1990 – 01 Jan. Newsletter – GRF

Sections in this issue:

1) Cornish Research Team Into 16th Century Records;
2) With Revolutionary Training . . . Charles Gowens, Sharpshooter Bagged Squirrels at 102;
3) Dear Cousins;
4) Gowen Research Foundation Editorial Board Nominees

All Gowen Manuscript Pages and Newsletters:   https://goyengoinggowengoyneandgone.com/gowen-research-foundation-pages-and-info/

GOWEN RESEARCH FOUNDATION NEWSLETTER
Volume 1, No. 5 January 1990

1)  Cornish Research Team
Into 16th Century Records

Cornwall, on the southwest extremity of England, was home to a concentration of Gawin-Gowen-Goyen-Goyne families prior to emigration to the New World. Although the family is generally considered Scotch because the surname has Celtic derivation, the Cornish language, though no longer in usage, was also Celtic.

From the Tamar River to Land’s End, the Cornish parish registers record the christenings, the marriages and the deaths of family members from the early 1500s to the present. These ledgers, some remaining after four centuries, plus data in the Public Records office in Truro reveal much of the family and are genealogical treasure troves to those with Cornish ancestors.

The registers reveal that life there in the early days was hard. Cornishmen in the 16th century had little option as to their livelihood. Some were farmers scratching a living from the rocky soil, primarily in the cultivation of oats and fodder crops and caring for a few head of sheep and small Devon cattle.

Some were fishermen who daily put out from little coastal towns like Newlyn and St. Ives to risk their lives in the Atlantic and the English Channel. A third option was tin mining, a profession so hazardous that by ancient charter the tinners were exempt from taxes and from all jurisdiction except in cases involving “land, life and limb.” The parish registers reveal that frequently the men died young, in drownings at sea and in mining accidents. Likewise the women were also carried away by disease and in childbirth, frequently at a young age.

Conditions in Cornwall made emigration attractive to its people, and when British colonies were being established, they readily fanned out to Barbados and the West Indies, to America, and to faraway places like Australia and New Zealand.

Robert J. Goyen, Foundation Editorial Board member of Sebastopol, Victoria in Australia, a pre-eminent Cornish researcher, has traced his family lineage in Cornwall beyond the point where the curtain of antiquity usually drops on genealogists. He has supplied the Foundation with computer printouts starting with John Goyne who brought his son
Edward to St. Columb’s parish for christening May 15, 1541 to present-day entries. He noted that the spelling of his surname varied through the centuries from “Goyne” to “Gowen” to “Goyen.”

The parish register reveals the hardships that his ancestors, Peter Goyne and Mary Ann Bowden Goyne, overcame to get to Australia. Their wedding was recorded August 4, 1845:
“Peter Goyne, of full age, bachelor, miner, of St. Austell, son of William Goyne, miner, married Mary Ann Bawden, minor [under 21], spinster of St. Austell, daughter of John Bawden, farmer. Married by Banns by Horatio Todd, Curate [priestl, both the bride and the
groom made their marks in the Register. Witnesses:  John Julyan [parish clerk] and William Goyne.”

“Peter Goyen” embarked for Australia aboard the “Antelope” which sailed from Liverpool March 8, 1853 with 140 passengers. Six months later, he arrived at his destination, and
six years later he was able to have his family come to Australia.

“Mary A. Goyen, 34, wife; Peter 13, laborer; Elizabeth 11; John, 7 and Mary Jane, 6, arrived on the ‘Red Jacket,’ 1,597 tons, 140 days out of Liverpool under Capt. Richard Kirby in August 1853.”

Because of his Cornish expertise, the Foundation has asked Robert J. Goyen to head up a research team to gather a complete history of the family in Cornwall. The Foundation
proposes to publish the work of the Cornish research team as a volume in its series on the family’s history.

Other researchers in England, Australia, New Zealand, Tasmania and the United States are invited to participate by pooling their research. They may address Robert J. Goyen at 523 Sutton St, Sebastopol, 3356, Victoria, Australia who has been asked to coordinate the efforts. Billie June Salmond, a native of Bountiful, Utah, who is presently researching in
Truro and St. Agnes, Cornwall, has volunteered to assist in Cornish research. Until March 1990, she may be addressed at London Temple, New Chapel Nr. Lingfield, Surrey, England.

Other research groups that have been formed by the Foundation include the Melungeon Team and the Gowrie Conspiracy Team. Researchers interested in working with the
Melungeon Team may contact Evelyn McKinley Orr, 8310 Emmet St, Omaha, NE. Researchers interested in the Gowrie Conspiracy of Perthshire may contact Landa Beth Sloan, 4320 Bellaire Drive South, Suite 201, Ft. Worth, TX, 76109 or Martha Rand Hix, 13531 Norland Dr, San Antonio, TX, 78232. A complete list of the 1990 Editorial Board appears in
this issue. Foundation officers reelected at the annual Board of Directors meeting include Arlee Gowen, president, Lubbock, TX; Chan Edmondson, vice-president, Dallas, TX;
Nancy Hargesheimer, Lubbock, vice-president; Linda McNiel, secretary, Lubbock; Bonnie Gowen, treasurer, Lubbock; Miller A. Gowen, director, Geneva, Switzerland and Phillip A.
Gowan, Nashville, TN.

Starting with this issue the Newsletter is being mailed only to family members who have purchased memberships.

Additionally sample copies will be mailed to prospective members upon request.

2)  With Revolutionary Training . . .
Charles Gowens, Sharpshooter
Bagged Squirrels at 102

Charles Gowens, a Revolutionary War soldier from Virginia saw much of the panorama of America unfold during his lifetime.

He died at the age of 106, according to the research of Anna Brooks Dobbin Gowens, a family researcher. She wrote in a letter May 1, 1952 from Del Rio, Texas, “Charles Gowens
became an expert marksman during the war and retained this proficiency throughout his lifetime. At the age of 102, in an exhibition, he brought down a squirrel from the top of a tall tree with his old muzzle-loader.”

Henry County was the earliest documented place of residence for Charles Gowens. Henry County was formed in 1776 with land from Pittsylvania County. Pittsylvania County was
formed in 1766 with land from Halifax County. Halifax County was formed in 1752 with land from Lunenburg County. Lunenburg County was formed in 1746 with land from Brunswick County. Brunswick County was formed in 1720 with land from Prince George County, Isle of Wight County and Surry County. Prince George County was formed in 1702 with land from Charles City County, an original shire.

The ancestors of Charles Gowens might be found in the records of any of the above counties.

Charles Gowens was born in 1763 in Henry [Halifax] County, according to his Revolutionary War pension application, No. S31,072 which was published in “Abstracts of Pension Papers Pertaining to Soldier of the Revolutionary War, War of 1812 and Indian Wars, Gallatin County, Kentucky:” “Charles Gowans, Va. S31,072, Bounty Land Warrant
No. 26106-160-55 On October 22, 1833 in Gallatin County, Kentucky, the said pensioner at the age of 70 years appeared in open court and stated that on September 1, 1779 in Henry
County, Virginia he had first volunteered to serve in the capacity of a private soldier for a tour of six months duration in the company under the command of Capt. Jonathan Hanley and Lt. Edward Tatum.

He stated that they had first marched to the state of South Carolina and that there they were attached to the regiment under the command of Col. Monroe and they then marched to 96 near Charleston and they then marched to guard the prisoners from 96 to Williamsburg and there and then the said pensioner was honorably discharged.

Then again in the month of May 1781 the said pensioner again volunteered to serve in the capacity of a private soldier for a tour of 3 months duration to serve in the company under the command of Capt. Shelton and they then rendezvoused at Russell Creek Meeting
House in Henry County, Virginia and they then marched up the Dan River and they were also often at the Hollow on the river. The said pensioner Charles Gowens was born in Henry County, Virginia in 1763 and came to Kentucky in 1797.

Then in the year 1815 the said pensioner removed from Harrison County, Kentucky to Gallatin County, Kentucky. In all his tours of duty the said pensioner had volunteered his services. The said pensioner stated and swore that he had seen Capt. Small, Col. Monroe
and Col. Martin and that he had been honorably discharged at Williamsburg.

==O==

The affidavit of Benjamin Miller, a clergyman and James Furnish, [his son-in-law] was also given. They stated that at one time and in the said county and state they had been well acquainted with the said pensioner, and the said deponents also stated that in the neighborhood in which the said pensioner resided he was reputed to have served in the Revolutionary War on the side of the United States.

==O==

April 7, 1855, in Gallatin County, Kentucky, the said pensioner at the age of 93 years appeared in open court again and stated that he had served in the capacity of a private in the company under the command of Capt Hamby and in the regiment under the command of Col Monroe. He stated that he had volunteered on September 1, 1779 in Henry County, Virginia for a tour of six months duration and that he had been honorably discharged at Petersburg, Virginia. He applied for the Bounty Land that was due him and he also appointed Henry J. Abbott of Warsaw, Kentucky to be his attorney.

==O==

The affidavit of David Story and White Hawkins was also given, etc. They stated that the said pensioner had signed the foregoing declaration in their presence, and they also swore that Charles Gowens was the identical person that he claimed himself to be.

The said pensioner Charles Gowens was on the Kentucky roll of pensions at the rate of $30 per annum, and his certificate of pension for that amount was issued 12-14-1?, and it was sent to the Hon. R. M. Johnson, House of Representatives.”

Charles Gowens lived through a time period that embraced the turbulent events from the Revolutionary War through the Civil War. His longevity, remarkable as it is, was eclipsed by that of his wife who lived to be 110, according to descendants.

He was married about 1785 probably in Henry County, wife’s name Elizabeth. Elizabeth “Betsy” Gowens was born in 1770.

In 1797 they removed to Kentucky, probably Harrison County where a daughter was married February 16, 1814.

In 1815, Charles Gowens removed his family to Gallatin County, Kentucky, according to his pension statement. He was enumerated there in 1830 as the head of a household, page 182:

“Goin, Charles white male 60-70
white female 50-60
white male 20-30
white male 10-15
white female 80-90”

The octogenarian in the household is believed to be the mother of Charles Gowens or Elizabeth “Betsy” Gowens. Adjoining the household, page 182, was that of “Garrott Goin,” a son.

The family of George Goins, unidentified was enumerated in 1830 in Gallatin County near the residence of Charles Gowens, “above the Kentucky River,” page 180:

“Goins, George white male 30-40
white female 20-30
white male 10-15
white female 10-15
white female 0-5
white female 0-5”

He was the only individual named “George” in the 1830 census of Kentucky whose surname was of interest to Gowen chroniclers.

In 1833 Charles Gowens received a pension as a Revolutionary soldier. He was pensioned on Certificate 25-242 issued under the act of June 7, 1832. He continued in Gallatin
County June 1, 1840 when he was listed there in the “U.S. Census of Pensioners.” In another compilation of pensioners he was shown as “Charles Goins, born in 1769.”

Charles Gowens wrote his will June 18, 1847 in Gallatin County. A great-great grandson, Norman Bass Gowens of Waco, Texas retained the original copy of the will in 1975. It read:

“I, Charles Goens of Gallatin County in the State of Kentucky, being sensible from my advanced age and increasing infirmities that the close of my mortal life draws near and being of sound mind and disposing memory, do make and publish this, my last will and testament, hereby revoking any and all wills and testaments by me heretofore made.

First, as I am not indebted to any one, in a pecuniary manner, I shall give my executors no trouble on that subject.

Second, as my wife, Betsey and myself have been living for a considerable time past with our son, James Goens, and as I expect to remain with him during my life and desire him to take care of and provide for us both while we live, I give and bequeath to my said son, James Goens the farm or tract of land in said county of Gallatin, near Providence meeting house, being the same whereon I have lived for many years past, containing about 107 acres, be the same more or less, with all the appurtenances thereof to be his and his heirs forever, upon the conditions as forestated, that the said James shall maintain and comfortably provide for myself and my wife during our natural lives.

Third to my son, John Goens; my son, Garrett Goens, my daughter, Lucinda Rose; my daughter, Polly Bales; my daughter, Nancy Furnish; my daughter, Hannah Rose and
my daughter, Sally Kidwell, I give and bequeath each the sum of two dollars to be paid out of my estate.

Lastly, I appoint my said son, James Goens as executor of this, my last will and testament, confidently believing that should my wife, his mother, survive me, that he will not suffer her to want during her life.

In witness whereof I have hereunto set my hand and seal this eighteenth day of June AD 1847.

Charles [X] Goens
Witnesses: K. I. Abbott, Benjamin Litter”

In an affidavit made July 2, 1853 “Charles Goins, a citizen of Gallatin County, aged 86, states that he is well acquainted with Lucinda Rose, that she is his daughter, that she married Charles Rose.” On September 20, 1854 Charles Gowens deeded to Lucinda Gowens Rose 127.5 acres of land on Craig’s Creek “for $1 and the love and affection of my daughter,” according to Gallatin County Deed Book O, page 139.

In 1855, at “age 92,” Charles Gowens made application for a land grant and received Bounty Land Warrant No. 26-106 for 160 acres under the Pension Act of 1855. He lived to be 102 years old, dying in Kentucky in 1865, and Elizabeth “Betsy” Gowens survived to 110 years old, according to Sylvester Bernard Gowens, a great-grandson of Lubbock, Texas.

“Texas Society DAR Register of Revolutionary Ancestors” gives the date of his death as 1857 in Gallatin County.

Children born to Charles Gowens and Elizabeth “Betsy” Gowens include:

John Gowens born about 1786
Lucinda Gowens born about 1788
Polly Gowens born about 1790
Garrett Gowens born about 1792
Nancy Gowens born about 1793
Hannah Gowens born about 1796
Sally Gowens born about 1800
George Washington Gowens born in 1802
James Blair Gowens born in 1810

The descendants of Charles Gowens and Elizabeth “Betsy” Gowens became quite numerous and scattered. Their children, like other branches of the family, used diverse
spellings of the surname. They were usually recorded as “John Goin,” whose descendants remained in Kentucky; “Lucinda Goen,” whose descendants removed to Indiana; “Polly Goen,” whose descendants remained in Kentucky; “Garret Goin,” whose descendants remained in Kentucky; “Nancy Goen,” whose descendants went to Indiana and Illinois; “Hannah Goins” whose descendants went to Indiana; “Sally Goens” whose descendants remained in Kentucky; “George Washington Gowing” whose descendants went to Iowa,
Missouri and Kansas, and James Blair Gowens whose descendants went to Iowa, Nebraska and Texas.

3)  Dear Cousins

As a Gowen, I wanted to let you know how delighted I am to receive the newsletter. I never realized what a rich and interesting history I am associated with. I am enclosing my
membership for 1990 and another as a gift for my brother, Neil O. Gowen of Loveland, CO. Lorna M. Gowen, 218 S. Lafayette St, Denver, CO, 80209.

==Dear Cousins==

It has always been of interest to me to find the town of Gowensville, SC listed on the state’s map, and I have intended to write someone there with the inquiry as to its origin. Your article has answered that question in an excellent manner.

Now, another question. During World War II and sometime thereafter, there was a Gowen Field somewhere in Idaho. Do your or any of your staff know the history of this airfield? I am sure it will be interesting to the members of the Foundation to also have an answer to this.

You are off to a fine start, and I sincerely approve of the membership fee as I am confident that we all want to contribute to the success of the Foundation. I am enclosing my Contributing Membership as I certainly do not want to risk missing the newsletter or any other mailing. Olen R. Gowens, Ashby Place, Ladoga, IN, 47954.

==Dear Cousins==

I received my first copy of the Newsletter, and it is one of the biggest thrills in my 84 years. I am enclosing my membership for 1990 and copies of proof of my descent from
James Goyen who was born in Mecklenburg County, VA May 30, 1755. My maternal grandmother, Julia Roberta Guynes was a daughter of George Ross Guynes, son of John Goyne and Matilda Hall Goyne. I was born in Mississippi. I last saw her in 1915 when my family moved to Louisiana. I remember her well. Three of her children were female triplets. Velma S. Beuerle, 3317 Clairmont St, Flint, MI, 48503.

==Dear Cousins==

Thank you so much for putting me in touch with Beverly Smith of Smyrna, Georgia who is descended from Gowen Harris, brother of my ancestor, James P. Harris. I called her
immediately, and she had already put a packet of information in the mail to me.

I was able to send her information on Gowen Harris in Mississippi. She said Gowen Harris was married to Frances Sharp who stated in court records they were married in 1801.

The Sharp name is going to help make my connection to the Gowen family. I am very excited to have someone like Beverly help me on my lineage, and it’s thanks to you and the Foundation that it has become possible. Rubie Harris, 4817 York, #226, Metairie, LA, 70001.

==Dear Cousins==

I was thrilled to be included in your mailing list at the request of my long-lost cousin Robert J. Goyen of Sebastopol, Victoria, Australia. About 12 years ago my brother started
researching the origins of mother’s family who came from Tasmania. He had moderate success, and in 1987, through a cousin in Alexandria, NZ we “discovered” Robert who was
fully committed to the family’s history.

We filled in a few gaps in his research, but he has provided us with our own heritage going back [through Goyen, Goyne, Gowenl to the mid 1600s. I had concluded that we were a dying race, but now I find I have literally thousands of cousins throughout the world! I am enclosing my 1990 membership and am looking forward to the next edition of the newsletter. L. Roy Grigg, 12 Mere Rd, Taupo, 3300, New Zealand, Phone 86-601.

==Dear Cousins==

I am very much interested in continuing to receive the Newsletter. I have been researching my Goins family for about six years. Enclosed is my pedigree sheet and a copy of a biography of my great-grandfather Oscar Clayborn Goins. I have Goins information on several families, Melungeon information, Civil War, Revolutionary War, War of 1812 and
state militia military records.

If anyone is interested in writing to me for more information, I’ll answer all letters. Louise Goins Richardson, 2207 E. Lake Street, Paragould, AR, 72450.

==Dear Cousins==

Recently I was in Pennsylvania visiting my sister, Mrs. George Brenton Gowan and saw the Foundation Newsletter. I have been researching my family for about 10 years. I am enclosing Gowan family group sheets and will continue to send data to the Foundation. Please add my membership. Marjorie A. Templeton, 204 S. Bentley St, Payson, AZ, 85541.

==Dear Cousins==

I was very interested in the article of Gowensville, SC in the newsletter. I will send to you an old article about the founding of Inman, SC which is very near Gowensville. The town was founded by Charles McElreath Amos and a Mr. Gowan [as spelled in the article.] It seems that Amos donated the land and that he and Gowan hauled the logs and built the
train station. They named the town “Imnan” after a railroad official, perhaps to curry a little favor. The plan worked; the depot was officially recognized by the railroad, and the town flourished because of the train-related business. Naturally Amos and Gowan owned much of the land which was sold to merchants and citizens. Smart businessmen! We wish the Foundation and staff continued success and the very best in the new year. Dennis R. Amos, 604 Ferndale Drive, Rock Hill, SC, 29730.

==Dear Cousins==

l recently purchased a facsimile of the 1901 edition of “The History of Sanford, Maine 1661-1900” as a Christmas present for my wife, Edna, a Gowen descendant. We have enjoyed perusing its pages and felt that you would also. You will notice in the enclosure 44 Gowens listed in the index.

Best wishes to the Foundation staff. Rev. Charles R Monteith, Box 748, Rockland, ME, 04841, 207/594-8701

==Dear Cousins==

Thank you for sending the Gowen Newsletter. I have enjoyed it and am enthusiastic about family organizations coordinating research and records. I am enclosing my membership
and a list of Gowen researchers who should be included if they are not already on your list.

I am president of Hawkins Family Organization, and we produce a newsletter called “Hawkins. Heritage.” We have collected over 500 family group sheets of Hawkins who lived in Virginia before 1800, plus numerous other Hawkins. We use this collection to offer a pedigree service worldwide. It has proven to be a very worthwhile service, and I hope that Gowen Research Foundation will be offering something similar in the future. Kathleen Briglio, 2261 Edgelow St, Victoria, B.C, V8N IR6 Canada.

==Dear Cousins==

l was born in Alabama, lived in Tennessee and migrated to Texas. From Dallas I went to Arkansas and lived in Dogpatch, Omaha and Harrison. I have lived a lot of my life believing
that I had very few relatives on my side of the family Imagine my surprise to learn that I have “cousins by the dozens” and they are turning up all over the world. It’s amazing to learn that the Foundation has already turned up 2,000 of them. R. Jonas Gowen, Rt. 3, Box 382, Mt. Vernon, TX, 75447.

==Dear Cousins==

Who were the parents of my ancestor, Thomas Goin, m1835 widow Lucy Long Whitlock in Madison County, KY.

Courthouse records show other names Goen, Goan, Gowing, Going, etc. in the vicinity with first names of Joseph, John, Micajah, Frances, William [m. Elizabeth Tatum], Jeremiah
[m. Susannah Campbell]. Birth and death dates of Thomas Goin unknown. He went off county tax records in 1849; Lucy shown as family head c1850 in Madison County with six Goin children. One was my great-grandfather. Beatrice Goins Dougherty, Box 388, Richmond, KY, 40475.

==Dear Cousins==

Seeking parents of my grandfather, James F. Gowan of Bemis, TN, bc1885. I would be happy to correspond with any family member who can find a relationship. Michael A.
Gowan, 12726 W. Virginia Ave, Lakewood, CO, 80228.

==Dear Cousins==

A bible inscription reads, “John Gowen was born February 13, 1775 in Grand, Pennsylvania.” If Grand, PA were a town, it no longer exists. Seeking the county where Grand, PA was located and any information about the parentage of John Gowen. Nancy Hargesheimer, Box 1901, Lubbock, TX, 79408, 806/744-8517.

4)  Gowen Research Foundation
Editorial Board Nominees

AMOS, DENNIS 604 Ferndale Drive ROCK HILL SC 29730
BRANTLEY, LEVA JOY GOWEN Route 1, Box 1440 FLETCHER OK 73541
CLEMENTS, BARBARA 38 Pine Road NORTH HAMPTON NH 03862
COUCH, MARIE GOWEN Route 7, Box 222 JONESBORO AR 72401
DEMARCELLUS, JUNE GOWEN 151 Riviera Drive RIVIERA BEACH FL 33404
DENDY, MIRIAM 1800 Ballard SE HUNTSVILLE AL 35801
DENNEY, CAROL A. 7112 Calumet AMARILLO TX 79106
DUNCAN, SAMMY CRAIG 2107 Division GREENVILLE TX 75401
EDMONDSON, CHAN Box 141235 . DALLAS TX 75214
FENDIG, GLADYS H. GOWEN 204 Cater Street ST. SIMONS IS. GA 31522
GOANS, SAM K. 8751 Wimbledon Dr. KNOXVILLE TN 37923
GOEN, MRS. DIXON 5157 Hastings Road SAN DIEGO CA 92116
GOIN, HOYT L. 2506 W. 2nd Street RUSSELLVILLE AR 72801
GOSNELL, JAMES RICHARD 506 Eastway Drive SPARTANBURG SC 29302
GOWAN, GEORGE T. 906 Wandering Way ALLEN TX 75002
GOWAN, JACK & LA FAY 2157 Shadybrook Lane BIRMINGHAM AL 35226
GOWAN, PATRICK WILLIAM 1422 Puterbough St. SAN DIEGO CA 92103
GOWAN, PHILLIP ALAN Box 5777 NASHVILLE TN 37208
GOWEN, ARLEE 5708 Gary Avenue LUBBOCK TX 79413
GOWEN, BARNEY ALEXANDER Box 387 WOODBINE GA 31569
GOWEN, CHARLES LATIMER 1327 Peachtree St NE ATLANTA GA 30309
GOWEN, DON LEE 1310 Cantwell Av SW DECATUR AL 35601
GOWEN, GARY E. 815 S. 3rd Street LAS VEGAS NV 89101
GOWEN, JERRY A. Box 641 ANTIOCH TN 37011
GOWEN, MILLER ABBOTT 9 rue Beauregard GENEVA SW 99999
GOWEN, THOMAS MASON Route 7, Box 7904 MANCHESTER TN 37355
GOWEN, WILLIAM RODWAY 4004 89th Ave SE MERCER ISLAND WA 98040
GOWEN, YVONNE 15015-91 “A” Avenue SURREY BC 99999
GOWENS, NORMAN BASS 7025 Harvey Drive WACO TX 76710
GOYEN, ROBERT J. 523 Sutton Street SEBASTOPOL 3356VC 99999
GOYNE, JR, COL. CARROLL H 10019 Canterbury Dr. SHREVEPORT LA 71106
HALL, EVELYN SANDIFER 4319 Colonial Drive SHREVEPORT LA 71119
HARGESHEIMER, NANCY Box 1901 LUBBOCK TX 79408
HERBERT, MARTHA GOWEN Rt. 1, Box 50 EKRON KY 40117
HIX, MARTHA RAND 13531 Norland Drive SAN ANTONIO TX 78232
JOHNSTON, DONNA GOWIN 1513 Westridge Terr. CASPER WY 82604
JOHNSTON, SALLIE GENTRY Box 892 JACKSONVILLE AL 36265
KRETZSCHMAR, LT. COL. SAM 3630 Old Post Road SAN ANGELO TX 76904
LAND, HELEN L. 2980 Arizona LOS ALAMOS NM 87544
MCNIEL, LINDA S. 3702 43rd Street LUBBOCK TX 79413
NEWMAN, KENNETH 906 Second St. JACKSONVILLE AL 36265
ORR, EVELYN MC KINLEY 8310 Emmet Street OMAHA NE 68134
OVERSTREET, HAZEL DEAN Rt. 1, Box 938 ODUM GA 31555
POE, PHYLLIS 15406 Ashburton HOUSTON TX 77040
PROCTOR, LOLA RUTH JAMERS 4717 Bethany GARLAND TX 75042
RICHARDSON, LOUISE GOINS 2207 E. Lake Street PARAGOULD AR 72450
ROBERTSON, BETTY J. 3127 Home Prk Circ.N JACKSONVILLE FL 32207
SALMOND, BILLIE JUNE 530 E. Woodland Lane BOUNTIFUL UT 84010
SLOAN, LANDA BETH 4320 Bellaire Dr, S. FT. WORTH TX 76109
SMITH, JUNE Box 85 BELFAIR WA 98528
SPALDING, ANNE GOWEN 350 Cross Tree Lane ATLANTA GA 30328
STARK, MARY BURNS 239 Deerfield Street HOUSTON TX 77022
TATE, MARGARET PEARSON 34 Washington St EXETER NH 03833
TROSTLE, MARY GOWIN 4515 48th Street LUBBOCK TX 79414
WHITE, MARY POPE 7008 Black Bluff SW CAVE SPRING GA 30124
WILHELM, MAE Route 2, Box 523 ESTILL SPRINGS,TN 37330
WILLIAMS, ANNE GOWEN Box 526 WOODBINE GA 31569
WOOD, BRENDA Box 218 CHANDLER IN 47610
WOOD, HAZEL M. 3772 Baker Street SAN DIEGO CA 92117
WRIGHT, MARGERY D. 9022 Southwood SHREVEPORT LA 71118

If you wish to participate in the Foundation, you may clip [or reproduce] the membership coupon below. Indicate the type of membership you prefer, and Linda McNiel, Foundation
secretary, will Issue your 1990 Membership Card.

Gowen Research Foundation Newsletter
Arlee Gowen, Editor
Linda McNiel, Circulation

Gowen Research Foundation
Phone: 806/795-8758 or 795-9694
5708 Gary Avenue
Lubbock, Texas, 79413
E-mail:gowen@llano.net
Fax: 806/795-9694
Internet: http://www.llano.net/gowen

___________________________________________________________

NOTE:  The above information produced by the Gowen Research Foundation (GRF), and parts of the “Gowen Manuscript” they worked on producing.  It has tons of information – much of it is correct, but be careful, some of it is not correct – so check their sources and logic.  I’ve copied some of their information in the past researching my own family, only to find out there were some clear mistakes.   So be sure to check the information to verify if it is right before citing the source and believing the person who researched it before was 100% correct.  Most of the information I found there seems to be correct, but some is not.

Their website is:  Internet: http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.com/~gowenrf

There does not seem to be anyone “manning the ship” at the Gowen Research Foundation, or Gowen Manuscript site any longer, and there is no way to contact anyone about any errors.   The pages themselves don’t have a mechanism to leave a note for others to see any “new information” that you may have that shows when you find info that shows something is wrong, or when something has been verified.

Feel free to leave messages about any new information found, or errors in these pages, or information that has been verified that those who wrote these pages may not have known about.

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