1996 – 08 Aug Newsletter – GRF

Sections in this issue:

1) CMDR Joseph Henry Gowan Buried At Arlington National Cemetery;
2) Cousins Have Chance Encounter In Cemetery After 46 Years;
3) DEAR COUSINS.

All Gowen Manuscript Pages and Newsletters:   https://goyengoinggowengoyneandgone.com/gowen-research-foundation-pages-and-info/

GOWEN RESEARCH FOUNDATION NEWSLETTER
Volume 7, No. 12 August 1996

1)  CMDR Joseph Henry Gowan Buried At Arlington National Cemetery

By Patrick William Gowan, his son
Foundation Editorial Boardmember
1422 Puterbough Street, San Diego, California, 92103

Part 2:

Joseph Henry Gowan, the eldest child of William M. and Laura Maxwell Gowen, was born on a farm of 160 acres located in Boone County on the White River about 6 miles north of Lead Hill, Arkansas November 24, 1886. He enlisted in the U.S. Navy August 22, 1911, and because of previous radio and telegraphy experience, was assigned to naval aviation.

Thus began a story-book career which saw him rise through the ranks to become a naval officer who experienced every phase of the development of the Navy’s air wing from the U.S.S. Langley, its first carrier until World War II. During his Navy tenure, he flew every type of aircraft the Navy had, including flying boats and lighter-than-air. In 1932, he was squadron commander of the seaplanes aboard the U.S.S. Houston, based in the Philippines. The Japanese began their invasion of China, and the Houston was ordered to China to protect the American interests there, quickly recalling the cruiser’s seaplanes from the Cavite naval base where they were being retrofitted.

This was completed in two days while the ship was underway. He flew observation flights during the fighting after the ship arrived in Shanghai and also commanded a detachment of 40 men from the U.S.S. Houston which was guarding American-owned Shanghai Power & Light Company. For all of this he received a letter of commendation.

Our tour was over in June, 1933, and Joe received orders to NAS Pensacola. After a return voyage aboard the U.S. Army transport Grant, we disembarked at San Francisco where the effects of the depression were quite evident. I remember seeing men selling apples in Union Square. The family bought a car and drove across country, and quite a few of the highways were dirt roads. We rented a house on the bay near the air station where there was lots of fishing, swimming, and boating. I entered Hallmark School in Pensacola in the sixth grade while Dick entered the fourth. Being new, we both found ourselves in fistfights on the second day of school. Luckily, we both won so we did not have any more trouble.

Joe was an instructor at Pensacola in seaplanes and torpedo bombers. In addition he transported personnel. He piloted the American ambassador to Cuba from Miami to Havana to Pensacola in January 1935. In June, 1935, Joe received orders to NAS San Diego.

We make an uneventful automobile trip across the country, although the highways still left a lot to be desired. Shortly after Joe reported to his new duty station, Rockwell Field, which had been in joint use by the Army and Navy since World War I, was designated Naval Air Station, North Island and all of the Army left.

Joe was initially assigned to a utility squadron which provided support to the fleet during exercises and flew missions for the Naval Air Station. Promotions in the Navy as well as other branches of the Armed Forces had been very slow since the mid-1920s due to size limitation treaties with other nations made after WWI. However, following Japanese aggression in China and the start of WWII in Europe, expansion of the armed forces began and in late 1938 Joe was selected for promotion to Lieutenant Commander.

The selection process divided the selectees into two classes, best qualified and qualified. Graduates of the Naval Academy and other colleges were considered best qualified and were promoted without a written examination, but all others were considered qualified and were required to take a written exam. Joe passed his exam and was promoted in January, 1939.

Upon his promotion, two things occurred. First, he joined the NAS North Island officers’ club. He had never before joined an officers’ club because of his enlisted service, and the general feeling among some of the senior officers was that it was not proper for him to do so. Second, he was transferred to the NAS North Island Operations Department where he became Assistant Operations officer with a lot of administrative duties, but he continued to fly. He began to fly sea and land transport planes more often, although he flew fighters and other types from time to time.

In April 1940, Joe became the Operations Officer of NAS North Island, but still continued flying. On January 3, 1941, he was the pilot of a transport plane which crashed into a mountain as it was returning to San Diego from Texas. Not much is known of the circumstances except that it was late on a foggy night, and the plane was on instruments.

NAS North Island was transmitting a radio beam which apparently was deflected by mineral deposits in the mountains, and the plane was close enough to San Diego to have begun its descent. Eleven other naval personnel were killed in the crash.

He was buried with full military honors in Arlington National Cemetery, and his wife now rests with him. At the time of his death, he was one of the most experienced pilots in the U.S. Navy. A street at NAS North Island was later named for him.

Two sons were born to Joseph Henry Gowan and Ida Clarice Epp Gowan:

Patrick William Gowan born January 10, 1922
Richard Leroy Gowan born August 17, 1923

==O==

Note: All information up to Joe’s enlistment is taken from “Gowen 1687Ä1980,” a family history written by my uncle Frank Maxwell Gowan of Phoenix, Arizona.

2)  Cousins Have Chance Encounter In Cemetery After 46 Years

By George William Gowan
1128 Eastbrook Lane, Webster Groves, Missouri, 63119

What are the odds of two cousins who had not seen each other for 46 years, who had never corresponded and who had no idea what the other looked like to meet! And to have that meeting be a chance encounter in a strange town hundreds of miles away from their homes!

By a slender thread of circumstance, that’s exactly what happened to us–in Washington, D.C. My first cousin, Patrick William Gowan lives in San Diego, and I live in the St. Louis area. And it was his deceased father, buried in Arlington Na-tional Cemetery, who brought us together.

A few years back, I visited my bother Thomas J. Gowan in El Paso. During my stay I decided to browse through some old family papers and photos. There were many interesting items. My father William T. Gowan, was employed as a telegrapher by the Santa Fe Railroad in Post, Texas.

He also doubled as the operator of the Western Union office there. A young boy on a bicycle would deliver the telegrams after my father printed and pasted the tiny little strips of paper onto the telegram form.

Many times he would send love notes, via this skinny kid, to my mother. Between deliveries, the kid hung around the depot and plunked on his guitar. His name was Floyd Tillman. If that name sounds familiar to you, that’s because it is. Floyd Tillman went on to achieve stardom as a country song writer and entertainer. It was very touching to see how much my mother and father loved one another by reading the notes they sent to one another via the kid on the bicycle with his guitar slung on his back.

One of the items in the old tin box, where my brother kept all the old family papers, was a newspaper article detailing the death of my Uncle Joe. The article ended with the fact that he was buried in Arlington National Cemetery. I told my brother if I was ever in D.C. again, I would visit his gravesite.

Finally the opportunity came. It was about 2:40 pm when the tour bus pulled up in front of the Visitor’s Center at Arlington. The driver announced that the changing of the guard, at the Tomb of the Unknown Soldier, occurred every hour on the hour. It is a most moving and touching ceremony, and I wanted to share this ceremony with Betsy, my wife..

We rushed through the Visitors Center and walked very briskly up the hill to the Tomb of the Unknown Soldier. We got there just in time to locate a place to sit and watch the changing of the guard.

On our way back down the hill to the Visitor’ Center we passed a small group of people who were obviously part of an organized tour. The guide, a large lady with a long white sweater, was saying that a large number of Civil War soldiers were buried in the cemetery.

We reached the Visitor’s Center around 3:20 and located the Grave Registration Office.

There were two ladies behind the counter. One looked up from her work, and I asked her if I was in the right place to find out where my uncle was buried. She pointed to a log and told me to fill it out and she then walked over to her computer.

I began to fill out the log. First column was “Name, first, middle, and last.” Not knowing his middle name, I just put “Joseph Gowan.” Next column was “Year of Internment.” I guessed “1942.” Last column was “Branch of Service.” I entered “Navy.”

The lady looked up from her computer and asked me, “Last name?”. I told her “Gowan” and that it might be spelled with an “e”. This was because some of my father’s brothers and sisters spelled it “Gowen.” The lady then asked, “First name and middle name?”. I told her “Joseph,” but had no idea what his middle name was.

She turned to me with a startled expression on her face and said, “His middle name was Henry. I looked this same name two minutes ago!” I stood in shocked disbelief.

She went on to say she had just looked the same name up for a very distinguished gentleman. She remembered that he was with a tour group with large pink name tags and their guide was a “large woman with a long white sweater.” Betsy turned to me and exclaimed, “We just passed them.”

After recovering from the eerie feeling I was experiencing, I managed to calm down and look at the register. Two lines above my entry was “Joseph Henry Gowan, Jan. 1941, Navy.”

I had to find Cousin Pat, and time was running out!

We walked back to the area where we had seen the tour group. They were nowhere in sight. I looked at the map of the cemetery which showed coordinates and the grave number of my uncle. It appeared that the next stop for the tour group would be the Kennedy grave site with the eternal flame.

When we arrived at the Kennedy site, we spotted a number of people wearing large pink name tags. I asked one man if there was a Gowan in their group. He did not know. I asked if they had a tour guide. He pointed to a woman, but she was not wearing “the white sweater.”

I spoke to the tour guide and asked if there was a man named Gowan in her tour group. She said she did not know of one, but had a listing of everyone on the tour. She opened her three ring binder and went down the list of names and said, “we have a Patrick Gowan from San Diego”.

My cousin Pat!

The tour guide went on to explain they had broken into three groups to tour the cemetery. I looked at my watch, and now it is 3:50, 10 minutes before the changing of the guard. I look at the map and see a foot trail connecting the Kennedy grave site to the Tomb of the Unknown Soldier. Betsy and I take the foot trail. I am now so excited that my mouth is dry, and I am walking so fast that Betsy is having a difficult time keeping up with me. Every so often I stop and tell her to hurry up.

We get to the Tomb just as people are leaving. I spot two el-derly ladies, with the large pink name tags, walking on the main road toward the Kennedy grave site. I stop them and asked if they know a man named Gowan? Neither did. I asked them if their group was on their way to the Kennedy site. They confessed that they had gotten separated from their group and were lost.

Betsy and I took the main road back to the Kennedy site because we could have missed them due to taking the foot trail. When we arrived, there was no one in sight with the large pink name tags.

What do I do now? Cousin Pat could be at his father’s grave site. We start the walk to the coordinates for my uncle’s grave. Before we get out of the Kennedy area, we see the two lost ladies. I learned from them that they were all traveling on one bus, and it was parked on the bus lot at the Visitor’s Center. It was going to leave promptly at 4:30.

It was obvious that the tour busses did not go to the area of my uncle’s grave. By this time I am really thirsty, and Betsy is falling further behind. I have to spend a lot of time waiting for her to catch up. As we walk past the Visitor’s Center, I look at my watch, and it is now 3:40. I realized that if we were not at Uncle Joe’s grave site by 4:05, we would not be able to get back to the bus parking lot before the bus left at 4:30.

Betsy is really falling behind now, and I am dying of thirst. I now have my coat off and working up a good sweat. About 4:00 we encounter a couple with the large pink name tags. I am now getting excited and asked if their name was Gowan? No, and they did not know of anyone in their group by that name.

At a little after 4:00, Even though it is October it is unusually warm. we arrive at my the site where my uncle and his wife are buried. We start the long walk back to the Visitor’s Center. Betsy is very tired and can not keep up with me. I told her I would walk fast and leave her behind, and she could catch up with me on the bus parking lot.

About 4:15 a cemetery maintenance pickup came along. I flagged him down. For the first time in many years, I told a little white lie. I told him that we were about to miss our bus and asked if the rules allowed him to give us a ride. He said he was not supposed to, but would do so in this case.

The driver dropped us right at the Visitor’s Center. We hurried through, headed toward the parking lot. Outside there were a group of people milling around. I noticed two men talking with the large pink name tags. I walked over, and as one of them turned around to face me, I peered at the name tag which read, “Pat Gowan!”

I introduced myself, and he looked at me with complete bewil-derment on his face. I proceeded to explain to him exactly who I was and how our fathers were brothers. He said, “you are my first cousin.” He was amazed with our efforts to intercept him. We met his wife, Mary Ellen and talked briefly–and then the bus departed–promptly at 4:30.

When you visit a Cemetery, you expect to find your relatives buried there and not walking around. I still look back on that day in complete amazement. I think of the things that might not have happened which would have prevented us from meeting:

What if the other lady had waited on me at the Grave Registra-tion Office? What if I had registered first at the Grave Registration Office? If Pat had registered after me, would the same lady have waited on him? If the same lady did wait on him, he would not have been able to find me because we were not part of a tour group.

What are the odds of all this happening? With in a matter of minutes, two cousins who have not seen nor heard from each in 46 years, are within minutes of being in the same office at the same time. I live 830 miles from D.C, and Pat lives 2,733 miles
away. Small world!

 

3)  DEAR COUSINS

The Newsletter article by Sandra M. Loridans has been very helpful to me in tracing my ancestors, Jeremiah Goins and his wife, Sarafina. I am enclosing my check for a set of tapes that will include her entire presentation at the Nashville Conference. I am so thankful for the work that the Foundation is doing. Juanita Thornburg Southerland, 9156 Sawyer Brown Rd, Nashville, TN, 37221.

==Dear Cousins==

I descend from David Goings’ [our spelling] youngest son, John Williams Goings. David was born September 15, 1783 in Newburn, Giles County, [West] Virginia. John Williams Goings was also born there December 16, 1826, and he died July 8, 1906 in Selma, Indiana. I have been told that the Foundation and several of its members hold information on this family. I am interested in joining the Foundation and hearing from fellow researchers. Cathy Olguin, 6515 N. Golden West St, Arcadia, CA, 91007

==Dear Cousins==

We are looking for descendants of Jeremiah Going, b1775 VA, v1840 Hendricks Co, IN; David & James Goings, v1840 Hendricks Co; William Goings, b1838 Hendricks Co, d1917 Tippecanoe Co, IN and William A. [or Matthew] Goings b1872 Litchfield, IL. Would like contact with anyone doing Goings research in Indiana or Illinois to find possible connections or trade information. Also would like to know if anyone knows how to locate Civil War military prison records. Norma J. Goings & Martha Goings Flora, 4548 S. Redwood Dr, Terre Haute, IN, 47802, 812/299-8209, email: mflora@holli.com.

==Dear Cousins==

My father, Dr. Raymond L. Goyne of Hove, Sussex is an enthusiasistic member of the Foundation, but has not yet subscribed to the Internet. In the meantime, I will forward messages to and from him. Nicola Winifred Mason, “tikki@btinternet.com”.

==Dear Cousins==

Dr. Tommy Johnson has confirmed that Dr. Brent Kennedy will be the principal speaker at the Founders of Natchitoches, Louisiana Conference on October 5. Dr. Johnson advised that Brent will arrive at the Shreveport airport on Friday afternoon, October 4, and be driven to Natchitoches. They have a reception and bookÄsigning planned for him that evening. Brent will be staying at the Holiday Inn, the site of the conference and will have the full morning for his presentation. Following lunch, he will be driven to the Shreveport airport for an approximate 4pm flight. Brent’s time in Natchitoches is limited due to his October trip to Turkey. Other speakers are planned for the afternoon session. One need not be a member of the organization in order to attend the conference. You will find the town delightful. It is the oldest in the Louisiana Purchase Territory, founded in 1714.

I received a nice letter from Dr. Raymond Goyne of Hove, England. He sent several charts identifying his family. It appears that Raymond’s line came to America much later than mine. He said that he had visited with his American cousins in Delaware, Virginia, and Lancaster County, PA. He and “Australian” Robert Goyen have linkedÄup.

 

I did so enjoy the “Cousins Have Chance Encounter” article in the August Newsletter. Sooner or later, all of us who dabble in genealogy have experiences of “genetic memory,” psychic occurrences, intuition or serendipity. Anyone who has had such experiences is certain to enjoy the book, “Psychic Roots” [Genealogical Publishing Co, Baltimore] by the well-known genealogist, Henry Z. Jones, Jr. This was one of those wonderful books I could hardly put down. He relates the experiences of many researchers [who have benefitted from psychic assistance.] Beverly J. Ellison Nelson, 3391 W. Aksarben Ave, Littleton, CO, 80123.

==Dear Cousins==

Congratulations on a fantastic job of presenting the Foundation on the Internet! I received my September Newsletter and immediately logged on. Hope the staff has taken doses of megavitamins because you are going to need them with all the new activity it will generate. I have the Gore family online now, and all I do is answer E-mail and look up information.

I have discovered a ‘Gorin Family Discussion Group’ on the Internet that supports all of the Goin/Gowen names. GRF members can subscribe at “GORIN@rmgate.pop.indiana.edu” with “SUBSCRIBE” in the subject line of the message. I posted a message with them yesterday that the Gowen Research Foundation is now online.

Again, wonderful job! Thanks to all who accomplished this feat. Joyce Campbell Locke, jglocke@yucca.net, Box 474, Portales, NM, 88130.

==Dear Cousins==

I want to thank you for a great reunion in Tennessee, and thank you for the Foundation itself. I met wonderful people, learned a lot about my family and got to see the country where my forefathers walked. It was a wonderful experience that I will always treasure. Keep up the wonderful work. My Contributing Membership is enclosed. Tammy Goin-Stone, Box 738, Ontario, OR, 97914.

==Dear Cousins==

Thanks so much for the Foundation Web Site and for my access ID number. Right now I am playing with setting up my own homepage. Isn’t the Web a lark! I could just live out there! Nancy Strawder Bruce, nbruce1@ldl.net, 1427 17th Ave, Columbus, GA, 31901.

==Dear Cousins==

I was glad to see the McGowens and the O’Gowens included in your research list after all the fuss and furor I raised several years ago to get them included–unsuccessfully, I might add. Last time I looked, there were 30-40 McGowens and O’Gowens here in my Montgomery County, MD telephone book. If you ever round up all of them, it will be quite a crowd! Glad to hear from you with this good news. My 1997 membership is enclosed. Edward Miles Joseph Gowen, 1258 Cresthaven Dr, Silver Spring, MD, 20903.

==Dear Cousins==

I would like to introduce your readers to “The Ap-palachian Quarterly,” a new historical, genealogical magazine covering the Southern Appalachians. We have recently entered into an association with Dr. N. Brent Kennedy to com-pile, collect, preserve and protect genealogical information on families of probable Melungeon descent. The repository is called the National Melungeon Registry. We are currently in the process of establishing a web site, and I will send you information as we go online. Rhonda Robertson, Editor, Wise County Historical Society, Box 368, Wise, VA, 24293.

Congratulations, Rhonda and welcome into ge-nealogical publishing. We are placing your news release on the Internet in the “Melungia” section, and we’ll be glad to “hotlink” our web site with yours.

==Dear Cousins==

I am seeking the names of the parents of Aaron Going [b1823 KY] Andrew Jackson Going [b1820 KY] and Emily Going. Aaron m1 Maria Gitzendanner; m2 Dozena Prather; m3 Clementine Prather Milburn. He was recorded cs1850 Natchez, MS; cs1860, cs1870, cs1880 St. Landry Parish, LA. He died there in Westlake, LA in 1898. Andrew Jackson Going lived in E. Feliciana Parish, LA. Inez Going, Box 20832, Houston, TX, 77225.

==Dear Cousins==

I was really excited to see the Foundation on the Internet! I only accessed the archives a few times, because of the toll charges, but now I can search and revel to my heart’s content! Thanks so much! Doris Ann Goins, goins@noblecan.org, 8018 E. Cree Lake, Kendallville, IN, 46755.

==Dear Cousins==

Your website is great. I have two Melungeon grandmothers and am particularly interested in “Melungia.” I am working to computerize my ancestry. When completed I will forward a copy for the Foundation Library and for the Electronic Library on the Internet. Thanks for such a great work dedicated to our heritage. Richard Couch, , 970 W. 68th St, Tulsa, OK, 74132. RCouch1148@aol.com.

==Dear Cousins==

Just received the September Newsletter today and was pleased to see my query in Dear Cousins. I had already had some responses to it before my copy arrived. The Electronic Library is a great concept. Please send my I.D. number so that I can make “tracks through the stacks.” Roy L. Edgar, 175 Allspice Ct, Springboro, OH, 45066, Ftscott@aol.com.

==Dear Cousins==

Congratulations! The web is really great! I felt the “presence of the past” when I found my ancestors Maj. John “Buck” Gowen and wife Lettice on the Internet in “gowenms.006.” My cousins and I are about to die from lack of sleep because now we now stay on the Internet most of the night. Chan Edmondson, edmosski@airmail.net, Box 190354, Dallas, TX, 75219.

==Dear Cousins==

I would like to exchange data on Nicholas Gowen [b1667, York Co, ME] and Abigail Hodsdon Gowen of York Co, ME. I am descended through their daughter, Margaret Gowen [bc1699, York Co, ME] who was married to Abraham Lord, son of Elder Nathan Lord. Keith Bean, 686 Rambleton Dr, Vacaville, CA, 95688, kbean99999@aol.com.

==Dear Cousins==

My ggg-gm was a sister to George Abbott of County Galway who settled on St. Simons Island, Georgia in about 1805 and married Mary Wright. Their 2nd dau. Annie [b1818] m. James Gowen in 1834. Their son George Harrison Gowen m. his cousin Elizabeth, dau of Henry Evans and Elizabeth Abbott Evans of Quebec. I would be interested in comparing notes with Foundation members.

I can tell you a certain amount about the Abbotts before 1800 and about the other descendants of George and his siblings since then, rather more about my line, of course. Do you publish a newsletter? Is it possible to subscribe from Europe? Hugh Casement, Bahnweg 11, 84405 Dorfen, Germany.

Indeed you may subscribe and affiliate with the Foundation with the membership blank from our Website. It has been our pleasure to visit with many of your Gowen kinsmen in southeast Georgia. Charles Latimer Gowen, now 92, g-son of James Gowen and Anna Elizabeth Abbott Gowen, spoke to the Foundation Research Conference earlier this year in Nashville about his branch of the family. His second cousin, Miller Abbott “Bud” Gowen of Geneva, Switzerland, is one of the founders of the Foundation.

==Dear Cousins==

I have been researching my g-g-g-gf Dillard Goen of Fairfield Co, SC, Jackson Co, GA, Smith Co, & Palo Pinto Co, TX. He had sons by the names of Joseph F, Lewis, William, James G. and Britten. I would like to communicate with anyone working on this line. Paul Lynn Goen, 2311 Don Felipe SW, Albuquerque, NM, 87105, 505/877-5069.

==Dear Cousins==

My g-gm Mary Ellen Goings was born in August 1871 in TN of parents who were also born in TN. She was enumerated in the 1900 census of Greene County, AR, Enum. Dist. 31, at age 28. Can anyone assist me on her ancestry? Leila J. Hewitt, 5201 Palomino Dr, Melbourne, FL, 32934, 407/242-1741, LJSH47@aol.com.

==Dear Cousins==

My paternal ancestors’ surnames were: Bilbo, Chelaitre, Cole, Courtney, Curtis, Davis, Flower, Green, Hall, Hobson, Johnson, Rentfroe, Roberts, Saidec, Selet and Simmons. I have been told that some of them are Melungeon names and that some of them intermarried with the Gowen/Going/Goyne family. Many migrated to Mississippi from the Carolinas and Tennessee. All appeared in Louisiana in the early 1800s. My grandmother, Sarah Hall stated that we are part Cherokee. I would like to contact Foundation researchers who are interested in any of the above families. Thelma Cole Morgan, Rt. 2, Box 94, Dayton, TX, 77535.

==Dear Cousins==

I am seeking information on Thomas Gowans and Rachel McClurg of York County, PA who were married “at Widow McClurg’s house” Nov. 26, 1778 by Rev. James Clarkson. Born to them were Elizabeth, b1779; Katherine, b1781 and Jean Gowans, b1784. Any help, anyone? Mamie Way, Rt. 1, Fairmont, OK, 73736.

==Dear Cousins==

Your “stuff” on your web site is wonderful. May we “hot link” you to our “E-zine Family Tree?” Beth Gay, Editor, Family Tree, Odom Library, Box 1110, Odom, GA, 31776. Aye, Lassie. We Scottish here will enjoy keeping company with you for auld lang syne.

==Dear Cousins==

When and how did the Caucasian race become pale, and when and how did they lose their pigmentation? When and how did the Caucasians destroy the melanin in their chromosomes which determines the color of skin, hair and eyes? Why are archaeologists unable to find fossil remains of Caucasian? Are they the descendants of albinos?

The white race excretes an enzyme which absorbs melanin; the black race does not. This is why a white corpse turns black. When scientists cleanse the skin of Egyptian mummies, the epidermis appears pigmented exactly like that of all other black people of Africa. People of the Mediterranean area–Spanish, Portuguese, Turkish, Jewish, Moorish, [Melungeon] etc. and American Indians still have some of the original black blood melanin. Robert Graham, #99451, Camp T’Shark 3R7, Louisiana State Penitentiary, Angola, LA, 70712.

==Dear Cousins==

I love the term “Melungia.” How sweet it is to see the pore ol’ Melungeons recognized in cyberspace after being down-trodden for so long on this earth. You have done a great job on the web site. We would like to announce it in the next issue of our newsletter, the “Southeastern Kentucky Melungeon Information Exchange.” I was glad to see Dr. Brent Kennedy’s reply in “melungia.002.” We appreciate your good work. Bill Fields, 1525 Barbra Ests. Dr, Seymour, TN, 37865, 76241.3137@compuserve.com.4.

==Dear Cousins==

My grandmother was Anna Brooks Dobbins Gowens who was an early researcher on Charles Gowens, the little drummer boy, our Revolutionary ancestor. I know a few of my cousins and others who spell the name “Gowens,” and I would like to make contact with all the Gowens researchers. Please contact me. Lou Edith Smith, Box 115, Dryden, TX, 78851-0115, 915/291-3331.

==Dear Cousins==

The Founders of Natchitoches Conference, with Brent Kennedy as principal speaker, was a great success. He was welcomed by the mayor and the president of the Chamber of Commerce. He was interviewed by KALB-TV, and a book-signing was held at Old Town Book Merchant.

On Saturday morning [10/6] Brent spoke from 9:00 to 12:00 about the Melungeons with a 100% positive response. Because of the warm reception, Brent promised to return.

John & Evelyn Orr arrived early for the Conference and spent two days with us, researching in the Shreveport Library. Our contributing membership for 1997 is enclosed. Carroll H. Goyne, Jr, 10019 Canterbury Dr, Shreveport, LA, 71106.

September 1996

I learned of the Foundation on America Online. I am just beginning research on my husband’s name, McGowan, and the information given to me by relatives is spotty, and I am not too sure of its accuracy. The first name I have is Bridget O’Flaenerty McGowan who had two children, Nancy McGowan who was married to Workman and Patrick T. McGowan was married to Catherine Condon. Their first child, Terence Francis McGowan was born June 22, 1898 in New York. He was my husband’s grandfather. Thank you for any help you can give. Brenda McGowan, 770 Regateo Dr, Hemet, CA, 92543.

==Dear Cousins==

I have traced one branch of my family back to Nathan Goins, regarded as the son of John Goins and Billie Driver Goins. Nathan Goins was born in the 1820s in Tennessee, in what was then known as Cherokee Nation, in Hamilton County. From there, his family removed to Arkansas and then on to what is now Gore, OK. I have found records where “Goins” was rendered as “Gowen.” Can the Foundation or its members assist me in this research? Roy L. Edgar, 175 Allspice Ct, Springboro, OH, 45066, 513/748-2999.

==Dear Cousins==

I have inherited the Goin research of my grandfather, Varion E. Goin. His third wife, Anna Lee Davis Goin survives, but in a care facility in a diminished mental capacity. I had expressed an interest in his family history records so they came to me. Interspersed with the records were the Foundation Newsletters going back to the first edition. I am enclosing a list of missing editions which I understand that you supply to new members. Will you please forward those to me and advise the cost. My membership is enclosed.
Being inexperienced in genealogy, I have not fully grasped the significance all of the wealth of family information and documentation that has been handed down to me. I have not yet discovered the filing system used by my grandfather and am having difficulty making rhyme or reason of his data. I understand that a research team has been organized within the Foundation among the descendants of Thomas Goin of Brunswick County, Virginia and Claiborne County, Tennessee. I would like to make contact with these team members and offer the benefit of my grandfather’s research in exchange for their guidance in how to proceed. Marilyn Morton, 5827 NE 14th Avenue, Portland, OR, 97211-4238. Welcome, Marilyn. The missing Newsletters have been forwarded to you, no charge. Any that remain missing can be downloaded from the Foundation web site on the Internet. You will be hearing from your cousins.

==Dear Cousins==

Peggy A. White of Hopkinsville, KY gave your address to me after she saw my query on Goin/Gowin in “Family Puzzlers.” My ancestor, Sarah A. E. Fulp[s] was bc1838 in NC, according to census records. Andrew Fulp/Phelps and Martha J. Goin/Gowin may have been her parents. They were married by William Lewis, J.P. December 5, 1837 in Claiborne County, TN, I believe. Sarah A. E. Fulps was married to George C. Fuller in Maury County, TN December 23, 1855. Do you or any of the Foundation members have any records on these individuals? Virginia Harmon Barnes, 101 Country Cove Drive, Clinton, MS, 39056. Foundation records show that Martha J. Gowen was married to Andrew Phelps December 5, 1837 by Samuel Wilson, J.P, recorded in Claiborne County, TN Marriage Book 2, page 3. David C. Gowen was married October 26, 1854 to Priscilla H. Fuller in Carroll County, TN [near Maury County].

==Dear Cousins==

The opening night of the Nashville Research Conference for the Gowen family was fun, friendly and a great way to meet new cousins. Donna Gowin Johnston is to be commended for devising such a clever contest. It was a marvelous way of meeting new family members. The evening ended with a warm and comfortable feeling. I now have a large collection of cousins and many happy memories.

Thanks to my cousin, Don Lee Gowen of Decatur, Alabama, I had the privilege of visiting the grave and cemetery of my g-g-grandfather, James Burns Gowen. I am delighted to have the photographs you sent. With warm appreciation and sincere thanks for a well planned reunion. Elizabeth Hale Morfitt, 353 Westmoreland Dr, Idaho Falls, ID, 83402.

==Dear Cousins==

This past month I had a double treat!! I was anxious to read the “rest of the story” about my uncle, Cmdr. Joseph Henry Gowan. I thought Pat did an excellent job of research; also it was nice to see my late father, Frank Maxwell Gowan given credit for his contribution. I knew that Pat & Mary Ellen Gowan had run into George William Gowan at Arlington Cemetery, but what a delight to see George’s article about their chance meeting. My first cousins made a major impact on in the August Newsletter.

I am enclosing my check for $40 for the Nashville Conference tapes. Since I could not attend, this will help soothe my disappointment and sense of loss. Thank you for all the hard work you do in bringing us the wonderful family stories in the Newsletter. Mary Jo Gowan Bray, 5719 E. Aster Dr, Scottsdale, AZ, 85254, 602/948-6554.

August 1996

The Newsletter article by Sandra M. Loridans has been very helpful to me in tracing my ancestors, Jeremiah Goins and his wife, Sarafina. I am enclosing my check for a set of tapes that will include her entire presentation at the Nashville Conference. I am so thankful for the work that the Foundation is doing. Juanita Thornburg Southerland, 9156 Sawyer Brown Rd, Nashville, TN, 37221.

==Dear Cousins==

I descend from David Goings’ [our spelling] youngest son, John Williams Goings. David was born September 15, 1783 in Newburn, Giles County, [West] Virginia. John Williams Goings was also born there December 16, 1826, and he died July 8, 1906 in Selma, Indiana. I have been told that the Foundation and several of its members hold information on this family. I am interested in joining the Foundation and hearing from fellow researchers. Cathy Olguin, 6515 N. Golden West St, Arcadia, CA, 91007

==Dear Cousins==

We are looking for descendants of Jeremiah Going, b1775 VA, v1840 Hendricks Co, IN; David & James Goings, v1840 Hendricks Co; William Goings, b1838 Hendricks Co, d1917 Tippecanoe Co, IN and William A. [or Matthew] Goings b1872 Litchfield, IL. Would like contact with anyone doing Goings research in Indiana or Illinois to find possible connections or trade information. Also would like to know if anyone knows how to locate Civil War military prison records. Norma J. Goings & Martha Goings Flora, 4548 S. Redwood Dr, Terre Haute, IN, 47802, 812/299-8209, email: mflora@holli.com.

==Dear Cousins==

My father, Dr. Raymond L. Goyne of Hove, Sussex is an enthusiasistic member of the Foundation, but has not yet subscribed to the Internet. In the meantime, I will forward messages to and from him. Nicola Winifred Mason, “tikki@btinternet.com”.

==Dear Cousins==

Dr. Tommy Johnson has confirmed that Dr. Brent Kennedy will be the principal speaker at the Founders of Natchitoches, Louisiana Conference on October 5. Dr. Johnson advised that Brent will arrive at the Shreveport airport on Friday afternoon, October 4, and be driven to Natchitoches. They have a reception and bookÄsigning planned for him that evening. Brent will be staying at the Holiday Inn, the site of the conference and will have the full morning for his presentation. Following lunch, he will be driven to the Shreveport airport for an approximate 4pm flight. Brent’s time in Natchitoches is limited due to his October trip to Turkey. Other speakers are planned for the afternoon session. One need not be a member of the organization in order to attend the conference. You will find the town delightful. It is the oldest in the Louisiana Purchase Territory, founded in 1714.

I received a nice letter from Dr. Raymond Goyne of Hove, England. He sent several charts identifying his family. It appears that Raymond’s line came to America much later than mine. He said that he had visited with his American cousins in Delaware, Virginia, and Lancaster County, PA. He and “Australian” Robert Goyen have linkedÄup.

I signed up for Internet access recently. My EÄmail address is: “cgoyne@softdisk.com”. Carroll Heard Goyne, Jr, 10019 Canterbury Dr, Shreveport, LA, 71106.

 

___________________________________________________________

NOTE:  The above information produced by the Gowen Research Foundation (GRF), and parts of the “Gowen Manuscript” they worked on producing.  It has tons of information – much of it is correct, but be careful, some of it is not correct – so check their sources and logic.  I’ve copied some of their information in the past researching my own family, only to find out there were some clear mistakes.   So be sure to check the information to verify if it is right before citing the source and believing the person who researched it before was 100% correct.  Most of the information I found there seems to be correct, but some is not.

Their website is:  Internet: http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.com/~gowenrf

There does not seem to be anyone “manning the ship” at the Gowen Research Foundation, or Gowen Manuscript site any longer, and there is no way to contact anyone about any errors.   The pages themselves don’t have a mechanism to leave a note for others to see any “new information” that you may have that shows when you find info that shows something is wrong, or when something has been verified.

Feel free to leave messages about any new information found, or errors in these pages, or information that has been verified that those who wrote these pages may not have known about.

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