1762 Levi Goins of Moore Co, NC (Y5)

Levi Goins b. June 1762- married to Amy Goins b. 1772

Parents:

  • David (Daniel) Goyen (b. bef 1735) m. Rebecca Becky (MNU) Goyen Elliot

Children:

  • Nutty Goings b. 1803
    • Joseph Goings b. 1840

Siblings:

  • David Goyen b. 1760-1780 (killed at Masker’s Station in 1780)
  • Levi Goyen b. 1762-

Possible Children, Grandchildren and Family of Levi Going that were listed on the same page or next page in the 1850 US Census in Moore Co, NC: 

  • John Goings b. 1792 m. Lydia Goings b. 1805
    • John Goings b. 1829
    • Benjamin Goings b. 1832
    • Lydia Goings b. 1836
    • Rachel Goings b. 1777
  • Elizabeth Goings b. 1804
    • Barbara Goings b. 1848
  • Neil Goings b. 1813 m. Mary Goings b 1814
    • Delilah Goings b. 1834
    • Amy Goings b. 1835
    • Cancy Goings b. 1838
    • Sarah Goings b. 1840
    • Celia Goings b. 1842
    • Catharine Goings b. 1844
    • Eliza Goings b. 1847
  • Lucy Goings b. 1821
    • Mary A Goings b. 1840
    • Rebecca Goings b. 1842
    • Lucian Goings b. 1847
    • Edmund Goings b. 1848
  • Levi Goings b. 1824 m. to Mary Goings b. 1825
    • Flora A Goings b. 1848
    • Jennet Goings b. 1849
  • Martha Goings b. 1825
    • Wiley Goings b. 1843
    • Hayward Goings b. 1847
  • Nancy Goings b. 1826
    • William Goings b. 1845
  • David Goings b. 1827
  • Thomas Goings b. 1830 m. Celicia Goings b. 1823
    • Telitha Goings b. 1842
    • James Goings b. 1845
    • Green Goings b. 1847
    • Henry Goings b. 1848
  • Mary Goings b. 1808
    • David Goings b. 1836
    • William H Goings b. 1834
    • Eliza Goings b. 1837
    • Berry Goings b. 1839
    • Emeline Goings b. 1842
    • Marticia Goings b. 1847
    • Laurence Goings b. 1849

Related Counties: 

FACTS: 

Levi Goines – 90 yrs old on June 28, 1852
DOB June 1762
Served in SC under Regiment which was Commanded by Col. John Winn, and Gen. Richard Winn
Captain John Gray
Started in 1780 after fall of Charleston, SC
Residence at end of war was in Fairfield (same as his Capt).
removed from the state of South Carolina to North Carolina Moore County soon after the close of the Revolutionary War where he has resided ever since

1780 May 12 – Levy Goines – Enters Revolutionary War (affids below from 1852 application for pension):
Transcribed by Tracy Hutchison. Not to be copied or reproduced in any format for profit. While I have tried my best, I am sure there are errors in the transcription.
Thutchison10@gmail.com
Revolutionary War Pension of Levi Goines
Declaration in order to obtain the benefit of the acts of Congress for the benefit of Revolutionary Soldiers.
State of North Carolina
County of Moore
On this 26th day of April AD1852 personally appeared before the court of Pleas and Quarter Sessions held for the county and State of aforesaid, Levi Goines a resident of said County of Moore, and State of N.C. aged, about ninety years, who being first duly sworn according to Law, doth on his oath, make the following declaration in order to obtain the benefit, of the provision made by the acts of Congress for Soldiers who served in the Revolutionary war. That he volunteered in Fairfield County, State of South Carolina, and agreed to serve until the end of the war, the time he entered the service he does not recollect, but believes it was about the time that the British took Charleston that he served as a private in a Company Commanded by Captain John Gray and was attached to a Regiment which was Commanded by Col. John Winn, and Gen. Richard Winn. He continues in actual service for about the time of twelve months though his recollection is not very distinct as to the time he served but he was honorably discharged as he believes, at the close of the said Revolutionary War by his said Captain, having been marched back to said Fairfield County, which was also the residence of his Captain. He obtained no written discharge. He was engaged in a battle near the confluence of the Congaree and Santee Rivers. Gen. Lee he (note at bottom of page reads “He thinks two year, but is determined to be written bounds”) believes was the commander though his memory as to this is indistinct. Says the town surrendered here without much fighting. His services was entirely confined to the Sate of South Carolina, marching from Wynsborough to the Congaree Fort. And various other parts of said state under his officers. He recollects the names of many officers and soldiers with whom he served but does not know any regulars the following are some of them. Gen. Sumpter, Majr John Pearson, William W. Morey, James Steel, Joseph Kennedy, John Greggs, Liut Andrew Gray, & Saml Croslin (the latter was a regular). He knows of no person living, whose testimony he can procure who can testify to his service having removed from the state of South Carolina to North Carolina Moore County soon after the close of the Revolutionary War where he has resided ever since. He has never been positive until recently that he was entitled to a Pension. Several years since a gentleman informed him that he was entitled to anything and made no further effort until now. He hereby relinquishes every claim whatever to a pension except the present and declares that his name is not on the pension roll of the agency of any state.
Sworn to and subscribed the day and year aforesaid in open court.
Test. Aron A. F. Leavell Levi (X) Goines
Sworn to in open court this 26th day of April A.D. 1852. A. C. Curry clerk of Moore County Court.
State of North Carolina
Moore County
On this 19th day of February A.D. 1852 personally appeared before me a justice of the peace, within and for the County and the state aforesaid Duncan Murchison, who, being duly sworn according to Law, declares that he has been acquainted with Levi Goines for 45 years during which time he has resided in the County and state aforesaid. That when he came to this county he understood and believed that he came from the state of South Carolina. He is a man of good character where oath may be relied on, he is reputed to have been a soldier in the Revolutionary War while living in south Carolina of which there is no doubt.
Sworn to and subscribe before me this 19th day of February AD 1852.
Duncan Murchinson
Jno. C Jackson JP
State of North Carolina
Moore County
Pension office department
The declaration of Levi Goines, a Revolutionary Soldier, with the proof of his services here unto annexed, is respectfully submitted for you consideration, it is believed that under the several acts of Congress he is entitled to a Pension for life from the 4th day of March 1831. To back pay since that time and to bounty lands having volunteered during the war and served as he believes until its close or until discharged by his officers which several claims he respectfully asks the department to allow him. He has no living nor documentary evidence of his services but has transmitted a correct statement under oath showing as near as frail memory will allow the time place and manner of his services the officer under whom he served and with whom he was acquainted. He also produces the certificate of three of the most respectable and intelligent men in his county who establish beyond doubt his food character and general reputation as a soldier and I imagine there are but few of those Veterans who have been mercifully spared until this day that would swear falsely. This proof I trust will be sufficient to establish his claim. Time has so reduced the number of Veterans and of the witnesses of their services and sufferings that to require of them positive proof independently of their own statement would be to deprive them of the benefit of the act. An early investigation of this claim is respectfully solicited. If consistent with the regulations of the department, his humble condition in life and very feeble health require it. All of which is respectfully subscribed. My address is Carthage, N.C.
W. C. Thagard
State of North Carolina
Moore County
On the 28th day of June A.D. 1852 personally appeared before me a justice of the peace within and for the county and state aforesaid Gen W. D. Dawd who being duly sworn according to law declared that he is well acquainted with Levi Goines of said county and from his general character has no hesitation in saying that he is entitled to full credit upon his oath. That he has recently been requested to examine said Goines relation to his services as a soldier in the Revolutionary war. That he has examined and conversed with him on that subject at various times and with great particularity and has no doubt that said Goines volunteered in the state of So. Carolina for and during the war and continued in actual service in the Revolutionary war for nearly or quite two years. That he inquired of said Goines when he entered the service. Said he could not tell but it was about the time the British took Charleston that he inquired what was his age now, he said he was ninety years this month. That he discovered he discovered he must have been under twenty one years when Charleston was surrendered to the British, that without making a single interaction to said Goines of that fact (nor can he read a word of history) that he inquired how old he was when he volunteered, to which he replied that he was about nineteen years old, that he then referred to the history of the revolution and found that the time Charleston was surrendered (12th May 1780). Said Goines was about nineteen. That he then inquired what general officers he knew. He said Green, Sumpter, Wynn, Lee. That he then inquired what battles he was in. He said he was in but one which was at the Cangaree Fort. That he again referred to the history and finds that this fort was called Moltes near the confluence of the Congaree & Santee Rivers. Gen Lee was dispatched to this place. That from these facts together with many other incidents of said war related by said Goines. The conclusion was irresistible that said Goines is one of these Veterans who stood up for his country in the hour of danger and has never yet received a pension. That said Goines with his aged companion are living alone in a very humble condition in life barely able to afford themselves the comforts which their advanced age require. That it is in the universal opinion of all who conversed with him that he was a faithful soldier in the Revolutionary war.
W. D. Dowd
Sworn to and subscribed before me this day and was above written.
D Street JP (Seal)
By reference to history I find that the battle of Kings Mountain was fought 7th October 1780 after which Lord Cornwallis left Charlotte and fell back to Winnsboro: the very place and years that Mr. Goines mentions in his declaration
W. C. T.
State of North Carolina
Moore County
On this 16th day of July AD1852 personally appeared before me a justice of the peace within and for the County and State aforesaid Duncan M. R. McIntosh Esqr who being duly sworn according to law declare that he has been acquainted with Levi Goines for about twenty five years. That he is a man of good character for truth and veracity. There are but five men whom to be believed upon on there oath than he is. He is reputed to have served as a soldier in the Revolutionary war in the state of South Carolina. That he has no doubt of that fact. He is a man about ninety years of age.
D. M. R. McIntosh
Sworn to and subscribed before me the day and year above written.
Wm Barrett
State of North Carolina
Moore County
I Alexander C. Curry Clerk of the Court of Pleas and Quarter Sessions in and for the county and state aforesaid do herby certify that the declaration of Levi Goines hereunto annexed was duly executed and sworn in open court by the identical Levi Goines named in said declaration who is reputed and believed to have been a Revolutionary soldier. I further certify that Duncan Murchison Esq, D.M.R. McIntosh Esq, and Genl W. D. Dowd whose names appear to the annexed certificate are citizens of said county of high standings whose varsity for truth cannot be doubted. Said Murchison is a prominent elder in the Presbyterian Church and each of them have been promoted to distinguished places of trust in their county and state. Said signatures being in their own proper handwriting. I further certify that John C. Jackson, William Barret and Donald Street whose names appear to the annexed certificates of Duncan Murchison, D.M.R. McIntosh and W.D. Dawd were at the time of signing the same acting justices of the peace in and for the county aforesaid duly confirmed and qualified accordingly to law and that their signatures to the same are genuine. In testimony wherof I have hereunto affirmed my seal of office and subscribed my name the 6th day of August A.D. 1852
A. C. Curry clerk
Of Moore County Court
Carthage N.C Apr 8th 1853
Dear Sir.
Some months since I presented (through Gen Dockery) to the department the declaration of Levi Goines a soldier in the war of the Revolution asking to be allowed a pension for his services in said war. I stated in my letter that the advanced age and feeble health of the old Veteran presents strong claims to the department for an early investigation. I have waited with great patience and as yet the department has not seen fit to address me on the subject. If there is any informality in the declaration or any lack of testimony that prevents the claim being allowed will the department please to inform me or if it has not yet been investigated or has been allowed and no information given. I ask respectfully to be informed thereof.
Very Respectfully
W. C. Thagard
Moore Co, NC.  https://www.fold3.com/image/22042789

1780 SC Levi Goins pension application abstract_Page_1

1780 SC Levi Goins pension application abstract_Page_1

1780 SC Levi Goins pension application abstract_Page_2

1780 SC Levi Goins pension application abstract_Page_2

1780 SC Levi Goins pension application abstract_Page_3

1780 SC Levi Goins pension application abstract_Page_3

1780 SC Levi Goins pension application abstract_Page_4

1780 SC Levi Goins pension application abstract_Page_4

1780 Levi Gaines or Goines in SC

1780 Levi Gaines or Goines in SC

1781-1798 – Land of David Gowen in Davidson Co, TN.
A David Gowen was killed by Indians in Davidson Co, TN in 1779. He was in possession of a 640 acre tract of land in that county, and several documents give hints to his family relationships.
The following records indicate the following:
1) An unsigned inventory in 1781 indicates David Gowine died in 1781.
2) William Gowen is granted admin of David Gowen decd’s estate in 1783.
3) Early Times of Middle Tennessee states David Goin was killed at Manskers Station by Indians
4) Levi Goyen is the brother of David Goyen, both free mulattos according to the power of attorney and affidavit filed in 1792, and both are children of David Goyen & Becky Goyen. (Becky had remarried to an Elliott by the time she files her affidavit in 1792)
5) Levi Goyen appoints John Goyen Gent, of Davidson Co, NC (TN), as his power of atty – calls him his “beloved friend”.
6) The 1792 power of atty says the 640 acres of land was left to Levi Goyen as David’s proper heir in law, Levi is also noted as David’s full and oldest brother.
7) William Easley witnesses the power of attorney given to John Goyen/Gowen.
8) The Benj Boyd (the justice) states that, “it is said” that Levi Goyen was born in Fairfield Co, SC

The information does not give the exact relationship, if any, of Levi Gowen to William Gowen & John Gowen of Davidson Co, TN. The fact that William Easley signs as witness indicates this is the John Gowen of Spartanburg Co, SC that signed this affidavit.

They may be 2d cousins. Levi & David may descend from James Gowen b. 1680’s presumed side of the family. Possibly related to the Granville Co, NC Gowen family that was near the Tarr River. One of the brothers in that group named Edward Gowen purchased 200 acres of land in Fairfield County in 1770 on the Broad River and had his payments/indents from the Revolutionary War delivered to Capt. John Gowen. Edward Gowen’s father named Edward & John Gowen’s father named William would be 1st cousins if this is the case. It is presumed that James Gowen b. 1680 may have had a spouse that was mixed race – as most of his presumed children are identified at different times as mulatto in records. Thomas Gowen b. 1650 would be their common paternal g-grandparent. See the following related records:

1781 Inventory of the estate of David Gowine,
An Inventory of the Estate of David Gowine who died in the year 1781 the ___ of was in the proceedings of Com.er.
To wit: One cow & calf 5.10.0, one cown and calf 5.12.0 – 11.2.0
One heifer 2.10.0, one heifer 1.9.0 – 3.19.0
One gun at 2.19.0, one bell at 0.7.0 – 3.12.0
One wedding bed(sp?) 0.5.0, one buckskin 0.5.0 – 0.10.0
One handkerchief 0.1.0, one pair of buckskins 0.1.0 – 0.2.0
(No signature on inventory)
Will Book 1, pg 11. Davidson Co, TN
https://www.familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:2:77TV-1MY?i=26&cc=1909088&cat=307760

1783 March 4 “William Goings entered into bond in Davidson County with James Shaw, security, in the amount of £200 specie” and was granted the administration of “the estate of David Goings, deceased” by the Nashville Committee. William Gowen signed the return of the estate of David Gowen presented to the court. Shortly afterwards “William Gowens” as administrator of the estate of “David Gowens, deceased” sued John Gibson in a “plea of detinue*.”
Worth S. Ray, writing in “Tennessee Cousins” stated, “The court of the Cumberland District met again of June 3, 1783, and the Estate of David Gowen came up against John Gibson.” The estate was awarded £2 “for a heifer he disposed of,” according to early Nashville court records.
David Goin, Patrick Quigley, Betsy Kennedy, John Shockley, James Lumsley and William Neely” were killed at Mansker’s Station, according to “Early Times in Middle Tennessee” published in 1857 by John Carr. Davidson Co, TN   1783 March 4: William Goings was granted administration of David Goins estate (David Goins killed by Indians at Mansker’s Station) by the Committee of the Cumberland Association. [ref. 44b].  Davidson County, North Carolina.  Richard Carlton. 1770–1790 Census of the Cumberland Settlements. Davidson, Sumner and Tennessee Counties (In What is Now Tennessee). Baltimore, Maryland: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc., 1987.
https://www.ancestry.com/interactive/3006/censuscumberland-001201_44?pid=953&backurl=http://search.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/sse.dll?_phsrc%3DPXv360%26_phstart%3DsuccessSource%26usePUBJs%3Dtrue%26gss%3Dangs-c%26new%3D1%26rank%3D1%26msT%3D1%26gsln%3DGoin%26gsln_x%3D0%26msypn__ftp%3DNorth%2520Carolina,%2520USA%26msypn%3D36%26msypn_PInfo%3D5-%257C0%257C1652393%257C0%257C2%257C0%257C36%257C0%257C0%257C0%257C0%257C0%257C%26msypn_x%3D1%26msypn__ftp_x%3D1%26cpxt%3D1%26cp%3D12%26catbucket%3Drstp%26MSAV%3D1%26MSV%3D0%26uidh%3Dm37%26pcat%3DCEN_1790%26h%3D953%26recoff%3D8%252020%26dbid%3D3006%26indiv%3D1%26ml_rpos%3D1&treeid=&personid=&hintid=&usePUB=true&_phsrc=PXv360&_phstart=successSource&usePUBJs=true#?imageId=censuscumberland-001201_44

1783 July 1: William Gowen plaintiff in lawsuit against John Gibson concerning cattle belonging to the estate of David Gower, deceased, before the Committee of the Cumberland Association [ref. 49b]. Davidson County, North Carolina. Richard Carlton. 1770–1790 Census of the Cumberland Settlements. Davidson, Sumner and Tennessee Counties (In What is Now Tennessee). Baltimore, Maryland: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc., 1987.
https://www.ancestry.com/interactive/3006/censuscumberland-001201_44?pid=953&backurl=http://search.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/sse.dll?_phsrc%3DPXv360%26_phstart%3DsuccessSource%26usePUBJs%3Dtrue%26gss%3Dangs-c%26new%3D1%26rank%3D1%26msT%3D1%26gsln%3DGoin%26gsln_x%3D0%26msypn__ftp%3DNorth%2520Carolina,%2520USA%26msypn%3D36%26msypn_PInfo%3D5-%257C0%257C1652393%257C0%257C2%257C0%257C36%257C0%257C0%257C0%257C0%257C0%257C%26msypn_x%3D1%26msypn__ftp_x%3D1%26cpxt%3D1%26cp%3D12%26catbucket%3Drstp%26MSAV%3D1%26MSV%3D0%26uidh%3Dm37%26pcat%3DCEN_1790%26h%3D953%26recoff%3D8%252020%26dbid%3D3006%26indiv%3D1%26ml_rpos%3D1&treeid=&personid=&hintid=&usePUB=true&_phsrc=PXv360&_phstart=successSource&usePUBJs=true#?imageId=censuscumberland-001201_44

1784 Jan 15 – John Gowen (Warrant No. 115) was issued 640 acres of land on 26 Jun 1793 in TN Davidson County, located “On the E. side of Mill Creek”. This was recorded in Land Patent Book 80 page 340 as TN Davidson County Grant # 395. The original request for this land was entered on 15 Jan 1784. It took 9 years and 5 months to issue the grant.
Survey made by virtue of assignment of preemption rights of Levi Gowan, heir of David Gowan, deceased.
PATENT BOOK Issued: 26 Jun 1793, County: TN Davidson, Grant no.: 395, Book: 80 pg: 340, File no.: 1822, MARS: 12.14.2.1816
https://www.nclandgrants.com/grant/?mars=12.14.2.1816&qid=82716&rn=3

1785 Sept 30 – 1000 acres land grant to Heirs of David GowinWarrant originally issued to heirs of David Gowin for service as a sergeant in the Continental Line.
State of North Carolina No. 2609.
The Honble James Glasgow Esqr Secretary of State
To Colonel Martin Armstrong Greeting:
You are hereby required to lay off & survey for the heirs of David Gowin in the line of this state a lot of 1000 acres of land within the limits of the lands reserved by law for the officers and soldiers of the Continental line in this State.
Observing the directions of the Act of Assembly such case made and provided for receiving out lands. Two just and fair plans thereof with a certificate to each annexed you are to transmit to my office within the time limited by law.
Given under my hand at Fairfield this 30th day of September 1785. Signed: William D Lee.
(On back of grant):
(Very faint writing at top): I Levi Gowin heir of David Gowin _______ the within warrant to be my ___________ (too light to read). (Note: It appears from the following that Levi Gowin assigned this to Reading Blount, and Reading Blount then assigned it to Stockley Donelson)
Signed: Levi Gowin (his mark).
(at bottom): I assign the within warrant to Stockley Donelson for value received. Witness my hand.
Reading Blount by Stockley Donelson
1796 Aug 13 (Survey) Robertson County, Moro District. Secretary of the State of N Carolina No. 2609. The entry dated 13 Aug, 1796. I have surveyed for Stockly Donelson assignee of David Gowin’s heirs 1000 acres of land lying on both sides of the Pond Branch of Kerrs Creek …
Signed: John Donelson (DS), Stockley Donelson, atto.
Chain Carriers: Thomas Berry, James McKinly
(Back of the survey): Certifd. Stockley Donelson for Martin Armstrong, surveyor.
File No. 040, Stockley Donelson, Assignee of David Gowin (Military Warrant No. 2609)
https://nclandgrants.com/frame/?fdr=618&frm=998&mars=12.14.14.48

1785 October 24 -“Rebecca Elliot formerly the wife of Daniel Gowen, present wife of John Elliot, appeared in Fairfield County Court Monday,”
(Note: This appears to be the same Rebecca as the one married to David Gowen who had sons David and Levi – possible that this should have said “David”):
“The Court met according to adjournment whereupon Isaac Young appeared and produced Rebecca Elliot, formerly wife to Daniel Gowen, deceased from whom the said Young rented a tract of land and had engaged to pay her and her present husband, John Elliot the rent of 55 bushels of corn. The said Rebecca Elliot satisfied the court that her former husband purchased the said land and that she had been 17 years in possession of the same.
A writ of attachment had been granted by Judge John Buchanan Esq. to Thomas Nelson against Isaac Young for an unpaid rental of 50 bushels of corn. In court:
“Isaac Young appeared and produced Rebeccah Elliot formerly wife to Daniel Gowen decd, from whom the said Young rented a tract of land and had engaged to pay her and her present husband John Elliot, the rent of 55 bushels of corn.”
The judgement of the court read:
“It appears to the court that the plaintiff had no cause of action against the defendant as the said Rebeccah Elliot had never given up possession of the said land for which the plaintiff demanded rent. Therefore ordered to pay cost.”
Fairfield County, SC. Court Minute Book A, page 4 (pages arent really numbered. It is image 10 of 220).
https://www.familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:1:3Q9M-CS42-G37P-G?i=9&cat=396628

1786 Aug 14 – The indents, issued by the Treasury August 14, 1786, were approved long after the death of David Gowen of Fairfield County, son of Daniel Gowen and Rebecca Gowen. David Gowen was killed by Indians in the winter of 1779-80 at Manskers Station in Davidson County, Tennessee. William Gowen, regarded as his grandfather, was the executor of his estate at Nashville. Levi Gowen, “who passes for mulatto,” brother of David Gowen, applied successful for the administration of the estate in Fairfield County and gave “John Gowen, gentleman of Daverson County” his power of attorney. Fairfield Co, SC. http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~gowenrf/Gowenms007.htm

1788 Oct 9 – William Gowen v. The heirs of David Gowen decd – William Gowen pleads the estate of David Gowen is justly indebted to him L 27.14.3. Oath that the heirs of the sd Gowen are not resident in this county or otherwise are unknown to him. William Gowen asks the sheriff to attach the estate of David Gowen to pay his debts. Jury finds for Plt. Davidson Co, TN – Court of Pleas and Quarter Sessions court records, 1783-1789 p. 110. https://www.familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:1:3Q9M-CSKX-M3LD-Q?i=62&cat=134460

1788 Dec 13: Sto. Donelson of Danl Gowen’s heirs (should say David Gowen’s heirs based on other entries) on both sides of the pond branch the waters of Keers Creek to includ a spring about half a mile above the mouth of the branch. W 2609- L 6150- A 1000- D 13. Surveyed by John Donelson. Records of Davidson County. Land Records 1788-1793. p. 118.
https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:2:77TV-TGC4?i=276&cat=266136

1788 Nov 17 David Gowen’s 1000 acres assigned to Col. Reading Blunt, on Wind Lick Creek, the south side of Cumberland, beginning below a fork called Plumb Fork, which runs in on the west side thence up both forks for compliment. No. 2609, No 3927. Cumberland TN.

1788 Dec 17: Colo. Reading Blunt – Assee. of David Gowers Sargt (Note: should say David Gowens Sargt based on other entries) on Round Lick Creek the south side of the Cumberland beginning below a fork called Plume Fork which runs in on the west side thence up both forks for compt. Payton. W 2609- L 3927- A 1009.
Records of Davidson County. Land Records 1788-1793. p. 6.
https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:2:77TV-TGSD?i=71&cat=266136

1792 Sept 17  – Affidavit / appointment of John Goyen as power of atty for Levi Goyen to sell land as heir to David Goyen decd, in Davidson County, NC. (Davidson Co, TN).
“Know all men by these presents that I Levi Goyen of the State of South Carolina, Fairfield County and for divers good causes & consideration thereunto moving have made ordained constitute and appoint my trusty and well beloved friend John Goyen of the State of North Carolina Daverson County Gent my true and lawfull attorney for me to take out of the rights in his the said John Goyen’s own name to sell make over convey and confirm at his pleasure unto whoever may or shall agree with & purchase of him the said John Goyen a certain tract or parcel of land lying and being on Mill Creek of the East side of Daversons County aforesaid. The said land being first in the hands of David Goyen dec’d a free mullato went to Cumberland River in the year 1779, and were killed by the Indians in the year 1780, and left the said malatto Levi Goyen his proper heir in law the said tract of land containing 640 acres.
And I do hereby grant unto my said attorney my sale and full power & authority to take pursue and follow such legal courses for confirming the right of sd land unto himself as I myself might or could do were I personally present. Ratifying and confirming whatsoever my said attorney shall lawfully do or cause to be done in and about the execution of the premises.
By virtue of these presents, in witness whereof I have hereunto set my hand & seal the 17th September in the year of our Lord 1792.
Signed: Levi Gowen (his mark)
Signed sealed & del’d in the presence of us: William Easley.
Levi Gowen made his mark as his signature to the above instrument of writing in my presence. Signed: Benjamin Boyd.”
(The following AFFIDAVIT of Becky Gowen follows the above power of attorney):
“Before me personally appeared Becky Elliot formerly Becky Gowen by a former husband David Gowen and after be duly sowrn deposith and said that she had a son by the afore David named David Goyen who about fourteen years ago left this county (and as she was informed went to Cumberland River in N Carolina and was there killed by the Indians.
Sd deponent further saith on oath that Levi Gowen who now appoints John Gowen as his attorney is the full and oldest brother to the aforesaid David Gowen.
Signed: Becky Elliot (x her mark)
Sworn & subscribed this 17th day of Sept 1792 before me. Signed: Benj Boyd J. FC.
Fairfield County: I hereby certify that the above named Levi Gowen passeth in this County for a free Mulatto & it is said was born here.
Given under my hand this 17th day of September 1792.
Signed: Benj Boyd J.F.C.”
Fairfield County } I do hereby certify that Benjamin Boyd Esqr is one of the Judges of this our County Court & that full faith and credit is to be given to the above and to his siganture the same being his proper hand writing.
Given under my hand & seal of office this 18th day of September in the year of our Lord 1792 & the 16th of American Independence. Signed: D Evans, CFC
Recorded 18th Sept 92.
Deed records v. A-C 1785-1789. Bk A, pg 162-164. Fairfield Co, SC
https://www.familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:1:3Q9M-CSKW-JQSR-Z?i=344&cat=207758

1793 Jan 17 James Craig v. Levi Goyen and James Scott in Fairfield Co SC
Dismd at the Defts costs. p. 82 FamilySearch
https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:1:3Q9M-CS42-G37T-W?mode=g&i=81&cat=396628
Minutes of the County Court of Fairfield from 25 July 1785 to 19 August 1786, 13 June 1791 to 25 July 1799 Authors: South Carolina. County Court (Fairfield County) (Main Author)

1794 May 19: John Gowen received on May 19, 1794 640 acres from the State of North Carolina on Warrant No. 350. The land lay on Mill Creek about one-half mile west of his father’s pre-emption site, between land grants of Ebenzer Titus. Cleve Weathers, a descendant of Nashville, identifies the section as the one which was issued to David Gowen who was killed in 1780 “in the settlement and defense of Nashville.”
The land was described in Davidson County Deed Book C, page 281:
“State of North Carolina to John Gowen . . . 640 acres on the East side of Mill Creek . . . beginning at a white walnut on the bank of Mill Creek, being the Northwest corner of James Meness’s guard right on the East boundary line of said Meness’ preemption, thence East 390 poles to a dogwood on Ebenezer Titus’s West boundary line, then north 340 poles to a hickory, thence West 164 poles to a sycamore on the bank of said creek, thence up said creek with its meanders 333 poles to a poplar on said Meness’s East boundary line, then South with said line to the beginning 120 poles.”

1799 Nov 19 – NC Archives; Title: File No. 1124, William Gowen. Parent Records: State Records; Secretary of the State Record Group; Land Office: Land Warrants, Plats and Survey, Related Records; Moore County. Call Number: S.108.886; Frames: 808-813. Site: Archives Search Room (Raleigh). MARS Id: 12.14.90.1112 (Folder). Genres/Forms :Warrants, Plats. Index Terms: Geographic Names: Crains Creek – Personal Names: William Gowen. Land Grant Info: Acres: 150 – Grant Number: 1076 – Issued Mar 16, 1799 – Entry Number: 1383 – Entered: Feb 2, 1795 – Book Page: 101:38 – Location: On both sides of Cranes branch. Entered Nov 19, 1799 14 acres on the drains of the Big Pocket Creek to Levy GOYEN (NC Archives http://www.ah.dcr.state.nc.us/archives/) Moore Co, NC.  http://lumbeeindiansandgoinsfamily.blogspot.com/2007/11/moore-county-nc-early-records.html

1798 Mar 10 – John Gowen to Jonathan Phillips – 150 acres Mill Cr – part of a tract of 640 acres granted to the sd John Gowen by Patent No. 395 dated June 26th 1793, originally entered in the name of David Gowen’s heirs etc No. 115 Jan 15 1784 and transfered to the sd John Gowen Oct 30, 1792 … Signed: John Gowen LS. Wit: Andrew Ewing. Deed bk D, p 416. Davidson County, TN.
https://www.familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:1:3Q9M-CS4R-1S99-L?i=238&cat=229234

1800 May 22 – (Survey) By Warrant No. 532 … for Levy Goyen 14 acres of land in Moore County on the drains of the Big Pocket Creek begining at a stake, Dowds & Cameron’s corner runing thence as Cameron’s line east 12 chains to his own corner of 100 acres. Thence along his own line north 23 chains and 50 links to Cofer’s corner, thence south 27 degrees west 25 chains to the beginning. 22 May 1800.
Signed: Neil McLeod, Surveyor.
Chain Carriers: Henry Goyen, William Elliot.
1800 June 10 – (Survey Order) – State of N Carolina, No. 532. To the surveyor of Moore Co, you are hereby required to surey lay off or cause to be surveyed and laid off for Levy Goyens 14 acres of land in the County afsd on the waters of the Big Pocket Creek joining his own lines entered the 19th day of November 1799 and two just and fair plans of such survey so to be made. Do your return to the Secretary’s office without delay or otherwise proceed therewith as the law directs.
Given under my hand this 10th day of June 1800. John McCullay, EJ. JP.
S.108.906 Moore County Land Grant Files 0136 – 0308, 1161 frames, Frame # 332-336.
File No. 0189, Levy Goyen
https://nclandgrants.com/frame/?fdr=406&frm=337&mars=12.14.90.5088

1799 Levy Goyen 14 acres Moore Co NC

1799 Levy Goyen 14 acres Moore Co NC

1800 US Census in Moore Co, NC
Name: Hennery Goin
Home in 1800 (City, County, State): Fayetteville, Moore, North Carolina
Number of All Other Free Persons: 5
Number of Household Members: 5
Year: 1800; Census Place: Fayetteville, Moore, North Carolina; Series: M32; Roll: 32; Page: 60; Image: 69; Family History Library Film: 337908
https://www.ancestry.com/sharing/294678?token=2ac4b392d607ed6d5259d5ed21637668ba5665a697ec21318ea2eb95e15407a1

1800 US Census in Moore Co, NC
Name: William Goin
Home in 1800 (City, County, State): Fayetteville, Moore, North Carolina
Number of All Other Free Persons: 9
Number of Household Members: 9
Year: 1800; Census Place: Fayetteville, Moore, North Carolina; Series: M32; Roll: 32; Page: 60; Image: 69; Family History Library Film: 337908
https://www.ancestry.com/sharing/294754?token=f2ab0b96fb45e197e5b89ea8b6666bbef53b4855a55b640120060486727606e5

1800 US Census in Moore Co, NC
Name: Levy Goin
Home in 1800 (City, County, State): Fayetteville, Moore, North Carolina
Number of All Other Free Persons: 5
Number of Household Members: 5
Year: 1800; Census Place: Fayetteville, Moore, North Carolina; Series: M32; Roll: 32; Page: 62; Image: 71; Family History Library Film: 337908
https://www.ancestry.com/sharing/294760?token=6c83d2c02de9e4e508081fad03132dcb921bf15421f3dad3eed86eb4ef39b790

1800 NC Moore Co US Census w Levi Goin

1800 NC Moore Co US Census w Levi Goin

1810 US Census in Moore Co, NC
Name: William Goyne
Home in 1810 (City, County, State): Moore, North Carolina
Number of All Other Free Persons: 6
Number of Household Members: 6
Year: 1810; Census Place: Moore, North Carolina; Roll: 41; Page: 615; Image: Ncm252_41-0139; FHL Roll: 0337914
https://www.ancestry.com/sharing/294720?token=0b03bcde591873833059480bac252ae267d43d784d655956c22d5ceea5d070c0

1810 US Census in Moore Co, NC
Name: Henry Goyne
Home in 1810 (City, County, State): Moore, North Carolina
Number of All Other Free Persons: 9
Number of Household Members: 9
Year: 1810; Census Place: Moore, North Carolina; Roll: 41; Page: 615; Image: Ncm252_41-0139; FHL Roll: 0337914
https://www.ancestry.com/sharing/294682?token=33cf92abfa487b51baf2ccd56ddba86c15f35467fe3707874c219177cc17d223

1810 US Census in Moore Co, NC
Name: Edward Goyne
Home in 1810 (City, County, State): Moore, North Carolina
Number of All Other Free Persons: 2
Number of Household Members: 2
Year: 1810; Census Place: Moore, North Carolina; Roll: 41; Page: 615; Image: Ncm252_41-0139; FHL Roll: 0337914
https://www.ancestry.com/sharing/294710?token=efb73c2166c3c2b62c6fe717e9d964e1b63eefcd568d5d0b55fe6cb1e65525f1

1810 US Census in Moore Co, NC
Name: Levi Goyne
Home in 1810 (City, County, State): Moore, North Carolina
Number of All Other Free Persons: 8
Number of Household Members: 8
Year: 1810; Census Place: Moore, North Carolina; Roll: 41; Page: 615; Image: Ncm252_41-0139; FHL Roll: 0337914
https://www.ancestry.com/sharing/294705?token=4bc52b7aaa04d029faee024b30a48d22801621a6b0e2e4c77558fb2bb934dd31

1810 NC Moore Co US Census w Levi Goyne

1810 NC Moore Co US Census w Levi Goyne

1820 US Census in Moore Co, NC
Name: Edward Goins
Home in 1820 (City, County, State): Moore, North Carolina
Enumeration Date: August 7, 1820
Number of Persons – Engaged in Agriculture: 2
1820 U S Census; Census Place: Moore, North Carolina; Page: 298; NARA Roll: M33_80; Image: 271
https://www.ancestry.com/sharing/294622?token=e67fc0de268fa6ef96c22d2c381d55397888678ed76033323072b105dfd9fbb7

1820 US Census in Moore Co, NC
Name: Levi Goins
Home in 1820 (City, County, State): Moore, North Carolina
Enumeration Date: August 7, 1820
Number of Persons – Engaged in Agriculture: 4
1820 U S Census; Census Place: Moore, North Carolina; Page: 307; NARA Roll: M33_80; Image: 280
https://www.ancestry.com/sharing/294608?token=82cb56adbf83fd3f68f0b93d8f04a13609aa951a85330856aa2b0a34e9295284

1820 US Census in Moore Co, NC
Name: Edwards Goins
Home in 1820 (City, County, State): Moore, North Carolina
Enumeration Date: August 7, 1820
Number of Persons – Engaged in Agriculture: 2
1820 U S Census; Census Place: Moore, North Carolina; Page: 308; NARA Roll: M33_80; Image: 281
https://www.ancestry.com/sharing/294618?token=663cba98e808d15be25acc1408ca93110857a4cb6bfef4bf80cee6f2ea73354a

1820 US Census in Moore Co, NC
Name: John Goines
Home in 1820 (City, County, State): Moore, North Carolina
Enumeration Date: August 7, 1820
1820 U S Census; Census Place: Moore, North Carolina; Page: 317; NARA Roll: M33_80; Image: 290
https://www.ancestry.com/sharing/294629?token=39bf830a4bd1486b2636cb15937412891b7776ef4f21263a6710850868b1ae29

1830 US Census in Moore Co, NC
Name: Edward Goins
Home in 1830 (City, County, State): Moore, North Carolina
Free Colored Persons – Males – Under 10: 2
Free Colored Persons – Males – 10 thru 23: 2
Free Colored Persons – Males – 36 thru 54: 1
Free Colored Persons – Females – Under 10: 2
Free Colored Persons – Females – 24 thru 35: 2
Total Free Colored Persons: 9
Total – All Persons (Free White, Slaves, Free Colored): 9
Year: 1830; Census Place: Moore, North Carolina; Series: M19; Roll: 122; Page: 464; Family History Library Film: 0018088
https://www.ancestry.com/sharing/294787?token=ee2c25d1e2f50d8c8eaa06a9f37340e33c9628dddb82c4209746fb166c375523

1830 US Census in Moore Co, NC
Name: Levy Goins
Home in 1830 (City, County, State): Moore, North Carolina
Free Colored Persons – Males – Under 10: 4
Free Colored Persons – Males – 10 thru 23: 1
Free Colored Persons – Males – 24 thru 35: 2
Free Colored Persons – Males – 55 thru 99: 1
Free Colored Persons – Females – Under 10: 4
Free Colored Persons – Females – 10 thru 23: 3
Free Colored Persons – Females – 24 thru 35: 3
Free Colored Persons – Females – 55 thru 99: 1
Total Free Colored Persons: 19
Total – All Persons (Free White, Slaves, Free Colored): 19
Year: 1830; Census Place: Moore, North Carolina; Series: M19; Roll: 122; Page: 464; Family History Library Film: 0018088
https://www.ancestry.com/sharing/294780?token=77f3a385b13fa860bcdeaf244cace5deb1c0ac6f96742e4ea58ad0d1de408b04

1830 NC Moore Co US Census w Levi Goins

1830 NC Moore Co US Census w Levi Goins

1850 US Census in Moore Co, NC
Name: Levi Goings
Age: 87, Birth Year: abt 1763
Birthplace: North Carolina
Home in 1850: Moore, North Carolina, USA
Race: Mulatto, Gender: Male
Family Number: 690
Household Members:
Name Age
Levi Goings 87 NC
Amy Goings 77 NC
Nutty Goings 47 NC
Joseph Goings 10 NC
Year: 1850; Census Place: Moore, North Carolina; Roll: 638; Page: 212a
https://www.ancestry.com/sharing/294844?token=97470781249ae2ab97231e019043411e78b42e04474772b12a38d25de386f072

1850 NC Moore Co US Census Levi Goines and other Going families p1

1850 NC Moore Co US Census Levi Goines and other Going families p1

1850 NC Moore Co US Census Levi Goines and other Going families p2

1850 NC Moore Co US Census Levi Goines and other Going families p2

From GRF Newsletter Aug 1998:

Levi Gowen Pensioned at Age 90 For SC Revolutionary Service

Levi Gowen, Mulatto/Melungeon son of Daniel Gowen and Rebecca Gowen, was born in Fairfield County, South Carolina in June 1762. He is identified as the grandson of Alexander Gowen of Stafford County, Virginia and Orange and Rutherford Counties, North Carolina and the great-grandson of William Gowen and Catherine Gowen of Stafford County.

When his father died as a soldier in the South Carolina militia during the Revolutionary War, Levi Gowen signed up, perhaps to avenge his father’s death. “Levi Goines” enlisted “about the time of the fall of Charleston” [May 12, 1780] at age 17 from Fairfield County “where he lived” as a Revolutionary soldier in the South Carolina line, according to his pension application. His statement continues:

“He recollects the names of many officers and soldiers with whom he served, but does not know many regulars. The following are some of them: Maj. John Pear-son, William W. Morey, James Steel, Joseph Kennedy, John Greggs, Lt. Andrew Gray and Samuel Croslin [the latter was a Regular]. He knows of no person living whose testimony he can procure who can testify to his Service having removed from the State of South Carolina to North Carolina, Moore County soon after the close of the Revolutionary War where he has resided ever since.

He has never been positive until recently that he was entitled to a Pension. Several years since a Gentlemen informed him that he was entitled and he would pro-cure a pension for him, but as nothing was done, he concluded that he was not entitled to anything and made no further effort until now.

He hereby relinquishes every claim whatever to a pen-sion except the present and declares that his name is not on the Pension Roll of the agency of any State.

Sworn to and Subscribed the day and year aforesaid in open Court.
Test. Aron A. F. Leavell Levi [X] Goines”

Duncan Murchison attached an affidavit to the pension application of Levi Gowen:

“State of North Carolina
Moore County

On this 19th day of February AD 1852 personally ap-peared before me, a Justice of the Peace within and for the County and State aforesaid, Duncan Murchison, being duly sworn according to law declared that he has been acquainted with Levi Goins for forty-five years, during which time he has resided in the county and state aforesaid, that when he came to this county, he understood and believed that he came from the State of South Carolina.

He is a man of good character whose oath can be relied upon. He is reputed to have been a soldier in the Revolutionary War while living in South Carolina of which there is no doubt.

Sworn to and subscribed before me this 19th day of February AD1852.

Duncan Murchison
John C. Jackson, J. P.”

Gen. W. D. David provided a corroborating affidavit to accompany the pension application to the Pension Department:

“State of North Carolina
Moore County

On this 28th day of June AD1852 personally appeared before me, a Justice of the Peace within and for the county and state aforesaid Gen. W. D. David who being duly sworn according to law declared that he is well acquainted with Levi Goines of said county and from his general character has no hesitation in saying that he is entitled to full credit upon his oath, that he has recently been requested to examine said Goines relative to his Services as a Soldier in the Revolutionary War, that he has examined and conversed with him on that subject at various times and with great particularity and has no doubt that said Goines volunteered in the State of South Carolina for and during the War and continued in actual service in the Revolutionary War for nearly or quite two years, that he has inquired of said Goines when he entered the service.

Said that he could not tell, but it was about the time the British took Charleston, that he inquired what was his age now, he said he was Ninety Years this month, that he then discovered he must have been under twenty-one years when Charleston was surrendered to the British.

That without making a single intimation to said Goines of that fact [nor can he read a single word of history] that he inquired how old he was when he volunteered, to which he replied that he was about Nineteen years old, that he then referred to the History of the Revolution and found that the time Charleston was surren-dered [May 12, 1780]. Said Goines was about Nineteen years old [actually 17].

That he then inquired what general officers he knew. He said ‘Green, Sumter, Wynn, Lee.’ That he then in-quired what battles he was in. He said that he was in but one, which was at the Congaree Fort. That he again referred to the history and finds that this fort was called Moultree, near the confluence of Congaree and Santee Rivers. Gen. Lee was dispatched to this place. That from these facts, together with many other incidents of said war related by said Goines, the conclusion was irresistible that said Goines is one of those Veterans who stood up for his country in the hour of danger and has never yet received a pension.

That said Goines with his aged companion are living along in a very humble condition in life, barely able to afford themselves the comforts which their advanced age require. That it is the universal opinion of all who converse with him that he was a faithful soldier in the Revolutionary War.

W. D. David”

“By reference to history, I find that the Battle of Kings Mountain was fought October 7, 1780 after which Lord Cornwallis left Charlotte and fell back to Winnsboro, the very place and year that Mr. Goines mentions in his declaration. –W. C. Thagard.”.
W. C. Thagard provided an affidavit to accompany the pension application:

“State of North Carolina
Moore County
Pension Office Department

The declaration of Levi Goines, a Revolutionary Soldier with proof of his Services, hereunto annexed, is respectfully submitted for your Consideration. It is be-lieved, that under the Several Acts of Congress, he is entitled to a Pension for life from the 4th of March 1831, to back pay since that time and to Bounty Lands, having volunteered during the War and served, as he believes, until its close or until discharged by his Officers, which several claims he respectfully asks the Department to allow him.

He has no living nor documentary evidence of his Services, but has transmitted a correct statement, under oath, showing as near as frail memory will allow, the time, place and manner of his Services, the Officers un-der whom he served and with whom he was acquainted.

He also produces the Certificates of three of the most respectable and intelligent men in his County who establish beyond doubt his good character and general reputation as a Soldier, and I imagine there are but few of those Veterans who have been mercifully spared un-til this day that would swear falsely.

This proof I trust will be sufficient to establish his claim. Time has so reduced the number of these Veter-ans and of the witnesses of their services and sufferings that to require of them positive proof, independently of their own statement, would be to deprive them of the benefit of the Acts. An early investigation of this claim is respectfully Solicited, if consistent with the Regula-tions of the Department.

His humble condition in life and very feeble health require it. All of which is respectfully submitted. My address is Carthage, N. C.
W. C. Thagard”

An additional certificate was provided by Duncan M. R. McIntosh, Esquire:

“State of North Carolina
Moore County

On this 16th day of July AD1852 personally appeared before me, a Justice of the Peace within and for the county and State aforesaid Duncan M. R. McIntosh, Esq. who being duly sworn according to law declares that he has been acquainted with Levi Goines for about Twenty-five years, that he is a man of good character for truth and veracity. There are but few men more to be relied upon, on their oath, than he is.

He is reputed to have served as a Soldier in the Revolutionary War in the State of South Carolina, that he has no doubt of that fact. He is a man of about Ninety years of age.

D. M. R. McIntosh
Sworn to and Subscribed before me the day and year above written.
Wm. Barrett, J. P.”

Alexander C. Curry, clerk of Moore County Court attached his own certificate:

“State of North Carolina
Moore County

I, Alexander C. Curry, Clerk of the Court of Pleas and Quarter Sessions in an for the County and State afore-said, do hereby certify that the declaration of Levi Goines hereunto annexed was duly executed and sworn to in open court by the identical Levi Goines named in said declaration who is reputed and believed to have been a Revolutionary soldier.

I further certify that Duncan Murchison, Esq, D. M. R. McIntosh, Esq. and Gen’l W. D. David whose names appear to the annexed certificates are citizens of said county of high standing whose regard for truth cannot be doubted. Said Murchison is a Prominent Elder in the Presbyterian Church, and each of them has been promoted to distinguished places of trust in their county and state. Said signatures being in their own proper hand writing.

From GRF Newsletter Sept 1998:

Levi Gowen Pensioned at Age 90 For SC Revolutionary Service

Levi Gowen, Mulatto/Melungeon son of Daniel Gowen and Rebecca Gowen, was born in Fairfield County, South Carolina in June 1762. He is identified as the grandson of Alexander Gowen of Stafford County, Virginia and Orange and Rutherford Counties, North Carolina and the great-grandson of William Gowen and Catherine Gowen of Stafford County.

When his father died as a soldier in the South Carolina militia during the Revolutionary War, Levi Gowen signed up, perhaps to avenge his father’s death. “Levi Goines” enlisted “about the time of the fall of Charleston” [May 12, 1780] at age 17 from Fairfield County “where he lived” as a Revolutionary soldier in the South Carolina line, according to his pension application. His pension papers continue:

“I further certify that John C. Jackson, William Barret and Donald Street whose names appear to the annexed certificates of Duncan Murchison, D. M. B. McIntosh and W. D. David were at the time of signing the same acting Justices of the Peace in an for the county aforesaid, duly commissioned and qualified according to law and that their signatures to the same are genuine.

In testimony whereof I have hereunto affixed my Seal of Office and subscribed my name the 6th day of Au-gust AD1852.

Alexander C. Curry, Clerk
Moore County Court”

The pension application of Levi Gowen and accompanying affidavits were mailed to Hon. W. Dockery, House of Represen-tatives with the request that his pension check be mailed to Dockery’s Store, N. C.

After a year had passed, W. C. Thaghard wrote a letter on the behalf of the application of Levi Gowen:

“Carthage, N.C, April 8, 1853
Dear Sir,

Some months since I presented through Gen. Dockery to the Department the declaration of Levi Goines, a Soldier in the War of the Revolution, asking to be allowed a pension for his services in said war. I stated in my letter that the advanced age and feeble health of the old Veteran present Strong claims to the Department for an early investigation. I have waited with great pa-tience, and as yet the Department has not seen fit to ad-dress me on the subject.

If there is any informality in the declaration or any lack of testimony that prevents the claim being allowed, will the Department please to inform me or if it has not yet been investigated or has been allowed and no information given, I ask respectfully to be informed thereof.

Very respectfully,
W. C. Thagard”

Levi Gowen received Pension No. R3865 approved August 4, 1852. It is unknown how long Levi Gowen and his wife re-ceived the pension. Of Levi Gowen and descendants nothing more is known.

Mention of the “Goings families” in Moore County appeared in “Ancient Records of Moore County, North Carolina:”

“By strange coincidence, there were two Goings fami-lies in Moore County in 1790, one being white; the other listed under the heading of “all other free persons,” that is free negro, mulatto or Indian. Both fami-lies were headed by William Goings. One William, of course the white one, was later made a justice of the peace for the county. Within the writer’s recollection, some of those families held themselves above associa-tion with negroes, and their white neighbors accepted them as several notches above their black brethren.

An examination of the 1850 census will show the increase in this clan, all of whom are there listed as mulatto. Briefly, the Goings were classed exactly as were the so-called “Lumbee” Indians of Robeson County. In later years, certain of these families intermarried with negroes, and their descendants now living in Moore County are as black as the pot. Others, however, have maintained the complexion and characteristics of their more ancient ancestors. The free family lived on or about Pocket Creek, in Lee County [organized from Moore County and Chatham County in 1907] or between there and Lemon Springs.

The writer’s father once pointed out to him their location and casually remarked, ‘they were not negroes, but probably Indians.’

What became of the white family of Williams Goings, the writer has been unable to determine. A few years ago, a writer in the “Saturday Evening Post” wrote a story on the ‘Melungeons’ [maybe from the French ‘melange,’ a mixture] who had a colony on the Clinch River in North Central Ten-nessee, and among whose members were Goings.”

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