1999 – 06 June Newsletter – GRF

Sections in this issue:

1) Augustus Sanders Goynes Survived Civil War to Be Killed by Kinsman;
2) William J. M. Gowen Narrowly Survived Civil War in Maine Cavalry Regiment;
3) Joseph Gowen Sentenced To 21 Lashes in Chowan County, NC;
4) Dear Cousins;
5) Foundation Family History Files Transferring to RootsWeb;
6) Augustus Sanders Goynes – Continued . . .

All Gowen Manuscript Pages and Newsletters:   https://goyengoinggowengoyneandgone.com/gowen-research-foundation-pages-and-info/

GOWEN RESEARCH FOUNDATION NEWSLETTER
Volume 10, No. 10 June 1999

1)  Augustus Sanders Goynes Survived Civil War to Be Killed by Kinsman

By Margaret Frances Goynes Olson
Editorial Boardmember
303 E. Hoffman Avenue Kingsville, Texas, 78363
E-mail: molson@interconnect.net

My grandfather, Augustus Sanders Goynes led an almost charmed life during the Civil War. He survived six major bat-tles in the Army of Northern Virginia, only to be killed after he returned to Texas by his brother-in-law!

Augustus Sanders Goynes, son of Wiley Williamson Goynes and Martha Brister Goynes, was born June 30, 1840 at DeKalb, Mississippi in Kemper County. He, an unmarried farmer, was enlisted at age 18 in Company B, First Louisiana [Nelligan’s] Infantry Regiment in New Orleans August 2, 1861. His 24-year-old brother, James B. Goynes accompanied him in enlisting.

The First Louisiana, after a short training period, was rushed to Virginia and placed under the command of Gen. Robert Edward Lee. Although the Confederate Army of Virginia was con-fronted by superior forces, Gen. Lee, the brilliant tactician who was graduated first in his class at West Point, won battle after battle. His troops were fairly successful in the battles of Winchester, Fredericksburg, Manassas, Chancellorsville, Wilderness and Spotsylvania.

The desperate Union Army was taken over January 1, 1863 by Gen. Joseph “Fighting Joe” Hooker, like Lee, a graduate of West Point and a veteran of the Mexican War. He trained, reinforced and equipped his forces for three months and announced that he then had the “finest army on the planet.” He commanded the largest army–132,000 strong–that was formed during the entire Civil War.

Over-confident, he set out to destroy the 62,000 men of Lee’s command. It was in the skirmishes that preceded the Battle of Chancellorsville which began April 27, 1863 that Augustus Sanders Goynes was wounded. The Louisiana soldier was transported to a Staunton, Virginia hospital located on the Staunton Military Academy campus. His military record states that he was in the hospital in April 1863.

Gen. Lee, by May 3, 1863, had pushed Hooker back to a new battle line five miles in his rear. In subsequent fighting, Hooker himself was injured by Confederate artillery fire in the Battle of Chancellorsville. Gen. Stonewall Jackson joined in the battle and destroyed an entire Union army corps. On May 5, Hooker gave up his positions and retreated to his starting point.

The Staunton Military Academy was established on the banks of the Shenandoah River in 1860 as the war clouds began to appear over Virginia. Fortunately the hospital was isolated about a hundred miles west of the battle corridor that lay between the two capitals. Augustus Sanders Goynes enjoyed the tranquility of Staunton in a well-deserved rest during his recuperation.

When his wounds healed, he rejoined the First Louisiana and completed the war without injury. Most of the battles between Lee and a succession of Union generals were on the 110-mile road which connected the two capitals, Washington and Richmond. It took the Federal Army four years to traverse the span between the two.

The First Louisiana, still under Gen. Lee, was surrendered and paroled at Appommattox Courthouse April 10, 1865. On being discharged, he returned to his home in Rapides Parish, Louisiana. Subsequently members of his family removed to South Texas, and Augustus Sanders Goynes accompanied them. He was married February 16, 1874 to Ellen Elizabeth McMurray in Live Oak County, Texas. She was born October 6, 1853 in San Patricio County, Texas.

(Continued on Page 2)

Augustus Sanders Goynes, Continued

She was the youngest child of William McMurray [b1796] and Bridget Fox McMurray [b1813].

Augustus Sanders Goyne received a quarter section of land un-der the terms of his father’s will written August 1, 1875, ac-cording to Live Oak County Will Book 1:

“Second, I will and bequeath to my beloved son Augus-tus Sanders Goynes my homestead, being one hundred and sixty acres of land situated in Live Oak County in the State of Texas and a part of the Bridget Fadden League, subject however to the life estate of my wife Martha, and it is my will that this bequest shall not take effect until her decease.”

They were enumerated in the 1880 census of Live Oak County, Enumeration District 101, page 9, Precinct 1 on June 3, 1880.

“Goynes, Aug S. 40, born in Mississippi, farmer
Ellen 25, born in Texas, keeping house
Margaret 5, born in Texas, daughter
Dott 3, born in Texas, daughter
Violia 1, born in Texas, daughter”

Bad blood had arisen between him and his brother-in-law, Fran-cis “Frank” McMurray and Augustus decided to move away. The McMurray family had taken Augustus’ twin son, William Goynes out in cold weather to have him baptized, and the infant, four days old, died following the ceremony. He was buried in Goynes Cemetery at Goynes Junction, Texas, just off IH37. Shortly afterward, Augustus Sanders Goynes sold his land in Live Oak County and headed for the Big Bend Country, a new frontier in West Texas.
In 1883 they lived in Presidio County, Texas on the Mexican border where he was elected to the county school board. In 1884 he was ranching in the Sierra Diablo Mountains of El Paso County, [later Hudspeth County, formed in 1917] near Van Horn, Texas.

Francis “Frank” McMurray followed Augustus and bought land adjoining the Goynes ranch, near Allamore, Texas. McMurray hired surveyors to locate the boundaries of his land.

The surveyors concluded that a waterwell that Augustus had drilled and developed lay a few feet inside the McMurray line. Water was a scarce commodity in the Big Bend Country. Neither men nor cattle could inhabit the area without a source of the precious water. When McMurray began to build a barbed-wire fence to deny the watertank to the Goynes cattle, a dispute arose, and the kinsmen reached for their guns. Augustus Sanders Goynes was shot and killed near Allamore June 30, 1892 on his 52nd birthday by his brother-in-law who was faster on the draw. He was buried in the Van Horn Cemetery on the edge of town.

Francis “Frank” McMurray was charged only with second de-gree murder because both men were drawing their guns; “Frank” was faster. His sister, Ellen Elizabeth McMurray Goynes was left a widow with 10 children to raise. She moved back to Live Oak County to be near her family. She died at George West, Texas January 6, 1926, according to Sue Nance of Three Rivers, Texas, a descendant. She was buried in Gussettville Cemetery.

Children born to Augustus Sanders Goynes and Ellen Elizabeth McMurray Goynes include:

Margaret Ellen Goynes born December 10, 1874
Dorothy “Dot” Goynes [twin] born November 8, 1877
William Goynes [twin] born November 8, 1877
Viola A. Goynes born May 7, 1879
Peter Reagan “Pete” Goynes born April 16, 1881
William Earl Goynes born May 9, 1883
Daniel Goynes born August 14, 1884
Nellie L. Goynes born November 6, 1887
Nettie Maude Goynes born November 11, 1889
John Lee Goynes born June 24, 1891

2)  William J. M. Gowen Narrowly Survived Civil War in Maine Cavalry Regiment

Pvt. William J. M. Gowen of Company H, Second Maine Cav-alry Regiment, fought in nine battles during the Civil War, and though uninjured, was lucky to survive. During the Battle of Marianna, Florida, 10 of his comrades were killed, but fol-lowing the engagement, 334 of the cavalrymen were swept away by disease. The mosquitos and something in the Florida water was able to accomplish what the Confederates had failed to do in 23 months of fighting.

Pvt. Gowen was mustered in January 12, 1864, at age 18, and three months later found himself and his company steaming down the Mississippi enroute to Louisiana. During the second week in May, his regiment under Gen. Edward Canby was en-gaged in the Battles of Cheneyville, Marksville, Avoyelles Prairie, Yellow Bayou and Pine Barren Creek.

In August of 1864, they were transferred to Ft. Barancus. On September 23, his regiment made the ill-fated attack on Mari-anna. On December 13, 1864, his decimated regiment fought in the Battle of Pollard, Alabama. On February 23, 1865 they fought in the Battle of Milton, Florida in their advance toward Pensacola. His regiment fought from March 17, 1865 until the end of the war in the Battle of Mobile where they were mus-tered out December 6, 1865.

William J. M. Gowen, son of William M. Gowen and Rebecca Ricker Merrifield Gowen, was born June 1, 1845 in Spring-vale. His father died in the year he was born. His widowed mother had a difficult time of supporting her son and her aged father, Jacob Merrifield. At the age of three, he was handed over to an uncle, James Jackson of Rochester, New Hampshire, according to “Biographical Review–Leading Citizens of York County, Maine.”

At the age of eight, he returned to Springvale to go to school. He was enumerated there in the 1860 census of York County in his mother’s household as a 14-year-old.

Following school, William J. M. Gowen served an apprenticeship in the machinist trade. He was glad to trade the grit and the grime of the machine shop for the army when the Second Maine Cavalry Regiment was organized.

On February 9, 1867, he was married to Ellen C. Morrison, daughter of Abram & Isabelle Morrison, of Sanford, Maine, according to Sanford town records. He settled there and took up the shoemaking trade, the profession of his father and his grandfather, James Gowen before him. He died in 1919. Children born to William J. M. Gowen and Ellen C. Morrison Gowen are unknown.

3)  Joseph Gowen Sentenced To 21 Lashes in Chowan County, NC

Joseph Gowen “alias Smith” of Chowan Precinct was indicted August 2, 1725 for larceny. He was charged by Patrick Ogilby of Edenton, North Carolina in the theft of a pair of shoes, according to “Colonial Records of North Carolina,” Volume 2, page 591. The indictment read:

“William Little, Esq: Attorney General comes to Prosecute the Bill of Indictment found by the Grand Jury against Joseph Gowen, alias Smith of Chowan Precinct, Mariner for Larceny in these words, viz:

The Jurors of Our Sovereign Lord the King on their Oath doe present that Joseph Gowen alias Smith, not having the fear of God before his Eyes, but moved by the instigation of the Devill in the precinct of Chowan aforesaid on or about the seventeenth day of this instant July in the year of our Lord One Thousand seven hundred & twenty-five by force and armes did fradulently and feloniously Steal, take and carry away from the house of Patrick Ogilby of Edenton of the Pre-cinct of Chowan aforesayd one payr of shoes of the value of eleven pence against the peace of Our Sovereign Lord the King . . .

Upon which Indictment the said Joseph Gowen alias Smith was arraigned and upon his arraignment pleaded [Not Guilty] and for tryall thereof he putt himself upon God and the Country and the said William Little on the behalf of our Lord the King likewise.

Whereupon the Marshall was commanded that he should cause to come twelve good & honest men etc. . . who being impannelled and sworn etc. . . do say upon their Oath, ‘Wee of the Jury find the Prisoner Guilty.’

Then the sayd Gowen alias Smith being asked if he had any-thing to say why sentence should not pass against him as the Law in that Case has provided and he offering nothing in avoydance thereof, It was then and there Considered and Adjudged that he should be carried to the publick Whipping post and there to receive twenty-one lashes on his bare back well layd on & to remayne in Custody till fees are payd.”

4)  Dear Cousins

I have a photograph of William Menefee Gowin, his wife Rebecca Jane Byrum Gowin and their youngest son, Francis Gowin taken about 1882, based on Francis’s age. Rebecca looks pregnant in this photo, however the youngest child in the Foundation’s record of the family is Francis.

The Foundation Manuscript identifies eight of their chil-dren. The 1900 census return indicates that 11 children were born to Rebecca, six of which were living at that time. Can anyone supply the names of the three missing children? Robert W. Gowin, 247 Sawgrass Way, Fayetteville, GA, 30215, gowinrob@usarc@emnh2.army.mil.

==Dear Cousins==

I am seeking a diary reportedly maintained by William Goyens who was born in North Carolina as a free Negro and travelled to Texas around 1820 where he settled near Nacog-doches. He was the local blacksmith, Mexican-Indian arbi-trator and Republic of Texas patriot. His diary is quoted in a biography, but there is no indication where the diary is located. Any help would be appreciated. Virginia K. P. Rigby, Director, East Texas Research Center, Stephen F. Austin State University, Ralph Steen Library, Box 13055, SFA Station, Nacogdoches, TX, 75962-3055, vrigby@sfalib.sfasu.edu.

==Dear Cousins==

The search for the reported letter of Gov. John Sevier in which he mentions contact with the Melungeons of East Ten-nessee continues. So far, I have struck out on all of the vari-ous repositories that have been cited as having the document. Will Allen Dromgoole in her book mentioned a Capt. Droomgoole who served in Sevier’s command. Could he be the source of this information in some old family letter which she never mentioned? Maybe we should put up a “Wanted Alive” reward for the original letter signed by Sevier. Jack Harold Goins, 207 Holston View Dr, Rogersville, TN, 37857, jgoins@usit.net.

==Dear Cousins==

I believe that Sherry Linn Goin of Woodlawn, IL was the first to know of the Thomas Goin and Rebecca Clark who were married about 1777. Dianne Stark Thurman who pub-lished “Goin & Variants” developed information that points to Jemima Sinnes as the wife of Thomas Goin. Also there may still be a belief that his wife was Elizabeth Goin.

What if Thomas Goin had three wives and that there are actually two or three sets of us out there somewhere? How many sisters did the sons of Thomas Goin have? Richard G. Bonds, Box 2384, Greenwood, AR, 72936, rrbonds@ipa.net.

==Dear Cousins==

I sent to the Foundation earlier a photo of my G-Gm Clara Ramona Turner Wilson and the newspaper story of her life done on her 100th birthday. Also enclosed was a copy of the death certificate of her mother, [Elizabeth Ellen Gowens Turner] who died of typhoid fever in Mills County, IA. Clara was married twice, the first time to my G-Gf Daniel Livingstone Wilson who died of cancer in 1907, leaving her with five children. A daughter still lives in Mills County, and I have asked her a lot of questions about her mother’s life. She is sensitive about the Melungeon connection, but I hope to break down some of the barriers, if time permits. Hopefully, I will have more information for the Foundation Manuscript soon. Viola M. Lawrence, 43827 27th St. W, Lancaster, CA, 93536, flawr84722@aol.com.

==Dear Cousins==

I have finally got my book, “Melungeons and Other Mestee Groups” on the Internet in full text. To your “Melungia” address file you may add:

http://www.hypertext.com/blackirish/melungeons.html
Mike Nassau, 4130 NW 64th St. Gainesville, FL, 32606, mnassau@exchange.acld.lib.fl.us.

5)  Foundation Family History Files Transferring to RootsWeb

Following a catastrophic failure of a downtown server, the Foundation has found it necessary to move its Website to RootsWeb. In the accident every file was corrupted beyond recovery. The Foundation Manuscript, “Dear Cousins,” 10 years of Newsletters, the Electronic Newsletters and “Melungia” were all obliterated.

Since the Foundation is having to reformat all of the files, it is expedient to reformat in HyperText Markup Language [html]. The original ASCII formatting will be replaced by HTML which was not available when the Foundation first placed its Website online. The improved formatting procedure will allow the use of color, graphics and photos and other advances on the new webpages.

It was determined by the membership early in 1999 that the Foundation Newsletter is to be superceded in January 2000 by an Electronic edition of the publication. The efficiencies and economies of electronic publishing are far superior to the limited capabilities of a printed newsletter. There is no re-straint on size; articles do not have to be “written to fit.”

Delivery is instantaneous; our members all around the world receive their Electronic Newsletters at the same time. And actually, subscribers to the west of the International Dateline, in Australia, Malaysia, the Orient, etc, receive their E-mail deliveries a day before our local members.

The printed Newsletters have all been posted on the new website, and the other sections of the Electronic Library will soon be available there.

At that time, all Foundation features will be accessed at: http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.com/~gowenrf.

About 70% of the Foundation membership is now online with E-mail and Internet capabilities. Any member, not yet online, is invited to designate a “wired” friend to receive his E-mail temporarily. Also many libraries now have Internet capabilities for their patrons who have not yet installed a computer.

Over 34,000 “hits” have been made on the Foundation Web-site since its beginning in 1996. Many of the visits were made by researchers who had never heard of the Foundation before. They were surprised to find their branch of the family recorded there, and were equally surprised to find that they have kinsmen all across the United States and all around the world seeking their same ancestors. It’s no surprise that they have become some of the Foundation’s most ardent supporters.

Savings in production expenses will allow the Foundation to recover from operating deficits which has plagued the orga-nization from its beginning in 1989.

A limited number of back issues of the Newsletter published during the past 10 years are available at no charge to Foundation Members upon request. Complete Library Editions of the 120 Newsletter issues in a binder are available at $75 each.

The Foundation Manuscript, begun in 1941 by Arlee Gowen, has grown to over 10,000 pages of family lore. The collec-tion, augmented daily by family historians pooling their re-search, has grown rapidly since the advent of the Internet. The research deals with various branches of the family in over 50 different spelling variations.

Family historians searching for a particular name, place or event may use the online search engine to scan the Manuscript, Newsletters, Electronic Newsletters, “Dear Cousins” and “Melungia, Home of the Melungeons” to quickly find their subject. The 160 sections of the Manuscript are preceded by a title index to help the researcher find his “starting point.”

The Foundation now offers more benefits and more research tools to the family researcher than he has ever had before. If it is financially convenient, you are invited to “move up a notch” on the membership schedule for the Year 2000 to help the or-ganization overcome the operating deficit. All 1999 memberships expire December 31, 1999.

Former members and new members are offered memberships which begin now and extend through December 31, 2000. On the form below, indicate the type of membership you have se-lected, and your membership card for the calendar year of 2000 will be in the mail promptly.

The form below may also be used to request sample copies of the Newsletter and to request gift memberships for members of your family. The Foundation will send gift cards acknowl-edging your thoughtfulness, both to you and the recipients.

Membership Application, 2000
Gowen Research Foundation Phone: 806/795-8758 or 795-9694
5708 Gary Avenue E-mail: gowen@llano.net
Lubbock, Texas, 79413

6)  Augustus Sanders Goynes – Continued . . . 

In 1883 they lived in Presidio County, Texas on the Mexican border where he was elected to the county school board. In 1884 he was ranching in the Sierra Diablo Mountains of El Paso County, [later Hudspeth County, formed in 1917] near Van Horn, Texas. Francis “Frank” McMurray followed Augustus and bought land adjoining the Goynes ranch, near Allamore, Texas. McMurray hired surveyors to locate the boundaries of his land.

The surveyors concluded that a waterwell that Augustus had drilled and developed lay a few feet inside the McMurray line. Water was a scarce commodity in the Big Bend Country. Nei-ther men nor cattle could inhabit the area without a source of the precious water. When McMurray began to build a barbed-wire fence to deny the watertank to the Goynes cattle, a dispute arose, and the kinsmen reached for their guns. Augustus Sanders Goynes was shot and killed near Allamore June 30, 1892 on his 52nd birthday by his brother-in-law who was faster on the draw. He was buried in the Van Horn Cemetery on the edge of town.

Francis “Frank” McMurray was charged only with second de-gree murder because both men were drawing their guns; “Frank” was faster. His sister, Ellen Elizabeth McMurray Goynes was left a widow with 10 children to raise. She moved back to Live Oak County to be near her family. She died at George West, Texas January 6, 1926, according to Sue Nance of Three Rivers, Texas, a descendant. She was buried in Gussettville Cemetery.

Children born to Augustus Sanders Goynes and Ellen Elizabeth McMurray Goynes include:

Margaret Ellen Goynes born December 10, 1874
Dorothy “Dot” Goynes [twin] born November 8, 1877
William Goynes [twin] born November 8, 1877
Viola A. Goynes born May 7, 1879
Peter Reagan “Pete” Goynes born April 16, 1881
William Earl Goynes born May 9, 1883
Daniel Goynes born August 14, 1884
Nellie L. Goynes born November 6, 1887
Nettie Maude Goynes born November 11, 1889
John Lee Goynes born June 24, 1891

 

Augustus Sanders Goynes, Continued

She was the youngest child of William McMurray [b1796] and Bridget Fox McMurray [b1813].

Augustus Sanders Goyne received a quarter section of land under the terms of his father’s will written August 1, 1875, ac-cording to Live Oak County Will Book 1:

“Second, I will and bequeath to my beloved son Augustus Sanders Goynes my homestead, being one hundred and sixty acres of land situated in Live Oak County in the State of Texas and a part of the Bridget Fadden League, subject however to the life estate of my wife Martha, and it is my will that this bequest shall not take effect until her decease.”

They were enumerated in the 1880 census of Live Oak County, Enumeration District 101, page 9, Precinct 1 on June 3, 1880.

“Goynes, Aug S. 40, born in Mississippi, farmer
Ellen 25, born in Texas, keeping house
Margaret 5, born in Texas, daughter
Dott 3, born in Texas, daughter
Violia 1, born in Texas, daughter”

Bad blood had arisen between him and his brother-in-law, Francis “Frank” McMurray and Augustus decided to move away. The McMurray family had taken Augustus’ twin son, William Goynes out in cold weather to have him baptized, and the infant, four days old, died following the ceremony. He was buried in Goynes Cemetery at Goynes Junction, Texas, just off IH37. Shortly afterward, Augustus Sanders Goynes sold his land in Live Oak County and headed for the Big Bend Country, a new frontier in West Texas.

==Dear Cousins==

I believe that Sherry Linn Goin of Woodlawn, IL was the first to know of the Thomas Goin and Rebecca Clark who were married about 1777. Dianne Stark Thurman who pub-lished “Goin & Variants” developed information that points to Jemima Sinnes as the wife of Thomas Goin. Also there may still be a belief that his wife was Elizabeth Goin.

What if Thomas Goin had three wives and that there are actually two or three sets of us out there somewhere? How many sisters did the sons of Thomas Goin have? Richard G. Bonds, Box 2384, Greenwood, AR, 72936, rrbonds@ipa.net.

==Dear Cousins==

I sent to the Foundation earlier a photo of my G-Gm Clara Ramona Turner Wilson and the newspaper story of her life done on her 100th birthday. Also enclosed was a copy of the death certificate of her mother, [Elizabeth Ellen Gowens Turner] who died of typhoid fever in Mills County, IA. Clara was married twice, the first time to my G-Gf Daniel Livingstone Wilson who died of cancer in 1907, leaving her with five children. A daughter still lives in Mills County, and I have asked her a lot of questions about her mother’s life. She is sensitive about the Melungeon connection, but I hope to break down some of the barriers, if time permits. Hopefully, I will have more information for the Foundation Manuscript soon. Viola M. Lawrence, 43827 27th St. W, Lancaster, CA, 93536, flawr84722@aol.com.

==Dear Cousins==

I have finally got my book, “Melungeons and Other Mestee Groups” on the Internet in full text. To your “Melungia” address file you may add:

http://www.hypertext.com/blackirish/melungeons.html

Mike Nassau, 4130 NW 64th St. Gainesville, FL, 32606, mnassau@exchange.acld.lib.fl.us.

Augustus Sanders Goynes – Continued . . . 

hundred miles west of the battle corridor that lay between the two capitals. Augustus Sanders Goynes enjoyed the tranquility of Staunton in a well-deserved rest.

When his wounds healed, he rejoined the First Louisiana and completed the war without injury. Most of the battles between Lee and a succession of Union generals were on the 110-mile road which connected the two capitals, Washington and Rich-mond. It took the Federal Army four years to traverse the span between the two.

The First Louisiana, still under Gen. Lee, was surrendered and paroled at Appommattox Courthouse April 10, 1865. On being discharged, he returned to his home in Rapides Parish, Louisiana. Subsequently members of his family removed to South Texas, and Augustus Sanders Goynes accompanied them. He was married February 16, 1874 to Ellen Elizabeth McMurray in Live Oak County, Texas. She was born October 6, 1853 in San Patricio County, Texas.

(Continued on Page 2)

 

___________________________________________________________

NOTE:  The above information produced by the Gowen Research Foundation (GRF), and parts of the “Gowen Manuscript” they worked on producing.  It has tons of information – much of it is correct, but be careful, some of it is not correct – so check their sources and logic.  I’ve copied some of their information in the past researching my own family, only to find out there were some clear mistakes.   So be sure to check the information to verify if it is right before citing the source and believing the person who researched it before was 100% correct.  Most of the information I found there seems to be correct, but some is not.

Their website is:  Internet: http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.com/~gowenrf

There does not seem to be anyone “manning the ship” at the Gowen Research Foundation, or Gowen Manuscript site any longer, and there is no way to contact anyone about any errors.   The pages themselves don’t have a mechanism to leave a note for others to see any “new information” that you may have that shows when you find info that shows something is wrong, or when something has been verified.

Feel free to leave messages about any new information found, or errors in these pages, or information that has been verified that those who wrote these pages may not have known about.

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