1636 abt. Restitute Hallowes Jr. in Northern Neck Virginia

Restitute Hallowes Jr b. abt 1636 – 1687 m. John Whetstone

Parents:

John Hallowes b. 1612-15 – d. 1657, married to Restitute Tew

Children:

Restitute Whetstone

Siblings:

(Verified Siblings – Children of Maj. John Hallowes):
Restitute Hollowes b. abt 1633 and d. abt 1687 m. John Whestone in 1660 (confirmed child – Jan 10, 1655 transaction and other docs)
John Hollowes b. abt 1634 – (confirmed child Jan 10, 1655 transaction)
Samuel Hollowes b. abt 1636 – (confirmed child June 10, 1657 transaction)
William Hollis b. abt 1642 adn d. 1704 – (likely child – is an heir.   After Maj. John Hollis’ death, on Dec 9, 1662, William receivs John Hollis’ 3900 acres in Westmoreland Co, Va)

(Possible Siblings):
Henry Hollis b. 1649 and d. 1688 – (Note: Possible child of Maj. John Hollis – the correct age, and is a servant of John Grammer – likely an apprenticeship. Henry Hollis would have been about 7-8 years old when Maj. John Hollis died. Henry Hollis ends up marrying John Grammer’s widow after he dies, so he must be around the same station in life for her to marry him).
Richard Hollis b. 1637 – possibly child
(Note: No verification he is a child of Maj John Hollis, but he is the correct age, in the correct area of Virginia, and has the same surname, so worth investigating).
Boaz Hollis b. 1648 – possible child (Note: Boaz Hollis would have been about 9 yrs old when Maj John Hollis died. He may be child of Maj John Hollis, but there is no verification)
Lucy Hollis est. birth abt 1640-45 – possible child (Note: Transp to land adj Maj John Hollis by Whetstone husb of Restitute Hollis Jr, having the same surname, being about the correct age, and in Virginia about the same time  likely related, possibly child)

(Other Possible Relatives):
Burr Hollis 1630-38 – possibly related (Note: was paid for his “time” out of John Hallowes estate)
Thomas Hollis est. birth 1626 or before – possibly related (speculative if even related – too old to be his child – age appears more in line with sibling or cousin – need to look at his relationships to see if possible he has any connections to Maj John Hallowes).
Robert Hollis b. 1629 or before – possible relative (Note: No indication of any relation, other than having the same surname, being about the correct age, and in Virginia about the same time)
Edward Hollis est. birth abt 1636-44 – possible relative (Note: No indication of any relation, other than having the same surname, being about the correct age, and in Virginia about the same time)
Ann Hollis est. birth abt 1675 – possible relative (Note: No indication of any relation, other than having the same surname, being about the correct age, and in Virginia – may not be in same time period though).

FACTS and EVENTS:

1655 Jan 10: p.52. ”Record fower Cowes Brownish of Culler Cropt on the right and slitt on the left eare two for John and two for Restitute the sone and Daughter of Major John Hallowes the guift of John Tew deceased by Will Roger Isham 10 Janu: 1655 This was Recorded”.
1660: WHISTON, John (or WHESTONE, WHISTONE, WHETSTONE) & HALLOWS, Restitute (HOLLOWS, HOLLIS); c. 1660; groom was prob. a son of Jn. WHISTON of Nominy (d. WC 1670); bride was a dau. of Jn. HALLOWS (HOLLOWS) of Rachdale in the County Palatine of Lancaster; Restitute HALLOWS and Jn. HALLOWS r. were named as .. nephews·’ in the will of John TEW
1722 March 28: (COURT DECISION re 2400 acres devised to daughter Restitute Hallows m. Whiston) John Hallows late of Rachdale in the County Palatine of Lancaster:, was seized of 2400 Acres of Land in Virginia & died so seized, leaving Issue, Restitute his Daughter & Heir. Restitute Hallows entered and intermarried with one Whiston & by him had Issue Restitute her Daughter and Heir and died seized.Restitute Whiston entered and intermarried with one Thomas Steel and by him, had Issue Thomas Steel her eldest Son & Heir; And afterwards intermarried with one Manly and had issue two sons by him John and William Manly And being a Widow at her Death made her last Will & Testament in Writing bearing Date the 30th Day of January 1687.

1650 Jan 30: CAVALIERS AND PIONEERS PATENT BOOK No. 2; Pg 207. JOHN HOLLOWES, Gent., 600 acs. Northumberland Co., 30 Jan. 1650, p. 281. Upon S. side of Potomeck Riv., upon E. side of Hollowes Cr., against a point called the Wadeing place. Trans. of 12 pas: John Thomlinson, Richd. Willis, John Symson, James Balleroe, Mary King, Restitute Hollowes, Senr., Wm. Freake, John Tew (?), John Knott, John Hawoes, Restitute Hollowes, Junr., Dan. Moore.  (Note:  John Hawoes is Hallowes?)
1650/1 Jan 30: This abstract not to be relied upon. p.1. Patent. 30 Jan 1650/1. William Berkeley, Governor, etc., to John Hallowes. 600 acres in Northumberland Co. On S side Potomack river. On E side ot a valley and E side ot Hallowes Creek, adjs a creek called ”the Wading place”. Due for transporting 12 persons •rail whose names are on records”·
VIRGINIA COLONIAL ABSTRACTS: Beverly Fleet: pg 691
(Note:  PAID FOR TRANSPORTING FAMILY MEMBERS – Restitute Hallowes Sr, Restitute Hollowes Jr.)

1650 Jan 30: Title Hollowes, John. Publication 30 January 1650. Other Format Available on microfilm. Virginia State Land Office. Patents 1-42, reels 1-41. Related See also the following surname(s): Hallowes. Note Location: Northumberland County. Description:1600 acres standing on the westward side of a creek and extending nigh Potomac River, thence &c. adjoining his own survey of 200acs. upon the head of the said Canawoman Creek.
Source: Land Office Patents No. 2, 1643-1651, p. 282 (Reel 2). http://image.lva.virginia.gov/cgi-bin/GetLONN.pl?first=282&last=&g_p=P2&co llection=LO Patent
1650 Jan 30: CAVALIERS AND PIONEERS PATENT BOOK No. 2; Pg 207
JOHN HOLLOWES, Gent., 1600 ac. Northumberland Co., 30 Jan. 1650, p. 282. Beg. on the W. side of a a. & extending nigh Potomeck Riv., to another tract, surveyed for sd. Hollowes upon the head of Canawoman Cr. Trans. of 32 pers: Robert Street, Edwd. Fryer, John Hanch, Wm. Weathers, And. Quinbrough, Mary Gray, Ailce Gray, Edwd. Tomson, Jane Tomson, Tho. Butler, Xtopr. Butler, Wm. Butler, John Butler, Nath. Butler,John Hollowes, John Tao (?), Wm. Freake, Robt. Street, Ann Marrowe, Tho. Yowill, Tho. Yowill, Junr., Ann Yowill, Junr., Wm. Yowill, Restitute Hollowes, Res. Hollowes, Junr., John Knott, Edward Fryer.
SAME. 200 acs. Northumberland Co., 30 Jan. 1650, p. 283. Beg. on Wwd. side of a marsh & swamp which divides this from land of Mr. Thomas Speake, N. W. next to another parcell of sd. Hollowes. Trans. of 4 pers.*
(Note:  PAID FOR TRANSPORTING FAMILY MEMBERS)

1654 Sept 6: CAVALIERS AND PIONEERS PATENT BOOK No. 3; Pg 315
THOMAS HOBKINS, 1400 acs. Lancaster Co., on N. side of Rappa. Riv., 6 Sept. 1654, p. 374. Bounded on S. E. with Pepetick Cr., adj. land of William Mells & opposite land of Mr. John Catlett. Trans. of 28 pers: William Wheeler, John Hallows, John Tue, William Freeke, Robert Street, Restitute Hollis, Sr., Restitute Hollis, Junr., John Knott, Edward Fryar, Thomas Youle, Ann Yowell, Senr., Ann Yowell, Junr., And. Munroe, Thomas Yowell, William Yowell, Tho. Broughton, Ann Williams, Edward Dawson, John Garner, John Eaton, Geo. Eaton, John Ridly, Rob. Burwell, John Hooks, Peter Ward, Con. Gamberson, Nath. Winly, Harry Renn; Assignee of A. Moon, assignee of Mr. Hollis & John Eaton
(Note:  Thomas Hobkins receives 1400 acres for TRANSP 28 people, including many people in John Hallows family – including John Hallows, Restitute Hollis Sr, Restitute Hollis Jr, John Tew, Thomas Youll, Ann Youll Sr, Ann Youll Jr, Thomas Youll, and William Youll).

1655 Jan 10: p.52. ”Record fower Cowes Brownish of Culler Cropt on the right and slitt on the left eare two for John and two for Restitute the sone and Daughter of Major John Hallowes the guift of John Tew deceased by Will Roger Isham 10 Janu: 1655 This was Recorded”.
VIRGINIA COLONIAL ABSTRACTS: Beverly Fleet: pg 669
(Note:  JOHN AND RESTITUTE are SON AND DAUGHTER OF JOHN HALLOWES)

1660: WHISTON, John (or WHESTONE, WHISTONE, WHETSTONE) & HALLOWS, Restitute (HOLLOWS, HOLLIS); c. 1660; groom was prob. a son of Jn. WHISTON of Nominy (d. WC 1670); bride was a dau. of Jn. HALLOWS (HOLLOWS) of Rachdale in the County Palatine of Lancaster; Restitute HALLOWS and Jn. HALLOWS r. were named as .. nephews·’ in the will of John TEW (d. WC 1655); (SC OW 1686-92:87; WC D 1665-77:63; OW 1:366; VCD (B22):551; BRMF:229; Eaton:46)
Virginia, Marriages of the Northern Neck of Virginia, 1649 to 1800 (pgs 15, 160, 161, 203, 281, 330, 373) (Note:  John Hollis’ daughter, Restitute Hollis marries John Whiston)

1722 March 28: (COURT DECISION re 2400 acres devised to daughter Restitute Hallows m. Whiston)
B26 VIRGINIA COLONIAL DECISIONS
SIR ROBT. RAYMOND’S OPINION IN A CASE SENT FROM VIRGINIA IN 1722.
CASE INT HALLOWS & MANLY } EJECTMENT UPON SPECIAL VERDICT
John Hallows late of Rachdale in the County Palatine of Lancaster:, was seized of 2400 Acres of Land in Virginia & died so seized, leaving Issue, Restitute his Daughter & Heir.  Restitute Hallows entered and intermarried with one Whiston & by him had Issue Restitute her Daughter and Heir and died seized.Restitute Whiston entered and intermarried with one Thomas Steel and by him, had Issue Thomas Steel her eldest Son & Heir; And afterwards intermarried with one Manly and had issue two sons by him John and William Manly And being a Widow at her Death made her last Will & Testament in Writing bearing Date the 30th Day of January 1687 [24] in these Words,
“I Give & Bequeath to my Son Thomas Steel that Tract of Land I now live on (y’e Land in Dispute) to him and his Heirs forever.
ltem it is my Will that my three Children with their Estates remain in the Hands of my Ex’r till they shall come of the Age of 16 Years & then to have their Estates;”
and the same Day made her Codicil in these Words
“It is my Will that if my Son Thomas Steel die in his Minority before he be of Age to enjoy my within mentioned Land, that, then my other two Sons, John & W’m Manly shall have the said Land equally to be divided between them & their Heirs forever.”
Thomas Steel at his Age of 16 entered into the Lands and took the Profits thereof, and lived till he had almost attained his Age of 21, & died without Issue; After whose Death John Manly entered into the Lands and died in Possession leaving Issue the Def’t.
The Lessor of the Pl’t is Samuel Hallows Son & Heir of Matthew Hallows, who was Son & Heir of Samuel Hallows who was eldest Brother of the said John Hallows.
Q’r. What Estate Thomas Steel had in those Lands by y’e Will of his Mother, and whether upon his dying before 21 tho’ in Possession, the Lands should go to Manly? And if the Lands shall remain over upon Thomas Steel’s dying before 21
Q’r how his Issue could have inherited if he had had any?
I am of Opinion, that Thomas Steel by Virtue of the Will and Codicil of his Mother Restitue Manly, (taking it for granted the Will and Codicil were duly executed according to the Laws in Virginia), took an Estate in Fee Simple, but subject to the Contingency of his dying in his Minority before he should be of Age to enjoy the Land devised, and if he died in his Minority before he should be of Age to enjoy it, then y’e Land by the Codicil was devised over to John and William Manly in Fee as Tenants in common by Way of executory Devise.
– Mr. Hallows Title depends upon the Construction of those Words in the Codicil ” IfThomas Steel die in his Minority before he be of Age to enjoy the Land devised,” if by those words Thomas Steel’s Death before 21 is to be understood, Mr. Hallows will have no title because Tho’s Steel did die before his Age of 21; and in that Case if Thomas Steel had had Children they could not have taken this Estate; w’ch is so hard a Construction, that it can’t be imagin’d the Mother intended it should be so – But if those Words in y’e Codicil shall be refer’d to the Words of the Will [25] whereby, by the Devise that y’e 3 Children with the Estates should remain in y’e Hands of her Extor, till they should come of the Age of 16 years, and that then they should have their Estates that – that was the time of Enjoyment intended by the Codicil, then after Thomas Steel came to 16 he was seized in Fee absolutely, and the Executory Devise over to John & W’m Manlycould never arise, but Mr. Hallows as Heir-at-Law to Thomas Steel will be entitled to these Lands.
If upon Thomas Steels coming into Possession he had an absolute Fee Simple in the Lands Q’r whether the Lessor of the Plt. hath not a good Title.
And I apprehend this last Construction is the right Construction and is inforced by its obviating that Hardship, in some Measure, which the other Construction would introduce, in Relation to the Defeating y’e Children of Thomas Steel, because it is not unreasonable to think that the Mother did not intend her Son should marry before 16 and if not he could have no Children to be defeated by the Devise over. And therefore upon the whole, if Mr. Hallows proves his Pedigree plainly, I am of Opinion he hath a good Title to these Lands devised.
Lincolns Inn.
Rob: Raymond
Mar: 28, 1722
[Note by W. G.] (This Opinion is published in North Carol. Law Repos. 72-4 )
Virginia Colonial Decisions, Volume 1
By Sir John Randolph, Edward Barradall
https://books.google.com/books?id=alLVG8BBE-IC&pg=SL2-PA26&lpg=SL2-PA26&dq=%22Samuel+Hallows%22,+lancaster&source=bl&ots=yHK2bgFGPk&sig=bJiisFiCo7RNqADnoeNJZTt6PYE&hl=en&sa=X&ved=0ahUKEwim-Kv0yL7PAhVIWSYKHe0EDLE4ChDoAQgoMAQ#v=onepage&q=%22Samuel%20Hallows%22%2C%20lancaster&f=false
1723 Nov 29:
Letter from Robert Carter to William Dawkins, November 29, 1723
Robert Carter writes to London merchant William Dawkins November 29, 1723, that he has learned that Robert Jones has lost his case tried in England. He informs the merchant that he wishes to be involved without his name being connected with it in another case that will be appealed from the judgment of the General Court in Virginia to England. The case was brought by a wealthy “Esqr. Hallow’s,” who lives near Liverpool against the heirs of Manley in Virginia. Carter recused himself from sitting on the case because he had bought an estate from Manley, and reports that Edmund Jenings’s vote carried it before the council even though he is so old and infirm that he really does not know what he is voting on.
Letter from Robert Carter to William Dawkins, November 29, 1723
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Rappahannock, [Lancaster County, Virginia]
Novr 29th. 1723
Mr Willm. Daqwkins
I understand Mr Robert Jones has met with a defeat in his appeal Mr Sewell by his letter informed me he was pretty sure the Court were of opinion the will of old Brereton gave an estate Tail in his lands but it seem’s the Judges have determined otherwise and Jones is quite blow’n
I am now concerned more nearly in another appeal one Esquire Hallow’s a gentleman of Lancaster not far from Liverpool has sued the [illegible] heirs of one Manley for a Seat of Land in Westmorland County and has had the good luck upon a
-2 –
[ … ] [gre] at nicety in the Law to get the Judgment of our General Court in his favour. The Court was divided until it came to Colonel Jenings who is so debilitated in his understanding by Age and infirmities that in reality he does not know what he says or does his Vote carried it against these poor Orphan’s he may have happened to have hit right but sure I am it was absolutly guess work in him I did not sit as a Judge in the Cause having purchased another Estate of this Manly to avoid all [illegible] reflections I have promised to the Orphan’s to support them in the Charge of this appeal if the Judgment of the Court here be affirmed against thn them The Orphan’s will be turned naked into the world to look for a being and the Will of their Mother under which this Hallows also claims intirely Defeated in her designed provision for them, I intend not now to enter into the particulars of the case your Lawyer will receive the best information from the Case it self which will be sent you in a short time all that I design at this time is that you may be early in feeing some of the ablest counsel you are to know it has been whisper’d that Mr Hallows sent in an opinion of Sir Robert Ramonds which seemed to favour his side of the question, I know this Opinion has been industriously talked of whether this report has had any influence upon our Court I shall not pretend to say Hallows is reported to be both eminent and rich and having the judgment here on his side makes the Struggle the more doubtful You were some years ago Desirous of getting business from hence for your Friend Mr Sewell commending very much both his diligence and Skill gives me the encouragement to expect this will be no ungrateful trouble
-3 –
to you, the Solicitor general appears to be a very g [ood] man in the Law if to be had so does Waerg [sic ] but Mr Sew [ell] can no doubt better judge whose Talents are the best of fite [d] for the Court where our Appeals have their trials, I wo [uld] be as Strenuous as I could in this affair and yet without th [e] mention of my name in it I am Sir
Your very Humb: Servt — —
per Fowler
Copy per Keiling
NOTES
Source copy consulted: Robert Carter letter book, 1723 June 16-1724 April 23, Robert Carter Papers (acc. no. 3807), Albert and Shirley Small Special Collections Library, University of Virginia. There is a nineteenth-century transcript of this letter in the Minor-Blackford Papers, James Monroe Law Office and Museum, Fredericksburg, Virginia.
Robert Carter generally used a return address of “Rappahannock” for the river on which he lived rather than “Corotoman,” the name of his home, on his correspondence, especially to merchants abroad. The county and colony have been added for clarity.
[1] The “old Brereton” mentioned here may be Thomas Brereton, clerk of the Council in the seventeenth century. (Harrison. Landmarks. . . . pp. 45, 53. )
[2] Carter refers to the legal process of entail which is “to restrict (property) by limiting the inheritance to the owner’s lineal descendants or to a particular class thereof “; or “to convert (an estate) into a ‘fee tail’ (feudum talliatum); to settle (land, an estate, etc.) on a number of persons in succession, so that it cannot be bequeathed at pleasure by any one possessor.” (Merriam-Webster [Dictionary] online at http://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/entailment?show=0&t=1290188110, 11/19/2010; and ( Oxford English Dictionary Online )
[3] John Hallowes (Hallows) (1615-1657) had come to Maryland as an indentured servant, but later moved to Westmoreland County where he acquired extensive tracts of land. Some of that land was purchased in 1733 by Thomas Lee from Samuel Hallowes of County Lancaster, England, who “as a great newphew of Major John Hallowes,” had acquired title in an important legal case decided in 1722, probably the one to which Carter refers. This land became part of Stratford. Carter may have hoped to acquire a tract from Samuel Hallowes to add to Nomini (see fn4) as John Hallowes had lived near that plantation of Carter’s. John Randolph sailed to England in 1727 to become the colony’s agent, and represented Hallowes in negotiations with Carter. (“Major John Hallowes. 1615-1657.” Norris. Westmoreland County, Virginia. pp. 99-103.)
[4] A William Manly (Manly) (b. 1686) of Westmoreland County was a descendant of John Hallowes (q.v. ), and inherited considerable land in the county, David Eaton wites, “Manly also gathered in one body the large tract called ‘Nomini Hall’ and sold the same to the Hon. Robert Carter, March 11, 1712. W[estmoreland] D[eed] B[ook] 2, page 71.” ( “Notes.” William and Mary College Quarterly Historical Magazine, 15[3, Jan. 1907]:48 ; and David W. Eaton. Historical Atlas of Westmoreland County Virginia. [Richmond: Dietz Press, 1942], in an undated reprint. p. 46. )
[5] Sir Robert Raymond (1673-1733), was Attorney General,1720-1724, and a member of Parliament. He became a judge in 1724, and would later be later Lord Chief Justice (1725-1733). He was regarded as one of thethe foremost lawyer of his day. (Entry for Robert Raymond, Oxford Dictionary of National Biography online athttp://www.oxforddnb.com/view/article/23207, 11/19/2010.)
[6] Captain William Keiling commanded the Betty. ( Survey Report 6800 summarizing Adm. 68/194, Virginia Colonial Records Project, Albert and Shirley Small Special Collections Library, University of Virginia. )
This text revised November 19, 2010.
A Collection Transcribed and Digitized by Edmund Berkeley, Jr.
List of Letters
Electronic Text Center , University of Virginia Library
http://carter.lib.virginia.edu/html/C23k29a.mod.html

1728 May 30:
Robert Carter writes to an English correspondent, Samuel Hallows, Esq., May 30, 1728, that he will not pay the price that John Randolph has set on Hallows’ Virginia land.
Letter from Robert Carter to Samuel Hallows, Esq., May 30, 1728
-1 –
Rappahannock, [Lancaster County, Virginia]
May the 30th, 1728

Samuel Hallows, Esqr.

Sir —

You would go near to condem me of di[s]respect if I did not return an answer to yours of the 24th: November Mr. Randolph has indeed valued your Lands at £700. but I dare Say it is a price he will never be able to procure for you If he can I am Sure I must not be the Purchaser The price what I offered is the utmost I will give. As for Clilton he did not die worth 500 Groats more than what he had in Virginia. I have a debt owing from that Estate which I am forced to Sue his Son for and do not yet See when I shall get my money who that other Gentleman is I can only guess. If you find his money better then mine I am very apprehensive you will think it proper to take it. Mr. Randolph is now coming for England, as for his Judgement of your Estate I shall not find fault with but from my information which I believe is rather better than his of the Circumstances of it I cannot Set it at so high an Esteem as he has done. Money is very hard to be raised in Virginia at this day Our Tobacco runs very Extreme low and we have no other way to re turn any Income from our Lands but by [illegible] that trade I hope if you have been under a misinformation as to the Value of your Estate you will not deem me ingracious when I tell you I cannot come up to your price Terms I am

Sir —
Your most humble Servt:
per Denton

NOTES
Source copy consulted: Robert Carter letter book, 1727 May-1728 July, Robert Carter Papers (acc. no. 3807), Albert and Shirley Small Special Collections Library, University of Virginia. There is a 19th-century transcript of the letter in the Minor-Blackford Papers, James Monroe Law Office and Museum, Fredericksburg, Virginia.

Robert Carter generally used a return address of “Rappahannock” for the river on which he lived rather than “Corotoman,” the name of his home, on his correspondence, especially to persons abroad. The county and colony have been added for clarity.
[1] John Hallowes (Hallows) (1615-1657) had come to Maryland as an indentured servant, but later moved to Westmoreland County where he acquired extensive tracts of land. Some of that land was purchased in 1733 by Thomas Lee from Samuel Hallowes of County Lancaster, England, who “as a great newphew of Major John Hallowes,” had acquired title in an important legal case decided in 1722. This land became part of Stratford. Carter may have hoped to acquire a tract from Samuel Hallowes to add to Nomini as John Hallowes had lived near that plantation of Carter’s. John Randolph sailed to England in 1728 to become the colony’s agent, and represented Hallowes futher in negotiations with Carter. (“Major John Hallowes. 1615-1657.” Norris. Westmoreland County, Virginia. pp. 99-103.)
[2] “The English groat coined in 1351-2 was made equal to four pence. This ratio between the groat and the penny continued to be maintained. . . . The groat ceased to be issued for circulation in 1662” ( Oxford English Dictionary Online . Oxford University Press. )
[3] The John & Betty was a Liverpool ship owned by merchant John Pemberton; she often carried slaves into the colony. In 1726 the captain was John Gale, and in the next year, she was commanded by a Captain William Denton. The ship would be lost in 1729. (Wright. Letters of Robert Carter. . . . p. 18, n. 23 ; Carter to P3mberton , December 18, 1727; Carter to Pemberton, April 15, 1730; and Carter to William Dawkins, June 28, July 26, and August 22, 1727, for Denton’s first name. )
This text, originally posted in 2004, was revised November 3, 2014, to add footnotes and strengthen the modern language version text.
A Collection Transcribed and Digitized by Edmund Berkeley, Jr.
List of Letters
Electronic Text Center , University of Virginia Library
http://carter.lib.virginia.edu/html/C28e30a.mod.html
______________________________________________

________________________________________________
1728 July 8:
Robert Carter writes to John Randolph, July 8, 1728, to have the letter waiting when Randolph reaches England to work as the colony’s agent to obtain revocation of the prohibition against the importation of stemmed tobacco, and he informs Randolph of the letters he has written to British merchants about the effort. He mentions a letter from Samuel Hallows concerning land in the colony.
Letter from Robert Carter to John Randolph, July 8, 1728
-1 –
Coroto [man, Lancaster County, Virginia]
July the 8th: 1728 —

John Randolph Esqr.

Sir —
This Complies with my promise of Saluting you in London, with Sincere wishes that it may meet you in good health, and to acquaint you that I have been very liberal in writing to all the Merchants I correspond with about our grand Affair under your Negotiations To Mr. Perry I have Particularly recommended both you and it, and to all the other Merchants that I have any Interest in And I have not Confined my Self to London I have written to Liverpool to Weymouth and to Glasgow I cannot pretend abundance of Interest any where however I shall have the Satisfaction of having thrown in my Mite. the greatest [t] hope is that the Merchants will be of Opinion that it is their own Interest to promote this design and that will be a Stronger Spur to them than any thing can be said from hence,
I think I Showd you Esquire Hallows Letter to me about his Land it is likely you will go near to See him before you return. Mr. Perry and I have had Some Pickerings of late; & your misunderstandings I knew have been much greater but I will hope both of us are coming into pretty good terms again with him The Station he is in will Enable him if he will Exert his Strength to do us the most Services of any Concerned in the Trade —
-2 –
I Shall Conclude as I begun that you may obtain the great Motive of your going home a full recovery of your health as well as
the Addition of all other happiness I am

Sir —
Your very most humble Servt: —
NOTES
Source copy consulted: Robert Carter Letter Book, 1727 April 13-1728 July 23, Carter Family Papers, Virginia Historical Society, Richmond. There is a 19th-century transcript of the letter in the Minor-Blackford Papers, James Monroe Law Office and Museum, Fredericksburg, Virginia.
Robert Carter generally used a return address of “Rappahannock” for the river on which he lived rather than “Corotoman,” the name of his home, on his correspondence, especially to merchants abroad. The county and colony have been added for clarity to the heading on the draft.
[1] Carter refers to the attempt of the colony to persuade Parliament to remove the prohibition against the importation of stemmed tobacco into Britain which it had had passed in 1722. Randolph was the colony’s agent to negotiate for the “grand Affair”; his mission would be successful. While Randolph would not leave for England until 1729, Carter had to write well in advance to get his letter aboard a ship sailing in the late summer so that it would reach England before Randolph. ( Arthur Pierce Middleton. Tobacco Coast: A Maritime History of the Chesapeake Bay in the Colonial Era. [Newport News, VA: Mariners’ Museum, 1953.] p. 116. )
[2] Samuel Hallows (Hallowes) was a great nephew of John Hallowes, an early landholder in Northumberland and later, Westmoreland County, who was usually identified as of “Nomini” in Westmoreland County. Samuel Hallows lived in Ashworth, County Lancaster, England. The tract in which Carter was interested may have been that of 2400 acres acquired from Hallowes in 1733 by Thomas Lee. Carter had written Hallows 1728 May 30 that he would not buy the tract of land. (“Major John Hallowes, 1615-1657” in Norris. Westmoreland County, Virginia. pp. 99-102. )
[3] Carter probably dictated “bickerings.”
[4] England
A Collection Transcribed and Digitized by Edmund Berkeley, Jr.
List of Letters
Electronic Text Center , University of Virginia Library
http://carter.lib.virginia.edu/html/C28g08e.mod.html
___________________________________

1729 Nov 24:
Summary
Letter from Robert Carter to John Randolph, November 24, 1729
Robert Carter writes to attorney John Randolph, November 24, 1729, concerning the purchase of lands owned by Samuel Hallows of England for whom Carter understands Randolph is agent.
Letter from Robert Carter to John Randolph, November 24, 1729
-1 –
Corotoman, [Lancaster County, Virginia]
Novembr 24th. 1729
John Randolph Esqr.
Sir —
I wrote to you from Colonel Pages with him to desire yo [ur] payment . of some money to Mrs Ravenscroft for nine thousand weight of Tobacco we had bought of him in Gloucester and that our Bills should be ready for you upon demand this affair I suppose may be accomodated by this time
After my coming home my Son Robert acquainted me you had made him an Offer of Hallows’s Land and told him that you were
fully empowered to Sell it when I went from home I had it in my thought [s] to [illegible] have treated with you very particularly about this Business matter but what through your multiplicty of Business the difficulty of having any conversatio [n] with you and to say truth my own forgetfulness it never came into my head Until Robins [illegible] discourse Mr. Hallows in a letter of the 16th: of December last (for you must know we have been in treaty about this Land for man [y] years) tells me that illegible among other things that upon your return from the Bath he had seen you and intended to Invest you with the property of the lands to Enable to [sic ] you to make good the title and therefore advised me to clo [se] with you upon your return that he had rather the Estate should fall as to my share with whom he has had some Correspondence rather than to a Stranger and that my Friend Mr Pemberton Will be ready to Observe my orders & would pay the [order] that he might have his money upon the first return answ [er] ing me that he will ratify and Confirm the Title upon the receipt of the Purchase money these are some of his Words and I cant but think he may have said something like this to you however it Came to pass that not a Word should arise Between you & I Concerning this Letter I must own the plaice is very convenient to some of my Sons Lands and he seems pretty fond of having it and therefore If you think it Proper to give me the refusal of it and Will contrive a place of meeting (but that I would Willingly have at my house which you may take in your Way up as my Son tells me you are designed )
if you are not too Stiff in your demands I shall be ready to Close the Barga [in] According to Mr Hallows Phrase Your Answer hereto is desired by Sir your most

NOTES
Source copy consulted: Letter book, 1728 August-1731 July, Robert Carter Papers (acc. no. 3807), Albert and Shirley Small Special Collections Library, University of Virginia.
The county and colony have been added for clarity to the heading on the draft.
[1] This may have been Elizabeth (Hamlin) Ravenscroft, wife of Thomas Ravenscroft who, originally trained as a carpenter, became a distinguished citizen and “held a number of public positions. He was sheriff of James City County in 1722, but in 1723 moved to Prince George County. . . . He was a burgess of Prince George in the assembly of 1727-34, and for a time in that of 1734-40, dying in 1736.”( “Thomas Ravenscroft ” on WikiTree, 7/14/2015 ; and “Ravenscroft Archaeological Site” of Colonial Williamsburg, 7/14/2015 .)
[2] A bill of exchange is a kind of check or promissory note without interest. It is used primarily in international trade, and is a written order by one person to pay another a specific sum on a specific date sometime in the future. If the bill of exchange is drawn on a bank, it is called a bank draft. If it is drawn on another party, it is called a trade draft. Sometimes a bill of exchange will simply be called a draft, but whereas a draft is always negotiable (transferable by endorsement), this is not necessarily true of a bill of exchange. (See “Bill of Exchange” in the online Dictionary of Financial Scam Terms: the Truth vs. the Scam. )
[3] Samuel Hallows (Hallowes) was a great-nephew of John Hallowes, an early landholder in Northumberland and later, Westmoreland County, who was usually identified as of “Nomini” in Westmoreland County. Samuel Hallows lived in Ashworth, County Lancaster, England. The tract in which Carter was interested may have been that of 2400 acres acquired from Hallows in 1733 by Thomas Lee. Carter had written Hallows May 30, 1728, that he would not buy the tract of land. (“Major John Hallowes, 1615-1657” in Norris. Westmoreland County, Virginia. pp. 99-102. )
[4] Randolph had recently returned from England where he was agent for Virginia. Apparently he had traveled to the resort town of Bath. “. . . it is not known exactly when the health giving qualities of Bath springs were first noticed. They were certainly known to the Romans who built a temple there around 50 AD. . . . They also built a public baths which was supplied by the hot springs. . . . In the 60s and 70s AD a town grew up on the site of Bath . . .In the late 17th century Bath continued to be a quiet market town. It largely depended on its springs. From 1661 Bath water was bottled and sold. . . . In the 18th century Bath became a much more genteel and fashionable place. It boomed in size. This was largely due to the efforts of Richard ‘Beau’ Nash 1674-1762 who was made Master of Ceremonies. Many fine buildings were erected in Bath. . . . A Pump Room was built in 1706. . . . During the Summer Georgian Bath was full of rich visitors. They played cards, went to balls and horse racing, went walking and horse riding. However the high life was only for a small minority.” (“A Brief History of Bath. ” 7/17/2015)
This text, originally posted in 2005, was revised July 17, 2015, to add footnotes and strengthen the modern language version text.
A Collection Transcribed and Digitized by Edmund Berkeley, Jr.
List of Letters
Electronic Text Center , University of Virginia Library
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___________________________________

1730 April 15:
Letter from Robert Carter to John Pemberton, April 15, 1730
Robert Carter writes to Liverpool merchant John Pemberton, April 15, 1730, reporting tobacco that he has shipped even though the merchant has written since the death of his only son that he will no longer handle tobacco. He is willing that Pemberton send the tobacco to Foster Cunliffe if he is not willing to sell it, but Carter wishes to continue to obtain goods from Pemberton. He notes his ongoing negotiation for the purchase of Virginia land belonging to Samuel Hallowes of England.
Letter from Robert Carter to John Pemberton, April 15, 1730
-1 –
Rappa[hannock, Lancaster County, Virginia]
April 15. 1730
Mr John Pemberton

Sir

I receiv’d your letters by the Loyalty Capt Loxum, with your Accots of Sales and Accot Currt. Miserable markets indeed the lowest I think I ever had from you in the Coarse of our dealings. My goods came to me in Very good order I am Sorry my 18 hogsheads by the Maxwell prov’d no better am in hopes your rising market will advance them a pritty good sale
I heartily condole the death of your only Son and the more because he bore the Character from all that were acquainted with him of a very hopefull gentlemen [sic ] under the presoure of your presint grief. you tell me you intended to decline trading in tobo advising me to a
Correspondence with Mr. Cunliff as a safe person and from whom I may Expect honourable dealings I am in hopes when the days of your grief are a little alleviated by the length of time you will take up other thoughts and in respect to our long correspondency Commencing I think near 40 years ago. you will still continue to transact my business at least & therefore I have consign’d to you the tobo I have on board the Loyalty, here are two Bills of Lading one for 25 hogsheads of my own Crop 15 of them stemm’d strait laid 9 well pickt clean lugs at least I am made to belive so and one leaf, for good tobo such as we have been used to make I beleive you will see none this year I hope mine may rise as well as any Others, the other bill Lading is for
-2 –
23 hhds. of Leaf I must own they are of last years crop but I take them to be never the worse for that Several of the hhds. were opene [d] at their going off they appear to be very Fresh and good and I flatter myself they will pleas you better than this years tobo they are receiv’d tobo you may dispose of them in such manner as you think best
After all if you remain fixd to your resolution that you will have no more to do with the tobo trade I must be contented that you Assign them over to Mr Cunliff who is an entire stranger to me however I have heard no other than a reputable character of the Gentleman In such case I desire you will assist Mr Cunliff with money to answer the Customs for as much of the tobo as he shall see proper to keep for the Inland Market I shall however send to you for the goods I shall want this year and it may be in the courses of my business I shall have occasion to draw upon you for some money
.I am yet in treaty with Mr Randolph attorney for Esqr. Hallows about his land and have some reason to Expect to be the purchaser at the last What instructions he hath lately receiv’d I don’t yet hear If I should buy this land I shall go near to draw for a good part of the money in Your hands
Herein I send you a small bill of Exchange of Capt Loxums upon Capt Watkinson — for £5″12″6 which I desire Credit for I am Sir Your most humble Servant —
&ca
per Loxum —
3d letter

NOTES
Source copy consulted: Letter book, 1728 August-1731 July, Robert Carter Papers (acc. no. 3807), Albert and Shirley Small Special Collections Library, University of Virginia.
Robert Carter generally used a return address of “Rappahannock” for the river on which he lived rather than “Corotoman,” the name of his home, on his correspondence, especially to merchants abroad. The county and colony have been added for clarity.
[1] Captain Loxom commanded a vessel named the Loyalty in 1729-1730. (Survey Report 9727, Virginia Colonial Records Project, Albert and Shirley Small Special Collections Library, University of Virginia. See Carter’s letters to John Pemberton 1730 April 15 and 1731 August 4.)
[2] Foster Cunliffe (d. 1767) was a merchant and prominent citizen of Liverpool who worked to expand manufacturing and the capacity of the harbor; he served a number of terms as mayor. He and Richard Gildart undertook “a major reorginization of business with Maryland and Virginia . . . beginning in the early 1720’s [they] sent numerous factors to the region.” They established stores in which retail goods were sold, purchased the produce of the region, had it ready for loading when ships arrived, and also moved into the sale of slaves ( James A. Picton, ed. Liverpool Municipal Archives and Records. . . . [Liverpool, 1907.] pp. 27, 31, 79, 90, 96, etc. and Paul G. Clemens. “The Rise of Liverpool, 1665-1750.” Economic History Review. 24[May 1976]:211-225.
[3] A bill of lading is “an official detailed receipt given by the master of a merchant vessel to the person consigning the goods, by which he makes himself responsible for their safe delivery to the consignee. This document, being the legal proof of ownership of the goods, is often deposited with a creditor as security for money advanced.” ( Oxford English Dictionary Online . Oxford University Press. )
[4] Parliament had passed an act forbidding the importation of stemmed tobacco in 1722. John Randolph was sent to England in 1728 as agent for Virginia to try to have the act overturned; his mission was successful, and he was home in the colony by June 2, 1729 , when Carter wrote to welcome him home. ( Arthur Pierce Middleton. Tobacco Coast: A Maritime History of the Chesapeake Bay in the Colonial Era. [Newport News, VA: Mariners’ Museum, 1953], 116. )
[5] “The lowest grade [of tobacco] was known as lugs as early as 1686. . . .” ( Philip A. Bruce. Economic History of Virginia in the Seventeenth Century: An Inquiry into the Material Condition of the People, Based on Original and Contemporaneous Records. [New York: MacMillan and Co., 1896], I:442 online at “Classics of American Colonial History.” http://www.dinsdoc.com/bruce-1-7.htm )
[6] The impost was the duty imposed by Britain on imported tobacco, and the cocket, for which a fee was charged, was the document bearing a cocket or seal issued by the “King’s Customs House” that the impost had been paid. (See the definitions of each word in Oxford English Dictionary Online. )
[7] John Hallowes (Hallows) (1615-1657) had come to Maryland as an indentured servant, but later moved to Westmoreland County where he acquired extensive tracts of land. Some of that land was purchased in 1733 by Thomas Lee from Samuel Hallowes of County Lancaster, England, who “as a great newphew of Major John Hallowes,” had acquired title in an important legal case decided in 1722. This land became part of Stratford. Carter may have hoped to acquire a tract from Samuel Hallowes to add to Nomini as John Hallowes had lived near that plantation of Carter’s. John Randolph sailed to England in 1727 to become the colony’s agent, and represented Hallowes futher in negotiations with Carter. (“Major John Hallowes. 1615-1657.” Norris. Westmoreland County, Virginia. pp. 99-103.)
[8] A bill of exchange is a kind of check or promissory note without interest. It is used primarily in international trade, and is a written order by one person to pay another a specific sum on a specific date sometime in the future. If the bill of exchange is drawn on a bank, it is called a bank draft. If it is drawn on another party, it is called a trade draft. Sometimes a bill of exchange will simply be called a draft, but whereas a draft is always negotiable (transferable by endorsement), this is not necessarily true of a bill of exchange. (See “Bill of Exchange” in the online Dictionary of Financial Scam Terms: the Truth vs. the Scam. )
[9] Watkinson was captain of the Vine, a ship that may have been owned by Micajah Perry. (Carter to Pemberton , March 25, 1724.)
This text, originally posted in 2005, was revised August 4, 2015, to add footnotes and strengthen the modern language version text.
A Collection Transcribed and Digitized by Edmund Berkeley, Jr.
List of Letters
Electronic Text Center , University of Virginia Library
http://carter.lib.virginia.edu/html/C30d15c.html
_________________________________________________

1732 June 9:
Summary
Letter from Robert Carter to John Pemberton, June 9, 1732
Robert Carter writes to Liverpool merchant John Pemberton, June 9, 1732, to inform him of two shipments of tobacco, bills of exchange, and to enclose an invoice for goods (not present). Stories in the colony report that tobacco is in short supply and he hopes that will affect the market favorably.He requests Pemberton enquire of Samuel Hallows if it is true that he has sold an estate to Thomas Carter that he, Robert Carter, had tried previously to buy as he remains interested in it.
Letter from Robert Carter to John Pemberton, June 9, 1732
-1 –
Rappahannock, [Lancaster County, Virginia]
June 9 1732
Mr John Pemberton
Sir,
I sent you by the True Blue Captain Berry fifty hogsheads of stemmed straight laid Tobaco . I have already told you the pleasing Story I had from Capt Fowler that he heard you say in Publick Company you would do my Business although you had declined being concerned for anybody else; therefore I go on in giving you the Trouble of my Consignments. Herein is a Bill of Lading for thirty hhds more on Board the Mayflower of Stemmed Straight laid tobo. Your advising that this Sort of Tobaco would do best at your Market hath incouraged me to ship so much of it to You. I have some in Loxam & some in Leatherland. Capt. Fowler will give you the Relation of the News that’s now stirring
-2 –
stirring, that many of the Ships both from London & the Outports are in no Expectation of getting near their Lodings; & its said in York and James Rivers Tobaco is much shorter than it is here. We can’t forbear pleasing ourselves with Hopes these Reports will have a good Influence upon the Markets as well for the Tobo already gone as for that which is still to — ship.
Herein I send an invoice for some goods which I would willingly have by the first Opportunity, Here is also a first bill of Exch of Mr. Burgesses for 15’1″8 and A second bill of his for £125″15″5 both drawn on Mr. Cunliff I have already advisd you of a bill of Excha. I drew payable to Edward Anderson for £90.

Here is a report that Esqr. Hallows hath sold his land to Colo Thomas Lee at the price of £450. and I am well inform’d Colo Lee hath said as much himself but I don’t know how to beleive this report when I consider as you may pleas to remember I offered him by yr hands Some years agoe £500 for it and if I forget not in my behalf you proposed to lay down the money: Beleiving you are well Acquainted with this gentleman I make it my riquest to you to inform yourself from him whether he has parted with his estate here or no for I am not yet quite off of the humour of buying it I am
with a great deal of Esteem and Sincerity Sr.
Yr very humble Servant
NOTES
Source copy consulted: Letter book, 1731 July 9-1732 July 13 , Robert Carter Papers (acc. no. 3807), Albert and Shirley Small Special Collections Library, University of Virginia.
Robert Carter generally used a return address of “Rappahannock” for the river on which he lived rather than “Corotoman,” the name of his home, on his correspondence, especially to merchants abroad. The county and colony have been added for clarity.
The last two paragraphs on the second page of this draft letter are in a different hand than the text that precedes. Apparently Carter started the draft with one clerk, and finished with another. The change in hand is indicated by a change in the color of the text.
[1] The True Blue was commanded by Captain Berry in 1732; she may have been owned by Liverpool merchant John Pemberton. ( Survey Report 05336 summarizing “Admiralty-Miscellanea, Register of Passes, 1731-1732 found in the microfilms of the Virginia Colonial Records Project, Albert and Shirley Small Special Collections Library, University of Virginia . See Carter to John Pemberton , March 1 , 1732, and Carter to Pemberton , April 12, 1732.)
[2] The Content was a Liverpool ship owned by John Pemberton and commanded by various masters including captains Stephenson (1721) , Fowler (1723), and Morton (1727). (Wright. Letters of Robert Carter. . . . pp. 92, 93, 102 ; and Carter to Pemberton, February 14, 1721, and June 28, 1727 . Also, Survey Report 05337 summarizing “Public Record Office Class: Adm. 7/80. “Admiralty-Miscellanea, Register of Passes, 1733-1736.” found in the microfilms of the Virginia Colonial Records Project, Albert and Shirley Small Special Collections Library, University of Virginia. .)
[3] A bill of lading is “an official detailed receipt given by the master of a merchant vessel to the person consigning the goods, by which he makes himself responsible for their safe delivery to the consignee. This document, being the legal proof of ownership of the goods, is often deposited with a creditor as security for money advanced.” ( Oxford English Dictionary Online . Oxford University Press. )
[4] Carter first mentions the Mayflower in a letter to Foster Cunliff of June 24 1731 , noting that a Captain Fowler commanded her. Other mentions in letters to Cunliff and John Pemberton, both Liverpool merchants, indicate that city probably was the vessel’s home port. There were a number of vessels of this name sailing from various British ports that appear in the records of the Virginia Colonial Records Project, but two that seem pertinent are: Survey Report 06445 summarizing “Public Record Office Class: Adm. 68/196. Greenwich Hospital: General Accounts. the Names of Ships and The Accounts Paid for Sixpences at the Port of London, 5 October 1731 to 26 August 1737” and Survey Report 05336 summarizing “Public Record Office Class: Adm. 7/78.Admiralty-Miscellanea, Register of Passes, 1731-1733.”
[5] Captain Edward Loxam commanded a vessel named the Loyalty in 1729-1732. James Tarleton commanded a vessel of that name in 1731. ( Survey Reports 04587 and 09727, Virginia Colonial Records Project, Albert and Shirley Small Special Collections Library, University of Virginia. See also Carter’s letters to John Pemberton April 15, 1730 , and August 4, 1731 .)
[6] Captain Nathaniel Leatherland commanded the William & James in June 20, 1729, and the Samuel & Jane in 1732. In 1727 he commanded the Penelope , owned by John Pemberton, when it was captured by a Spanish ship and Pemberton filed a claim for £2488. ( Carterto the freighters of the ship Rose, April 11 and June 29, 1729, ; Carter to Pemberton July 13, 1732 ; and Survey Report 02046 summarizing “House of Lords Record Office Class Main Papers 1735 May 13. Account of British ships taken at sea. 1732.” Virginia Colonial Records Project, Albert and Shirley Small Special Collections Library, University of Virginia )
[7] Out port means “a port outside a particular place; any port other than the main port of a country, etc.; spec[ically]. a British port other than London.” ( Oxford English Dictionary Online )
[8] A bill of exchange is a kind of check or promissory note without interest. It is used primarily in international trade, and is a written order by one person to pay another a specific sum on a specific date sometime in the future. If the bill of exchange is drawn on a bank, it is called a bank draft. If it is drawn on another party, it is called a trade draft. Sometimes a bill of exchange will simply be called a draft, but whereas a draft is always negotiable (transferable by endorsement), this is not necessarily true of a bill of exchange. (See “Bill of Exchange” in the online Dictionary of Financial Scam Terms: the Truth vs. the Scam. )
[9] Foster Cunliffe (d. 1767) was a merchant and prominent citizen of Liverpool who worked to expand manufacturing and the capacity of the harbor; he served a number of terms as mayor. He and Richard Gildart undertook “a major reorginization of business with Maryland and Virginia . . . beginning in the early 1720’s [they] sent numerous factors to the region.” They established stores in which retail goods were sold, purchased the produce of the region, had it ready for loading when ships arrived, and also moved into the sale of slaves. ( James A. Picton, ed. Liverpool Municipal Archives and Records. . . . [Liverpool, 1907.] pp. 27, 31, 79, 90, 96, etc. and Paul G. Clemens. “The Rise of Liverpool, 1665-1750.” Economic History Review. 24[May 1976]:211-225. )
[10] Samuel Hallows (Hallowes) was a great nephew of John Hallowes, an early landholder in Northumberland and later, Westmoreland County, who was usually identified as of “Nomini” in Westmoreland County. Samuel Hallows lived in Ashworth, County Lancaster, England. The tract in which Carter was interested may have been that of 2400 acres acquired from Hallowes in 1733 by Thomas Lee. Carter had written Hallows 1728 May 30 that he would not buy the tract of land. (“Major John Hallowes, 1615-1657” in Norris. Westmoreland County, Virginia. pp. 99-102. )
[11] Thomas Lee (1690-1750) of Westmoreland County was the son of Richard Lee II, and nephew of Edmund Jenings; he would build “Stratford,” and succeed Carter on the Council. For a good article on Thomas Lee, see “Thomas Lee of Stratford 1690-1750” by Jeanne A. Calhoun on Stratford plantation’s website. ( Burton J. Hendrick. The Lees of Virginia: Biography of a Family. [Boston: Little Brown, 1935]. pp. 48, 51, etc. )
This text, originally posted in 2006, was revised May 30, 2016, to add footnotes and strengthen the modern language version text.
A Collection Transcribed and Digitized by Edmund Berkeley, Jr.
List of Letters
Electronic Text Center , University of Virginia Library
http://carter.lib.virginia.edu/html/C32f09b.html

1771 Nov 13:
From George Washington to Harrison Manley, 13 November 1771
To Harrison Manley
[Mount Vernon] Novr 13th 1771.Sir,
Inclosed you will receive a Copy of the Act Impowering your Grandfather to sell certain Intaild Lands—There being no printed copy of it, I was obliged to have recourse to the Inrolld Bills in the possession of the Clerk of the House of Burgesses, and consequently pay the Fee established by our Assembly (which is 15/) an expence I would have saved you, by copying it myself, if the private Acts of that date had been Printed; but it seems they are not.1 Colo. Carter’s Escheat of Hallowss Land is not among the records in the Secretary’s Office, for this you will be obliged to apply to the Proprietor’s office;2 and Mr Everard, the principal clerk in the Secretary’s, being constantly engaged with the Court business I could not get him to search for the Paper’s, and decree in favour of Hallows against Manley’s heir—I attempted it myself, but for want of knowledge in their Records, I could not trace the proceedings regularly on; though I found where the Suit was commenced in April 1720 by Hallows, against George Eskridge Guardian to your Father3—I shall probably go to Williamsburg again in Feby as the Assembly, it is suppos’d, will then meet; and shall find the Clerks more at leizure to search for the Papers you want, or if this will be delaying the matter longer than you would choose, I could write to Mr Everard by the Post, who I dare say would send transcrips from the records of every thing necessary to illucidate the point you want to know.
Herewith you will receive the Notes &ca agreeable to your Memm and the Treasurers rect for the Sum you sent by me, but he would not receive the Acct as the 61 Hhds of relanded Tobo should mutilated be a credit to the Country mutilated was money actually received, or ought to have been so, mutilatedlaced to the Country credit as the Warehouses belongd to mutilated—I offer’d to pay the difference, that is the £2.0.8, but he said this would answer no purpose, as the Acct must be fresh stated, at which time it would do equally well to receive the Ballance, and requested me to bring down the Acct with the alteration I have here mentioned, that he may enter a proper state of it in his Books. I am, Sir Yr Very Hble Servt
Go: Washington

ALS, DLC:GW. Harrison Manley (d. 1773) was the son of John Manley (died c.1750) and Sarah Harrison Manley (d. 1785). In Fairfax County Manley owned a small tract of land on the southwestern part of Mount Vernon Neck which GW was finally able to purchase in 1786. This tract, along with a larger one he was to acquire the same year from Penelope French, would complete GW’s acquisition of the entire neck of land originally granted in the seventeenth century to Nicholas Spencer and John Washington.
1. The October 1712 session of the assembly passed “An Act to enable William Manley, gent. to sell and dispose of certain entailed Lands and Tenements lying in the County of Westmoreland, on settling other Lands and Tenements lying in the said County, of which he is seized in fee, to the same uses” (4 Hening 36). Only the title of the act is recorded in Hening. The copy of the act attested by Richard Buckner, clerk of the House of Burgesses in 1712, is in the Virginia Session Laws, 1710–12, P.R.O., C.O. 5/1386, ff. 32–34, in Microfilm Collection of Early State Records. The act permitted William Manley, because he had “no personal Estate wherewith to support himself and his family . . . [and had contracted] Great Debts . . . and hath not wherewithall to Sattisfye the said Debts,” to sell 2,200 acres of entailed land in Westmoreland County. This land was patented by John Whiston (Whittstone) in 1667. Manley was instead to settle 1,600 acres of other land in the county, which he held in fee simple under a 1650 patent of John Hollows (Hollis), to be entailed. One of the conditions under which this act could be declared void was if it ran contrary to the interests of “any other person or persons Claiming under the above named John Hallows.”
2. Col. Robert (King) Carter (1663–1732) served as agent for the Fairfaxes’ Northern Neck Proprietary from 1702 to 1711 and again from 1722 to 1732.
3. Thomas Everard (1719–1781) held a number of important posts, among them clerk of the General Court. The office of the deputy secretary of the colony, Thomas Nelson (1715–1787), issued land patents. The George Eskridge who acted as guardian to Harrison Manley’s father John Manley was probably the same man—a Westmoreland County lawyer—who served as guardian to GW’s mother, Mary Ball Washington, and godfather to GW. Eskridge died in 1735.
John Hollows (Hollis), an early justice and burgess from Westmoreland County, in 1650 patented 2,400 acres on the Potomac River at the mouth of Nomini Creek. His granddaughter, Restitute Whiston (Whittstone), inherited the property, and upon her death in 1687 she left this tract of land to her oldest son, Thomas Steele, Jr., with the proviso that in case of his death before he reached his majority the land was to be divided between her two younger sons, John and William Manley. Young Steele died before he reached the age of 21, leaving no heirs, and John Manley, Restitute Whiston Manley’s only surviving son, took possession. A suit was brought by Samuel Hollows, the heir of John Hollows’s older brother, for recovery of the land, and the case was sent to England for an opinion. On 28 Mar. 1722 Sir Robert Raymond ruled that the plaintiff, Hollows, had “a good Title to these Lands devised” (Barton, Virginia Colonial Decisions, 2:1326–27). The land was bought by Thomas Lee in 1732 and became part of his Stratford Hall plantation. See also Eaton, Westmoreland Atlas, 22, 46, 52, and Lee, Lee Chronicle, 64.
http://founders.archives.gov/documents/Washington/02-08-02-0360
_________________________________________________

1733 March 27: WESTMORELAND COUNTY, VIRGINIA DEEDS & WILLS. No. 8. Part 2; 1723-1738 {Antient Press}: pp 13-15
ARTHUR HAMILTON of Liverpoole in the County of Lancaster, Merchant and ISAAC GREENE of Liverpoole aforesaid, Gentlemen, and WILLIAM HUSON of Liverpoole aforesaid (Clerks to the said ISAAC GREENE), jointly and severally make Oath that they were present when SAMUELL HALLOWS Esquire in the paper writeing hereunto annexed mentioned did signe seale and as his act and deed deliver the said paper writeing hereunto annexed bearing date the Seventh day of July now last past to impower HENRY FITZHUGH Esquire and DANIELL JENINGS, his true and lawfull Attorneys for the acknowledging the severall Indentures of Lease and Release therein mentioned; And say that the SAML: HALLOWS subscribed to the said annexed paper writeing is the proper hand writeing of the sd, SAMUELL HALLOWS and that the names ARTHUR HAMILTON, ISAAC GREENE and WILL: HUSON subscribed as witnesses to attest the execution thereof are the proper hand writeings of them these Deponents respectively.
(Attestation in French clued 5th day of August
signed by RICHD; GILDART ARTH: HAMILTON
ISAAC GREENE WILL: HUSON
TO ALL PEOPLE to whom these presents shall come, SAMUELL HALLOWS of Ashworth in the County of Lancaster, Esquire sendeth Greeting. Whereas by Indentures of Lease and Release, the Lease bearing date the day next before the day of the date of these presents and the Release beareing a like date with these presents and both made betweene SAMUELL HALLOWS of the one part and THOMAS LEE of POTOMACK in the County of Westmorland in the Colony of Virginia Esquire of the other part; SAMUELL HALLOWS for the consideration therein mentioned hath sufficiently conveyed unto THOMAS LEE his heirs that parcell of land with appurtenances belonging to SAMUEL HALLOWS scituate on POTOMACK RIVER in Parish of Cople and County of Westmoreland consisting of about two thousand and four hundred acres of land plantable and two hundred and sixty acres of Marsh be the same more or lesse being now divided into severall plantation; together with all other lands marshes houses and appurtenances which premises heretofore pattented by Major JOHN HALLOWS, late of Virginia, deceased, and descend to his Daughter, RESTITUTE, and were lately recovered by SAMUEL HALLOWS from the heirs of JOHN MANLEY, deceased, and are now in the possession of SAMUELL HALLOWS; Know yee that SAMUEL HALLOWS for the better compleating and perfecting of said conveyance hath and by these presents doth appoint HENRY FITZHUGH Esquire and DANIELL JENINGS his true and lawfull Attorneys jointly or either of them severally in any Court in the County of Westmorland or elsewhere in the Colony of Virginia and there acknowledge in due form in the name of SAMUELL HALLOWS the Indentures of Lease and Release according to the Laws or Custome of the County or Colony; In Witness whereof SAMUELL HALLOWS hath hereto putt his hand and seale the seventh day of July in the sixth yeare of the Reigne of our most gracious Lord George the Second of Great Brittain France and Ireland, King Defender of the faith and in the yeare of our Lord 1732
Sealed and Delivered by the above named SAMUELL HALLOWS
in the presence of us ARTH: HAMILTON SAM: HALLOWS
ISAAC GREENE, WILL; HUSON
Westmorld, ss. At a Court held for the sd. County the 27th day of March 1733, NATHANIEL MILBY and WILLIAM MARGRISSON two of the witnesses to the attestation under the hand of RICHARD GILDART, Esqr., Mayor of the Borough of Leverpoole in the Kingdom of Great Brittain and Seale of Office hereto annexed, came into this Court and made Oath that they did see ARTHUR HAMILTON, ISAAC GREENE and WILLIAM HUSON sign the Certificate hereto also annexed and make Oath thereto before the said Mayor of their seeing SAMUELL HALLOWS of Acworth in the County of Lancaster in the Kingdom of Great Brittain aforesaid, Esqr., sign and seal and as his proper act and deed deliver the said Power of Attorney thereby constituting and impowering HENRY FITZHUGH, Esqr. and DANIEL JENINGS or either of them to acknowledge in due form in the name place and stead of the said SAMUELL HALLOWS certain Deeds of Lease and Release of Lands in the Parish of Cople in this County, by the said Deeds sold and conveyed by him to THOMAS LEE. of the County of Westmorland, Esqr., which power of Attorney and proof And for the better attestation of the Caption of the above affidavit, the above named RICHARD GILDART, Esquire, Major of the Burrough and Corporation of Liverpoole hath hereunto subscribed his name and affixed his Seale of Office the day and yeare left above mentioned GILDART
Mayr: de Liverpoole

===
WESTMORELAND COUNTY, VIRGINIA DEEDS & WILLS. No. 8. Part 2; 1723-1738 {Antient Press}: pp 13-15
ARTHUR HAMILTON of Liverpoole in the County of Lancaster, Merchant and ISAAC GREENE of Liverpoole aforesaid, Gentlemen, and WILLIAM HUSON of Liverpoole aforesaid (Clerks to the said ISAAC GREENE), jointly and severally make Oath that they were present when SAMUELL HALLOWS Esquire in the paper writeing hereunto annexed mentioned did signe seale and as his act and deed deliver the said paper writeing hereunto annexed bearing date the Seventh day of July now last past to impower HENRY FITZHUGH Esquire and DANIELL JENINGS, his true and lawfull Attorneys for the acknowledging the severall Indentures of Lease and Release therein mentioned; And say that the SAML: HALLOWS subscribed to the said annexed paper writeing is the proper hand writeing of the sd, SAMUELL HALLOWS and that the names ARTHUR HAMILTON, ISAAC GREENE and WILL: HUSON subscribed as witnesses to attest the execution thereof are the proper hand writeings of them these Deponents respectively.
(Attestation in French clued 5th day of August
signed by RICHD; GILDART ARTH: HAMILTON
ISAAC GREENE WILL: HUSON
TO ALL PEOPLE to whom these presents shall come, SAMUELL HALLOWS of Ashworth in the County of Lancaster, Esquire sendeth Greeting. Whereas by Indentures of Lease and Release, the Lease bearing date the day next before the day of the date of these presents and the Release beareing a like date with these presents and both made betweene SAMUELL HALLOWS of the one part and THOMAS LEE of POTOMACK in the County of Westmorland in the Colony of Virginia Esquire of the other part; SAMUELL HALLOWS for the consideration therein mentioned hath sufficiently conveyed unto THOMAS LEE his heirs that parcel! of land with appurtenances belonging to SAMUEL HALLOWS scituate on POTOMACK RIVER in Parish of Cople and County of Westmoreland consisting of about two thousand and four hundred acres of land plantable and two hundred and sixty acres of Marsh be the same more or lesse being now divided into severall plantation; together with all other lands marshes houses and appurtenances which premises heretofore pattented by Major JOHN HALLOWS, late of Virginia, deceased, and descend to his Daughter, RESTITUTE, and were lately recovered by SAMUEL HALLOWS from the heirs of JOHN MANLEY, deceased, and are now in the possession of SAMUELL HALLOWS; Know yee that SAMUEL HALLOWS for the better compleating and perfecting of said conveyance hath and by these presents doth appoint HENRY FITZHUGH Esquire and DANIELL JENINGS his ture and lawful! Attorneys jointly or either of them severally in any Court in the County of Westmorland or elsewhere in the Colony of Virginia and there acknowledge in due form in the name of SAMUELL HALLOWS the Indentures of Lease and Release according to the Laws or Custome of the County or Colony; In Witness whereof SAMUELL HALLOWS hath hereto putt his hand and seale the seventh day of July in the sixth yeare of the Reigne of our most gracious Lord George the Second of Great Brittain France and Ireland, King Defender of the faith and in the yeare of our Lord 1732
Sealed and Delivered by the above named SAMUELL HALLOWS
in the presence of us ARTH: HAMILTON SAM: HALLOWS
ISAAC GREENE, WILL; HUSON
Westmorld, ss. At a Court held for the sd. County the 27th day of March 1733, NATHANIEL MILBY and WILLIAM MARGRISSON two of the witnesses to the attestation under the hand of RICHARD GILDART, Esqr., Mayor of the Borough of Leverpoole in the Kingdom of Great Brittain and Seale of Office hereto annexed, came into this Court and made Oath that they did see ARTHUR HAMILTON, ISAAC GREENE and WILLIAM HUSON sign the Certificate hereto also annexed and make Oath thereto before the said Mayor of their seeing SAMUELL HALLOWS of Acworth in the County of Lancaster in the Kingdom of Great Brittain aforesaid, Esqr., sign and seal and as his proper act and deed deliver the said Power of Attorney thereby constituting and impowering HENRY FITZHUGH, Esqr. and DANIEL JENINGS or either of them to acknowledge in due form in the name place and stead of the said SAMUELL HALLOWS certain Deeds of Lease and Release of
Lands in the Parish of Cople in this County, by the said Deeds sold and conveyed by him to THOMAS LEE. of the County of Westmorland, Esqr., which power of Attorney and proof And for the better attestation of the Caption of the above affidavit, the above named RICHARD GILDART, Esquire, Major of the Burrough and Corporation of Liverpoole hath hereunto subscribed his name and affixed his Seale of Office the day and yeare left above mentioned GILDART
Mayr: de Liverpoole

http://www.colonial-settlers-md-va.us/getperson.php?personID=I061225&tree=Tree1

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