1997 – 09 Sept Newsletter – GRF

Sections in this issue:

1) William Going Survived Bloodiest Battles of American Revolution;
2) William Goyne, Early Patriarch Pioneered in Georgia in 1790 (300 yrs Goings) Part 4;
3) Dear Cousins;
4) William Going – Continued.

All Gowen Manuscript Pages and Newsletters:   https://goyengoinggowengoyneandgone.com/gowen-research-foundation-pages-and-info/

GOWEN RESEARCH FOUNDATION NEWSLETTER
Volume 9, No. 1 September 1997

1)  William Going Survived Bloodiest Battles of American Revolution

By Austin Dakota Holt
9516 Timberlake, #211, Lynchburg, Virginia, 24592

Nineteen-year-old William Going and his First Virginia Regiment of the Continental Line got off to a bad start when they began taking on the British Redcoats in the Revolutionary War. In his first encounter, the bloody Battle of Guilford Courthouse, the fighting raged all day, back and forth, in the cornfields north of present-day Greensboro, North Carolina.

The two armies, the Americans under Gen. Nathanael Greene and the British under Gen. Charles Lord Cornwallis, fought to a standstill on March 15, 1781, and casualties were heavy on each side. Each had to withdraw, leaving their dead and wounded on the field. New Garden Monthly Meeting, a Quaker church stood just west of the battlefield, and as soon as the firing ceased, the church building became a hospital. Churchmembers went to the scene of the carnage and brought the wounded, both British and American, to the church and began to bind up their wounds.

A month later, Gen. Greene had his reduced army of only 840 men facing Lord Rawdon in the Second Battle of Camden, South Carolina. Rawdon made a surprise attack on Greene April 19, 1781, inflicting 271 casualties and driving him from the field. The persistent Greene summed up the situation, “We fight, get beaten and fight again!”

William Going survived both of the disastrous battles as well as the subsequent campaign in South Carolina. Following the end of the war at Yorktown, he was discharged in South Carolina and walked back home to Henry County, Virginia.

William Going, a Melungeon/mulatto, was born September 13, 1761 in Rockingham County, Virginia. He stated that his date of birth was recorded in his family bible which was given to him by his father, name unknown. When he was very young, his family removed to Henry County, according to his Revolutionary pension application. He enlisted there under Capt. Shaw in the Virginia Continental Line.

He stated that he fought in the Battle of Guilford Courthouse and in the Second Battle of Camden. He marched to Salisbury, North Carolina, and continued southward, crossing the Dan River, the Yadkin River, the Catawba River, the Broad River, the Tyger River, the Enoree River and the Saluda River. His regiment joined the troops of Gen. Greene in the Siege of Ninety-six. He stated that he saw “Col. Washington and Col. Lee.” He was discharged near Broad River. He stated that he “served with Manuel Hill of Stokes County, North Carolina and Joel Blankit of Patrick County.” For his military service he received Bounty Land Warrant No. 26870-160-55.

When Patrick County was organized from Henry County in 1790, the Going land lay in the new county, according to “Genealogical Abstracts of Revolutionary War Pension Files” by Virgil D. White. He was married to Mary “Polly” Overman February 17, 1802 by John Nunn, M. G, according to Patrick County Marriages, 1791-1850.” Thomas Beasley was surety. Benjamin Hails was a witness. The bride was born about 1775.

William Going appeared in the tax records of Patrick County from 1798 through 1817. In 1814, he appeared as a taxpayer there, but a notation on the tax roll showed his residence “in North Carolina on Little Dan River.” It appears that he disposed of his Virginia land about 1817.

William Going and William Going, Jr. were listed as heads of households in the 1810 tax list of Patrick County as reproduced in “A Supplement to the 1810 Census of Virginia.” The two are not regarded as father-and-son. The enumerator probably appended “Jr.” to designate the younger of the two.

In 1824, William Going removed to adjoining Surry County, North Carolina. William Going received a land grant in Surry County in February 1834. On February 12, 1834, while continuing there he applied for a Revolutionary pension at age 74, which was granted.

William Going was enumerated as the head of Household No. 275 in the 1840 census of Surry County:

“Going, William free colored male 55-100
free colored female 55-100”

The enumerator noted on the census form that he was “78 and drawing a pension for Revolutionary War military service.”

Surrounding this household were those of their children: William Going, No. 273; Morgum Going, No. 274; Woodson Going, No. 276 and George Going, No. 290.”

It is believed that William Going died about 1842 in Surry County. After his death, Mary “Polly” Overman Going returned to Patrick County. She was enumerated there in the 1850 census as the head of Household 660-699:

“Going, Mary 75, born in Virginia
Catherine 35, born in Virginia”

On May 23, 1853, she applied there for a pension at age 78. Mary “Polly” Overman Going received a widow’s pension, No. W7546, March 30, 1855, at age 80 while living in Patrick County.

A notation by Virgil D. White reveals that “there were some family records on a sheet which was too dark to read on this film, see National Archives Series M804, Roll No. 1087 for entire file.”

Children born to William Going and Mary “Polly” Overman Going include:

William Going, Jr. born about 1802
Woodson Going born November 2, 1803
Morgan Going born July 17, 1805
Ruckerson Going born about 1808
George W. Going born about 1810
Catherine Going born about 1815

 

 

2)  William Goyne, Early Patriarch Pioneered in Georgia in 1790 (300 yrs Goings) Part 4

By Col. Carroll Heard Goyne, Jr.
Foundation Editorial Boardmember
10019 Canterbury Drive, Shreveport, Louisiana, 71106

William4 Goyne first appeared in the tax records of Wilkes County, Georgia in 1790, according to the research of Frank Parker Hudson, Atlanta, Georgia.

William4 Goyne was married to Nancy Stroder, daughter of Alexander Stroder and Isabella Stroder, between 1794 and 1796 in Wilkes County. She was his second wife. Isabella Stroder’s will of October 6, 1793 names the Stroder children. Two of the named sons were married in Lincoln County, North Carolina. William4 Goyne lived on Ward’s Creek near First Broad River in eastern Rutherford County [now Cleveland County], which was bounded by Lincoln County to the east. Thus, the conclusion is drawn that William4 Goyne of Wilkes County, Georgia was the same William4 Gowen who previously lived in Rutherford County, North Carolina, and that he knew his second wife’s family in North Carolina prior to their move to Georgia.

William4 Goyne made his will January 4, 1816, and it was probated September 1, 1817 in Warren County, Georgia. He named the following children in his will:

John5 Goyne who was married to Nancy and moved to Jefferson County, Alabama, dying there in 1839.
Drury5 Goyne who was last recorded in the 1820 Census of Wilkes County, Georgia. He may be the man who was married to Martha Worthington November 15, 1838 in Upson County, Georgia.
William5 Goyne, Jr. who was last recorded in the tax records of Wilkes County, Georgia in 1799.
Hardy5 Goyne who was last recorded in 1830-31 in Taliaferro County, Georgia.
Rebecca5 Goyne who was married about 1790, husband’s name Dick.
Alice5 Goyne who was married about 1793 to King as his second wife.
Hiram Davis5 Goyne who was married [1] Mary “Polly” Allen; and [2] Susan Lupo. They removed to Union Parish, Louisiana where he died in 1852.
Tyra A.5 Goyne who was married to Mary and moved to Coffee County, Alabama where he died in 1883.

While moving from Georgia to Louisiana, my great-great-grandfather, Hiram Davis5 Goyne must have visited with members of the family of James4 Goyne, [son of John3 Going] in Kemper County, Mississippi. For Hiram Davis5 Goyne obtained a Military Warrant issued to Amos D.5 Goyne and used it to purchase land in Union Parish, Louisiana. Amos D.5 Goyne, regarded as a son of James4 Goyne, served in the 12th and 13th Consolidated Regiment, Louisiana militia in the War of 1812. This is additional evidence of kinship among these individuals, and proof that these cousins maintained contact with one another.

Hopefully, this paper will contribute in some small measure to a better understanding of this branch of the extended Going family. However one might spell the name [and there are over 50 different spellings in the records], we are all “cousins” who share a common name that has its origins in deep antiquity.

3)  Dear Cousins

I am searching for the parents of Cornelia Ellenor Goins, born November 5, [or November 18], 1859 near Middlesboro, KY. In either 1874 or 1880, she was married to Greenberry Burton of Madison County, KY. The 1900 census of McLean Co, IL lists her as being born in KY and both parents born in TN. According to family lore, she is the daughter of Frank and Nancy [Cadle] Goins of Claiborne Co., TN. Siblings of Cornelia include: Amelia “Mel”, Laura, James, Nellie and Charles Goins. Cornelia died October 4, 1934 in Chicago, IL. Any information about these persons, especially Cornelia’s parents, would be greatly appreciated. Terry B. Hildreth, 2805 Wellington Dr., Florissant, MO, 63033, Adwtman@aol.com

==Dear Cousins==

I am mailing a check for two Contributing Memberships, one for myself and the other for Ken & Rose Going, my uncle and aunt, who are celebrating their 50th anniversary. They were married August 30, 1947 in Durham, CT. Ken was the ninth of ten siblings in the family of Millard Going and Anna Knapp Going. My mother, Laura Going Miller was the second oldest. There are only three of them left now: Ken, Ruth Going Lewis of Sun City, AZ and Flora Going Orsina of Myrtle Beach, SC. Ruth and Joe Lewis will celebrate their 60th anniversary next month.

Thanks again for maintaining a great service to the family. After I edit a few things I learned at the anniversary party, I will forward that section for the Foundation Manuscript, as promised. Martha Miller Byrnes, 14 Leopard Dr, Sandy Hook, CT, 06482-1531, HomeByrnes@aol.com.

==Dear Cousins==

I am gathering all the information available in the Albemarle, Amherst and Nelson County, VA courthouse records on the early Goens/Goins/Going/Gowen/etc. After I have compiled it, I will compare it with the online Foundation records and send to you all of this data that you do not have already.

It is easy to round up information when you live in the location where it can be found, and it is so hard when you have to drive hundreds of miles to glean a few facts at a strange courthouse. I am sure that there are many other cousins who live where the “family” resided before 1850. This could be a special project for 1998 with many participants. Rosemary Dunne, Box 687, Amherst, VA, 24521, rosemars@juno.com. Thanks for an excellent idea, Rosemary. Research, anyone?

==Dear Cousins==

The enclosed article, “There’s no such thing as a ‘Melungeon'” by Winston De Ville recently appeared in the “Acadiana Profile,” Vol. 18, No. 1. I live within 10 miles of Mr. DeVille who is a distant relative of my wife. Most of his writings on Louisiana and its people are usually great, however this column will draw fire. I thought you would like to see this, if you haven’t already received it from some other “cousin.” Bill Nash, Box 70, Turkey Creek, LA, 70587 Thanks, Bill. We regard Winston De Ville as the dean of southern genealogical columnists and a very respected author. Perhaps a scholar of equal erudition will prepare a rejoinder.

==Dear Cousins==

4)  William Going – Continued

In 1824, William Going removed to adjoining Surry County, North Carolina. William Going received a land grant in Surry County in February 1834. On February 12, 1834, while continuing there he applied for a Revolutionary pension at age 74, which was granted.

William Going was enumerated as the head of Household No. 275 in the 1840 census of Surry County:

“Going, William free colored male 55-100
free colored female 55-100”

The enumerator noted on the census form that he was “78 and drawing a pension for Revolutionary War military service.”

Surrounding this household were those of their children: William Going, No. 273; Morgum Going, No. 274; Woodson Going, No. 276 and George Going, No. 290.”

It is believed that William Going died about 1842 in Surry County. After his death, Mary “Polly” Overman Going returned to Patrick County. She was enumerated there in the 1850 census as the head of Household 660-699:

“Going, Mary 75, born in Virginia
Catherine 35, born in Virginia”

On May 23, 1853, she applied there for a pension at age 78. Mary “Polly” Overman Going received a widow’s pension, No. W7546, March 30, 1855, at age 80 while living in Patrick County.

A notation by Virgil D. White reveals that “there were some family records on a sheet which was too dark to read on this film, see National Archives Series M804, Roll No. 1087 for entire file.”

Children born to William Going and Mary “Polly” Overman Going include:

William Going, Jr. born about 1802
Woodson Going born November 2, 1803
Morgan Going born July 17, 1805
Ruckerson Going born about 1808
George W. Going born about 1810
Catherine Going born about 1815

It is easy to round up information when you live in the location where it can be found, and it is so hard when you have to drive hundreds of miles to glean a few facts at a strange courthouse. I am sure that there are many other cousins who live where the “family” resided before 1850. This could be a special project for 1998 with many participants. Rosemary Dunne, Box 687, Amherst, VA, 24521, rosemars@juno.com. Thanks for an excellent idea, Rosemary. Research, anyone?

==Dear Cousins==

The enclosed article, “There’s no such thing as a ‘Melungeon'” by Winston De Ville recently appeared in the “Acadiana Profile,” Vol. 18, No. 1. I live within 10 miles of Mr. DeVille who is a distant relative of my wife. Most of his writings on Louisiana and its people are usually great, however this column will draw fire. I thought you would like to see this, if you haven’t already received it from some other “cousin.” Bill Nash, Box 70, Turkey Creek, LA, 70587 Thanks, Bill. We regard Winston De Ville as the dean of southern genealogical columnists and a very respected author. Perhaps a scholar of equal erudition will prepare a rejoinder.

When Patrick County was organized from Henry County in 1790, the Going land lay in the new county, according to “Genealogical Abstracts of Revolutionary War Pension Files” by Virgil D. White. He was married to Mary “Polly” Overman February 17, 1802 by John Nunn, M. G, according to Patrick County Marriages, 1791-1850.” Thomas Beasley was surety. Benjamin Hails was a witness. The bride was born about 1775.

William Going appeared in the tax records of Patrick County from 1798 through 1817. In 1814, he appeared as a taxpayer there, but a notation on the tax roll showed his residence “in North Carolina on Little Dan River.” It appears that he disposed of his Virginia land about 1817.

William Going and William Going, Jr. were listed as heads of households in the 1810 tax list of Patrick County as reproduced in “A Supplement to the 1810 Census of Virginia.” The two are not regarded as father-and-son. The enumerator probably appended “Jr.” to designate the younger of the two.

(Continued on Page 2)

___________________________________________________________

NOTE:  The above information produced by the Gowen Research Foundation (GRF), and parts of the “Gowen Manuscript” they worked on producing.  It has tons of information – much of it is correct, but be careful, some of it is not correct – so check their sources and logic.  I’ve copied some of their information in the past researching my own family, only to find out there were some clear mistakes.   So be sure to check the information to verify if it is right before citing the source and believing the person who researched it before was 100% correct.  Most of the information I found there seems to be correct, but some is not.

Their website is:  Internet: http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.com/~gowenrf

There does not seem to be anyone “manning the ship” at the Gowen Research Foundation, or Gowen Manuscript site any longer, and there is no way to contact anyone about any errors.   The pages themselves don’t have a mechanism to leave a note for others to see any “new information” that you may have that shows when you find info that shows something is wrong, or when something has been verified.

Feel free to leave messages about any new information found, or errors in these pages, or information that has been verified that those who wrote these pages may not have known about.

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