1998 – 03 March Newsletter – GRF

Sections in this issue:

1)  Canaan Gowen Fought the British in Battle of Thames River;
2) Don Lee Gowen to Speak at SLC On Grandpa James B. Gowen;
3) Dear Cousins;
4) Don Lee Gowen to Speak at SLC On Grandpa James B. Gowen;
5) Was Thomas Gowen the First Of the Name in Virginia?;

All Gowen Manuscript Pages and Newsletters:   https://goyengoinggowengoyneandgone.com/gowen-research-foundation-pages-and-info/

GOWEN RESEARCH FOUNDATION NEWSLETTER
Volume 9, No. 6 March 1998

1)  Canaan Gowen Fought the British in Battle of Thames River

Canaan Gowen, son of Mary Gowen, was born about 1775 in Botetourt County, Virginia. He was bound out to Edward Pate June 8, 1790, according to Botetourt County Court Minutes. On the same day “Mary Gowing” was bound out to John Johnston. She is regarded as a sister to Canaan Gowen.

On February 12, 1793, “Canaan Gowen, son of Mary Gowen was set at liberty,” according to “Annals of Southwest Vir-ginia, 1760-1800” by Lewis Preston Summers.

“Canan Going” was enlisted as a private in 1812 in the Second Regiment [Jennings] Kentucky Volunteers, according to the research of Donna Gowin Johnston, Foundation member of Casper, Wyoming. The Kentuckians, under Col. Isaac Shelby, governor of Kentucky, participated in the capture of Detroit and the decisive Battle of the Thames River.

“Caanan Going, free man of color” was mentioned in an affi-davit signed by Williamson Toole of Madison County, Ken-tucky in Adams County, Mississippi April 3, 1814, according to “Passports of Southeastern Pioneers, 1770-1823” by Dorothy Williams Potter. Passports were required for Ameri-cans passing through Indian land and Spanish land.

The affidavit read:

“Mississippi Territory
Adams County

Williamson Toole of Madison County, State of Kentucky this day appeared before the undersigned Justice of the Peace in & for the said County and made oath that he has known Canaan Going, a free man of color upwards of four years–during which time he has never heard his freedom disputed–that he has served as camp [illegible] in the Michigan Territory and [under the] command of Genl. [William Henry] Harrison in the years 1812 and 1813 in the same regiment with the said Going–Going is six feet high, stout built, complexion of a yellowish cast, is going to Madison County in the State aforesaid in company with deponent.

Sworn to & subscribed this 3d April, 1814.

Andrew Marschalk”

Since the affidavit was made in Natchez, Mississippi, it is suggested that the men were preparing to take the Natchez Trace back to their home in Kentucky. The Natchez Trace passed through Chickasaw land and thus the necessity of having the passport.

The fact that Williamson Toole and Canaan Gowen were re-turning to Madison County, Kentucky suggests that Canaan Gowen might have been related to the family of William Gowan and Anastasia Sullivan Gowan who removed from Bedford County, Virginia to Madison County in 1800. Bed-ford County adjoined Botetourt County where Canaan Gowen grew up.

Gen. Harrison was the hero of the Battle of Tippecanoe fought November 7, 1811 in Indiana in which the Americans defeated the forces of Elskwatawa the Prophet, brother of Tecumseh, the Shawnee chieftain. The estimated 6,000 Indians, sup-ported by the British, launched the battle in a pre-dawn attack in which they caught the Americans sleeping. After several hours of desperate fighting, the Indians withdrew, leaving 40 dead on the field. The Americans lost 185 men, but Harrison declared victory and became famous. The battle, fought on the Tippecanoe River, is regarded as the opening round of the War of 1812.

Harrison was appointed a major-general in the Kentucky mili-tia at the beginning of the War of 1812. He began to combine his forces with that of Commodore Oliver Hazard Perry, the daring naval commander who challenged the British Navy on Lake Erie.

On September 10, 1813, as the British Navy was preparing to transport more troops to their outpost on the Sandusky River in Ohio, Perry attacked the superior flotilla. After his flagship, the U.S.S. Lawrence had become disabled and defeat seemed certain, Perry transferred his commanded by small boat to the U.S.S. Niagara, took her into close action with his six remain-ing vessels and turned the tide of victory.

The British Army, faced with the severance of its line of sup-plies, was forced to make a hasty evacuation of Ohio and Michigan. Gen. Harrison, then commander of all the troops in the Northwest, advanced northward. He occupied Detroit Sep-tember 29, 1813 and began to press the British in their re-treat up the Thames River toward Lake Ontario.

Perry quickly took Harrison’s troops aboard his ships and pur-sued the British up the Thames. Thus Canaan Gowen partici-pated in one of the U.S. Navy’s first amphibious landings. When they overtook the English forces, the troops and sailors debarked to continue the fight on land.

The British had 983 regulars and Tecumseh, who had been made a brigadier general in the British army, had 3,500 Indi-ans. Harrison and Perry, with 6,500 militiamen and sailors, launched the attack.

Commodore Perry took command of one American force, and General Harrison commanded another. Perry led the decisive charge and again showed his daring leadership. The Kentuck-ians under Col. Shelby, regarded as the best Indian fighters, were ordered to the left front facing Tecumseh. The Kentuck-ians charged into the Indians, penetrated through their ranks and finding Tecumseh, killed him on the spot. With the death of their Chieftain, the Indians quickly melted away, leaving the British in a hopeless situation.

The British surrendered, and on October 5, 1813, Col. Henry A. Proctor gave up all the territory west of the Niagara penin-sula as the result of losing the battle. When the fighting was over, the Americans had suffered 47 casualties and the British 48. The Battle of Thames River not only destroyed the British power in upper Canada, but splintered the Northestern Indian Confederacy as well.

Later Perry commanded the Mediterranean expedition of 1815-16. He died of yellow fever at Port of Spain, Trinidad August 23, 1819.

Subsequently, Gen. Harrison was nominated by the Whig party and was elected president of the United States in 1840 under the slogan of “Tippecanoe and Tyler Too.” He served only one month after inauguration and succumbed to pneumonia. He was succeeded in office by his vice-president, John Tyler.

“Cannon Gowen, free negro” was enumerated in the 1830 cen-sus of Clay County, Indiana, according to the research of June A. Smith, Foundation Member of Bremerton, Washington.

“Canaan Goans” was married March 2, 1835 to Susan Tucker in Fountain County, Indiana, according to the research of Stephen L. Allen, Foundation Member of Chino Hills, California. He appeared there as the head of a household in the 1840 census, according to June A. Smith.

Children born to Canaan Gowen and Susan Tucker Gowen include:

Stephen Goins born about 1837

Stephen Goins, son of Canaan Gowen and Susan Tucker Gowen, was born about 1837 in Fountain County. His death certificate showed his father as “Canaan Goins,” according to Stephen L. Allen.

2)  Don Lee Gowen to Speak at SLC On Grandpa James B. Gowen

The legendary James Burns Gowen and the old legends of Tennessee will be related in Salt Lake City by Don Lee Gowen, Editorial Boardmember of Decatur, Alabama. He, a great-grandson of James Burns Gowen has been in pursuit of the history of his family for the past 25 years. He will describe the fascinating success of his research at the Foundation Research Conference & Family Reunion at the Salt Lake Plaza Hotel June 21-22-23.

Don Lee Gowen, a legend himself in Northern, Alabama, is senior vice-president of the Bank of Alabama, senior vice-president of Security Mutual Financial Services, senior vice-president of SMF Insurance Agency and senior vice-president of Phoenix Funding, all of Birmingham. He is 33-year financial services executive with senior management responsibility for multi-million dollar bank operations and supervisory authority of subsidiary companies.

He previously served as regional vice-president of USA Financial Services with 219 consumer financial service offices in the Southwest and Midwest and vice-president of World Acceptance Corporation with over 200 plus offices in the Southeast and Southwest.

At family reunions and other gatherings, he regularly regales his audiences with tales of the old days in pioneer Tennessee surrounding his famous kinsman. James Burns Gowen arrived in Middle Tennessee in 1800 and lived as a neighbor on Mul-berry Creek with Davey Crockett. They went hunting together for 20 years and served together under Andrew Jackson in his campaigns against the Creeks in the Alabama Indian Wars. They maintained their close friendship even after Davey Crockett was elected to Congress.

When Crockett became disillusioned and declared, “Y’all can go to hell–I’m going to Texas,” Gowen was unable to dissuade him.

Don Lee Gowen was graduated magna cum laude from Athens State University and did graduate work at the University of North Carolina. He served in the U.S. Army in Korea in the Seventh Division and 101st Airborne Division. He is a li-censed private pilot with a multi-engine rating, a licensed in-surance agent and a licensed real estate broker. He declares however that his “greatest claim to fame” is his bass fishing ability. This “world class career Bassmaster” is a “piscatorial scourge on every lake within 1,000 miles of Decatur.”

Don Lee Gowen is the son of Forrest Lee Gowen and Goldie Christine Crumley Gowen. He and his wife, Linda Gail, are the parents of Tonya Telisa Gowen, sales manager for Pfizer Pharmaceuticals and Blake Lee Gowen, a pharmacist.

He will be one of the featured speakers at Salt Lake City as well as program chairman for the event which is one of the most unique research opportunities of a lifetime. The hotel is located adjacent to the Latter Day Saints Family History Library–the world’s largest.

Researchers may arrive early or stay after the Conference to use the Library. The hotel’s largest meeting room will accommodate 325 people in theatre seating and 255 people for the Tuesday night dinner meeting.

Donna Johnston, Conference Accommodations Chairman, ad-vises that because of its location, the Salt Lake Plaza in 1998 is booked solid six months ahead of time. The hotel has agreed to hold a block of rooms for the Foundation until the April 21 deadline. After that date, all remaining rooms will be released and offered at rack rates [$129 per night.]

The Foundation has contracted for the rooms at $85 per night [plus tax] until the deadline. Two queen-size beds are offered in each room, and the rate is the same for one, two, three or four occupants. A limited number of in-room refrigerators are available at no charge. Members may make reservations by dialing 800/366-3684 and must mention that they are with the Foundation, Group 191516, to receive the discount.

If the Salt Lake Plaza sells out quickly, late reservations can be made at nearby Travel Lodge Motel at 801/533-8200. Other hotels and motels in the downtown area are “over $100 per night,” according to Donna Johnston.

The hotel offers a free shuttle to and from the airport and a covered parking garage for members driving in. Public park-ing is available one block west of the hotel at $2 per day and one block north of the hotel at $3 per day. Self-contained recreational vehicles may park on the lot west of the hotel at $4 per day.

Additional information may be obtained from the hotel at its E-mail address: sales@plaza-hotel.com or by writing Salt Lake Plaza Hotel, 122 West Temple, Salt Lake City, UT, 84101. Information on area attractions and brochures may be obtained from Salt Lake Convention & Visitors Bureau, 180 S. West Temple, 84101, 801/521-2822.

Early registration fee for the Foundation Conference, by May 25, for members and guests is $50. After that date, the regis-tration fee is $60 per person. Registrants may clip or repro-duce the coupon below and attach their checks. The registra-tion fee pays for the Foundation Dinner, coffee break refresh-ments, speaker honoraria, audio visual equipment rental and other hotel expenses.

Research Conference Registration
Gowen Research Foundation 806/795-8758
5708 Gary Avenue 806/795-9694
Lubbock, Texas, 79413

3)  Dear Cousins

The minutes of the old Mill Creek Baptist Church in Davidson County are replete with persons being suspended, dismissed for going to a ball, etc, and even excommunicated. However, the actions were taken after meeting, taking of tes-timony from witnesses, etc. Its seems one of our ancestral rel-atives distinguished himself as perhaps the only family mem-ber summarily thrown out of Mill Creek Baptist Church:

“Mill Creek Church Meeting Minutes, April 1797-April 1811, Davidson County, Tennessee,” p. 23-24, a part of the minutes for ‘The Church in conference at Mill Creek the Satyrday before the first Lords day in Ap[ril 1805] . . .” states “James Gowin came in to Church and denied the Authenticity of the Scriptures whereupon he was excommunicated.”

It is possible that this James Gowin was James H. Gowen, [Newsletter, Nov. 1992] son of William and Sarah Gowen. The church was about one mile east of where William and Sarah’s brick home was located. Cleve Weathers, 315 Dead-erick St, Nashville, TN, 37238, Rainsman13@aol.com.

==Dear Cousins==

Thanks for the warm welcome into the Foundation. What is most gratifying is that here in the USA is the recognition by one family, at least, that it resulted from a confluence of di-verse ethnic backgrounds, and that it is proud to acknowledge this fact. All too often, white Americans do not want to know or believe that they have any “black” blood, given the standard in the South of long ago that one drop of Negro blood was enough to make you Black. In my personal case, I could be mistaken for anything, having been mistaken [in the teaching profession] for Moroccan, Puerto Rican, Egyptian, Arab, etc. by members of those groups.

I gather that most of the Foundation members are “white” yet being “black” I feel welcomed. Thanks so much. Franklin S. & Ana R. Goins, 43-10 Kissena Blvd. #2B, Flushing, NY, 11355-2928, Frankana@aol.com.

==Dear Cousins==

Vardy Presbyterian Church was built in 1899 in Hancock County, TN. It was placed on the National Register of His-toric Places in 1984. The church was built for the Melungeons of the valley.

In November a non-profit corporation was formed to begin restoration of the church and to enhance the Melungeon her-itage. The church restoration will include the building, the grounds and the Vardy Cemetery. It will also include an area to house a museum, host reunions and offer a place for ge-nealogical research.

Restoration costs are estimated at $25,000. Local residents have joined together to make it a community project. The or-ganization is contacting Melungeon descendants with a request for their support in the undertaking. Tax deductible checks should be made to Vardy Community Historical Society, %Molly Hall, Box 2102, Ellicott City, MD, 21041, 410/771-4808, Troy Lee Williams, President.

==Dear Cousins==

I just recently found out about the Foundation and would like to join. I have a Goins line in my family. My great-grandmother was Josephine Goins, daughter of James Goins and Rhoda Galena Goins, who was born in 1855 in Boone County, Indiana.

James Goins, son of Micajah Goins, was born about 1818 in Madison County, KY and died in 1865. Micajah Goins was born about 1780 in Bedford Co, VA and died here in Frankfort about 1845. Other sons of Micajah were Isom, Capt. Sanford W, Noah and Francis.

James and Rhoda were living in Boone County, IN in 1855, but were back-and-forth between Indiana and Kentucky much of this time. I think James and Rhoda must have met and married in Indiana, since there were no Galenas anywhere in Kentucky, as far as I can tell. But there were a few in Indi-ana and Ohio.

James Goings and Joseph Galena appeared on the same census page in the 1840 enumeration of Hendricks County, IN. This could have been the family of James and Rhoda. I would like to hear from anybody with help on any of the above. Wayne A. Moore, 1013 Entrada Dr, Frankfort, KY, 40601.

==Dear Cousins==

I need help in locating two long lost cousins: Barbara Jeanne Gowins Cheney and Mary Susan Gowins. We are all descended from my great-grandfather, Henry Harrison Gowins, a Confederate veteran of Claiborne County, Missis-sippi who was born in 1826 of parents unknown. They also descend through his son, Henry Harrison Gowins, Jr. who came to Dallas County, Texas in 1894 where he was married to Lula Myrtle Witt.

They were the parents of Ruth Gowins [bc1899] and Harry Witt Gowins [b1901]. Ruth Gowins Cheney was the mother of Barbara Jeanne Cheaney Gowins who was born in 1925 in Dallas. Mary Susan Gowins was born to Harry Witt Gowins about 1926 and was a first cousin to Barbara Jeanne Cheaney Gowins. Do you have any knowledge of these two cousins? Barbara Gowins White, 981 Buck Creek Rd, Richton, MS, 39476.

==Dear Cousins==

We are enclosing our registrations for the Salt Lake City Conference and are really looking forward to seeing all of our cousins again. The Nashville Conference was s-o-o-o good! Can we have a “family time” at SLC [example:] where all the descendants of Tommy Goin of Brunswick County, VA can get over in the corner and share breakthroughs and frustra-tions? Just wait until you hear what I have learned about Eliz-abeth Stallings, the wife of Levi Goin! Beverly J. Nelson, 3391 W. Aksarben Ave, Littleton, CO, 80123

Family Narratives Requested

The Foundation would like to carry in future Newsletters an account of the earliest progenitors in your branch of the family. Please consider yourself “next” to prepare a narrative on your most interesting ancestor. If you need help in organizing your material, the Foundation staff will be glad to assist. Jot down the salient facts, dates and places, and we’ll take it from there.

GOWEN RESEARCH FOUNDATION ELECTRONIC NEWSLETTER
Volume 1, No. 3 March 28, 1998

4)  Don Lee Gowen to Speak at SLC
On Grandpa James B. Gowen

The legendary James Burns Gowen and the old legends of
Tennessee will be related in Salt Lake City by Don Lee
Gowen, Editorial Boardmember of Decatur, Alabama. He, a
great-grandson of James Burns Gowen has been in pursuit of
the history of his family for the past 25 years. He will
describe the fascinating success of his research at the
Foundation Research Conference & Family Reunion at the Salt
Lake Plaza Hotel June 21-22-23.

Don Lee Gowen, a legend himself in Northern, Alabama, is
senior vice-president of the Bank of Alabama, senior vice-
president of Security Mutual Financial Services, senior
vice-president of SMF Insurance Agency and senior vice-
president of Phoenix Funding, all of Birmingham. He is 33-
year financial services executive with senior management
responsibility for multi-million dollar bank operations and
supervisory authority of subsidiary companies.

He previously served as regional vice-president of USA Fi-
nancial Services with 219 consumer financial service offices
in the Southwest and Midwest and vice-president of World Ac-
ceptance Corporation with over 200 plus offices in the
Southeast and Southwest.

At family reunions and other gatherings, he regularly
regales his audiences with tales of the old days in pioneer
Tennessee surrounding his famous kinsman. James Burns Gowen
arrived in Middle Tennessee in 1800 and lived as a neighbor
on Mulberry Creek with Davey Crockett. They went hunting
together for 20 years and served together under Andrew
Jackson in his campaigns against the Creeks in the Alabama
Indian Wars. They maintained their close friendship even
after Davey Crockett was elected to Congress. When Crockett
became disillusioned and declared, “Y’all can go to hell–
I’m going to Texas,” Gowen was unable to dissuade him.

Don Lee Gowen was graduated magna cum laude from Athens
State University and did graduate work at the University of
North Carolina. He served in the U.S. Army in Korea in the
Seventh Division and 101st Airborne Division. He is a licensed private pilot with a multi-engine rating, a licensed insurance agent and a licensed real estate broker. He
declares however that his “greatest claim to fame” is his
bass fishing ability. This “world class career Bassmaster”
is a “piscatorial scourge on every lake within 1,000 miles
of Decatur.”

Don Lee Gowen is the son of Forrest Lee Gowen and Goldie
Christine Crumley Gowen. He and his wife, Linda Gail, are
the parents of Tonya Telisa Gowen, sales manager for Pfizer
Pharmaceuticals and Blake Lee Gowen, a pharmacist.

He will be one of the featured speakers at Salt Lake City as
well as program chairman for the event which is one of the
most unique research opportunities of a lifetime. The hotel
is located adjacent to the Latter Day Saints Family History
Library–the world’s largest. Researchers may arrive early
or stay after the Conference to use the Library. The
hotel’s largest meeting room will accommodate 325 people in
theatre seating and 255 people for the Tuesday night dinner
meeting.

Donna Johnston, Conference Accommodations Chairman, advises
that because of its location, the Salt Lake Plaza in 1998 is
booked solid six months ahead of time. The hotel has agreed
to hold a block of rooms for the Foundation until the April
21 deadline. After that date, all remaining rooms will be
released and offered at rack rates [$129 per night.]

The Foundation has contracted for the rooms at $85 per night
[plus tax] until the deadline. Two queen-size beds are
offered in each room, and the rate is the same for one, two,
three or four occupants. A limited number of in-room
refrigerators are available at no charge. Members may make
reservations by dialing 800/366-3684 and must mention that
they are with the Foundation, Group 191516, to receive the
discount.

If the Salt Lake Plaza sells out quickly, late reservations
can be made at nearby Travel Lodge Motel at 801/533-8200.
Other hotels and motels in the downtown area are “over $100
per night,” according to Donna Johnston.

The hotel offers a free shuttle to and from the airport and
a covered parking garage for members driving in. Public
parking is available one block west of the hotel at $2 per
day and one block north of the hotel at $3 per day. Self-
contained recreational vehicles may park on the lot west of
the hotel at $4 per day.

Additional information may be obtained from the hotel at its
E-mail address: sales@plaza-hotel.com or by writing Salt
Lake Plaza Hotel, 122 West Temple, Salt Lake City, UT,
84101. Information on area attractions and brochures may be
obtained from Salt Lake Convention & Visitors Bureau, 180 S.
West Temple, 84101, 801/521-2822.

Early registration fee for the Foundation Conference, by May
25, for members and guests is $50. After that date, the
registration fee is $60 per person. Registrants may clip or
reproduce the coupon below and attach their checks. The
registration fee pays for the Foundation Dinner, coffee
break refreshments, speaker honoraria, audio visual
equipment rental and other hotel expenses.

 

5)  Was Thomas Gowen the First Of the Name in Virginia?

Was Thomas Gowen the first member of familia nostra to set
foot on American soil? On the “7th, 8th month, 1635” the
18-year-old was listed as a passenger for Virginia out of
London. “New England Historical & Genealogical Register”
includes his name in “These underwritten names are to be
transported to Virginia in the ‘Globe’ of London, Jeremy
Blackman, Master, have been examined by the Minister of
Gravesend, of their conformitie and have taken the oaths of
allegeance and supremacie.”

The term “transported” was usually reserved for convicts who
were to be banished to the colonies by the Crown because of
criminality or heresy. John Camden Hotten in “Our Early Emi-
grant Ancestors” mentions Thomas Gowen as bound for Vir-
ginia. The term bound was usually reserved for endentured
servants.

In any event, the departure of our namesake with Capt.
Blackman for Virginia was not an auspicious event. The
captain apparently made a career of sailing the
trans-Atlantic route. On the “26th, 3rd month, 1639 Jeremy
Blackman, mariner and Thomas Stegg, merchant,” contracted
with the Virginia Council “to import horses and export neate
cattle,” according to “Acts of the Privy Council.”

Very likely Thomas Gowen first set foot on American soil at
Jamestown, a settlement destined to be burned and destroyed
by marauding Indians a few years later. Apparently he found
land in Gloucester County, across the York River from
Jamestown, probably in Abingdon Parish, 35 miles east of
present-day Richmond. It is believed that Thomas Gowen died
there at age 60, in 1676, the year that the colonists under
Nathaniel Bacon repulsed the Indians in the Battle of Bloody
Run. Does the coincidental date suggest that Thomas Gowen
might have died in the battle?

 

Francis William Gowan was born in Ireland in 1776, probably
in Queens County, according to the research of Jewel Ann
Lorenz Dunn, a descendant who lived in Olympia, Washington
in 1990. Queens County was organized as an Irish shire in
1556, but was later renamed County Leix in the Province of
Leinster.

Austin William Gowan, a descendant of Wilmington, New York
who has researched the family since 1963, suggests that “he
was a son of Samuel and Jane Gowan.”

“Francis William Gowing” was married April 28, 1806 to Anne
Wilkinson at St. Peter’s Church, Marybere, Queens County,
according to the church register. “Ann Wilkinson, daughter
of William and Mary Wilkinson, was baptized 6 December
1789,” according to “The Register of St. Patrick, Dublin,
Ireland,” edited by J. H. Bernard, 1907, Dublin. It is
believed she had a brother, George Wilkinson who influenced
many of the family to emigrate to America.

Francis William Gowan became a weaver in Clonsaughy, Queens
County and the father of 12. He lived in a thatched-roof
house containing 11 weaver’s looms, apparently utilizing his
large family to develop a cottage industry.

Children born to Francis William Gowan and Anne Wilkinson
Gowan include:

Margaret Gowan born about 1807
Mary Gowan born about 1809
Joshua Gowan born about 1812
William Gowan born about 1814
Catherine Gowan born about 1815
Joseph Henry Gowan born about 1818
Ann Gowan born about 1820
Charles Gowan born April 10, 1822
Richard “Jerry” Gowan born about 1825
Hannah Gowan born about 1828
Eliza Gowan born May 6, 1830
Elijah Gowan born September 4, 1833

 

 

==Dear Cousins==

From: gbonner@cbt.net
Query from Washington State

Michael J. Goyne of George, WA saw my posting in the
“Evertons’ Genealogical Helper” some time back. He sent me
scant information, then recently sent more.

Does anyone know anything of this family?

James Eldridge Goyne b 26 Sep 1861, d 29 July 1923 [places
unknown]. Married Allie Ida Jones 02 Nov 1882 in Bosque Co,.
TX. Had 11 children:

1] Aruther [sic] Hinten Goyne b 14 Oct 1883 d 03 Feb 1965
m Mamie Elizibeth [sic] Philley no date nor place. They
had 4 children:
1. Michael’s grandfather Robert James Goyne b 09 Aug
1921 in Throckmorton County, TX.
2. Punny Arther b 18 Nov 1924
3. Sydney Towers Goyne b 28 Mar 1926;
4. Minnie Mary Goyne b 06 Jan 1933.

2] Oscar Britton Goyne b 21 Apr 1885 d 19 Apr 1964
3] Lillie Pearl Goyne b 01 Jan 1887
4] James Lee Goyne b 21 Dec 1889 d 27 Oct 1958
5] Grace Ethel Goyne b 06 Aug 1891
6] Henry Ozro Goyne b 11 June 1893 d 14 Jun 1977
7] Mary Francis Goyne b 26 Nov 1895
8] Bertha Ina Goyne b 20 Mar 1898
9] Bell Essie Goyne b 22 May 1900
10] Birdie Alice Goyne b 29 Dec 1903
11] Ruby Fae Goyne b 07 Mar 1907

Am not certain of Michael J. Goyne’s age, but his gf was
born 1921, and assuming 20-year generations, Michael might
be in his 30’s. His letters to me are hand-printed, not
hand-written, but he signs his name in cursive script.
Michael’s grandmother is his source of information–the
wife of Robert James Goyne.

Any help is appreciated. Michael is not online.

Thanks–
Ann Harper Bonner
403 Hickory St.
Springhill, LA 71075-2635 gbonner@cbt.net

Reply from the Foundaton:

Ann,

My parents were married in Throckmorton County and were
friends of the Goyne family that you are researching. I
interviewed several members of this family back in the
1950s and have ransacked a few courthouses where their
records are preserved. I am inserting below a report I
wrote on this branch of the family for the Foundation
Manuscript. You are welcome to forward this information
to Michael Goyne in Washington. Perhaps he would like to
affiliate with the Foundation and join in the effort to
draw back the curtain of antiquity on our ancestors.

If you are open to some speculation, there was a James
A.[ldridge/Aldrich?] Gowin who was enumerated in the 1870
household of Rev. Charles Albert Gowin in Crawford
County, AR. He was shown as an “orphan, age 10.”

Rev. Charles Albert Gowin, son of Nathan Gowin and Louisa
Gowin, was born in 1844 in Tennessee. He served as a
Confederate infantryman during the Civil War. He was
married to Serena I. Evatt about 1870, and they removed
to Crawford County, Arkansas prior to 1872. Serena
died March 22, 1874, perhaps in childbirth, and the Rev.
Gowin was remarried about 1876, wife’s name Li Adeline.
She was a widow with two children whom Rev. Gowin adopted.

Good huntin’
Arlee

The Manuscript excerpt follows:

James Eldridge Goyne was born in Arkansas September 26, 1861
according to his 1900 census enumeration. He was married in
Bosque County November 2, 1882 to Alice Ida “Allie” Jones,
according to Bosque County Marriage Book D, page 288. She
was the daughter of F. D. Jones, a Kentucky native, and Mary
Boykin Jones who was born in Tennessee. Alice Ida “Allie”
Jones Goyne was born in Texas February 14, 1867, according
to her death certificate. She was born in Iredell, Texas,
according to J. A. Goyne and Ella Percy. In 1893 they lived
at Walnut Springs. James Eldridge Goyne was a farmer in
Throckmorton County, Texas in 1898.

He was enumerated as the head of a household in the 1900
census of Throckmorton County, Enumeration District 154,
page 26. The household was rendered as:

“Goyne, James 38, born in AR in Sept. 1861
Allie I. 33, born in TX in February 1867
Arthur H. 16, born in TX in October 1883
Oscar B. 15, born in TX in April 1885
Lillie P. 13, born in TX in January 1887
James L. 11, born in TX in Dec. 1888
Ethel G. 8, born in TX in August 1891
Henry I. 6, born in TX in June 1893
Mary F. 4, born in TX in Nov. 1895
Bertha I. 3, born in TX in March 1898
Belle 0, born in TX in May 1900”

On April 22, 1904 he gave a release on property in Hamilton
County, Texas, according to Hamilton County Deed Book 26,
page 97. James Eldridge Goyne died July 23, 1924, according
to Michael J. Goyne, a great-grandson.

Alice Ida “Allie” Jones Goyne died April 29, 1935 of a heart
attack, according to Wilbarger County, Texas death records.
She was a resident of Oklaunion, Texas, according to Sidney
Jones, Wichita Falls, Texas, informant. She was buried in
the city cemetery, Vernon, Texas.

Children born to James Eldridge Goyne and Alice Ida “Allie”
Jones include:

Arthur Henton Goyne born October 14, 1883
Oscar Britton Goyne born April 21, 1885
Lillie Pearl Goyne born January 1, 1887
James Lee Goyne born December 21, 1889
Ethel Grace Goyne born August 6, 1891
Henry Ozro Goyne born June 11, 1893
Mary Frances Goyne born November 26, 1895
Bertha Ina Goyne born March 20, 1898
Essie Belle Goyne born May 22, 1900
Birdie Alice Goyne born December 29, 1903
Ruby Fay Goyne born March 7, 1907

Arthur Henton Goyne, son of James Eldridge Goyne and Alice
Ida “Allie” Jones Goyne, was born in Bosque County October
14 1883. He was married about 1919 to Mamie Elizabeth
Philley who was born February 16, 1898 in Mississippi. They
were residents of Throckmorton County in 1920. Arthur
Henton Goyne was a railroad worker living at Leuders, Texas
in 1924 and 1927.

Arthur Henton Goyne gave a deed to property in Jones County,
Texas January 5, 1940, according to Jones County Deed Book
244, page 192. Arthur Henton Goyne and Mamie Elizabeth
Philley Goyne received a warranty deed August 11, 1951 to a
lot in Leuders, according to Jones County Deed Book 377,
page 436. Mamie Elizabeth Philley Goyne died March 8, 1956
of pneumonia while a patient at Stamford Hospital in
Stamford, Texas. She was buried in Leuders Cemetery.

Arthur Henton Goyne was remarried to Mrs. Katie Clara Reed
Box in 1957 in Collin County, Texas, according to Collin
County, Marriage Book 27, page 497. She was a daughter of
Hirman Reed and Maxine Greer Reed and was born in Texas
August 4, 1881.

Arthur Henton Goyne died February 2, 1965 at age 81 leaving
Katie Clara Reed Box Goyne, age 83, a widow. He wrote his
will June 17, 1964 and named H. G. Andrews, Jr. his ex-
ecutor, according to Jones County Probate Book 52, page 433
and 439.

Katie Clara Reed Box Goyne died of uremia April 28, 1974 at
age 92, at Stamford, Texas where she had resided for 15
years, according to Jones County Death Book 12, page 123.
Her body was returned to Collin County where she was buried
in Stoney Point Cemetery.

Children born to Arthur Henton Goyne and Mamie Elizabeth
Philley Goyne include:

Robert James Goyne born May 22, 1920
Punny Arthur Goyne born November 18, 1924
Sydney Towers Goyne born March 23, 1927
Minnie Mary Goyne born January 6, 1933

Robert James Goyne, son of Arthur Henton Goyne and Mamie
Elizabeth Philley Goyne, was born May 22, 1920 in Throck-
morton County. He was married to Eula Jean O’Donnell April
29, 1944 in Dallas County, Texas, according to Dallas County
Marriage Book 83, page 268. Eula Jean O’Donnell Goyne was
born at Terrell, Texas in 1925.

In 1946 Robert James Goyne and Eula Jean O’Donnell Goyne
were living at Leuders, where he was employed as an
engineer. On November 14 Robert James Goyne purchased some
property in Leuders, according to Shackelford County Deed
Book 140, page 597. The deed was also recorded in Jones
County Deed Book 515, page 43. He sold the lots for $470
January 6, 1948, according to Shackelford County Deed Book
142, page 87.

Robert James Goyne was employed as a rock quarry worker in
1948 and continued to live in Leuders. Eula Jean O’Donnell
Goyne was a storekeeper. In 1951 Robert James Goyne, pow-
erman at a rock quarry, continued to live at Leuders.

On March 17, 1964 Robert James Goyne and Eula Jean O’Donnell
Goyne, residents of Okanogan County, Washington gave a
warranty deed to Alex Dee Spicer and Minnie Mary Goyne
Spicer, his sister to lots in Leuders, according to Jones
County Deed Book 537, page 383. In February 1965 they lived
at Brewster, Washington.

Children born to Robert James Goyne and Eula Jean O’Donnell
Goyne include:

Jim Bob Goyne born December 31, 1946
Sydney Clyde Goyne born May 16, 1948
Dennis Wayne Goyne born July 22, 1951

Jim Bob Goyne, son of Robert James Goyne and Eula Jean
O’Donnell Goyne, was born December 31, 1946 at Leuders. Of
this individual nothing more is known.

Sydney Clyde Goyne, son of Robert James Goyne and Eula Jean
O’Donnell Goyne, was born May 16, 1948 at Leuders. Of this
individual nothing more is known.

Dennis Wayne Goyne, son of Robert James Goyne and Eula Jean
O’Donnell Goyne, was born July 22, 1951 at Stamford. Of
this individual nothing more is known.

Punny Arthur Goyne, son of Arthur Henton Goyne and Mamie
Elizabeth Philley Goyne, was born November 18, 1924, ac-
cording to Jones County Birth Book 10, page 449. Punny
Arthur Goyne in 1965 lived in Belfield, North Dakota.

Sydney Towers Goyne, son of Arthur Henton Goyne and Mamie
Elizabeth Philley Goyne, was born March 23, 1927, according
to Jones County Birth Book 10, page 448. He enlisted in the
U. S. Navy November 9, 1944 at Dallas. He was discharged
January 20, 1945 as an apprentice seaman, according to
Shackelford County Discharge Book 2, page 78. In 1965 Syd-
ney Towers Goyne, a single man at age 37, lived at Billings,
Montana where he was employed at East Parkway Truck Ter-
minal.

Minnie Mary Goyne, daughter of Arthur Henton Goyne and Mamie
Elizabeth Philley Goyne, was born January 6, 1933 at Ft.
Worth, according to City of Ft. Worth Birth Book O-46, page
313. On August 14, 1953 she was married to Alex Dee Spicer
at Abilene, Texas, according to Taylor County, Texas
Marriage Book 26, page 572.

On March 17, 1964 Alex Dee Spicer and Minnie Mary Goyne
Spincer “of Jones County, Texas” purchased from her brother,
Robert James Goyne some lots in Leuders, according to Jones
County Deed Book 537, page 383. On February 2, 1965 they
lived at 6919 Biscayne Drive, San Antonio, according to
Jones County Probate Book 52, page 433 and 439.

Oscar Britton Goyne, son of James Eldridge Goyne and Alice
Ida “Allie” Jones Goyne, was born in Bosque County April 21,
1885. On August 28, 1910 he was married to Lona Mae Pearcy,
according to Bosque County Marriage Book I, page 48. Lona
Mae Pearcy was born in Bosque County in 1889.

In 1922 Oscar Britton Goyne was a railroad laborer living in
Shackelford County. Lona Mae Pearcy Goyne died in Tarrant
County, May 8, 1927, according to BVS records.

On June 4 1957 he lived on Route 4, Houston, Texas. He died
April 19, 1964 and was buried in Lockhart City Cemetery, in
Lockhart, Texas. Beside him was buried Alice Pearl Goyne,
“October 26, 1903–April 9, 1958.” Alice Pearl Goyne died
April 9, 1958 in Harris County, Texas, according to BVS File
21960.

Children born to Oscar Britton Goyne and Leona Mae Pearcy
Goyne include:

[infant] born May 26, 1912
Anna Etoyle Goyne born July 30, 1922

An infant was born to Oscar Britton Goyne and Lona Pearcy
Goyne May 26, 1912 in Bosque County, according to BVS File
15538.

Anna Etoyle Goyne, daughter of Oscar Britton Goyne and Lona
Mae Pearcy Goyne, was born July 30, 1922 at Albany, Texas,
according to Shackelford County Birth Book 3-A, page 16.

Lillie Pearl Goyne, daughter of James Eldridge Goyne and
Alice Ida “Allie” Jones Goyne, was born January 1, 1887,
probably in Bosque County. She was enumerated as a 13-year-
old in her father’s household in the 1900 census of
Throckmorton County. Of this individual nothing more is
known.

James Lee Goyne, son of James Eldridge Goyne and Alice Ida
“Allie” Jones Goyne, was born in Bosque County December 21,
1889. He was married about 1911 to Bessie Jones, who was
born in Jones County in 1894. They lived on a farm in
Throckmorton County from 1912 until 1920.

In 1950 they lived in Comanche County. James Lee Goyne and
Bessie Jones Goyne sold property March 23, 1950 for $3,150,
according to Comanche County Deed Book 256, page 230. James
Lee Goyne died October 27, 1958.

Children born to James Lee Goyne and Bessie Jones Goyne in-
clude:

Edna Lessie Goyne born July 10, 1912
Archie Lee Goyne born April 27, 1916
Thelma Adelle Goyne born May 24, 1920

Edna Lessie Goyne, daughter of James Lee Goyne and Bessie
Jones Goyne, was born July 10, 1912 in Throckmorton County.
She was married to G. G. Tallent December 17, 1930,
according to Throckmorton County Marriage Book 2, page 317.

Archie Lee Goyne, son of James Lee Goyne and Bessie Jones
Goyne, was born April 27, 1916, according to Throckmorton
County birth records.

Thelma Adelle Goyne, daughter of James Lee Goyne and Bessie
Jones Goyne, was born May 24, 1920, according to
Throckmorton County Birth Book 6, page 6.

Ethel Grace Goyne, daughter of James Eldridge Goyne and
Alice Ida “Allie” Jones Goyne, was born August 6, 1891,
probably in Bosque County. She appeared as an 8-year-old in
the household of her father in the 1900 census of
Throckmorton County.

Henry Ozro Goyne, son of James Eldridge Goyne and Alice Ida
“Allie” Jones, was born June 11, 1893, probably in Bosque
County. Henry Ozro Goyne “of Throckmorton County”, received
a warranty deed from Firl Irwin March 26, 1914 to a lot in
Greenwade City, Texas, according to Upton County, Texas Deed
Book 12, page 600. On April 2, 1914 he received a general
warranty deed from N. H. Brown to another lot in Greenwade
City, according to Upton County Deed Book 12, page 599. He
paid $50 for each lot in the town, which never developed as
far as can be determined.

Henry Ozro Goyne was married to Maude Mae Willson in 1917,
according to Tarrant County Marriage Book 35, page 377. In
1923 they lived in Everman, Texas. In February 1929 they
were living in Throckmorton County. In 1931 they lived in
Ft. Worth, Texas.

On August 14, 1934 Henry Ozro Goyne and Maude Mae Wilson
Goyne sold some lots in Ft. Worth, according to Tarrant
County Deed Book 1233, page 101. They gave a warranty deed
December 3, 1938 to land in Tarrant County, according to
Tarrant County Deed Book 1373, page 317. They received a
warranty deed to a residence in Belmont Addition September
23, 1942, according to Tarrant County Deed Book 1537, page
43.

Henry Ozro Goyne and Maude Mae Wilson Goyne received a
warranty deed from Ada Marie Thompson Gowin, “formerly Ada
Marie Gowin Gilliam” to a lot in Byers & McCart Addition May
16, 1944, according to Tarrant County Deed Book 1641, page
112.

Henry Ozro Goyne and Maude Mae Wilson Goyne sold the lot in
Belmont Addition November 8, 1944, according to Tarrant
County Deed Book 1673, page 441.

Henry Ozro Goyne and Maude Mae Wilson Goyne traded the
property they received from Ada Marie Thompson Gowin, ac-
cording to Tarrant County Deed Book 2032, page 13 and Deed
Book 2033, page 97.

Henry Ozro Goyne and Maude Mae Wilson Goyne were listed in
the city directory of Ft. Worth for the first time in 1946,
living at 3245 Townsend Drive. He was shown as a
transferman for Railway Express Agency, a job he retained
until he retired in 1963, at the age of 70. The listing
remained the same in 1947 and 1948. In 1949 Henry Ozro
Goyne, a mechanic for Consolidated Vultee Aircraft
Corporation, and “Bertha Goyne” lived at 4906 Diaz Avenue.
In 1950 he was again listed at 3245 Townsend Drive.

Henry Ozro Goyne and Maude Mae Wilson Goyne were listed in
every subsequent edition of the Ft. Worth directory through
1973 living at 4906 Diaz Avenue. He died June 14, 1977.

Children born to Henry Ozro Goyne and Maude Mae Wilson Goyne
include:

John C. Goyne born October 21, 1923
Leonard O. Goyne born about 1924
Willard E. Goyne born about 1926
Mary Jo Goyne born February 7, 1929
Ida Nell Goyne born December 7, 1931

John C. Goyne, son of Henry Ozro Goyne and Maude Mae Wilson
Goyne, was born October 21, 1923 at Everman. On June 5,
1940 he enlisted in the U. S. Army at Fort Worth and served
as a truck driver in the 1949th Service Command Unit. When
he was discharged as a private November 28, 1945 he showed
his address as 3245 Townsend Drive, the address of his
parents.

He was married to Virginia Long in 1941, according to Tar-
rant County Marriage Book 82, page 389. John C. Goyne, a
driver, lived at 3245 Townsend Drive in 1946, according to
the Ft. Worth city directory.

On June 6, 1946 John C. Goyne was married to Mrs. Norene E.
Rhoads, according to Parker County, Texas Marriage Book 23,
page 454. In the 1947 city directory of Ft. Worth John C.
Goyne was listed as an employee of Century Homes. He and
Norene E. Rhoads Goyne lived in Rosemont Village.

Mrs. Virginia Long Goyne lived at 736 Clinton Avenue, Abi-
lene, Texas in 1944, according to the Abilene city direc-
tory. She was married to H. J. Allen May 25, 1949,
according to Parker County Marriage Book 27, page 33.

In 1948 John C. Goyne and Norene E. Rhoads Goyne continued
to live at 3245 Townsend Drive. He was employed as a
driver, according to the city directory. In 1949 and 1950
John C. Goyne was listed as a student, and Norene E. Rhoads
Goyne was listed as a cafe worker at Montgomery-Wards. They
lived at 334 North Henderson in 1949 and at 203 North
Sylvania in 1950.

In 1951 “Reverend” John C. Goyne was employed as an as-
sembler at Consolidated Vultee Aircraft Corporation and
lived at 531 Fairview. Apparently John C. Goyne and Norene
E. Rhoads Goyne were divorced about 1952. On April 1, 1954
John C. Goyne was married to Dora Frances Allen, according
to Tarrant County Marriage Book 113, page 2.

Mrs. Norene E. Rhoads Goyne was remarried to Glen V. Gary
May 22, 1954, according to Tarrant County Marriage Book 113,
page 168.

In 1955 and 1956 John C. Goyne was listed as an business op-
erator of “Ft. W. T. Co.”. He and Dora Frances Allen Goyne
lived at 1109 College Avenue in 1955 and at 1600 Lagonda in
1956.

In 1958 John C. Goyne was listed as a salesman for Charlie
Hillard Ford, Inc. He and Dora Frances Allen Goyne lived at
1210 Clinton. In 1959 he was employed as a salesman by
Thurman Smith Motor Company. He and Dora Frances Allen
Goyne lived at 2608 May.

In 1961 John C. Goyne appeared as a salesman for McDavid
Pontiac living at 4210 Deering Drive, an address he main-
tained through 1965. From 1962 through 1965 he was a
salesman for Ryno Motor Company. He was listed as an auto
salesman from 1969 through 1972 living at 620 Perkins
Avenue. He was listed in the 1973 city directory of Ft.
Worth as the manager of Trinity Motors, Arlington, Texas.
He continued to live at 620 South Perkins.

Leonard O. Goyne, son of Henry Ozro Goyne and Maude Mae
Wilson Goyne, was born about 1924, probably in Everman.
Apparently he enlisted in the U. S. Army about the time of
the beginning of World War II. He “died on a Japanese
prison ship which was bombed by an American ship off the
western shore of Mindanao,” according to Tarrant County
Probate Book 16, page 257 and Book 17, page 397. His
parents were appointed administrators of his estate which
was valued at $2,668.55. He did not marry.

Willard E. Goyne, son of Henry Ozro Goyne and Maude Mae
Wilson Goyne, was born about 1926, probably at Everman. He
was married to Imogene Thorton in January 1941, according to
Tarrant County Marriage Book 82, page 362. In 1946 Willard
E. Goyne and Imogene Thornton Goyne lived at 3245 Townsend
Drive, rear, Ft. Worth, the address of his parents.

In 1948 Willard E. Goyne, a driver, continued to live at
3245 Townsend Drive, rear. In 1949, 1950 and 1951 he was
listed in the U.S. Army with residence at 309 North Cherry,
according to the Ft. Worth city directory. Nothing more is
known of Willard E. Goyne.

On December 29, 1951 Mrs. Imogene Thornton Goyne was married
to Steve Walter Whitsett, Jr., according to Parker County
Marriage Book 28, page 467. Apparently this second marriage
did not work out. By 1955 she had resumed her previous
name.

Imogene Thornton Goyne was listed as a bookkeeper for
Schooler Automotive Electric at Burleson, Texas, according
to the 1955 city directory of Ft. Worth. In 1957 she lived
on Route 2, Burleson and was employed by Family Security In-
surance Company. She continued with the insurance company
in 1958 and lived at 911 West Petersmith. She lived at the
same address in 1959, but was a clerk employed at Gause-Ware
Company.

In the 1961 and 1962 she was listed in the city directory as
a supervisor at Family Security Insurance Company. She
lived at 3912 Sydney in 1961 and at 3418 Bideker in 1962.
In 1963 she was an auditor at Sears and lived at 4620
Crenshaw Avenue. On March 14, 1966 Imogene Thornton Goyne,
“a femme sole of Tarrant County” received a warranty deed
from Agee Construction Company to a residence in Burton
Acres Addition, according to Tarrant County Deed Book 4189,
page 33. She was listed as a payroll clerk for Sears in the
1967 city directory of Ft. Worth living at 4104 Comanche
Street.

Imogene Thornton Goyne was married to Weldon Ross Harbison
January 26, 1967, according to Tarrant County Marriage Book
142, page 38.

Children born to Willard E. Goyne and Imogene Thornton Goyne
include:

Durwood Eugene Goyne born July 24, 1944

Durwood Eugene Goyne, son of Willard E. Goyne and Imogene
Thornton Goyne, was born in Tarrant County, July 24, 1944,
according to BVS File 84367. He was an inventory employee
at Leonard’s in 1960. He and Imogene Thornton Goyne lived
at 911 West Petersmith, according to the 1960 city directory
of Ft. Worth. In 1965 he was employed as an electrician at
Lewis Electric Service and lived at 3809 Byers with Juanita
Goyne.

Durwood Eugene Goyne was married to Mrs. Janet Joann Younger
September 27, 1971, according to Young County, Texas
Marriage Book J, page 349. Apparently they were divorced
shortly afterwards. Mrs. Janet Joann Younger Goyne was
remarried to Victor Sully Lovern July 27, 1972, according to
Young County Marriage Book J, page 392.

Mary Jo Goyne, daughter of Henry Ozro Goyne and Maude Mae
Wilson Goyne, was born February 7, 1929 in Throckmorton
County, according to the Throckmorton County Birth Book
7, page 105. She was married to Billy Ray Young in Decem-
ber 1943, according to Tarrant County Marriage Book 88,
page 411.

Ida Nell Goyne, daughter of Henry Ozro Goyne and Maude Mae
Wilson Goyne, was born in Tarrant County, December 7, 1931,
according to Ft. Worth City Birth Book 0-45, page 152. Of
this individual nothing more is known.

Mary Frances Goyne, daughter of James Eldridge Goyne and
Alice Ida “Allie” Jones Goyne, was born November 26, 1895,
probably in Bosque County. She appeared as a four-year-old
in the 1900 census of Throckmorton County, living in her
father’s household.

Bertha Ina Goyne, daughter of James Eldridge Goyne and Alice
Ida “Allie” Jones Goyne, was born March 20, 1898, according
to Throckmorton County Birth Book 4, page 162. She appeared
in the 1900 census of Throckmorton County as a three-year-
old living in her father’s household.

Essie Belle Goyne, daughter of James Eldridge Goyne and Al-
ice Ida “Allie” Jones Goyne, was born May 22, 1900 in
Throckmorton County, according to BVS File 342166. She
appeared in her father’s household in the 1900 census of
Throckmorton County as “age 0”.

Birdie Alice Goyne, daughter of James Eldridge Goyne and
Alice Ida “Allie” Jones Goyne, was born December 29, 1903.

Ruby Fay Goyne, daughter of James Eldridge Goyne and Alice
Ida “Allie” Jones Goyne, was born March 7, 1907.

___________________________________________________________

NOTE:  The above information produced by the Gowen Research Foundation (GRF), and parts of the “Gowen Manuscript” they worked on producing.  It has tons of information – much of it is correct, but be careful, some of it is not correct – so check their sources and logic.  I’ve copied some of their information in the past researching my own family, only to find out there were some clear mistakes.   So be sure to check the information to verify if it is right before citing the source and believing the person who researched it before was 100% correct.  Most of the information I found there seems to be correct, but some is not.

Their website is:  Internet: http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.com/~gowenrf

There does not seem to be anyone “manning the ship” at the Gowen Research Foundation, or Gowen Manuscript site any longer, and there is no way to contact anyone about any errors.   The pages themselves don’t have a mechanism to leave a note for others to see any “new information” that you may have that shows when you find info that shows something is wrong, or when something has been verified.

Feel free to leave messages about any new information found, or errors in these pages, or information that has been verified that those who wrote these pages may not have known about.

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