1762 William Going in Caswell Co, NC and Hawkins Co, TN

William Going born 1762 married to Elizabeth Going (unk maiden name) married Oct 1793 in Caswell Co, NC

(Link to page on various William “Going’s” and other variations of last name.  See this page to compare this William Goyens to other William Going variations that were in the VA, NC, or SC areas in the 1700s.  List is not complete, but I’ve listed those I know about so far:  https://goyengoinggowengoyneandgone.com/various-william-goings-different-ones/ ).

Parents:

Unk

Children:

Andrew Going

Sherard Going

Siblings:

Unk

1819 William Goings b. 1762
d. Aug 23, 1827 in Hawkins Co, Tenn
m. Elizabeth Goings (married Oct 1793 in Caswell Co, NC)
Hawkins Co, Tenn (residence when applied for pension in 1819)
Private for col. Dixon in Virginia.
56 years of age in 1818 (1762 DOB)
Enlisted in 1780

Aug 29, 1820 states he has:
Wife age 45 (Elizabeth)
son age 11
daughter 10
daughter 5
Son 2

July 7, 1838 – Elizabeth Going is 70 yrs old

Peter Goings – affid for Elizabeth m to William (Hawkins Co)
1839 affid – is 40 yrs old (DOB 1799)
Agga Goings – affid for Elizabeth m to William (Hawkins Co)

Will in 1827 names two sons:
Andrew Going and
Sherard Going

1819 TN Hawkins Co William Goings rev war pension app_Page_01

1819 TN Hawkins Co William Goings rev war pension app_Page_01

1819 TN Hawkins Co William Goings rev war pension app_Page_02

1819 TN Hawkins Co William Goings rev war pension app_Page_02

1819 TN Hawkins Co William Goings rev war pension app_Page_03

1819 TN Hawkins Co William Goings rev war pension app_Page_03

1819 TN Hawkins Co William Goings rev war pension app_Page_04

1819 TN Hawkins Co William Goings rev war pension app_Page_04

1819 TN Hawkins Co William Goings rev war pension app_Page_05

1819 TN Hawkins Co William Goings rev war pension app_Page_05

1819 TN Hawkins Co William Goings rev war pension app_Page_06

1819 TN Hawkins Co William Goings rev war pension app_Page_06

1819 TN Hawkins Co William Goings rev war pension app_Page_07

1819 TN Hawkins Co William Goings rev war pension app_Page_07

1819 TN Hawkins Co William Goings rev war pension app_Page_08

1819 TN Hawkins Co William Goings rev war pension app_Page_08

1819 TN Hawkins Co William Goings rev war pension app_Page_09

1819 TN Hawkins Co William Goings rev war pension app_Page_09

1819 TN Hawkins Co William Goings rev war pension app_Page_10

1819 TN Hawkins Co William Goings rev war pension app_Page_10

1819 TN Hawkins Co William Goings rev war pension app_Page_11

1819 TN Hawkins Co William Goings rev war pension app_Page_11

1819 TN Hawkins Co William Goings rev war pension app_Page_12

1819 TN Hawkins Co William Goings rev war pension app_Page_12

https://www.fold3.com/image/22778387

From GRF Newsletter Aug, 1990:

William Goings Was Veteran
of Yorktown at Age 17

Prepared from research developed
By Louise Goins Richardson

William Goings [or Gowan] was born in Virginia in 1764 of
parents unknown. He enlisted in the First Regiment of the
Virginia Continental Line in 1780, at the age of 16 and served
in the light infantry company commanded by Capt. Tilman
Dixon. In his pension application he stated that he
participated in the Battle of Brandywine, but it is likely that
his scribe misunderstood. That battle was fought in
Pennsylvania in 1777 when William Goings was 13 years old.

William Goings received his baptism of fire at the second
Battle of Camden, earlier called Pine Tree, South Carolina.

Lord Cornwallis had routed Gen. Horatio Gates and the
Americans there August 16, 1780. Four months later, the First
Virginia came back to Camden under Gen. Nathanael Greene
and this time was successful against the British December 3,
1780. In this battle William Going received grapeshot wounds
in his knee and ankle and carried the effect of them to his
grave. This battle was followed by their victory in the Battle
of Cowpens January 17, 1781 in Spartanburg County under
Gen. Daniel Morgan. The First Virginia was handed back to
Gen. Greene for the Battle of Guilford Court House which was
fought to a draw March 15, 1781 near present-day
Greensboro, North Carolina. Under Greene they were
successful in the Battle of Eutaw Springs, the last battle of the
war in South Carolina, September 8, 1781. When Lord
Cornwallis walked into the trap at Yorktown, the First
Virginia was quickly called home to participate in the Battle
of Yorktown in October.

After the surrender of Cornwallis at Yorktown, William
Goings set out on foot to return to his home in Halifax County,
and in his pocket was an honorable discharge, personally
signed by Gen. George Washington. In October 1793, at age
29 he was married in adjoining Caswell County, North
Carolina, wife’s name Elizabeth. She was born in 1769. Parts
of three decades slip by before the couple is again located,
according to research on them to date.

On May 25, 1819, at age 56, William Goings appeared before
the Hawkins County, Tennessee County Court to file an
affidavit of his Revolutionary service in an application for a
pension. His war wounds had continued to plague him
through the years, and combined with advancing age, they had
made him unable to continue working as a farmer and a day
laborer.

“State of Tennessee
Hawkins County May Session, 1819

Personally appeared in open court this twenty-fifth day of May
1819 William Going or Gowan, aged about fifty-six years, a
citizen of said county & State & being first duly sworn in open
Court according to law maketh the following declaration, viz:

That he enlisted in the Regular Service of the United States
during the War of the Revolution sometime in the year 1780 in
the Spring (of [——] this deponent [——] [—-] to oath) at
Halifax Court House, State of Virginia under Captain Tilman
Dixon of the 1st Regiment of Light Infantry commanded by
Col. Henry Dixon & Major Doniphan attached to General
George Washington’s Command for the duration of the War,
that this deponent served under Col. Dixon in said First
Regiment three years of one continued time without leaving
said Service any time and that having served his country
honorably and faithfully during said period was honorably
discharged at York Town, State of Virginia (when Cornwallis
was taken in the Year 1781) by his Excellency General
George Washington. This deponent further declareth on oath
that he was in the following battles, viz: at the Battle of
Brandywine when he was wounded in his knee and ankle by
Grape Shot thrown by the Enemy, at the Battle of Camden (or
Pine Tree) North Carolina when General Greene commanded,
in the Battle of Cowpens, at the Battle of Guilford Courthouse,
in the Battle of Eutaw Springs and at the Battle of York Town
when Cornwallis with his army was taken by Grnl. Geo.
Washington. He further saith that he has suffered great
hardships, privations and extreme fatigue while in said service
of which he now feels the effects, that he is in extreme poverty
& hardship and without the support of his Country he will
suffer greatly, that his circumstances are such as having
nothing at all to support himself with, that he has never drawn
any pension altho he believes he was entitled thereto on
account of his wounds, but has hitherto supported himself by
his labors, and is now compelled to apply for relief by reason
of his further debilitated state of health. He further states that
his honorable discharge which he received from the
commander-in-chief he has lost sometime ago in Virginia.
That he knows of no person in this country by whom he could
prove his service and that having served faithfully and
honorably more than nine months, the period requisite to be
placed on the pension list, at one continued time he hopes to
receive the benefit of the act passed for the relief of the
Soldiers of the Revolution whose case is comprehended by
such act.

Sworn to & subscribed in open Court the day and date above.

P. D. Mitchel, Clk
William “X” Going
By W. A. Mitchell, his deputy”

A pension of $8 per month was granted to him in Washington,
D. C. July 16, 1819:

“Pension No. 12757: East Tennessee

William Goings of Hawkins County in the state of Tennessee
who was private in the regiment commanded by Colonel
Dixon of the Virginia line, for the term of the War. Inscribed
on the Roll of East Tennessee at the rate of Eight Dollars per
month, to commence on the 16 of July 1819 and sent to D.
Alexander, Esq. Agt, Rogersville, Tennessee.”

Apparently a review board sought additional information
about his financial status in the following year, and William
Going had to return to the Rogersville, Tennessee courthouse
and file an amendment to his earlier affidavit, giving an
inventory of his property and the number of people living in
his household:

“On this 29th day of August 1820 personally appeared in open
Court, being a court of record in the County of Hawkins in the
state of Tennessee, William Going, aged about 56 years [57?],
resident of said county of Hawkins and who being first duly
sworn according to law did on his oath declare that he served
in the revolutionary war as follows: Enlisted in Captain
Dixon’s Company, First Regiment, Virginia Line, that he has
received a pension certificate, now in his possession,
November 12, 1819, that his first declaration was made out in
said County Court of Hawkins County about the 6th day of
May 1819, and I do solemnly swear that I was a resident
citizen of the United States on the 18th day of March 1818 and
that I have not since that time by Gift, Sale or in any manner
disposed of my property or any part thereof with intent
thereby to diminish it or to bring myself within the provisions
of an Act of Congress entitled An Act to Provide for certain
persons engaged in the land and naval service of the United
States during the Revolutionary War passed the 18th of March
1818 and that I have not given to any person in trust for me
any property or securities, contracts or notes due to me nor
have I any income other than what is contained in the schedule
herein assessed and by me subscribed, viz: four hogs, 1 pot &
one oven, 1 old chair, 1 axe, 1 hoe, four forks, four knives, 2
tin plates. I am by occupation a daily laborer or farmer, but
am frail and not able to support myself and family which is
composed of the following persons, viz: my wife aged about
48 years, 1 boy 11 years old, 1 girl 10 years, 1 girl aged 5
years and one boy aged two years and that I stand in great
need of the assistance of my country for support. Sworn to &
subscribed in open court.

William X Going

The Court values the property contained in the foregoing
schedule to thirteen dollars and thirty cents.”

William Goings died in Hawkins County August 23, 1827,
Elizabeth Goings, at age 70 filed an application for a widow’s
pension June 8, 1839. Her affidavit, in part, read:

“On this 8th day of June in the year 1839 personally appeared
before me, the undersigned Justice of the Peace for the County
of Hawkins, Elizabeth Goings, a resident of this county &
state, age Seventy Years, who first being duly sworn
according to law, doth on her oath state . . . that she is the
widow of William Goings who honorably served in Captain
Tilmon Dixon’s Company in the 1st North Carolina [Virginia]
Regiment. . . She further declared that she was married to him
in the month of October 1793 in Caswell County, North
Carolina and that her said husband died at his residence in
Hawkins County on the 23rd day of August in the year 1827
and since that time she had not been married. . . . She has no
record of proof of said marriage.

Elizabeth X Goings”

Elizabeth Going was successful in her application and
received the following pension:

“Pension No. W930: Tennessee

Elizabeth Goings, widow of William Goings, decd. who was a
pensioner under the Act of 1818 and who died on the 23rd
Aug. 1827 of Hawkins County in the State of Tennessee who
was a private in the company commanded by Captain Dixon
of the regt. commanded by Col. Dixon in the N. Carola.

[Virginia] line for 2 years. Inscribed on the Roll of Tennessee
at the rate of 80 Dollars per annum to commence on the 4th
day of March, 1836. Certificate of Pension issued the 10th
day of Feby. 1840.”

At least four children, names unknown, were born to William
Going and Elizabeth Going.

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