons – White, Slaves, Colored, Other: 12

1820 US Census Union SC with Isaac Going

1820 US Census Union SC with Isaac Going

Isaac Going was enumerated as the head of a household in the 1830 census of Union District, page 182: Name: Isaac Going
Home in 1830 (City, County, State): Union, South Carolina
Free White Persons – Males – Under 5: 2
Free White Persons – Males – 5 thru 9: 1
Free White Persons – Males – 10 thru 14: 2
Free White Persons – Males – 20 thru 29: 1
Free White Persons – Males – 50 thru 59: 1 (Isaac Going b. btw. 1771 to 1780).
Free White Persons – Females – 5 thru 9: 1
Free White Persons – Females – 40 thru 49: 1
Slaves – Males – Under 10: 2
Slaves – Males – 10 thru 23: 4
Slaves – Males – 36 thru 54: 1
Slaves – Females – Under 10: 1
Slaves – Females – 10 thru 23: 1
Slaves – Females – 36 thru 54: 1
Slaves – Females – 55 thru 99: 1
Free White Persons – Under 20: 6
Free White Persons – 20 thru 49: 2
Total Free White Persons: 9
Total Slaves: 11
Total – All Persons (Free White, Slaves, Free Colored): 20

1830 US Census Union SC with Isaac Going

1830 US Census Union SC with Isaac Going

 

Isaac Going was shown as the owner of 11 slaves in the enumeration, listed as:

“one female                                                                           55-100
one female                                                                             36-55
one male                                                                                 36-55
four males                                                                              10-24
one female                                                                             10-24
two males                                                                               0-10
two females                                                                            0-10”

“Isaac Goings, Esquire,” reappeared in the 1840 census of Union District, page 230.  Seven members of the household were engaged in agriculture: Name: [Isaac Goings]
Home in 1840 (City, County, State): Union, South Carolina
Free White Persons – Males – 5 thru 9: 1
Free White Persons – Males – 10 thru 14: 1
Free White Persons – Males – 15 thru 19: 1
Free White Persons – Males – 60 thru 69: 1 (Isaac Goings b. btw 1771 and 1780).
Free White Persons – Females – 5 thru 9: 1
Free White Persons – Females – 15 thru 19: 1
Free White Persons – Females – 50 thru 59: 1
Slaves – Males – Under 10: 1
Slaves – Males – 10 thru 23: 2
Slaves – Males – 24 thru 35: 1
Slaves – Males – 36 thru 54: 1
Slaves – Females – 10 thru 23: 1
Slaves – Females – 36 thru 54: 1
Slaves – Females – 55 thru 99: 1
Persons Employed in Agriculture: 7
Free White Persons – Under 20: 5
Total Free White Persons: 7
Total Slaves: 8
Total All Persons – Free White, Free Colored, Slaves: 15

1840 US Census Union SC with Isaac Going

1840 US Census Union SC with Isaac Going

He owned eight slaves recorded as:

“one female            55-100
one male                 36-55
one female              36-55
one male                 24-36
two males               10-24
one female              10-24
one male                  0-10”

1850 US Census in Union County, South Carolina with Isaac Goings as head of household and the following entries:  Name: Isaac Goings
Age: 75
Birth Year: abt 1775
Home in 1850: Union, South Carolina, USA
Gender: Male
Family Number: 1158
Household Members:
Name Age
Isaac Goings 75
Rebecca Goings 61
Amasa Goings 23
Elisha Goings 20
Martha Goings 15
Drury Goings 34
Sarah Goings 34
Eliza Goings 10
James Goings 8
Isaac Goings 6
Rebecca Goings 4

1850 US Census w Isaac Going p1

1850 US Census w Isaac Going p1

1850 US Census w Isaac Going p2

1850 US Census w Isaac Going p2

1854 Isaac Going and Rebecca Going both wrote letters on behalf of Merry McGuire’s Revolutionary War pension application.  A review in 1872 mentions these affidavits and letters.

1854 AL Merry McGuire heirs Rev War pension application w Isaac and Rebecca Going_Page_1

1854 AL Merry McGuire heirs Rev War pension application w Isaac and Rebecca Going_Page_1

1854 AL Merry McGuire heirs Rev War pension application w Isaac and Rebecca Going_Page_2

1854 AL Merry McGuire heirs Rev War pension application w Isaac and Rebecca Going_Page_2

In his later years Isaac Going had very poor eyesight.  Rebecca Palmer Going died August 31, 1855.  Isaac Going wrote a letter to his nephew Alfred Elijah Going February 3, 1857:

“Union District, South Carolina
February 3, 1857
To Alfred E. Going
Dear Nephew,

It is with the kindest feeling of respect that I undertake to answer your kind letter which came safe to hand.  I was truly glad that you were prompted to write me so interesting a letter respecting my relatives.  I believe yours is the first letter that I have received from the family; sometime I have heard of your verbally.  I feel sorrow to hear of your blindness and can sympathize with you, for I know the lack of eyesight.  I have not been totally blind as you, to be led about; the roads that I have been accustomed to travel I can of a light day make my way along with a staff.

My wife died last day of August 1855 after a few hours of sickness, we lived a long life together, we had eleven children.  I will give you all their names.  The first is Thomas Baxter, Sarah, John Madison, Elijah, Drury, Rhoda, Isaac Mack, William, Amasa Vernon, Elisha and the youngest is Martha Kerenhappuch.  Elijah, John and Isaac Mack are dead.  I have six grandchildren married.  I am eighty-two years old the 28th day of next April–if I should live to see it.

(Note: above info calculates to following dates: Rebecca Palmer, his wife, died Aug 31, 1855, and Isaac Going was born April 28, 1755).

I joined the Baptist Church and was baptized June 1803, of which I have been a member ever since.  I served the church as deacon forty-five years.  During the time since I became acquainted with myself and blessed Redeemer, I have met with many a sore conflict, but by the grace of God enabling me I have continued to this day.  I have served as an active magistrate twenty-four years.  Three of my children joined the Baptist church, Thomas Baxter, John and Rhoda.  Thomas Baxter is now acting deacon and clerk of the same church to which I am a member.  I have three children living with me, two boys and one girl; the rest of them are married.  As to this world’s goods, their progress has not been so great as others, yet they are enabled to live.

Negro men rate from one thousand to twelve hundred dollars, likely young girls rate at nine hundred dollars.  the price of land is from ten to twelve dollars an acre.  We have had several bad crop years; corn brings 75c per bushel readily, flour eight dollars per barrel.  Pork sells at 7c gross.  Our country is nearly all cleared and worn out, but reclaimed land with proper cultivation produces tolerably well.

The settlement your father moved from does not look like the same country; the generation of people that then lived are near all dead and moved away, the country nearly cleared and covered with swarms of negroes.

Tell Joseph Cook that his old Uncle Josiah Cook is yet living and very rich without heirs, that he should do well to visit us next summer as he speaks of coming or any of the rest of the connections.

If these few lines should be so fortunate as to reach you, please write me on receipt of the same about all of the relations, who is dead and who is alive, who is rich and who is poor, and the current news of the country.  I have one grandson who follows overseeing, spoke of visiting you this winter, wishes to know what he could get per year for overseeing in your country.  I think he is declined going away till next winter.

I would be very glad if I could enjoy myself in your company, but I will never expect it as my days will soon be numbered according to the course of nature.  I have lived a long time, can witness the assertion of the Scriptures where it says, “Many are the afflictions of the righteous, yet the Lord delivers them out of them all.”

Please to write to whether Andrew McGuire received his pension of Merry McGuire, his grandfather.

I believe I have written most of the general news.  I must come to a close shortly.  I am bouyed up to think that I have not much longer to stay here in a state of blindness, but I expect a day soon when I shall be received up into heaven, when I shall not need these poor blind eyes to give sight, for the Lord God in his dazzling glory is the light of that place.  I must come to a close by wishing you prosperity through life, and at last be received at the right hand of God.

Give my best wishes to all of my inquiring friends, so farewell.
Isaac Going”

Rebecca Palmer Going died August 1, 1855 at age 66 and was buried in the Going family cemetery in Union District.  Isaac Going was enumerated as the head of a household in the 1860 census of Union County, page 236.  Isaac Going died January 27, 1861, according to a letter written by Thomas Baxter Going March 16, 1879 and was buried beside his wife..

Find a Grave for Isaac Going:  http://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi?page=gr&GRid=11842892

Find a Grave for Rebecca Palmer Going: http://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi?page=gr&GRid=12135225

1861 Isaac Going headstone

1861 Isaac Going headstone

1855 Rebecca Palmer Going headstone

1855 Rebecca Palmer Going headstone

1861 Going cemetery

1861 Going cemetery

1861 Isaac Going headstone 2

1861 Isaac Going headstone 2

Eleven children were born to Isaac Going and Rebecca Palmer Going:

Thomas Baxter Going                                              born May 13, 1806
Sarah Palmer Going                                                 born July 13, 1808
John Madison Going                                                born July 14, 1810
Elijah Bobo Going                                                     born January 15, 1813
Drury Dobbins Going                                               born November 24, 1815
Isaac McKissick Going                                             born September 2, 1818
Rhoda Going                                                               born August 24, 1821
William George Washington Going                       born July 17, 1824
Amasa Vernon “Mace” Going                                  born January 30, 1827
Elisha Palmer Going                                                  born December 22, 1829
Martha Kerenhappuch Going                                  born July 4, 1835

Fredrick M. Tucker wrote, “All birthdates above came from the Isaac Going bible, now destroyed.  The dates were copied from it in 1879 by Thomas Baxter Going in Alabama and sent to my great-great-grandfather William George Washington Going in a letter, copies of which still exist.  Death dates for some of their children also came from this bible.”

Thomas Baxter Going, son of Isaac Going and Rebecca Palmer Going, was born May 13, 1806 in Union District.  He was married February 20, 1825 to Elizabeth Vinson, his childhood sweetheart, according to Essie Clarice Joiner Oswalt, a descendant.  She was born February 4, 1804 in Union District, according to Fredrick M. Tucker.

“Thomas B. Gowing” was enumerated in the 1830 census of Union County, page 183:

“Gowing, Thomas B.           white male             20-30
white female          20-30
white female            0-5”

“Baxter Goings” was listed as the head of a household in the 1840 census of Union County, page 211, adjoining his brother “Drury Goings” and near “Nancy Goings,” “John Goings” and his father “Isaac Goings, Esquire.”

The head of the household was recorded as a “teacher and a
farmer.”  The family was composed of:

“Goings, Baxter    white male             30-40
white female          30-40
white female          10-15
white male               5-10
white female            5-10
white female            0-5”

In 1855 Thomas Baxter Going was “acting deacon and clerk” of the Baptist Church, according to a letter written by his father.

“Baxter Going” was enumerated as the head of a household in
the 1860 census of Union County, page 226.  He was mentioned as a resident of Union District in the probate application of his brother, Amasa Vernon “Mace” Going filed there November 23, 1866.

Elizabeth Vinson Going died in Union District July 18, 1865, according to Fredrick M. Tucker.

After her death, Thomas Baxter Going joined William M. Dabbs and Jim Inman in a wagontrain to remove to Huntsville, Alabama, according to Essie Clarice Joiner Oswalt.

“When they reached Walnut Grove, Alabama, they were forced to stop because a snow storm was in progress.  They never reached Huntsville.  They thought Walnut Grove was the Garden of Eden.

Being well-educated, Thomas Baxter Going organized a private school and taught the children from the ‘Blue Back Speller.’  He bought land and farmed, but he never recovered in all his 90 years from the loss of his beloved Beth who had died at Skull Shoals just before their departure.”

Thomas Baxter Going wrote a letter to his brother, William George Washington Going March 16, 1879:

Walnut Grove, Etowah County, Ala.
March 16, 1879
Dear Brother,

By the Divine Providence of God, I am again permitted to write to you in answer of yours and also to send your request.  We are today enjoying common health and also Dabbs and Inman are well as far as I know.  We have had a very cold, wet winter with heavy freezes, but little snow.  Gentle spring has come in with mild and pleasant weather.  The farmers are busy engaged in preparing for another crop.  There will be more guano used this year than has been any year previous.  By that you can guess respecting the indebtedness of the people.

According to your request, I with pleasure send you a true list of ages as recorded in Father’s Bible.  I will begin with father and mother’s.  Isaac Going was born 28th day of April, 1775.  Mother, Rebecca Palmer was born 1st day of February 1789 and was married the 21st day of August 1804.  Father was baptized in the May meeting of the Pacolet Church in 1803, and also the same year joined the Masonic fraternity.

Thomas Baxter Going was born the 13th day of May 1806.
Sarah Palmer Going was born the 13th day of July 1808.
John Madison Going was born the 14th day of July 1810 and died the 25th day of July 1844.  He lived 34 years and 10 days.
Elijah Bobo Going was born on Friday, 15th day of January, 1813 and died the 16th day of February 1827.  He lived 14 years and 32 days.
Drury Dobbins Going was born on Friday, 24th day of November 1815.
Isaac McKissick Going was born Wednesday, 2nd day of September 1818.  He died in Pickens County, Alabama the 10th day of August 1840; he wanted 23 days of being 22 years old.
Rhoda Going was born Friday, 24th day of August 1821
William George Washington Going was born on Saturday, 17th day of July  1824 at 35 minutes past 8 o’clock in the morning.
Amasa Vernon Going was born Tuesday, 30th day of January 1827, 45 minutes past 6 o’clock in the evening.
Elisha Palmer Going was born on Tuesday, 22nd day of December 1829, ten minutes past 6 o’clock in the evening.
Martha Kerenhappuch Going was born Thursday, 4th day of July 1835.

The death of Father and Mother stands recorded thus–Rebecca Going departed this life the first day of August 1855, aged 66 years and 6 months.  Isaac Going departed this life the 27th day of January 1861, aged 85 years and 9 months and one day.

Drury Going departed this life the 22nd day of February 1796 in the 47th year of his age.  He died on the road coming home from Charleston with his wagon and team.  He lacked 3 days drive of reaching home when he died.  He was hauled home and buried at home.  Sarah Going departed this life 22nd day of April 1820 in the 69th year of her age.

Patty or Martha Palmer departed this life 19th day of August 1813 in the 59th year of her age.  John Palmer departed this life 28th day of January 1828.

In looking over I find the date of Elisha P. Going’s death as 16th day of July 1864 by a cannon ball near Fussels Mill in the New Market fight, Henry County, Va.  Now, dear brother, you can record the dates I have given you in your large family Bible so that your children and grandchildren may hand down their fore father’s posterity.  The Going is of Irish on Mother’s side English and Dutch. (Sarah Baxter is English and Dutch)

I was pleased to hear of the well doing of your children.  I have not heard a word about Eva.  Is she dead?  Eunice sent her likeness to her.  Eunice says she would like to enjoy Eva’s company again.  I am getting old and feeble near 73 years old.  I have not had good health since last July.  When I feel able, I go out and work a little.  I feel better with exercise.  I gain, but the least cold throws me back.

I am what is called a Licentiate Preacher.  I don’t go about much, but if it is the Lord’s will, when the weather becomes warm I wish to visit the churches around.  Religion is at a very low ebb at this time owing to so many divisions of profession–three kinds of Baptists, Missionary, Primitive or commonly called Hard Shells.  Two years ago they divided and called it  The Church of Christ being wonderfully opposed to all  benevolent institutions of the day, especially the Masonic fraternity and Sabbath Schools.  Their chief doctrine is that of Election and reprobation and non-fellowship with all who do not coincide with their Views.  There are two kinds of Methodists–North and South.  They divided during the war–they have no fellowship with each other.  Then there are the Seventh Day Adventists and Soul Sleeping Baptists.  I could not give a full history of their doctrines in the space I have to write.  They make proselytes owing to the unlearned and unread of many of the people.  I hope you and all the boys that have grown up have made to rejoice in Jesus Christ the Savior.  Let us pray for each other as all are dead of father’s family that if we never meet again, we will try to meet together with our friends in Heaven.

Farewell,
Thomas B. Going
To W.G.W. Going and children
All write soon.

P. S. I received a letter from James DuPre a few days ago who says these are hard times.  All well.  Intends moving back to Alabama next fall from Georgia.  What has become of Walter Morehead?

died May 9, 1896 in Blount County, Alabama, according to the “Weekly Union Times.”  He was buried in Harmony Cemetery near Altoona, Alabama.

Four children were born to them:

Winnie Adeline Going                                                        born July 17, 1827
James McIsaac Going                                                        born January 4, 1832
Lucinda Christina (Atnas?) Going                                   born January 8, 1836
Eunice Going                                                                        born in June 1839

Winnie Adeline Going, daughter of Thomas Baxter Going and Elizabeth Vinson Going, was born July 17, 1827.  She was married to John Inman, Jr. of Union District, South Carolina about 1845, according to Terry Jackson.  She died June 25, 1909.

James McIsaac [McKissick?] Going, son of Thomas Baxter Going and Elizabeth Vinson Going, was born January 4, 1832.  A “James Going” was in the Seventh South Carolina Confederate Cavalry Regiment in the Civil War with his uncle, William George Washington Going.  He died in July 1908.

Lucinda Christina Atlas (Atnas) Going, daughter of Thomas Baxter Going and Elizabeth Vinson Going, was born January 8, 1836 in Union District.  She was married to William Dabbs February 28, 1856 in Union District.  He was born there August 29, 1827.  He died in 1908 at Kelton, South Carolina, and she died at Marietta, Georgia on June 23, 1914.

Children born to William Dabbs and Lucinda Christina Atlas (Atnas) Going Dabbs include:

Mariah Sims Dabbs                                                                             born April 12, 1857

Mariah Sims Dabbs, daughter of William Dabbs and Lucinda Christina Atlas (Atnas) Going Dabbs, was born April 12, 1857 at Pa-colet, South Carolina.  She was married January 1, 1874 to Coleman Haynes who was born February 29, 1851 at Flat Creek, Georgia.  She died at Walnut Grove, Alabama December 24, 1890, and he died there January 14, 1913.

Children born to them include:

Ara Atlas Haynes                                                                                born February 23, 1883

Ara Atlas Haynes, daughter of Coleman Haynes and Marian Sims Dabbs Haynes, was born February 23, 1883.  She was married November 11, 1900 to Rev. Charles William Joiner who was born August 15, 1879 at Cullman, Alabama.  He died January 30, 1951, and she died June 29, 1956 at Cullman.

Children born to them include:

Essie Clarice Joiner                                                                              born January 5, 1908

Essie Clarice Joiner, daughter of Rev. Charles William Joiner and Ara Atlas Haynes Joiner, was born January 5, 1908 at Boaz, Alabama.  She was married October 19, 1930 at Cullman to Loyd Clifton Oswalt.  She affiliated with D.A.R. in 1965 on the basis of the Revolutionary service of Drury Going.

In 1992 and in 1996 Essie Clarice Joiner Oswalt lived in Tuskeegee, Alabama.  She died October of 1996.

Eunice Going, daughter of Thomas Baxter Going and Elizabeth Vinson Going, was born in June 1839 in Union District.

______________________________________________

Sarah Palmer Going, daughter of Isaac Going and Rebecca Palmer Going, was born July 13, 1808 in Union District.  She was married January 5, 1826 to Willis Vinson.  She was mentioned in the probate application of her brother, Amasa Vernon “Mace” Going filed in Union District November 23, 1866.  She, apparently a widow, lived in Chattanooga, Tennessee at that time.  She died there in Hamilton County, Tennessee February 9, 1875 and was buried there in Tyner Baptist Church Cemetery.  Six children were born to them.

An entry in the family bible read, “Elijah Vinson departed this life 3 day of May 1887.  He died in Georgia where he lived several years.  He was a son of Willis & Sariah Vinson.”

__________________________________

John Madison Going, son of Isaac Going and Rebecca Palmer Going, was born July 14, 1810 in Union District.  “John Goings,” a bachelor living alone, was enumerated on page 223 of the Union County census of 1840.  He was listed as a teacher, age “30-40.”  He died there July 25, 1844, unmarried.

____________________________

Elijah Bobo Going, son of Isaac Going and Rebecca Palmer Going, was born January 15, 1813 in Union District.  He died there at age 14, February 16, 1827.

__________________________________

Drury Dobbins Going, son of Isaac Going and Rebecca Palmer Going, was born November 24, 1815 in Union District.  He was married about 1838 to Sarah Spears.

“Drury Goings” was the head of a household in the 1840 census of Union County, page 211.  He was a farmer.  The household was enumerated as:

“Goings, Drury     white male             20-30
white female          20-30
white female            0-5”

He was remarried about 1857 to Elizabeth Wyatt.  He was enumerated as the head of a household in the 1860 census of Union County, page 226.

On November 23, 1866, he applied for the administration of the estate of his brother, Amasa Vernon Going who was killed in Civil War service in December 1864, perhaps in the Battle of Nashville.  The application was refused.

Drury Dobbins Goings was married for a third time in 1870 to Mrs. Miriam Sharp Adams Fowler Bentley as her fourth husband.

Children born to Drury Dobbins Going and Sarah Spears Going include:

Eliza Doshea Going                                  born August 21, 1839
James M. Going                                        born about 1842
William Isaac Peeler Going                    born about 1844
Rebecca Going                                           born about 1846

Children born to Drury Dobbins Going and Elizabeth Wyatt
Going include:

John Smith Going                                     born June 21, 1859
William Beauregard Going                      born May 9, 1861
Elisha R. Going                                          born March 29, 1863

Children born to Drury Dobbins Going and Miriam Sharp Adams Fowler Bentley Going include:

Mary Elizabeth Going                             born March 1, 1871
Jacob A. Going                                         born August 26, 1873
Abram Egbert Going                               born November 11, 1875

Eliza Doshea Going, daughter of Drury Dobbins Going and Sarah Spears Going, was born August 21, 1839 in Union District.  She was enumerated in the 1840 census of her father’s household as a “white female, 0-5.”  She died February 16, 1913, according to Fredrick M. Tucker.

James M. Going, son of Drury Dobbins Going and Sarah Spears Going, was born about 1842.  He died August 19, 1861 in Confederate military hospital in Charlottesville, Virginia.

William Isaac Peeler Going, son of Drury Dobbins Going and Sarah Spears Going, was born about 1844.  He died about 1883.

Rebecca Going, daughter of Drury Dobbins Going and Sarah Spears Going, was born about 1846.  She was deceased by 1853.

John Smith Going, son of Drury Dobbins Going and Elizabeth Wyatt Going, was born June 21, 1859 in Union District.  He died December 29, 1928.

William Beauregard Going, son of Drury Dobbins Going and Elizabeth Wyatt Going, was born May 9, 1861.  He died July 29, 1911.

Elisha R. Going, son of Drury Dobbins Going and Elizabeth Wyatt Going, was born March 29, 1863 in Union District.  He died April 24, 1932.

Mary Elizabeth Going, daughter of Drury Dobbins Going and Miriam Sharp Fowler Bentley Going, was born March 1, 1871.  She died February 14, 1931.

Jacob A. Going, son of Drury Dobbins Going and Miriam Sharp Fowler Bentley Going, was born August 26, 1873.  He died March 14, 1963.

Abraham Egbert Going, son of Drury Dobbins Going and Miriam Sharp Fowler BEntley Going, was born November 11, 1875.  He died April 23, 1876.

____________________________

Isaac McKissick Going, son of Isaac Going and Rebecca Palmer Going, was born September 2, 1818 in Union District.  He died unmarried August 10, 1840, at age 21, in Pickens County, Alabama and was buried there in Franconia Cemetery.

_________________________________

Rhoda Going, daughter of Isaac Going and Rebecca Palmer Going, was born August 24, 1821 in Union District.  She was married about 1849 to Richard Page.  They were mentioned in the probate application of her brother, Amasa Vernon “Mace” Going filed in Union District November 23, 1866.  She died there March 12, 1871, at age 49.  She was buried at Flat Rock Methodist Church in Union County.  She was the mother of four.

_________________________________

William George Washington Going, son of Isaac Going and Rebecca Palmer Going, was born July 17, 1824 at Kelton, South Carolina in Union District, according to his family bible.

He was married September 16, 1847 in Union County to Nancy Manerva Jane Dupree who was born in South Carolina June 3, 1827, the first of 19 children of William Griffin DuPree and Julia Ann Fields Shaw DuPree.  He became a farmer and a merchant in the Pea Ridge section of Union District.

Nancy Manerva Jane Dupree joined the Baptist Church at Pacolet Shoals, South Carolina in 1845 and was baptized in the Pacolet River, according to the family bible record published in “Old Southern Bible Records” by Memory Aldridge Lester.

“William Going” was enumerated as the head of a household in the 1860 census of Union County, page 226.  Nearby was a household which included “Sarah Going,” page 277.

William George Washington Going served on a Coroner’s Jury which investigated a bizarre murder January 6, 1862, according to “The South Carolina Magazine of Ancestral Research,” Vol. 18:

“An Inquisition indented taken at Mastin Comer’s in Union District 6 January 1862 before G. S. Gregory, Magistrate, acting as coroner, upon the dead body of Mastin Comer by the oaths of John P. McKissick, Robert Lawson, Wm. Goins, Ebenezer Fowler, Stephen Fowler, Joseph Kelly, Wm. D. Gault, Jackson Hames, Augustus Wood, Smith Cook, Wm. Sprouse, and Washington Gault, being a lawful Jury of Inquest, do say from evidence herewith annexed that the deceased came to his death by a wound inflicted in the head by Seaborn Woolbright with a knife in the public road near J. P. Porter’s some 5 or 6 weeks previous to this date which caused the death of Mastin Comer.

Signed and sealed by G. S. Gregory, magistrate. acting Coroner, John P. McKissick, foreman, Robert Lawson, W. G. W. Going, Ebenezer Fowler, Stephen Fowler, Joseph Kelly, A. J. Hames, Wm. D. Gault, A. G. Wood, Smith Cook, Wm. Sprouse and G. W. Gault.

Summons issued to Franklin Vaughn, special constable, to notify the jury to appear at Mastin Comer’s between the hours of 5 and 6 oclock on 6 January 1862.  Signed 6 January 1862 by G. S. Gregory, Magistrate. acting as Coroner.

The State vs Seaborn Woolbright–felony.  Wiley Wood, Doct. S. P. Simpson and J. P. Porter–Witnesses on examination at Inquest.

Wiley Wood sworn says that he was with Mastin Comer the day previous to his death some 4 or 5 hours and that he complained some, witness has been with him more or less ever since he received a wound in the forehead with a knife, that the deceased would not talk and acted as tho he was an Eidet [idiot], that before he was wounded in the head he talked very freely and did not appear to be so dull.  Witness was not with him when he received the wound, but found him at work in the field the next morning and persuaded him to quit and go to his house, deceased appeared to be in a great deal of misery, was bleeding freely at the nose.  Dated 6 January 1862 and signed by Wiley Wood.

Doct. Samuel P. Simpson sworn, says that he opened the wound on the head of Mastin Comer, deceased, and is of the opinion that the wound caused his death.  Dr. Simpson was called on by G. S. Gregory, magistrate, acting as coroner, to perform the postmortem examination.  Signed 6 Jan. 1862 by S. J. Simpson.

Jidathan Porter sworn, states that he was present and saw Seaborn Woolbright stick a knife in the head of Mastin Comer deceast, and that the knife blade broke loose from the handle and remained in the wound and had to be drawn with a pair of strong nipers.  Witness does not recollect the day of the month but thinks it was at least 5 or 6 weeks previous to this date. Dated  6 January 1862 and signed by J. P. Porter.”

William George Washington Going was enlisted March 10, 1863 in Company C, Seventh South Carolina Cavalry Regiment commanded by Col. A. C. Haskell in the Civil War.  He wrote his family June 15, 1863:

Camp near Madden Station
in 10 miles of Richmond
Hanover County, Va.
June 15th day 1863, Monday morning

Dear wife and children,

I seat myself to write to you to let you know that I am still well and hearty as yet–hoping that when you receive this letter, it may find you all well.  We here of course see a hard time of it, but no more that I expected when I left home.  We are falling back slowly.  We come here at this [place] on the 13th of June.  We don’t know how long we will stay here.

The yankees are advancing from Yorktown and Williamsburg on the roads and on James River & the Permunkey River and Chickhommana.  We are falling back off the Bernenlere in order to get a chance at them.  We are getting a re-enforcement here now.  We have 9 calvary companies camped near here.  We got four more regiments of infantry yesterday, 3 regiments of North Carolinians and one from VA.

Col. Dabb’s pickets and yankee pickets had a little fight day before yesterday.  We lost one man killed and two taken prisoner.  The yankees, 3 killed and one taken prisoner.  I can state to you and my friends that one the 6th of June we had a sever crumber[?] at King Williams Court House, that was our squadron and the 150 infantry–the yankees which we killed were 3 and wounded 2 and taken 3 prisoners.  Our loss was one man shot through the thigh.  I never heard bullets whizz around me as fast as that did for a few minutes.  We all thought a while back that we would not have much more fighting to do here, but now it is a daily thing.  We have a heap of picket fighting here now.  I take note of all the movements that is made.  It is my opinion that we will have a fight close by here in a short time.  Gen[?] Wise will fight if they will let him.  He got orders from Gen. Ensley to fall back to this place where we are stationed now.  I think that we can stand our ground now with them.

This is a fine country for fish, we get as much fish as we want.  This is a great wheat country, the best wheat I have ever saw, but the yankees down where we left are destroying everything before them.  I am sorry for the women and children for it was hard before, but now it is worse.  The ladies treat us well in our travels.  If they have anything to eat, they generally give us some.  Some of the men who are out of service here are more like hogs than men.

We have cavalry fighting here every day.  I hope to God that I may live to go through safe and every man in our company.  We get along like brothers.  We had a fine sermon preached to us last Sunday by a Presbyterian preacher.  I want you to write to me when you get a letter from your father and when you have heard from any of your brothers or when you have heard from A. V. Going or E. P. Going.  I have not heard from any of them in some time, but it may be that some of them may be close by us.

I got $91.20 the other day.  I paid $75 toward my horse.  I hear that cows are selling at home from one hundred to two hundred dollars.  I want you to take care of all your cows.  Butter is selling here at $3 per pound, $2 per gallon for buttermilk and $4 for a common chicken.  I paid $2 the other morning for my breakfast.  We get at this time coarse corn meal and bacon–that is what we are drawing. But we get plenty of fish.  James Going [James McKissisk Going, his nephew and son of his brother, Thomas Baxter Going] is well.  He went fishing yesterday and got a fine mess of fish, and James Going found a bee tree which we got lots of honey out of it.  If it was not for this war, it would be one of the best countries to live in I ever saw.  The land is just good anuff and the great fields of clover, this is a low, flat country, the tide water runs up all these rivers.  I was on picket on the Pormunkey River last week at Treaiters Ferry.  I caught 14 fine fish.  I live well up here, certain.

I have to go on picket again in the morning.  We have to picket near the yankees.  Crops are very late here and little wheat is planted.  There is not more than one half of the land planted here and what is stands a chance to be destroyed.

I want you to write to me as soon as you get this letter and write to me about your farm.  I hope that you will get all of your wheat safe.  Try to make all the corn you can and write how much molasses cane you planted and if you have the rice planted or not and plant all the best corn land peas and I would like to hear from your garden.  I hope that you will make plenty to live on.

My Dear Children, you all must be good to your Mother and learn your books every Sunday and be good to each other and be good to all your friends.

Give my best respects to all inquiring friends.  Write in your next letter who is set to go to the war or now is gone.  I heard that was good many more had to go in service.  Now is the time for every man to do his duty if he ever intends to do it for we need all we can get now.  I had as bad a chance to leave as any man ever did.  I am willing to do my duty as any man and do it.  I know it is hard for every man to leave home, but the people don’t know anything hard times at home to what the people do here, and I hope they never will know for I have seen more fine farms and fine houses burned and destroyed that is in Union District.

Write how George Washington [his one-year son and namesake] is and if the boy grows any or not, and if your fruit hit or not.  There is lots of fruit here this year.  Be sure to write when you get this letter, and if you need anything to live on, you must buy it, and write how your corn is holding out.  I hope that you will have enough to do you.  Put a shoat in the pen and see if you can’t make a fine hog out of it.  I hope the yankees may never get in Union.  Here I send you three postage stamps, ten cent stamps.

So I must come to a close.  Farewell, my Dear Wife and Children, I hope to see you all again.  Tell Alley Howdy and be a good boy and mind his mistress and make all he can, and when I come home I will give him a present if he will be a good boy.  God bless you all.
Wm. G. W. Going
To Nancy Going & Children”

He wrote again July 11, 1863:

“Camp War Bottoms Bridge
in Henrico County
Saturday morning, July 11 day, 1863
Dear Wife,

I take my pen in hand this morning to let you know and the childrens that I am well at this time.  Hopeing when you get this it may be fine with you and all the childrens well.  I received your letter the other day which was dated 22nd of June.  Which I was sorry to learn that Father Griffen was dead.  I was in hope to see him once more in this life, but he has gone home out of this troubles some world.  I just believe that he has gone to heaven.  We are all got to die.  I want you to take care of your self and not grieve your self two much, and try to keep up for you are all of my dependent in this world to raise my dear little children.

I hope to God that you and all of my dear little children may have good health, that I may see you and all of my dear little children once more.  Of course, I see a hard time of it, but no more than any other soldier does.  I have had my health as I ever did in my life, but about two weeks which I had the dysentery.  I have got stout again, and I weigh more than I ever did in my life.  I weigh 178 pounds.

Well, the yankeys are all gone from the white houses near this place, we have been taking several yankeys as prisoners.  They say we are gaining down to York Town and to Washington City.  I understand that the yankeys are got to Vicksburg.  I am sorry to hear that.  I heard last night that the yankeys had attacked Charleston.  I understand that Lee is falling back from Tennessee.  A week ago we all thought we had the yankeys whipped, but our men are low down now.  I am in hopes that we will hear some good news in a few days again to help our feelings.  Lee has captured a great many yankeys in Maryland and Penn.  He has done a great deal of good there on our side.  I have been over several battle grounds.  The yankeys bones are laying like old horses bones all over the ground.  I have seen several where they were shot down.  All of the bones were like a horse or any beast.  Dead at Gains Mill beats any place.  I saw in some square pits where they threw them in, arm bones are sticking out of the ground and threw a little dirt over them.  I have seen as many as three in one grave of our men, with head to their graves.  It is no more to see a dead man here than to see a dead dog at home.

Tell all of the boys that it does me good that they are working so well this summer, and I am glad to hear that you have got everything growing to live on.  I wish I had some of your Irish potatoes and beans and greens.  Nancy, I went out yesterday to buy some vegetables for our mess.  I gave for butter $2 per lb.  I gave $1 per quart for Irish potatoes and $1 for one dozen cucumbers and $1 per dozen squashes, and 50 cents for a quart of butter milk, and was glad to get it at that.  We get plenty of bacon.  We drawed out rashings yesterday.  We got crackers in place of meal.  We got some rice and salt.

We are looking to hear of a march somewhere in a day or two.  I want you to write to me whether you have got any salt or not.  And how your corn are holding out and try to get out your wheat and have all your straw taken care of.  If you haven’t got no shoat in the pen, put you one in the pen, and it will make you a good hog.

I don’t want you to be uneasy about me not having something to eat, for if it is to be had, I intend to have it.  I don’t believe in dieing hungry, for I don’t know how soon it may be.  I have got some cloth[e]s to send home.  If I ever get a chance.  I have got a nice cap to send Elijah Vernon [his third son, age 10].  I have got plenty of coats.  I need a pair of cotton pants and a hat.  Be sure and send my hat by Doctor Little.  I understand the old regt. South Carolina are going to North Carolina.  E. P. Going promised me that he would write to me before he went home.  I don’t know whether he has gone home or not.  I am looking for a letter from him every day now.  I haven’t heard from any of your brothers in some time, or Mary Ann Page or Willis Page.  I don’t know whether Mary Ann are still at Richmond or not.  I got a little clipping of the people in William Fowler’s letter stating that you have heard from A. V. [Amasa Vernon, his brother] Going, but I can’t make no since out of it.  If you have heard from your mother, write all the news about them all, if you please.  I want you to be sure to write to me whether John McKissicks got those notes and money I left for him to get.  I wrote to you before about it, and you never give me no answer about it.  I see in a little peace that came in Fowler’s letter that Salley Vinson and her daughter has come in.  If that is right, write to me.  I don’t want you to have anything to do with old Betts, but if she come in side of the Fort, or anywhere in side of my place, fight her as long as you have breath for she is a gambler, and a devil ain’t her match.  I hope to live to get to see them again. Betts is a lier.

I will write more, but I have to come to a close.  From
W. G. W. Going
To Nancy Going and Family”

William George Washington Going was paroled April 10, 1865 after the surrender and was listed as a farmer at Kelton, South Carolina in 1866.  Later he became a postmaster.

He was mentioned in the probate application of his brother, Amasa Vernon “Mace” Going filed in Union District November 23, 1866.

William George Washington Going was listed as the head of a household in the 1880 census of Union County, Enumeration District 158, page 21, Pinkney Township:

“Goings,William G.              55, born in SC
Nancy                                    52, born in SC
Evilina                                   30, born in SC
James D.                                18, born in SC
Washington                           17, born in SC
Gary                                        14, born in SC
Rhoda                                    11, born in SC
Oliver                                       9, born in SC
Hames, John S.                   20, born in SC, nephew
Keturah                                 18, born in SC, niece
Louisa                                    16, born in SC, niece”

Nancy Manerva Jane Dupree Going died November 13, 1903 and was buried at Mt. Joy Baptist Church in Union County, according to “Union County, South Carolina Cemetery Records.”  The family bible recorded her passing as “Nov 13, Friday night, 1903, ten minutes after 9 o’clock, age 76 years, 6 months and 10 days old when she died.  She jine the Baptis Church at Packolet on Skulls Sholes 1845 and was babtise in Packolet River by J. G. Kindrick.  W.G.W. Going and Nancy Dupree was married on 16th day of September 1847.  She had 10 boys and 3 girls.  Nancy Manerva Jane Going was buried at Mt. Joy church Sonday, November 15, 1903.”

William George Washington Going died October 7, 1915, at age 91, and was buried beside his wife at Mt. Joy Baptist Church, according to Fredrick M. Tucker, a great-great-grandson.  The bible entry showed that his age was “91 years, 2 months & 20 days.”

Children born to William George Washington Going and Nancy Manerva Jane Dupree Going include:

Mary Ann Rebecca Evelina Going – born October 25, 1848
William Mack Isaac Going – born February 7, 1850
John Thomas Richard Going – born August 16, 1851
Elijah Vernon Going – born March 25, 1853
Julia Ann Frances Jane Going – born Dec. 26, 1854
Butler Brooks Going – born Feb. 25, 1856
David Anderson Going – born May 30, 1858
James Daniel Lenard Going – born May 5, 1860
George Washington Going – born May 16, 1862
Robert Lee Going – born Dec. 26, 1864
Joseph Bight Gary Going – born April 10, 1866
Rhoda Cornelia Alice Sarah Elizabeth Going – born Sept. 12, 1868
Oliver Francis Marion Going – born June 16, 1870

Mary Ann Rebecca Evelina Going, daughter of William George Washington Going and Nancy Manerva Jane Dupree Going, was born October 25, 1848.  She appeared as a 30 year-old spinster living in her father’s household in the 1880 census of Union County.  She died unmarried August 5, 1923 and was buried in Mt. Joy Cemetery in Union County.

William Mack Isaac [McKissick?] Going, son of William George Washington Going and Nancy Manerva Jane Dupree Going, was born February 7, 1850 in Union County.  He was married October 26, 1873 to Margaret Cordelia “Delie” Trubey Cole, one-half Cherokee who was born July 17, 1857 in Cherokee County, Georgia.  She died there November 9, 1912, and he was remarried September 15, 1914 at Holly Springs, Georgia to Nicy Lee Biddy.  She was born June 19, 1877.  He died February 5, 1938 in Cobb County, Georgia at age 88 and was buried in New Hope Baptist Church Cemetery.  Nicy Lee Biddy Going died November 18, 1960.  (Note:  according to researcher Fredrick  M. Tucker, Margaret Cordelia Trubey Cole was NOT half-Cherokee, as her descendants and siblings tried to get money from the government in the early 1900s (regarding their Native American ancestry).  They were turned down.  Her father was a Cole and her mother was a Whitlock . . . see note at bottom of page)(Just as an addendum – people often assume, based on what a relative has told them, that they may be part Native American, or related to some famous person, etc.  So I am not publishing this information to indicate any purpose or intent to deceive, etc.  Their intent may possibly be inferred, but not known at this late date.  There may have been legitimate reasons they thought they were of Native American ancestry, but that information which led them to believe this is not known to me, so I have no further info to add other than what has been contributed.  If anyone wants to add information regarding this, feel free to send a message on this page for an update and I will update this page).  

Children born to William Mack Isaac Going and Margaret Cordelia “Delie” Trubey Cole Going include:

Byrus Wesley Going                          born April 29, 1876
Nancy Elizabeth Going                     born November 25, 1877
Alma Louola Going                            born October 25, 1879
Julia Rebecca Going                          born April 25, 1881
Mary Susan Going                              born November 15, 1882
Magnolia Nora Going                        born August 25, 1884
John William Going                           born June 12, 1886
James Leonard Going                        born February 6, 1891

James Leonard Going, son of William Mack Isaac Going and Margaret Cordelia “Delie” Trubey Cole Going, was born February 6, 1891 in Bartow County, Georgia.  He served as a cavalryman in World War I.  He was married in 1909 to Lori Land, and the marriage was annulled.  He was remarried about 1920 to Emma Mae Hobbs.  Later he was married a third time to Mary Artimissa Chastain.  He died July 19, 1956 at age 65 in Fulton County, Georgia.

Children born to James Leonard Going, Lori Land Going, and Mary Artimissa Chastain Going are unknown.  Children born to James Leonard Going and Emma Mae Hobbs Going include:

William Rufus Going                           born January 11, 1924

William Rufus Going, son of James Leonard Going and Emma Mae Hobbs Going, was born January 11, 1924 in Fulton County.  He enlisted in the U.S. Navy July 11, 1944 at Atlanta, Georgia.  After a brief time at Camp Peary near Williamsburg, Virginia and Norfolk Naval Training Station, he was assigned to the U.S.S. Southerland, a destroyer.

His destroyer provided a carrier screen in the first naval air strikes on Tokyo on July 10, 1945.  On July 14-15 the armada attacked Northern Honshu and Hokkaido.  On July 17-18 the Task Force struck at the Tokyo Plains.  On July 24, 25 and 28 the U.S.S. Southerland participated in attacks on targets in the Inland Sea.

On July 29, the Southerland was ordered to stand off the Hamamatsu area and to bombard the shore installations with its five-inch rifles.  On July 30 Central Honshu felt the wrath of the Grumann Wildcat fighters, the Chance-Vought Corsairs and the Curtis Helldiver divebombers from the fleet, and the Southerland continued to provide an air defense screen for the carriers.

On August 9, the air attacks returned to Central Honshu, on August 10 to Northern Honshu.  The destroyer was ordered to Sagami Wan August 27 as part of the occupation forces.  On August 28, the U.S.S. Southerland was ordered to procede to Tokyo Bay to take part in the surrender ceremony.

Returning home with campaign ribbons, battle stars and naval citations, William Rufus Going was greeted by his wife, Dora Evelyn Elliott Going and baby daughter.  He was employed by the Southern Railway for the next 40 years.  The Goings, now in retirement, continue living in the Atlanta area.  Their three children have given them eight grandchildren and step-grand-children, two grandchildren-in-law and three great-grandchil-dren.

Three children were born to William Rufus Going and Dora Evelyn Elliott Going include:

Martha Elaine Going                                                          born October 2, 1944
Donald Eugene Going                                                        born August 9, 1947
Claire Yvonne Going                                                           born February 8, 1959

Donald Eugene Going, son of William Rufus Going and Dora Evelyn Elliott Going, was born in Atlanta August 9, 1947.  His sister Martha Elaine Going Thomas wrote an account of his winning the Carnegie Medal for Heroism in 1966:

“Donald Eugene Going, following an underground explosion in a cave at Trenton, Georgia in 1966, was awarded the Carnegie Medal for Heroism for his efforts in a daring rescue.  The 18-year-old spelunker, with a total disregard for his own safety, was recognized for bravery in his rescue efforts.

While exploring with other members of his college spelunking club on April 16, 1966, the explosion erupted in a nearby cave.  A group of 10 boy scouts with two scoutmasters had entered the ill-fated cave unaware that
a gasoline pipeline had ruptured and that the cave was being filled with gasoline fumes.

When the explosion occurred, one scoutmaster and three Boy Scouts were atop a ledge at one end of a cathedral cavern.  The other members of their party were at the opposite end of the cavern.  At that instant an carbide cap lamp ignited the gasoline fumes, causing a violent explosion and a huge fireball throughout the cavern.

The larger party of Scouts were able to climb a steep slope at their end of the cavern which led to the mouth of the cave and safety.  The other four were in a precarious position.  The smoke and noxious gasses had rendered them unconscious, and they lay atop the narrow ledge with a 40-foot drop before them and a long, hazardous 225 feet between them and the entrance.

Some would-be rescuers including an 18-year-old local boy, equipped with flashlights, pulled wet shirts over their faces, entered the cave and attempted to cross the cathedral. Don Going and his fellow spelunkers were better equipped; they entered wearing smoke masks and carrying spare masks for the victims.  Dense water vapor in the cavern rendered the flashlights ineffective, and the wet shirts did little to filter out the fumes.

Two of the spelunkers reached the end of the cathedral and found the local boy, weak and dizzy, trying to climb to the ledge.  Fearing that he would collapse, the spelunkers sent him back. and he started toward the en-trance.  The college boys were successful in reaching the ledge. but were unable to arouse the unconscious Scouts.

The first party of would-be rescuers were having to turn back. and those entering with smoke masks were obliged to take off the masks and place them on those who were faltering.  Don Going removed his mask and gave it to a companion who, becoming delirious, removed it.  Going forced it back on the companion and took him back to the slope where another rescuer was being raised to the entrance on a rope.  After assisting the man being raised, Going himself slumped down unconscious.

By that time, a rescue squad wearing gas masks had arrived and began to take charge.  Two of them descended the slope and fastened a rope around Going who was still unconscious.  He was then pulled out to the entrance.  The rescue squad then brought out the rest of the people in the cave.  One of the college spelunkers and the 18-year-old local boy died in the rescue attempt.

Don Going and another college friend were considered dead at the scene, but were resuscitated and  regained consciousness in a local hospital and recovered.  For his efforts in the rescue Don Going received the Carnegie Medal for Heroism and a cash award, as did of the res-cuers.  In 1994, Don Going and his son live in Peachtree City, Georgia.”

Children born to Donald Eugene Going include:

Jay Clinton Going                                                                                born November 8, 1984

John Thomas Richard Going, son of William George Washington Going and Nancy Manerva Jane Dupree Going, was born August 16, 1851 in Union County,  He was married November 15, 1874 to Izora Levotia “Boshie” Cole in Georgia.  She was born January 28, 1859 to John Cole and Elizabeth Whitlock Cole.  He farmed in the Pea Ridge area of Union County.  Later they removed to the Kelton area, “into the Baxter Going house, a log house that still stands as a hay barn on my father’s farm near Pinckneyville,” according to Jacquelyn Sanders Petty.

She died August 26, 1937, and he died September 2, 1948.  They were buried at Mt. Joy Baptist Church in Union County.

Children born to John Thomas Richard Going and Izora Levo-tia Cole Going include:

Emma O’Della Going                                          born September 20, 1876
James Thomas Going                                         born July 12, 1878
Nannie Rebecca Jane Going                             born October 25, 1880
William Dilmus Going                                        born August 11, 1882
Bessie Bell Going                                                 born March 2, 1885
Mary Leila Going                                                 born August 30, 1887
Carrie Evelina Going                                           born August 28, 1889
Bertha Elizabeth Going                                      born January 25, 1892
Rutha Lois Going                                                 born June 20, 1898

Emma O’Della Going, daughter of John Thomas Richard Going and Izora Levotia Cole Going, was born September 20, 1876.  She died March 13, 1930.

James Thomas Going, son of John Thomas Richard Going and Izora Levotia Cole Going, was born July 12, 1878 in Union County.  He became a minister.  He died June 1, 1957.

Nannie Rebecca Jane Going, daughter of John Thomas Richard Going and Izora Levotia Cole Going, was born October 25, 1880.  She was married about 1897 to Sumpter Sanders.  She died January 18, 1973.

William Dilmus Going, son of John Thomas Richard Going and Izora Levotia Cole Going, was born August 11, 1882.  He died February 27, 1907.

Bessie Bell Going, daughter of John Thomas Richard Going and Izora Levotia Cole Going, was born March 2, 1885.  She was married about 1905 to James Franklin Sanders, brother to Sumpter Sanders, according to Jacquelyn Sanders Petty, a granddaughter.  She died March 27, 1963.

Mary Leila Going, daughter of John Thomas Richard Going and Izora Levotia Cole Going, was born August 30, 1887.  She was married about 1905, husband’s name John Henry Cudd.  She died December 5, 1959.

Carrie Evelina Going, daughter of John Thomas Richard Going and Izora Levotia Cole Going, was born August 28, 1899.  She was married about 1909, husband’s name Albert Levister.  She died February 9, 1975.

Bertha Elizabeth Going, daughter of John Thomas Richard Going and Izora Levotia Cole Going, was born January 25, 1892.  She was married about 1911, husband’s name Mike Trammell.  She died September 8, 1977.

Rutha Lois Going, daughter of John Thomas Richard Going and Izora Levotia Cole Going, was born June 20, 1898.  She was married about 1918, husband’s name Calvert Farr.

Elijah Vernon “Jock” Going, son of William George Wash-ington Going and Nancy Manerva Jane Dupree Going, was born March 25, 1853, Good Friday, in Union County.  He was married March 1, 1877 to Margaret Minerva Farr who was born April 12, 1853.  He died July 7, 1922, and she died May 12, 1939.  They were buried in Mt. Joy Baptist Church.

Children born to Elijah Vernon Going and Margaret Minerva Farr Going include:

William Isaac Going                                           born December 29, 1877
Mace Vernon Going                                            born December 16, 1879
Alice Mariel Going                                              born February 26, 1882
Samuel Ratchford Going                                   born March 16, 1884
Eddie Going                                                         born August 10, 1886
Henry Walter Going                                           born August 11, 1887
Ben Tillman Going                                              born July 5, 1890
Wallace Thomson Going                                    born March 11, 1893
Joseph Arthur Going                                          born April 29, 1885
Maggie Nannie May Going                                born December 17, 1897

William Isaac Going, son of Elijah Vernon Going and Margaret Minerva Farr Going, was born “Saturday night at 12:00 o’clock” December 29, 1877, according to the family bible.

Eddie Going, son of Elijah Vernon Going and Margaret Min-erva Farr Going, was born in August 1886.  He died “September 14, 1886, half after ten o’clock–he was 5 weeks ole,” according to the family bible.

Julia Ann Frances Jane Going, daughter of William George Washington Going and Manerva Jane Dupree Going, was born December 26, 1854.  She died “the 3rd night of March 1855, age 2 months and 5 days,” according to the family bible.

Another entry in the bible states, “Julyann Dupree departed this life the 17 day of September 1884.  She was the wife of Griffin Dupree.  She died in Georgia.  She was the mother of Nancy Going.  She was buried at New Hope Baptist Church in Barto County, Ga.”

Butler Brooks Going, son of William George Washington Go-ing and Nancy Manerva Jane Dupree Going, was born February 25, 1856 in Union County.  He was married September 7, 1879 to Mrs. Sarah Ethel Farr Smith who was born October 13, 1849.  She was a widow with one son, Buddy Smith.

She died “Friday morning,” February 29, 1884, according to the family bible.  “Union County, South Carolina Cemetery Records” shows “Sarah Going, wife of B. B. Going: died March 28, 1884.  He was remarried August 15, 1889 to Rachel “Tompie” Gordon who was born October 18, 1853.  She died November 12, 1897.  He was married for the third time November 23, 1918 to Beatrice Eugenia Wilburn who was born November 20, 1886.  She died June 1, 1922.  He died September 9, 1931 and was buried in Rosemont Cemetery in Union, South Carolina.  No children were born to Butler Brooks Going, Rachel “Tompie” Gordon Going and Beatrice Eugenia Wilburn Going.

One daughter was born to Butler Brooks Going and Sarah Ethel Farr Smith Going:

Minnie Ethel Going                                        born February 5, 1881

Minnie Ethel Going, daughter of Butler Brooks Going and Sarah Ethel Farr Smith Going, was born February 5, 1881.  She attended Union County Grade School and Clifford Seminary in Union.  She also attended Asheville Academy for Young Ladies, in Asheville, North Carolina.  She died May 7, 1941 and was buried beside her father.

David Anderson “Bud” Going, son of William George Wash-ington Going and Nancy Manerva Jane Dupree Going, was born May 30, 1858 in Union County.  He was married Novem-ber 26, 1882 to Josephine Tallulah “Lula” Stewart who was born about 1855.  She died November 8, 1930, and he died July 10, 1932.  They were buried in Mt. Vernon Presbyterian Church cemetery in Union County.

Two daughters were born to David Anderson Going and Josephine Tallulah Stewart Going:

Hassie Euphemia Going                                      born September 1, 1885
Alma Nancy Going                                                born March 20, 1888

James Daniel Lenard Going, son of William George Wash-ington Going and Nancy Manerva Jane Dupree Going, was born May 5, 1860 in Union County.  He appeared in the 1880 census of Union County as a 18 year-old living in the house-hold of his father.  He was married February 14, 1894 to Emma Blalock in Bartow County, Georgia.  He died July 2, 1898, according to “Union County, South Carolina Cemetery Records” and was buried in Mt. Joy Cemetery.  He “departed this life the first night of July, half after three o’clock in the morning 1898 and was buried July 3 by the Masons.  He had the feavor, age 38 years, 1 month, 26 days,” according to the family bible.  No children were born to James Daniel Lenard Going and Emma Blalock Going.

George Washington Going, son of William George Washington Going and Nancy Manerva Jane Dupree Going, was born May 16, 1862.  He appeared in the 1880 census of Union County as a 17 year-old living in the household of his father.  He was married January 9, 1887 to Mary Jane Vaughan.  Mary Jane Vaughan Going was born May 26, 1871 and died November 24, 1899.  George Washington Going was married to Mrs. Annie Gilliam Jeter Smith January 29, 1904.  She was born December 12, 1868 and died December 30, 1914.

George Washington Going maintained his home at Kelton, South Carolina until 1899 when he moved to Union, South Carolina where he operated George W. Going General Mercantile.  Annie Gilliam Jeter Smith Going died December 30, 1914, and he was remar-ried November 7, 1928 to Rebecca Arabella “Belle” Crosby Spears.  She was born August 10, 1880.  George Washington Going died August 2, 1934.  Rebecca Arabella “Belle” Crosby Spears Going died January 24, 1978 at age 97.  They were buried in Rosemont Cemetery in Union County.

Children born to George Washington Going and Mary Jane Vaughan Going include:

Bernice Going                        born December 2, 1887
Walter Franklin Going         born July 26, 1889
Paul Going                              born October 7, 1893
Henri Rochelle Going          born November 18, 1895

Children born to George Washington Going and Annie Gilliam Jeter Smith Going include:

James Clyde Going                                              born July 5, 1905
George Washington Going, Jr.                          born April 1, 1909

Bernice Going, daughter of George Washington Going and Mary Jane Vaughan Going, was born December 2, 1887 in Union County.  She was married October 6, 1909 to William Hagood, Jr.

Children born to William Hagood, Jr. and Bernice Going Ha-good include:

Elizabeth Hagood                           born December 20, 1910
George Cleveland Hagood            born June 18, 1916

Elizabeth Hagood, daughter of William Hagood, Jr. and Bernice
Going Hagood, was born December 20, 1910.  She was married to David Ralph Spearman September 10, 1931.

Children born to David Ralph Spearman and Elizabeth Hagood Spearman include:

David Hagood Spearman                      born Nov. 16, 1932
William Benjamin Spearman               born Aug. 17, 1937

Walter Franklin Going, son of George Washington Going and Mary Jane Vaughan Going, was born July 26, 1889 at Kelton, South Carolina.  He was married June 12, 1912 to Jacquelin Almeda Mack, daughter of John W. Mack and Ella E. Gibson Mack of Orangeburg, South Carolina.  He became a life insur-ance underwriter.  He held a number of positions in Union Ma-sonic Lodge No. 75, Columbia Lodge No. 326, Columbia Commandery No. 2, Grand Council of DeMolay and Omar Temple, Charleston.  He died September 26, 1952 at age 63 in Columbia, South Carolina.

His obituary, prepared by fellow Masons, read:

“Walter Franklin Going was educated in the public schools of Union, Furman University and Eastman Business College.  He was married to Allie Mack of Orangeburg June 12, 1912, and to them were born three children Jacqueline, Ethel and Walter F. Going, Jr, all of whom survive him.

After a lingering illness, which he knew to be fatal, Bro. Going passed away at 10:00 a.m, September 26, 1952 at his residence, 228 Wateree Avenue, Columbia.  Funeral services were held in the First Baptist Church, Columbia at 3:00 p.m. Sunday, September 28, 1952.  Interment followed in Elmwood Cemetery, Columbia.

Walter’s business was insurance, a field in which he rendered signal service and attained considerable success.  At the time of his passing, he was head of the Going Life Agency of Columbia.  He was a devoted members of the First Baptist Church and took an active part in its activities.

Bro. Going was a man of unusual interests, energy and ability.  He was president of the Columbia Lions Club and later District Governor.  He was chairman of the Advisory Committee for the Division of the Blind, South Carolina State Department of Welfare.  He was active in the work of the Crippled Children’s Society of South Carolina.  He had a great capacity for doing good, and he used every opportunity afforded him to the fullest.”

Children born to Walter Franklin Going and Jacquelin Almeda Mack Going include:

Jacquelin Almeda Going                                     born July 26, 1917
Walter Franklin Going, Jr.                                 born December 25, 1919
Ethel Bernice Going                                             born April 25, 1926

Jacquelin Almeda Going, daughter of Walter Franklin Going and Jacquelin Almeda Mack Going, was born July 26, 1917.  She was married September 20, 1941 to John Keels Maxwell.

Children born to them include:

John Keels Maxwell, Jr.                      born October 5, 1942
Walter Going Maxwell                         born March 4, 1947
Lucy Earle Maxwell                              born July 4, 1948
Jacquelin Almeda Maxwell born September 28, 1952

Walter Franklin Going, Jr, son of Walter Franklin Going and Jacquelin Almeda Mack Going, was born December 25, 1919.  He was married September 15, 1947 to Eleanore Toole.

Children born to Walter Franklin Going, Jr. and Eleanor Toole Going include:

Jacquelin Almeda Going                      born December 10, 1950

Ethel Bernice Going, daughter of Walter Franklin Going and Jacquelin Almeda Mack Going, was born April 25, 1926.  She was married May 17, 1945 to Waddy McFall Anderson.

Children born to them include:

Waddy McFall Anderson, Jr.                            born February 4, 1946
Walter Going Anderson                                     born May 31, 1948
Charles Ellis Anderson                                       born July 27, 1949
Margaret Lucretia Anderson                             born March 4, 1951
John F. Anderson                                                born February 2, 1953

Paul Going, son of George Washington Going and Mary Jane Vaughan Going, was born October 7, 1893.  He died October 29, 1899.

Henri Rochelle  Going, son of George Washington Going and Mary Jane Vaughan Going, was born November 18, 1895.  He was married to Edith Purvis June 20, 1923.  Of Henri Rochelle Going and Edith Purvis Going and descendants nothing more is known.

James Clyde Going, son of George Washington Going and Annie Gilliam Jeter Smith Going, was born July 5, 1905, at Union, South Carolina.  He attended the College of Charleston in 1923, according to an alumni bulletin of the college.  He received an L.L.B. degree from the University of South Carolina in 1927.  He was married to Sarah Elizabeth Bell November 28, 1928.  She was from Spartanburg.  In 1930, James Clyde Going was an attorney at Union.  Children born to James Clyde Going and Sarah Elizabeth Bell Going are unknown.

George Washington Going, Jr, son of George Washington Go-ing and Annie Gilliam Jeter Smith Going, was born April 1, 1909 at Union.  He was married November 29, 1933 at Rock Hill, South Carolina to Eloise Barfield.  He died in 1947.  Children born to George Washington Going, Jr. and Eloise Barfield Going are unknown.

Robert Lee Going, son of William George Washington Going and Nancy Manerva Jane Dupree Going, was born December 26, 1864.  He died January 2, 1865, according to the family bible.

Joseph Wright Gary Going, son of William George Washington Going and Nancy Manerva Jane Dupree Going, was born April 10, 1866 at Kelton, South Carolina.  He appeared as a 14-year-old in the household of his father in the 1880 census of Union County.  Later his name was rendered “Joseph Gary Going.”  In 1891 he was graduated from medical school at Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia.  On December 24, 1892 he was married to Mary E. Stephens of Georgia. Mary E. Stephens Going died January 20, 1904 in Union..

On December 25, 1904 Dr. Joseph Gary Going was married to Ophelia Parham Jeter who was born September 15, 1873 in Union, South Carolina.  She was born September 15, 1873, ac-cording to her tombstone.  In 1930 Joseph Gary Going was a physician and surgeon practicing at Union, South Carolina.  Dr. Joseph Gary Going died April 26, 1950 and was buried in Rosemont Cemetery, according to “Union County, South Carolina Cemeteries” by Mrs. E. D. Whaley.  Ophelia Jeter Going died January 7, 1958 and was buried beside her husband.

Children born to Dr. Joseph Gary Going and Mary E. Stephens Going include:

Ottis Earl Going                     born June 14, 1893
Paulette Going                        born April 16, 1896

Children born to Dr. Joseph Gary Going and Ophelia Parham Jeter Going include:

Gilliam Jeter Going               born July 21, 1906
Nora Cleo Going                     born June 12, 1907
Joseph Gary Going, Jr.         born December 7, 1912

Ottis Earl Going, son of Dr. Joseph Gary Going and Mary E. Stephens Going, was born June 14, 1893.  He died October 23, 1933 and was buried in the family plot in Rosemont Cemetery.

Paulette Going, daughter of Dr. Joseph Gary Going and Mary E. Stephens Going, was born April 16, 1896.  She died Decem-ber 18, 1948.

Gilliam Jeter Going, son of Dr. Joseph Gary Going and Ophelia Parham Jeter Going, was born July 21, 1906.  He died at eight months and was buried in Rosemont Cemetery.

Nora Cleo Going, daughter of Dr. Joseph Gary Going and Ophelia Parham Jeter Going, was born June 12, 1907, at Union, South Carolina.  In 1930 she was a student at Brevard Institute in North Carolina.  She died June 22, 1980.

Joseph Gary Going, Jr, son of Dr. Joseph Gary Going and Ophelia Parham Jeter Going, was born at Union.  In 1930 he was a student at Union High School.  In 1961 “J. Gary Going” resided at Palmetto Gardens, Charleston, according to the telephone directory.

Rhoda Cornelia Alice Sarah Elizabeth Going, daughter of William George Washington Going and Nancy Manerva Jane Dupree Going, was born September 12, 1868 at Kelton.  She appeared as an 11-year-old in the 1880 census of Union County living in the household of her father.  She was married Sunday, October 17, 1886 to William Vaughan, born March 29, 1866, a brother to Mary Jane Vaughan, who married her brother, George Washington Going.  Rhoda Cornelia Alice Sarah Elizabeth Going Vaughan died March 3, 1928 and was buried at the Phillipi Baptist Church in Union County.  Her husband died three weeks later, March 27, 1928.

Mary Vaughan                                       born September 23, 1887
James Lemuel Vaughan                      born March 27, 1889
Giles Franklin Vaughan                      born May 1, 1891
William Arthur Vaughan                    born March 14, 1893
Nettie Aileen Vaughan                        born March 7, 1895
Byron Bozell Vaughan                        born July 25, 1897
Charles Douglas Vaughan                  born October 1, 1900
Lily Marie Vaughan                             born July 16, 1902
Albert Sidney Vaughan                       born March 19, 1904
Nancy Sarah Evelina Vaughan          born November 9, 1901
Lee Roy Vaughan                                 born December 12, 1908
Janie Ruth Vaughan                            born November 23, 1910

Janie Ruth Vaughan, daughter of William Vaughan and Sarah Elizabeth Going Vaughan, was born November 23, 1910 in Union County.  She was married July 29, 1929 to Fred Alford Cogdell.  He was born in Cocke County, Tennessee January 31, 1912 to Andrew Calhoun Cogdell and Jennie Archer Cogdell.  Fred Alfrod Cogdell died May 19, 1988.

Children born to them include:

Ruth Ann Cogdell                                                                born December 31, 1930

Ruth Ann Cogdell, daughter of William Vaughan and Sarah Elizabeth Going Vaughan, was born December 31, 1930 at Monarch, South Carolina in Union County.  She was married March 31, 1956 to Marshall Zebual Tucker.

One child was born to them:

Fredrick Marshall Tucker                                    born August 22, 1959

Fredrick Marshall Tucker, only child of Marshall Zebual Tucker and Ruth Ann Cogdell Tucker, was born August 22, 1959 at Greer, South Carolina.  In 1996, he a Foundation member, was a teacher in Duncan, South Carolina.

Oliver Francis Marion Going, son of William George Washing-ton Going and Nancy Manerva Jane Dupree Going, was born June 16, 1870 at Kelton.  He appeared in the 1880 census of Union County as a nine-year-old living in the household of his father.  He was married February 10, 1897 to Ellen McPherson in Greenville, South Carolina.  She was born February 21, 1876.

Oliver Francis Marion Going died December 11, 1931, and Ellen McPherson Going died July 5, 1936.  They were buried in Springwood Cemetery in Greenville.

Children born to them include:

Oliver Francis Marion Going, Jr.        born March 23, 1898
James William Going                                                           born April 26, 1910
_______________________________
Amasa Vernon “Mace” Going, son of Isaac Going and Rebecca Palmer Going and namesake of his uncle Amasa Palmer, was born in Union District, South Carolina.  His birth occurred “Tuesday, 30th day of January 1827, 45 minutes past 6 o’clock in the evening,” according to the family bible..

Like Amasa, captain of the host of Judah who was treacherously slain by Joab in II Samuel, he became a soldier.  He was a grandson of Drury Going, a Revolutionary soldier and Sarah “Sallie” Baxter Going.

Amasa Vernon “Mace” Going fled to Louisiana about 1858, to avoid being implicated in the theft of a slave, according to Fredrick M. Tucker.  He is believed to have lived in St. Landry Parish.  “A. M. Goins” appeared in the 1860 census of Union Parish.  While there he began to court Emma Porter, daughter of Tillman Porter and probably would have married her had the Civil War not interfered.  Emma Porter was born in 1843 and died in 1932, at about age 89.  She was buried with her parents in Shiloh Church Cemetery in Union Parish.

Tillman Porter bought land in Union Parish November 5, 1851.  His location was in Township 21 North, Range 2 West, about four miles east of present-day Bernice, Louisiana and about three miles north of Shiloh Church.  George W. Bolton, a resident of the Shiloh community served in Company E with Amasa Vernon “Mace” Going and wrote letters during the War, some of which are retained by Col. Carroll Heard Goyne, Jr. of Shreveport, Louisiana.

In July 1861 Amasa Vernon “Mace” Going enlisted as a private in Company E of the “Independent Rangers” at Camp Moore, Louisiana, according to Carl H. Moneyhon, professor of history at University of Arkansas at Little Rock.  At that time Camp Moore was located just north of New Orleans near the site of the New Orleans Fairgrounds.

Prof. Moneyhon researched the military career of Amasa Vernon “Mace” Going and included his portrait in “Portraits of Conflict, A Photographic History of Louisiana in the Civil War” compiled in collaboration with Bobby Roberts.  The sixth plate ambrotype, taken shortly after his enlistment, was made by a woman photographer, E. Beachabard in New Or­leans August 18, 1861.  In 1993 it was owned by J. Dale West of Longview, Texas.

The “Independent Rangers” regiment was incorporated into Confederate service as the Twelfth Louisiana Infantry Regiment.  Amasa Vernon “Mace” Going wrote a letter September 12, 1862 to his brother, William George Washington Going which has been retained by a Going descendant researcher, Fredrick M. Tucker of Duncan, South Carolina:

“Mississippi, Marshall County Camp
Near Holly Springs
September 12, 1862
Dear Brother,

I am well, and I hope this will find you and family with all the connection is in the same good blessing.  We have just got back from a tiresome trip, we travel over 700 miles, got but little to eat and done very hard marching.  We did not get into any fights.  Our regiment stood it much better than I thought.  I saw John Bailey and Old Jim Sams at Jackson, Miss.  He was well.  I also saw John Foster yesterday.  He heard of me and came by to see me.  He belongs to the 6th Miss. Regt.  He is above 12 miles above here.

We have just received orders to cook up five days ra-tions and be ready for marching in the morning at 4 o’clock.  We will go up North I think.  We will have a fight at Bolivar, Tenn. before this time next week, if the yankeys don’t leave there before we can get there.  They are 12,000 strong at that place.  We have and can get about 20,000 I think.  The general notion is to push on a fight at that place.  We are camped on cold water, five miles from Holly Springs, just where the yankeys were camped 6 weeks ago.  They did a great deal of mischief in this settlement.

I found some yankey letters today they lost when they left here.  One young lady writing to her sweetheart said, “Oh how she would like to see the Rebels tortured a while and then killed” and others praying for him to come home for she and her children were living on bread and other one was grieving because her husband was not buried in a coffin.  I see from the letters we found about here that they have hard living as well as we do in the South.

I suppose you have heard of the glorious victorys in Virg, Tenn and Ky. long before this can reach you.  I have to write in a hurry.  You can tell brothers that I am up here and direct there letters to Holly Springs and I will get them though they are fixing to start to Tenn. and will be there tomorrow.

I want you to keep everything strait between you and I about the Land.  You do what you think is rite and that will suit me.  I will wright again before long, soon as we stop or our fight is over.  Tell Keran [his sister] I will wright to her before long.  Tell them all that I am well.  I must go to cooking.

I am your loving brother
A. V. Going
To William Going”

Amasa Vernon “Mace” Going served three years in the Twelfth Louisiana Infantry Regiment and was killed in December 1864, according to his probate application.  If the probate date is correct, he may have died in the bloody Battle of Nashville.

His service record reveals that he was absent from his regiment and company after August 1864.  His absence was due either to illness, capture or death.  Since the horrific Battle of Atlanta was fought in August 1864, he may have died in that engagement.

His personal property in Union Parish was sold in an estate sale, and members of the Porter family purchased items from it.

Drury Dobbins Going, his older brother, filed an application for Amasa Vernon “Mace” Going in Union District November 23, 1866.  The document was never properly filed and was discovered over 100 years later among scraps of paper in the Union District probate office.  The document read:

“South Carolina    }
Union District       }

To C. Gage, Ordinary

“Your petitioner would respectfully show into your Court that A. V. Going, late of Louisiana, Union Parish, dec’d, departed this life on or about the _____ Decr. 1864, intestate, that he was seized and possessed of a personal estate in this district, to the amount of three or four hundred Dollars, also a distributive interest in the land of the real estate of Isaac Going, dec’d, late of this district, that no administration has been had on the Estate of said deceased, and that an administration is necessary in order that there may be some person authorized by law to receive and receipt for any money coming to and due the said estate, and for a final distribution of the estate amongst his brothers and sisters, all of whom, except one, [Sarah Vincen] reside in this District, that he left kin surviving his heirs at law, Thomas B. Going, Wm. G. W. Going, Richard Page and wife Rhoda and the children of Martha K. Hames, vix. John, Eliza & Kittury Hames, minors, residents of this district & Sarah Vincen residing in Chattanooga, Tennessee.

Your petitioner would therefore pray that your Court may grant him letters of administration on the personal estate of said deceased, and he will ever pray.  H H

Ex Parte           }
D. D. Going     }

Petition for Admin.

Petition Refused.”

______________________________

Elisha Palmer Going b. 1829 , son of Isaac Going and Rebecca Palmer Going, was born December 22, 1829 in Union district.  He en-listed in the Confederate service and was killed by a cannonball August 13, 1864, at age 24 in the Battle of Fussel’s Mill near Ft. Harrison, Virginia.

_______________________________

Martha Kerenhappuch Going b. 1835 [Cornucopia; second daughter of Job’s second family, Job 13:14] Going, daughter of Isaac Going and Rebecca Palmer Going, was born July 4, 1835 in Union District.

She was married there about 1854 to Isaac Hames.  He died in Confederate service.  She and children were mentioned in the probate application of her brother Amasa Vernon “Mace” Going filed in Union District November 23, 1866.  She died in Union District in 1865.  In the 1880 census of Union District their children were enumerated in the household of her brother, William George Washington Going.

Hames,   John S.                   20, born in SC, nephew
Keturah                                   18, born in SC, niece
Louisa                                      16, born in SC, niece”

Isaac Going’s Ancestry.com page:  http://person.ancestry.com/tree/69705632/person/34477827486/facts

 

10 Responses to 1775 Isaac Going m. Rebecca Palmer

  1. Fredrick Marshall Tucker says:

    Just testing to see if this works.

    • Fredrick Marshall Tucker says:

      I will respond again soon with some updates.

      • Fredrick Marshall Tucker says:

        I have several corrections on dates, etc. Since your post does not have page numbers, I printed it out and will use the automatically created page numbers on my printed copy. This will give you an idea of where in your post these mistakes occur.

        Page 1. Job Going died in 1834, not 1854.
        Page 3. Rhoda Palmer married Joseph McKissick in 1813, according to “The McKissicks of South Carolina,” a book published in 1965 by descendant Margaret McKissick Davis.
        Page 19. Lucinda Christina Atnas Going Dabbs died in Marietta, GA, on 23 June 1914.
        Page 19. Essie Clarice Joiner Oswalt was not a member of the Gowen Research Foundation in 1997 because she died in October 1996. I knew her quite well. When she was 88, I took her through briars and weeds and stumps to the grave of our common ancestor Isaac Going. She was a lovely, lovely person.
        Page 21. William Isaac Peeler Going died about 1883, not 1886.
        Page 21. Rebecca Going, dau. of D. D. Going and Sarah Spears, died in 1853.
        Page 21. Jacob A. Going died on 14 March 1963, not 23 April 1876.
        Page 22. Rhoda Going and Richard Page married about 1849, instead of 1840.
        Page 27. Margaret Cordelia Trubey Cole was NOT half-Cherokee, as her descendants and siblings tried to get money from the government in the early 1900s. They were turned down. Her father was a Cole and her mother was a Whitlock. I have their photo. They were as white as snow.
        Page 30. Mary Leila Going married JOHN HENRY CUDD.
        Page 30. Carrie Evelina Going married ALBERT LEVISTER.
        Page 31. Bertha Elizabeth Going married MIKE TRAMMELL.
        Page 31. Rutha Lois Going married CALVERT FARR.
        Page 39. Martha Kerenhappuch Going died in 1865, not 1867.

        Hope this helps.

      • douggoyen says:

        Thanks Fredrick, as always your attention to detail is appreciated. Ill try to get these fixes within the week.

      • douggoyen says:

        Is it Lucinda Christina Atnas Going Dabbs – or is it Atlas? Just making sure not a typo.

  2. Fredrick Marshall Tucker says:

    Good question. I have seen her family Bible, and it was ATNAS. But I always wondered about that because she had a granddaughter named ATLAS. Essie Joiner Oswalt, Lucinda’s great-granddaughter whom I mentioned before, had the Bible, which I transcribed it in ’91. Essie’s mother was Ara Atlas Haynes Joiner.

  3. Fredrick Marshall Tucker says:

    I do have additional notations. Will try to get to some of that this weekend. You’ve done an awesome job here, especially with the land grants section and the possible parentage of our 1749 Drury. I’m just amazed at your analysis and the “big picture.” Love it.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s