1997 – 02 Feb Newsletter – GRF

Sections in this issue:

1) Evidence Links Redbones and Baton Rouge to Melungeons;
2) Elijah Gowin and Joseph Goings Pioneered in Hawkins County;
3) Dear Cousins;
4) Elijah Gowin and Joseph Goings Pioneered in Hawkins County;
5) Elijah Gowin and Joseph Goings, Continued

All Gowen Manuscript Pages and Newsletters:   https://goyengoinggowengoyneandgone.com/gowen-research-foundation-pages-and-info/

GOWEN RESEARCH FOUNDATION NEWSLETTER
Volume 8, No. 6 February 1997

1)  Evidence Links Redbones and Baton Rouge to Melungeons

By Evelyn McKinley Orr
Chairman, Melungeon Research Team
8310 Emmet, Omaha, Nebraska, 68134

The fraternity of Melungeon-origin researchers is growing daily.

They are, for the most part, interested in learning more about the isolated groups of people that were found living in America who did not share the physical appearance of the average European Anglo, Native American or Negro. Instead they seemed to carry a dominant gene of a dark-skinned fine-featured “mystery race,” [an early term commonly used to describe them] different, but similar, to some families or groups who indeed were likely some form of a mix of the above. Today many descendants could carry all four or some mixture of them.

It seemed logical for early ethnologists to lump them all as an Indian, white and Negro mix. After all, it was believed that there were no other nationalities living in America during these early years. Soon America would become a nation obsessed with separating the “dark skins” from the white. If peoples with early Mediterranean, Middle East, and Southern Europeans heritages did come to America, their heritages would be lost.

But, as Nancy Hopkins Kennedy, the mother of Dr. Brent Kennedy put it, “It is like trying to answer their cries from the grave.”

When the Foundation started collecting Melungeana, most of the written material received was about the Appalachian Melungeons. Similar mystery traits would surface in some other mixed blood groups and other races. Many of those writing about their nationalities felt they were not connected to any of the others. Yet, Melungeon family researchers are discovering they have ancestors among more than one of the mystery groups.

Since joining with Dr. Kennedy’s study, we have also learned that the term Melungeon may have originated with these early peoples, and was not given to just the Appalachian group as previously thought. Mixed-blood groups or individual families other than the Appalachian Melungeons would now also be part of the original Melungeon heritage. How this scenario could have happened is described more in detail in the book, “The  Melungeons, Resurrection of a Proud People,” by Dr. Kennedy.

One of the Melungeon type groups I recently wrote about are the Redbones of Louisiana. In the late 1800s and early 1900s, Charles James McDonald Furman, a neighbor of the Privateer Township, Sumter County, South Carolina Redbones, became intrigued with what he felt was their unusual heritage. He wrote several newspaper articles about them. He wrote, “The term ‘free Negro’ was given to them, but in reality they are a distinct race from the people who used to be known as ‘free Negro.'” He found them a “peculiar” mixed-blood race with no history of slavery.

Common surnames at that time in Sumter County were: Gibbes, Goins, Smiling, and Chavis. Other Redbones were living in central and eastern South Carolina counties. He, and other mixed-blood researchers documented that some Redbones from South Carolina moved to Calcasieu Parish, Louisiana many years earlier.

In general, the South Carolina group would remain a separate group from either the Sumter County Turks or their neighboring North Carolina Lumbees. Careful researchers will soon discover that they all shared the mystery features to some degree. Furman indicated that the Privateer Township Redbone families originated with Thomas Gibbes, a Revolutionary soldier.

The term Redbone would join the ranks of being a derogatory mixed-blood name. In 1975, Wesley White published a 113-page report on these same people and some of their descendants entitled, “The Smiling Indians of North Carolina.” These papers now repose in the Smithsonian Institution, National Anthropologist Archives, Center for Studies on Man, Box 92. Mr. White’s surname was changed to “Taukchiray,” Catawba for “White.”

The Turks of Sumter County also appeared prior to the Revolutionary War when a Turk named Benenhaley married a woman named Oxendine. Oxendine is a major Lumbee name. Additional surnames still associated with the Turks in the White papers are, Hood, Ray and Buckner and in the last century Chavis and Lowery. Lowery and Chavis are Lumbee Indian names, and Chavis was a common Redbone name. The surname Goins was found among both the Lumbee and Redbone.

The name Red Sticks which had never been considered part of the Melungeons has surfaced again. At least one of their group found their way into a Goins family of Sumter County.

Mary Browder Barr, Foundation member of Florence, South Carolina, in researching her Carolina Redbone Goins, discovered a letter Charles James McDonald Furman had written in 1903. It revealed that Laviny Tucker Goins told Furman that she was the daughter of Jeb Tucker, an Englishman, and Ocenee Hayo, a Red Stick woman from Baton Rouge, Louisiana. Jeb Tucker fought with the British and Red Sticks in the War of 1812 and was considered a traitor. In 1813, the Red Sticks and the Creeks were soundly defeated by the Tennessee volunteers in the Battle of Tallushatchee and the Battle of Talledega.

After the war, Tucker and his new wife removed to Sumter County, South Carolina, where Laviny was born. Laviny was described by Furman as “a small dark-skinned woman with
black hair, but with blue eyes; therefore she could pass as a white woman.”

After Laviny was married to Madry Goins, her mother felt free to go back to Baton Rouge to be with her people. It is this kind of intermixing that makes the tracing of nationalities of ancestors difficult. It shows how various groups, whose descendants assume no connection to each other, could be in error.

According to Kevin P. Scrantz, Lafayette, Louisiana researcher, Red Stick [Baton Rouge] was first recorded by the French. Red Stick and its application as a place name can be traced back to 1686, with the first recorded contact between Europeans and the Houma Indian tribe. In that year the French explorers LaSalle and Tonti descended the Mississippi and met the Houma at their ancestral homelands.

At a village located on the site of the present Louisiana state capital, the Houma had erected a cypress pole to mark the boundary with their neighbors to the south, the Bayougoulas In-dians. This pole was stained red by the blood of sacrificial animals, and the French called the Houma village and the later white settlement Baton Rouge.

Manuel Mira, an officer of the Portuguese-American Society and Foundation researcher of Franklin, North Carolina, discovered the term “Os Rouge” [Red Bone] was used to describe persons of mixed Indian blood. The new book, “The Forgotten Portuguese–the Melungeons and Others” written by Manuel Mira will be published this spring.

Also, the French apparently named a group of people living along the Cane River as the Cane River Mulattos. Previous researchers have credited the French with naming the Appalachian Melungeons from their word “melange” [mixture.] lt is possible that they did call them “melange,” but could it have been others later, who invented the connection. It appears logical that if they did call them a “melange,” they certainly found them also to be a people different from any they had encountered before.

The search for the origin of the Melungeons continues.

2)  Elijah Gowin and Joseph Goings Pioneered in Hawkins County

Part 2:

By Twanda E. Buckreis* and Johnnie Rhea**
*1256 Devonport, Lexington, Kentucky, 40504
**Route 2, Box 132, Sneedville, Tennessee, 37869

Elijah Gowin, regarded as a son of Joseph Goings and Millie Loving Goings, was born about 1797 in Virginia. He was married about 1813, wife’s name Sarah. Elijah Gowin, “white male, 40-50” [page 232] and “Joseph Gowin, white male 70-80” [page 234] appeared as heads of households in the 1840 census of Hawkins County, Tennessee.

Both were enumerated in the 1850 census of adjoining Hancock County, “in the 33rd subdivision, east side, along with “Alexandria Gowins,” and “John Goins,” sons of Elijah Gowin “Elijah Gowins” was a 53-year-old chairmaker, and “Joseph Goings” was an 84-year-old cooper.

The January issue dealt with Alexander Gowin and Ethel “Ethie” Collins Gowin. Children born to them include:

John Goins born about 1832
Alfred Goins born in November 1833

==O==

John Goins, son of Alexander Gowin and Ethel Collins Gowin, was born in Tennessee about 1832. He was enumerated as a 17-year old farmer in the 1850 census of Hancock County, Tennessee. He was married about 1855 to Synda Sexton who was born about 1839 to Solomon Sexton and Lucinda Maxey Sexton.

John Goins served in the First Tennessee Cavalry Regiment, U.S.A. during the Civil War. John Goins and Synda Sexton Goins were buried in Goins Cemetery on Newmans Ridge.

Children born to them include:

George William Goins born about 1857
John Goins born about 1867
Howard Goins born about 1869

Alfred Goins, son of Alexander Gowin and Ethel Collins Gowin, was born in Tennessee in November 1833, according to the research of Robert Goins, a descendant of Kentucky. He was enumerated as “Alfred Gowin,” a 15-year-old farmer in 1850.

Alfred Goins was married about 1860 to Hannah Gibson, born about 1840 to Yearby Gibson and Elizabeth “Betty” Gibson, according to William P. Grohse, Hancock County, historian. Yearby Gibson was a son of Jonathan Gibson who was born in Virginia May 17, 1759, according to Willard G. Peil IV, a descendant. The Yearby Gibsons had other children named Sally Gibson, Thomas Gibson, Debba Gibson and John Gibson.

Alfred Goins was enlisted December 8, 1862, along with “John Goins and R. J. Goins” in the First Tennessee Cavalry Regiment, Company M and served until 1865, according to his pension record.

“Pvt. Alfred Goen” appeared on the muster roll of Company C, Forty-third Tennessee Infantry Regiment, CSA during the Civil War. Also serving in this regiment were Pvt. Anderson Goen, Pvt. Charles Goen, Pvt. Dodson Goen, Pvt. John Goen and Pvt.
William A. Goins. Alfred Goins “switched sides” during the war, perhaps after being captured.

Pvt. Alfred Goins appeared on the muster roll of Company M, First Tennessee Cavalry Regiment, USA during the Civil War. Also enlisted in this regiment were “Pvt. Claiborne Goins, Pvt. John Goins, Pvt. R. J. Goins, Pvt. William Goins, Pvt. Zachariah Goins, Pvt. Alfred Gowen and Sgt. Burton M. Goins.” Burton McGinnis Goins, a ninth-generation descendant of Mihil Gowen, was the son of George Goins and Emily “Lively” Bunch Goins.

Hannah Gibson Goins died January 10, 1879 in Hancock County, according to Patricia Ann Goins Rice, a descendant of Shepherdsville, Kentucky.. He was remarried about 1880 to Mrs. Malvina “Viana” Johnson. They lived on Newmans Ridge.

They were enumerated in the 1880 census of Hancock County as:

“Goins, Alfred 42
Malvina 27
Thomas 18
Johnson, Landon 5, step-son”

Alfred Goins received land from “John Mullins et ux Mahala Mullins” July 30, 1889, according to Hancock County Deed Book 5, page 541. Simeon Collins and James H. Goins, uniden-tified, were witnesses. Alfred Goins was reported to be suffering from a disability of “chronic diarrhea and lung trouble” in the 1890 Civil War veterans census.

Alfred Goins was recorded as the head of a household in the 1900 census of Hancock County, Enumeration District 73, page 2, 11th Civil District:

“Goins, Alfred 66, born in TN, Nov. 1833
Viney 47, born in TN, April 1853
Elizabeth 17, born in TN, Nov. 1882
Garfield 12, born in TN, May 1888
Lombard 9, born in TN, March 1891
Lydia M. 7, born in TN, April 1893
Samueal [Simeon] 3, born in TN, Mar. 1897”

Alfred Goins died September 4, 1907, “an old, old man,” [69], according to Rev. Arthur Hamilton Taylor, an early Hancock County historian. Alfred Goins was buried in Goins Cemetery on Newmans Ridge. Malvina “Viana” Johnson Goins continued to live in 1933 when she was interviewed by the Rev. Taylor.

Children born to Alfred Goins and Hannah Gibson Goins include:

Buchanan Goins born about 1857
Julia Ann Goins born about 1858
Thomas Goins born March 8, 1862

Children born to Alfred Goins and Malvina “Viana” Johnson Goins include:

Elizabeth Goins born November 25, 1882
James Abram Garfield Goins born May 22, 1888
Lambert Goins born March 12, 1891
Lydia M. Goins born April 4, 1893
Symeon [Samuel?] Goins born March 6, 1897

John “Hammer John” Goins, regarded as the son of Elijah Gowin and Sarah Gowin, was born about 1816 in Virginia. He accompanied his parents in a move to Claiborne County, Tennessee

He was married about 1838 to Catherine Williams. According to Rev. Taylor, “Hammer John belonged to the older race of Goins who were fair-skinned. He was of medium size, red complexioned and lived on Newmans Ridge.”

“John Gowins” was listed as the head of a household enumerated December 4, 1850 in Hancock County, 33rd subdivision, east part, as Household 383-106. The family consisted of:

They appeared in the 1850 census of Hancock County, House-hold 383-106:

“Gowins, John 34, born in VA, hammerman, illiterate
Catherine 28, born in Virginia, illiterate
William 11, born in TN, attending school
Jane 9, born in TN
Wilson 7, born in TN
Catherine 3, born in TN
Alexandria 1, born in TN, male”

They reappeared in the 1880 census of Hancock County in the 11th District:

“Goins, John 59, born in Virginia
Catherine 49,
Lawson, George 35, son-in-law
Jane 39, daughter”
Mary 12, twin granddaughter
John 12, twin grandson”

It is believed that John “Hammer John” Goins died during the 1890s and was buried in Goins Cemetery on Newmans Ridge.

Children born to John “Hammer John” Goins and Catherine Williams Goins include:

William Goins born about 1839
Jane Goins born about 1842
Catherine Goins born about 1847
Alexander Goins born about 1849
Candace Goins born about 1851
Elizabeth “Betty” Goins born about 1852
Caroline Goins born in 1857
Margaret Goins born about 1859
John Goins born in 1868

William Goins, son of John “Hammer John” Goins and Catherine Williams Goins, was born about 1839 in Hancock County. He appeared in the 1850 census as an 11-year-old.

Jane Goins, daughter of John “Hammer John” Goins and Catherine Williams Goins, was born about 1842 in Hancock County.

According to the Rev. Taylor, Jane Goins, “the daughter of John Goins and Catherine Williams Goins,” was enumerated in the 1870 census of Hancock County in the household of John A. Lovins, No. 383-383:

“Lovins, John A. 27
Lucinda 23
Henry 2
Charlie 1
Goins, Jane 28”

She was married in 1857 to George Lawson, son of Emanuel Lawson. According to William P. Grohse, two daughters were born to Jane Goins before her marriage:

Molly Goins born about 1855
Mandy Goins born about 1856

Children born to George Lawson and Jane Goins Lawson include:

Birdie Lawson born about 1858
Mary Lawson [twin] born about 1868
John Lawson [twin] born about 1868

Catherine Goins, daughter of John “Hammer John” Goins and Catherine Williams Goins, was born about 1847 in Hancock County. She appeared as a three-year-old in the 1850 census. She was married January 17, 1875 to Hillery Collins, son of Pascal Collins and Dorcus Gibson Collins, who was born in 1857.

They appeared in the 1880 census of Hancock County, 11th District:

“Collins, Hillery 23, born in Tennessee
Catherine 27, born in Tennessee
Goins, Caroline 23, born in Tennessee, sister-in-law
Collins, Hillery 13, born in VA, cousin”

Children born to them include:

Henry Collins born in 1877
Orvall Collins born in 1878

Alexander Goins, son of John “Hammer John” Goins and Catherine Williams Goins, was born about 1849. He was recorded as a one-year-old in the 1850 census.

Betty Goins, daughter of John “Hammer John” Goins and Catherine Williams Goins, was born was born in 1855, accord-ing to the research of Rev. Arthur Hamilton Taylor. She was married about 1875 to a cousin, Buchanan Goins, son of Alfred Goins and Hannah Gibson Goins.

Caroline Goins, daughter of John “Hammer John” Goins and Catherine Williams Goins, was born in 1857. She appeared in the 1880 census of Hancock County living in the household of her sister Catherine Goins Collins.

Margaret Goins, daughter of John “Hammer John” Goins and Catherine Williams Goins, was born about 1860. Of this indi-vidual nothing more is known.

John “Stiff John” Goins, son of John “Hammer John” Goins and Catherine Williams Goins, was born in 1868. He was married about 1891, wife’s name unknown and “moved to Jonesville,” according to Rev. Arthur Hamilton Taylor.

3)  Dear Cousins

Wow, I have just received the two research packets you sent on my York County, Maine Gowen family, and I am impressed! However much fun we amateur genealogists have doing whatever it is we do, it is always a delight to find someone who has done a lot of your work for you. My Contributing Mem-bership is enclosed. I am looking forward to learning more about the remarkable Manuscript and look forward to being a member of the Foundation. Victor G. Jackson, 7728 W. 85th St, Playa del Rey, CA, 90293.

==Dear Cousins==

Thanks so much for the Newsletter file. I mention the Foundation frequently in my Kinsearching column. There seems to be several Melungeon/Redbone families living in our county. I study the Newsletters because I gain more information from them than I do from the resources at our library. It is obvious that the Foundation is really digging and researching the mystery of the Melungeons. I cannot use the computer or the Internet because of serious eye surgery, but I can read the Newsletters–every word! Johnnie Blair Dean, 12801 Roydon Dr, #819, Houston, TX, 77034.

==Dear Cousins==

We are searching for information on Lewis Goings, b1823, Giles Co, VA, d1890, m1846 in Delaware Co, IN to Mary Elizabeth Ketterman. Their daughter, our gggm, Mary Anne was married in Delaware Co, IN to Thomas Garner in Blackhawk Co, IA “at the home of her parents.” Any data on this family will be much appreciated. Sharla G. Bertram and Jerry C. Bertram [siblings], 3806 Manchester NW, Albuquerque, NM, 87107, sbertram@flash.net. A research team composed of your cousins and Foundation members, Evelyn McKinley Orr of Omaha, Ramona Thomas of Eureka, CA, Rosalie Holben of Mohave Valley, AZ, Hazel M. Wood of San Diego, Catherine Elizabeth Strawn Olquin of Arcadia, CA, Alice P. Thorn of Pembroke, VA and Norman Haskell Goings of IN has put together a detailed narrative on your ancestors. A print-out is being forwarded to you.

==Dear Cousins==

Mary Sellers was mc1720 in MD or VA to William Spurgeon. From 1730-1755 they lived on the Potomac River just east of Sheperdstown, WV. Mary, a widow and her sons removed to Rowan Co, NC c1756. Can anyone assist me with these families? I found the church incident involving Sis. Susanna “Sookie” Kitchen very interesting. Might Sis. Kitchen have “harbored them Melungeons” because they were kinsmen? Kitchen individuals are involved in my family. Are they Melungeon? Larry Dean Spurgeon, 1146 Orville Ave, Kansas City, KS, 66102-5140.

==Dear Cousins==

I am a 34-year-old lady from Norway which has just been connected with the Internet. My first trip on the net brought me to you in my search for family members in America. My mother is Norwegian, and my father is American. I have not heard from my father, Alberto Monroy Gowens since I was too small to remember. All papers indicating how to find him were lost in a fire several years ago. I have learned that my father tried to reach me many years ago. I would like to be a member of your group, hoping that you can assist me in my search. I am the only person in Norway with Gowens as surname, I believe. Anne-Linda Gowens, gowens@sn.no. Try Albert M. Gowens, 4600 Paradise Road, Apt. 56, Las Vegas, NV, 89109-7194, 702/737-3367. Good luck, Anne-Linda.

==Dear Cousins==

Through the Foundation and its helpful members, I have been able to locate my Goins ancestors in a short period of time. As an avid 60-year-old netsurfer, I posted a query on the Claiborne County, TN Website. Within two days, I received an E-mail from Johanna Howard suggesting that I check the Foundation Website. Searching for Daniel Goins, I was amazed at the number of references you list. I received an E-mail from Dianne Stark Thurman and a photocopy of the April 1993 Newsletter with the headline, “Daniel Goins Pioneered in Washington County, Virginia.” I believe he is my 5th-generation grandfather. I was also aided by a letter from Geraldine Webb. I look forward to being a member of the Foundation. You have a wealth of information and wonderfully kind and helpful member cousins. Terry B. Hildreth, 2805 Wellington Dr, Florissant, MO, 63033, adwtman@aol.com.

==Dear Cousins==

“Goin and Variants: Going, Gowin, Gowen, Gowan, Goen, Gowing” is off the press! All 626 pages are printed and bound, and 40 years of work is done. Please advise the members that their copies are being shipped. Dianne Stark Thurman, 4201 Wildflower Circle, Wichita, KS, 67210, 316/529-0438, dst@southwind.net

==Dear Cousins==

I am seeking information on Lawson Gowins and Ruthey Harper Gowins, my g-grandparents, who were married May 16, 1865 and lived in southern Illinois. He was born in Tennessee about 1840 of parents who were also Tennesseeans. In early enumerations he was listed as “black” or “Indian,” but later he appeared as “white.” Illinois records also show the surname spelled as “Goins,” “Goin,” Gowin and Gowan. There was a village named Gowanville, Illinois in the early 1900s, and there is a Gowins Cemetery located in Pope County, Illinois. I would be glad to share my information with any researcher. Can the Foundation assist me? Connie Gowins Kommer, 105 S. 10th St, Altamont, IL, 62411, 618/483-5687.

==Dear Cousins==

What a wonderful and informative Newsletter that is so full of useful research data! My 1997 renewal is enclosed, and I am excited to be coming on the Internet in the very near future and accessing even more Goins research. Elsie Taylor Goins, 112 Olde Springs Rd, Columbia, SC, 29223, 803/699-0759

==Dear Cousins==

My husband, Roy E. Gooing passed away June 23, 1995, but I am still researching his lineage. I would like some information about Temperance “Tempey” Gowan in the 1850 and 1860 census returns of Carroll County, TN. I am willing to exchange data on Pleasant Gooing, bc1797 TN, and his wife, Temperance “Tempey” Cooper Gooing of Dallas County, AL. Barbara Bigelow Gooing, 3950 Homedale Rd, #78, Klamath Falls, OR, 97603, 503/882-3727.

Gowen Research Foundation 806/795-8758 or 795-9694
5708 Gary Avenue E-mail: gowen@llano.net
Lubbock, Texas, 79413
Website: http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.com/~gowenrf
race from the people who used to be known as ‘free Negro.'” He found them a “peculiar” mixed-blood race with no history of slavery. Common surnames at that time in Sumter County were: Gibbes, Goins, Smiling, and Chavis. Other Redbones were living in central and eastern South Carolina counties. He, and other mixed-blood researchers documented that some Redbones from South Carolina moved to Calcasieu Parish, Louisiana many years earlier.

In general, the South Carolina group would remain a separate group from either the Sumter County Turks or their neighboring North Carolina Lumbees. Careful researchers will soon discover that they all shared the mystery features to some degree. Furman indicated that the Privateer Township Redbone families originated with Thomas Gibbes, a Revolutionary soldier.

(Continued on Page ?)

4)  Elijah Gowin and Joseph Goings Pioneered in Hawkins County

Part 2:

By Twanda E. Buckreis* and Johnnie Rhea**
*1256 Devonport, Lexington, Kentucky, 40504
**Route 2, Box 132, Sneedville, Tennessee, 37869

Elijah Gowin, regarded as a son of Joseph Goings and Millie Loving Goings, was born about 1797 in Virginia. He was married about 1813, wife’s name Sarah. Elijah Gowin, “white male, 40-50” [page 232] and “Joseph Gowin, white male 70-80” [page 234] appeared as heads of households in the 1840 census of Hawkins County, Tennessee.

Both were enumerated in the 1850 census of adjoining Hancock County, “in the 33rd sub-division, east side, along with “Alexandria Gowins,” and “John Goins,” sons of Elijah Gowin “Elijah Gowins” was a 53-year-old chairmaker, and “Joseph Goings” was an 84-year-old cooper.

The January issue dealt with Alexander Gowin and Ethel “Ethie” Collins Gowin. Children born to them include:

John Goins born about 1832
Alfred Goins born in November 1833

==O==

John Goins, son of Alexander Gowin and Ethel Collins Gowin, was born in Tennessee about 1832. He was enumerated as a 17-year old farmer in the 1850 census of Hancock County. He was married about 1855 to Synda Sexton who was born about 1839 to Solomon Sexton and Lucinda Maxey Sexton. John Goins served in the First Tennessee Cavalry Regiment, U.S.A. during the Civil War. John Goins and Synda Sexton Goins were buried in Goins Cemetery on Newmans Ridge.

Children born to them include:

George William Goins born about 1857
John Goins born about 1867
Howard Goins born about 1869

Alfred Goins, son of Alexander Gowin and Ethel Collins Gowin, was born in Tennessee in November 1833, according to the research of Robert Goins, a descendant of Kentucky. He was enumerated as “Alfred Gowin,” a 15-year-old farmer in 1850.

Alfred Goins was married about 1860 to Hannah Gibson, born about 1840 to Yearby Gibson and Elizabeth “Betty” Gibson, according to William P. Grohse, Hancock County, historian. Yearby Gibson was a son of Jonathan Gibson who was born in Virginia May 17, 1759, according to Willard G. Peil IV, a descendant. The Yearby Gibsons had other children named Sally Gibson, Thomas Gibson, Debba Gibson and John Gibson.

Alfred Goins was enlisted December 8, 1862, along with “John Goins and R. J. Goins” in the First Tennessee Cavalry Regiment, Company M and served until 1865, according to his pension record.

“Pvt. Alfred Goen” appeared on the muster roll of Company C, Forty-third Tennessee Infantry Regiment, CSA during the Civil War. Also serving in this regiment were Pvt. Anderson Goen, Pvt. Charles Goen, Pvt. Dodson Goen, Pvt. John Goen and Pvt. William A. Goins. Alfred Goins “switched sides” during the war, perhaps after being captured.

Pvt. Alfred Goins appeared on the muster roll of Company M, First Tennessee Cavalry Regiment, USA during the Civil War. Also enlisted in this regiment were “Pvt. Claiborne Goins, Pvt. John Goins, Pvt. R. J. Goins, Pvt. William Goins, Pvt. Zachariah Goins, Pvt. Alfred Gowen and Sgt. Burton M. Goins.” Burton McGinnis Goins, a ninth-generation descendant of Mihil Gowen, was the son of George Goins and Emily “Lively” Bunch Goins.

Hannah Gibson Goins died January 10, 1879 in Hancock County, according to Patricia Ann Goins Rice, a descendant of Shepherdsville, Kentucky.. He was remarried about 1880 to Mrs. Malvina “Viana” Johnson. They lived on Newmans Ridge.

5)  Elijah Gowin and Joseph Goings, Continued

They were enumerated in the 1880 census of Hancock County:

“Goins, Alfred 42
Malvina 27
Thomas 18
Johnson, Landon 5, step-son”

Alfred Goins received land from “John Mullins et ux Mahala Mullins” July 30, 1889, according to Hancock County Deed Book 5, page 541. Simeon Collins and James H. Goins, uniden-tified, were witnesses. Alfred Goins was reported to be suffering from a disability of “chronic diarrhea and lung trouble” in the 1890 Civil War veterans census.

Alfred Goins was recorded as the head of a household in the 1900 census of Hancock County, Enumeration District 73, page 2, 11th Civil District:

“Goins, Alfred 66, born in TN, Nov. 1833
Viney 47, born in TN, April 1853
Elizabeth 17, born in TN, Nov. 1882
Garfield 12, born in TN, May 1888
Lombard 9, born in TN, March 1891
Lydia M. 7, born in TN, April 1893
Samueal [Simeon] 3, born in TN, Mar. 1897”

Alfred Goins died September 4, 1907, “an old, old man,” [69], according to Rev. Arthur Hamilton Taylor, an early Hancock County historian. Alfred Goins was buried in Goins Cemetery on Newmans Ridge. Malvina “Viana” Johnson Goins continued to live in 1933 when she was interviewed by the Rev. Taylor.

Children born to Alfred Goins and Hannah Gibson Goins include:

Buchanan Goins born about 1857
Julia Ann Goins born about 1858
Thomas Goins born March 8, 1862

Children born to Alfred Goins and Malvina “Viana” Johnson Goins include:

Elizabeth Goins born November 25, 1882
James Abram Garfield Goins born May 22, 1888
Lambert Goins born March 12, 1891
Lydia M. Goins born April 4, 1893
Symeon [Samuel?] Goins born March 6, 1897

John “Hammer John” Goins, regarded as the son of Elijah Gowin and Sarah Gowin, was born about 1816 in Virginia. He accompanied his parents in a move to Claiborne County, Ten-nessee.

He was married about 1838 to Catherine Williams. According to Rev. Taylor, “Hammer John belonged to the older race of Goins who were fair-skinned. He was of medium size, red complexioned and lived on Newmans Ridge.”

“John Gowins” was listed as the head of a household enumerated December 4, 1850 in Hancock County, 33rd subdivision, east part, as Household 383-106. The family consisted of:

“Gowins, John 34, born in VA, hammerman, illiterate
Catherine 28, born in Virginia, illiterate
William 11, born in TN, attending school
Jane 9, born in TN
Wilson 7, born in TN
Catherine 3, born in TN
Alexandria 1, born in TN, male”

They reappeared in the 1880 census of Hancock County in the 11th District:

“Goins, John 59, born in Virginia
Catherine 49,
Lawson, George 35, son-in-law
Jane 39, daughter”
Mary 12, twin granddaughter
John 12, twin grandson”

It is believed that John “Hammer John” Goins died during the 1890s and was buried in Goins Cemetery on Newmans Ridge.

Children born to John “Hammer John” Goins and Catherine Williams Goins include:

William Goins born about 1839
Jane Goins born about 1842
Catherine Goins born about 1847
Alexander Goins born about 1849
Candace Goins born about 1851
Elizabeth “Betty” Goins born about 1852
Caroline Goins born in 1857
Margaret Goins born about 1859
John Goins born in 1868

William Goins, son of John “Hammer John” Goins and Cather-ine Williams Goins, was born about 1839 in Hancock County. He appeared in the 1850 census as an 11-year-old.

Jane Goins, daughter of John “Hammer John” Goins and Catherine Williams Goins, was born about 1842 in Hancock County.

According to the Rev. Taylor, Jane Goins, “the daughter of John Goins and Catherine Williams Goins,” was enumerated in the 1870 census of Hancock County in the household of John A. Lovins, No. 383-383:

“Lovins, John A. 27
Lucinda 23
Henry 2
Charlie 1
Goins, Jane 28”

She was married in 1857 to George Lawson, son of Emanuel Lawson. According to William P. Grohse, two daughters were born to Jane Goins before her marriage:

Molly Goins born about 1855
Mandy Goins born about 1856

Children born to George Lawson and Jane Goins Lawson include:

Birdie Lawson born about 1858
Mary Lawson [twin] born about 1868
John Lawson [twin] born about 1868

Catherine Goins, daughter of John “Hammer John” Goins and Catherine Williams Goins, was born about 1847 in Hancock County. She appeared as a three-year-old in the 1850 census. She was married January 17, 1875 to Hillery Collins, son of Pascal Collins and Dorcus Gibson Collins, who was born in 1857.

They appeared in the 1880 census of Hancock County, 11th District:

“Collins, Hillery 23, born in Tennessee
Catherine 27, born in Tennessee
Goins, Caroline 23, born in Tennessee, sister-in-law
Collins, Hillery 13, born in VA, cousin”

Children born to them include:

Henry Collins born in 1877
Orvall Collins born in 1878

Alexander Goins, son of John “Hammer John” Goins and Catherine Williams Goins, was born about 1849. He was recorded as a one-year-old in the 1850 census.

Betty Goins, daughter of John “Hammer John” Goins and Catherine Williams Goins, was born was born in 1855, according to the research of Rev. Arthur Hamilton Taylor. She was married about 1875 to a cousin, Buchanan Goins, son of Alfred Goins and Hannah Gibson Goins.

Caroline Goins, daughter of John “Hammer John” Goins and Catherine Williams Goins, was born in 1857. She appeared in the 1880 census of Hancock County living in the household of her sister Catherine Goins Collins.

Margaret Goins, daughter of John “Hammer John” Goins and Catherine Williams Goins, was born about 1860. Of this indi-vidual nothing more is known.

John “Stiff John” Goins, son of John “Hammer John” Goins and Catherine Williams Goins, was born in 1868. He was married about 1891, wife’s name unknown and “moved to Jonesville,” according to Rev. Arthur Hamilton Taylor.

Gowen Research Foundation 806/795-8758 or 795-9694
5708 Gary Avenue E-mail: gowen@llano.net
Lubbock, Texas, 79413
Website: http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.com/~gowenrf

___________________________________________________________

NOTE:  The above information produced by the Gowen Research Foundation (GRF), and parts of the “Gowen Manuscript” they worked on producing.  It has tons of information – much of it is correct, but be careful, some of it is not correct – so check their sources and logic.  I’ve copied some of their information in the past researching my own family, only to find out there were some clear mistakes.   So be sure to check the information to verify if it is right before citing the source and believing the person who researched it before was 100% correct.  Most of the information I found there seems to be correct, but some is not.

Their website is:  Internet: http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.com/~gowenrf

There does not seem to be anyone “manning the ship” at the Gowen Research Foundation, or Gowen Manuscript site any longer, and there is no way to contact anyone about any errors.   The pages themselves don’t have a mechanism to leave a note for others to see any “new information” that you may have that shows when you find info that shows something is wrong, or when something has been verified.

Feel free to leave messages about any new information found, or errors in these pages, or information that has been verified that those who wrote these pages may not have known about.

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