1762 Levi Goins of Moore Co, NC (Y5)

Levi Goins b. June 1762 married to Amy Goins b. 1772

Parents:

Unk

Children:

  • Nutty Goings b. 1803
    • Joseph Goings b. 1840

Siblings:

Unk

Possible Children, Grandchildren and Family of Levi Going that were listed on the same page or next page in the 1850 US Census in Moore Co, NC: 

  • John Goings b. 1792 m. Lydia Goings b. 1805
    • John Goings b. 1829
    • Benjamin Goings b. 1832
    • Lydia Goings b. 1836
    • Rachel Goings b. 1777
  • Elizabeth Goings b. 1804
    • Barbara Goings b. 1848
  • Neil Goings b. 1813 m. Mary Goings b 1814
    • Delilah Goings b. 1834
    • Amy Goings b. 1835
    • Cancy Goings b. 1838
    • Sarah Goings b. 1840
    • Celia Goings b. 1842
    • Catharine Goings b. 1844
    • Eliza Goings b. 1847
  • Lucy Goings b. 1821
    • Mary A Goings b. 1840
    • Rebecca Goings b. 1842
    • Lucian Goings b. 1847
    • Edmund Goings b. 1848
  • Levi Goings b. 1824 m. to Mary Goings b. 1825
    • Flora A Goings b. 1848
    • Jennet Goings b. 1849
  • Martha Goings b. 1825
    • Wiley Goings b. 1843
    • Hayward Goings b. 1847
  • Nancy Goings b. 1826
    • William Goings b. 1845
  • David Goings b. 1827
  • Thomas Goings b. 1830 m. Celicia Goings b. 1823
    • Telitha Goings b. 1842
    • James Goings b. 1845
    • Green Goings b. 1847
    • Henry Goings b. 1848
  • Mary Goings b. 1808
    • David Goings b. 1836
    • William H Goings b. 1834
    • Eliza Goings b. 1837
    • Berry Goings b. 1839
    • Emeline Goings b. 1842
    • Marticia Goings b. 1847
    • Laurence Goings b. 1849

Related Counties: 

FACTS: 

Levi Goines – 90 yrs old on June 28, 1852
DOB June 1762
Served in SC under Regiment which was Commanded by Col. John Winn, and Gen. Richard Winn
Captain John Gray
Started in 1780 after fall of Charleston, SC
Residence at end of war was in Fairfield (same as his Capt).
removed from the state of South Carolina to North Carolina Moore County soon after the close of the Revolutionary War where he has resided ever since

1780 May 12 – Levy Goines – Enters Revolutionary War (affids below from 1852 application for pension):
Transcribed by Tracy Hutchison. Not to be copied or reproduced in any format for profit. While I have tried my best, I am sure there are errors in the transcription.
Thutchison10@gmail.com
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Revolutionary War Pension of Levi Goines
Declaration in order to obtain the benefit of the acts of Congress for the benefit of Revolutionary Soldiers.
State of North Carolina
County of Moore
On this 26th day of April AD1852 personally appeared before the court of Pleas and Quarter Sessions held for the county and State of aforesaid, Levi Goines a resident of said County of Moore, and State of N.C. aged, about ninety years, who being first duly sworn according to Law, doth on his oath, make the following declaration in order to obtain the benefit, of the provision made by the acts of Congress for Soldiers who served in the Revolutionary war. That he volunteered in Fairfield County, State of South Carolina, and agreed to serve until the end of the war, the time he entered the service he does not recollect, but believes it was about the time that the British took Charleston that he served as a private in a Company Commanded by Captain John Gray and was attached to a Regiment which was Commanded by Col. John Winn, and Gen. Richard Winn. He continues in actual service for about the time of twelve months though his recollection is not very distinct as to the time he served but he was honorably discharged as he believes, at the close of the said Revolutionary War by his said Captain, having been marched back to said Fairfield County, which was also the residence of his Captain. He obtained no written discharge. He was engaged in a battle near the confluence of the Congaree and Santee Rivers. Gen. Lee he (note at bottom of page reads “He thinks two year, but is determined to be written bounds”) believes was the commander though his memory as to this is indistinct. Says the town surrendered here without much fighting. His services was entirely confined to the Sate of South Carolina, marching from Wyns borough to the Congaree Fort. And various other parts of said state under his officers. He recollects the names of many officers and soldiers with whom he served but does not know any regulars the following are some of them. Gen. Sumpter, Majr John Pearson, William W. Morey, James Steel, Joseph Kennedy, John Greggs, Liut Andrew Gray, & Saml Croslin (the latter was a regular). He knows of no person living, whose testimony he can procure who can testify to his service having removed from the state of South Carolina to North Carolina Moore County soon after the close of the Revolutionary War where he has resided ever since he has never been positive until recently that he was entitled to a Pension. Several years since a gentleman informed him that he was entitled to anything and made no further effort until now. He hereby relinquishes every claim whatever to a pension except the present and declares that his name is not on the pension roll of the agency of any state.
Sworn to and subscribed the day and year aforesaid in open court.
Test. Aron A. F. Leavell Levi (X) Goines
Sworn to in open court this 26th day of April A.D. 1852. A. C. Curry clerk of Moore County Court.
State of North Carolina
Moore County
On this 19th day of February A.D. 1852 personally appeared before me a justice of the peace, within and for the County and the state aforesaid Duncan Murchison, who, being duly scorn according to Law, declares that he has been acquainted with Levi Goines for forth five years during which time he has resided in the County and state aforesaid. That when he came to this county he understood and believed that he came from the state of South Carolina. He is a man of good character where oath may be relied on, he is reputed to have been a soldier in the Revolutionary War while living in south Carolina of which there is no doubt.
Sworn to and subscribe before me this 19th day of February AD 1852.
Duncan Murchinson
Jno. C Jackson JP
State of North Carolina
Moore County
Pension office department
The declaration of Levi Goines, a Revolutionary Soldier, with the proof of his services here unto annexed, is respectfully submitted for you consideration, it is believed that under the several acts of Congress he is entitled to a Pension for life from the 4th day of March 1831. To back pay since that time and to bounty lands having volunteered during the war and served as he believes until its close or until discharged by his officers which several claims he respectfully asks the department to allow him. He has no living nor documentary evidence of his services but has transmitted a correct statement under oath showing as near as frail memory will allow the time place and manner of his services the officer under whom he served and with whom he was acquainted. He also produces the certificate of three of the most respectable and intelligent men in his county who establish beyond doubt his food character and general reputation as a soldier and I imagine there are but few of those Veterans who have been mercifully spared until this day that would swear falsely. This proof I trust will be sufficient to establish his claim. Time has so reduced the number of Veterans and of the witnesses of their services and sufferings that to require of them positive proof independently of their own statement would be to deprive them of the benefit of the act. An early investigation of this claim is respectfully solicited. If consistent with the regulations of the department, his humble condition in life and very feeble health require it. All of which is respectfully subscribed. My address is Carthage, N.C.
W. C. Thagard
State of North Carolina
Moore County
On the 28th day of June A.D. 1852 personally appeared before me a justice of the peace within and for the county and state aforesaid Gen W. D. Dawd who being duly sworn according to law declared that he is well acquainted with Levi Goines of said county and from his general character has no hesitation in saying that he is entitled to full credit upon his oath. That he has recently been requested to examine said Goines relation to his services as a soldier in the Revolutionary war. That he has examined and conversed with him on that subject at various times and with great particularity and has no doubt that said Goines volunteered in the state of So. Carolina for and during the war and continued in actual service in the Revolutionary war for nearly or quite two years. That he inquired of said Goines when he entered the service. Said he could not tell but it was about the time the British took Charleston that he inquired what was his age now, he said he was ninety years this month. That he discovered he discovered he must have been under twenty one years when Charleston was surrendered to the British, that without making a single interaction to said Goines of that fact (nor can he read a word of history) that he inquired how old he was when he volunteered, to which he replied that he was about nineteen years old, that he then referred to the history of the revolution and found that the time Charleston was surrendered (12th May 1780). Said Goines was about nineteen. That he then inquired what general officers he knew. He said Green, Sumpter, Wynn, Lee. That he then inquired what battles he was in. He said he was in but one which was at the Cangaree fort. That he again referred to the history and finds that this fort was called Moltes near the confluence of the Congaree & Santee Rivers. Gen Lee was dispatched to this place. That from these facts together with many other incidents of said war related by said Goines. The conclusion was irresistible that said Goines is one of these Veterans who stood up for his country in the hour of danger and has never yet received a pension. That said Goines with his aged companion are living alone in a very humble condition in life barely able to afford themselves the comforts which their advanced age require. That it is in the universal opinion of all who conversed with him that he was a faithful soldier in the Revolutionary war.
W. D. Dowd
Sworn to and subscribed before me this day and was above written.
D Street JP (Seal)
By reference to history I find that the battle of Kings Mountain was fought 7th October 1780 after which Lord Cornwallis left Charlotte and fell back to Winnsboro: the very place and years that Mr. Goines mentions in his declaration
W. C. T.
State of North Carolina
Moore County
On this 16th day of July AD1852 personally appeared before me a justice of the peace within and for the County and State aforesaid Duncan M. R. McIntosh Esqr who being duly sworn according to law declare that he has been acquainted with Levi Goines for about twenty five years. That he is a man of good character for truth and veracity. There are but five men whom to be believed upon on there oath than he is. He is reputed to have served as a soldier in the Revolutionary war in the state of South Carolina. That he has no doubt of that fact. He is a man about ninety years of age.
D. M. R. McIntosh
Sworn to and subscribed before me the day and year above written.
Wm Barrett
State of North Carolina
Moore County
I Alexander C. Curry Clerk of the Court of Pleas and Quarter Sessions in and for the county and state aforesaid do herby certify that the declaration of Levi Goines hereunto annexed was duly executed and sworn in open court by the identical Levi Goines named in said declaration who is reputed and believed to have been a Revolutionary soldier. I further certify that Duncan Murchison Esq, D.M.R. McIntosh Esq, and Genl W. D. Dowd whose names appear to the annexed certificate are citizens of said county of high standings whose varsity for truth cannot be doubted. Said Murchison is a prominent elder in the Presbyterian Church and each of them have been promoted to distinguished places of trust in their county and state. Said signatures being in their own proper handwriting. I further certify that John C. Jackson, William Barret and Donald Street whose names appear to the annexed certificates of Duncan Murchison, D.M.R. McIntosh and W.D. Dawd were at the time of signing the same acting justices of the peace in and for the county aforesaid duly confirmed and qualified accordingly to law and that their signatures to the same are genuine. In testimony wherof I have hereunto affirmed my seal of office and subscribed my name the 6th day of August A.D. 1852
A. C. Curry clerk
Of Moore County Court
Carthage N.C Apr 8th 1853
Dear Sir.
Some months since I presented (through Gen Dockery) to the department the declaration of Levi Goines a soldier in the war of the Revolution asking to be allowed a pension for his services in said war. I stated in my letter that the advanced age and feeble health of the old Veteran presents strong claims to the department for an early investigation. I have waited with great patience and as yet the department has not seen fit to address me on the subject. If there is any informality in the declaration or any lack of testimony that prevents the claim being allowed will the department please to inform me or if it has not yet been investigated or has been allowed and no information given. I ask respectfully to be informed thereof.
Very Respectfully
W. C. Thagard
Moore Co, NC.  https://www.fold3.com/image/22042789

1780 SC Levi Goins pension application abstract_Page_1

1780 SC Levi Goins pension application abstract_Page_1

1780 SC Levi Goins pension application abstract_Page_2

1780 SC Levi Goins pension application abstract_Page_2

1780 SC Levi Goins pension application abstract_Page_3

1780 SC Levi Goins pension application abstract_Page_3

1780 SC Levi Goins pension application abstract_Page_4

1780 SC Levi Goins pension application abstract_Page_4

1780 Levi Gaines or Goines in SC

1780 Levi Gaines or Goines in SC

1784 Jan 15 – John Gowan receives 640 acr on the E side of Mill Creek. Other names: Levi Gowan, David Gowan. 1793 June 26. Davidson Co., TN. http://www.nclandgrants.com/grant/?mars=12.14.2.1816&qid=82716&rn=3

1786 Aug 14 – The indents, issued by the Treasury August 14, 1786, were approved long after the death of David Gowen of Fairfield County, son of Daniel Gowen and Rebecca Gowen. David Gowen was killed by Indians in the winter of 1779-80 at Manskers Station in Davidson County, Tennessee. William Gowen, regarded as his grandfather, was the executor of his estate at Nashville. Levi Gowen, “who passes for mulatto,” brother of David Gowen, applied successful for the administration of the estate in Fairfield County and gave “John Gowen, gentleman of Daverson County” his power of attorney. Fairfield Co, SC. http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~gowenrf/Gowenms007.htm

1792 – Affidavit / appointment of John Goyen as power of atty to sell land in Davorson County, NC – as David Goyen (brother of Levi), had gone to the Cumberland River and was killed by Indians some 14 years earlier – 640 acres of land). Levi called “Mulatto”John Goyen called “Gentleman”. (see links below for full text – very difficult to read due to shadows on document):
Fairfield County:
“Before me personally appeared Becky Elliot formerly Becky Gowen by a former husband David Gowen and after be duly sowrn deposith and said that she had a son by the afore David ____ David Goyen who about fourteen years ago left this county land as she was informed went to Cumberland River in N Carolina and was there killed by the Indians. The deponent further saith on oath that Levi Gowen who now appoints John Gowen of his attorney is the full and oldest brother to the aforesaid David Gowen.
Sworn tby affidavit this 17th day of Sept 1792 before me Benj Boyd J. FC.
Becky Elliot (x her mark)
Fairfield County: I hereby certify that the above named Levi Gowen ___ as the County for a free Mulatto got i ward was born her. Given under my hand this 17th day of September 1792.” Benj Boyd J. FC. Fairfield Co, SC
http://www.ken-shelton.com/Fairfield/Deeds/Bond_A/Bond_A_0135a.tif
http://www.ken-shelton.com/Fairfield/Deeds/Bond_A/Bond_A_0136a.tif

1792 Bond marked Levi Goyen, David Goyen, John Goyen affid p1

1792 Bond marked Levi Goyen, David Goyen, John Goyen affid p1

1792 Bond marked Levi Goyen, David Goyen, John Goyen affid p2

1792 Bond marked Levi Goyen, David Goyen, John Goyen affid p2

1799 Nov 19 – NC Archives; Title: File No. 1124, William Gowen. Parent Records: State Records; Secretary of the State Record Group; Land Office: Land Warrants, Plats and Survey, Related Records; Moore County. Call Number: S.108.886; Frames: 808-813. Site: Archives Search Room (Raleigh). MARS Id: 12.14.90.1112 (Folder). Genres/Forms :Warrants, Plats. Index Terms: Geographic Names: Crains Creek – Personal Names: William Gowen. Land Grant Info: Acres: 150 – Grant Number: 1076 – Issued Mar 16, 1799 – Entry Number: 1383 – Entered: Feb 2, 1795 – Book Page: 101:38 – Location: On both sides of Cranes branch. Entered Nov 19, 1799 14 acres on the drains of the Big Pocket Creek to Levy GOYEN (NC Archives http://www.ah.dcr.state.nc.us/archives/) Moore Co, NC.  http://lumbeeindiansandgoinsfamily.blogspot.com/2007/11/moore-county-nc-early-records.html

1799 Nov 19: Entered. 1800 May 22: Survey. 1800 June 10: Survey Ordered. No. 0189. Warrant No. 582.  Levy Goyen recd 14 acres on the drains of the Big Pocket Creek, joining his own line (Levy Goyen).  Surveyer notes adj to Dowd, Cameron, Cofer, and Levy Goyen’s own land of 100 acres. Chain Carriers: Henry Goyen, William Elliott.  Surveyor: Neil McLeod. Moore County, North Carolina.   1799 Nov 19 – Entered for 14 acres on the drains of the Big Pocket Creek to Levy GOYEN (NC Archives http://www.ah.dcr.state.nc.us/archives/) Moore Co, NC   http://lumbeeindiansandgoinsfamily.blogspot.com/2007/11/moore-county-nc-early-records.html  

1799 Levy Goyen 14 acres Moore Co NC

1799 Levy Goyen 14 acres Moore Co NC

1800 – Levy Goin, Hennery Goin, William Goin
1800 US Census Index:
GOIN:
Hennery , p 60
Levy , p 62
William , p 60
Moore Co, NC
http://lumbeeindiansandgoinsfamily.blogspot.com/2007/11/moore-county-nc-early-records.html

1800 Goin, Allen 7 Person page 621 – US Census North Carolina – “Other Free” Census
Goin, Edward 6 Person page 599
Goin, Godrich 7 Person page 612
Goin, Hinnery 5 Moore County page 60
Goin, Levy 5 Moore County page 62
Goin, Oliva 2 Robeson County page 381
Goin, William 9 Moore County page 60
Going, Burgess 2 whites ( 1001-) Randolph page 353
Going, Isham 4 Orange County page 565
Going, Jacob 6 Stokes 495
Goins?, Judith 1 Nash County page 102
http://www.freeafricanamericans.com/1800NCa.htm

1800 US Census in Moore Co, NC
Name: Levy Goin
Home in 1800 (City, County, State): Fayetteville, Moore, North Carolina
Number of All Other Free Persons: 5
Number of Household Members: 5
https://search.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/sse.dll?indiv=1&dbid=7590&h=344778&tid=&pid=&usePUB=true&_phsrc=TqH1125&_phstart=successSource

1800 NC Moore Co US Census w Levi Goin

1800 NC Moore Co US Census w Levi Goin

1810 – Edward Goyne, Henry Goyne, Levi Goyne, William Goyne
1810 US Census, Moore Co, p 64:
EDWARD GOYNE: All other free persons=2
HENRY GOYNE: All other free persons=9
LEVI GOYNE: All other free persons=8
WILLIAM GOYNE: All other free persons=6
Moore Co, NC
http://lumbeeindiansandgoinsfamily.blogspot.com/2007/11/moore-county-nc-early-records.html

1810 US Census in Moore Co, NC
Name: Levi Goyne
Home in 1810 (City, County, State): Moore, North Carolina
Number of All Other Free Persons: 8
Number of Household Members: 8
https://search.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/sse.dll?indiv=1&dbid=7613&h=388452&tid=&pid=&usePUB=true&_phsrc=TqH1109&_phstart=successSource

1810 NC Moore Co US Census w Levi Goyne

1810 NC Moore Co US Census w Levi Goyne

1820 US Census in Moore Co, NC
Name: Levi Goins
Home in 1820 (City, County, State): Moore, North Carolina
Enumeration Date: August 7, 1820
Number of Persons – Engaged in Agriculture: 4
https://search.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/sse.dll?indiv=1&dbid=7734&h=100011&tid=&pid=&usePUB=true&_phsrc=TqH1131&_phstart=successSource

1830 US Census in Moore Co, NC
Name: Levy Goins
Home in 1830 (City, County, State): Moore, North Carolina
Free Colored Persons – Males – Under 10: 4
Free Colored Persons – Males – 10 thru 23: 1
Free Colored Persons – Males – 24 thru 35: 2
Free Colored Persons – Males – 55 thru 99: 1
Free Colored Persons – Females – Under 10: 4
Free Colored Persons – Females – 10 thru 23: 3
Free Colored Persons – Females – 24 thru 35: 3
Free Colored Persons – Females – 55 thru 99: 1
Total Free Colored Persons: 19
Total – All Persons (Free White, Slaves, Free Colored): 19
https://search.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/sse.dll?indiv=1&dbid=8058&h=220247&tid=&pid=&usePUB=true&_phsrc=TqH1133&_phstart=successSource

1830 NC Moore Co US Census w Levi Goins

1830 NC Moore Co US Census w Levi Goins

1850 US Census in Moore Co, NC
Name: Levi Goings
Age: 87
Birth Year: abt 1763
Birthplace: North Carolina
Home in 1850: Moore, North Carolina, USA
Race: Mulatto
Gender: Male
Family Number: 690
Household Members:
Name Age
Levi Goings 87
Amy Goings 77
Nutty Goings 47
Joseph Goings 10
https://search.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/sse.dll?_phsrc=TqH1136&_phstart=successSource&usePUBJs=true&indiv=1&dbid=8054&gsln=Goins&cp=12&msypn__ftp=moore,%20north%20carolina,%20usa&msypn=2095&msypn__ftp_x=1&msypn_x=1&new=1&rank=1&redir=false&gss=angs-d&pcat=35&fh=0&h=12871472&recoff=&ml_rpos=1

1850 NC Moore Co US Census Levi Goines and other Going families p1

1850 NC Moore Co US Census Levi Goines and other Going families p1

1850 NC Moore Co US Census Levi Goines and other Going families p2

1850 NC Moore Co US Census Levi Goines and other Going families p2

From GRF Newsletter Aug 1998:

Levi Gowen Pensioned at Age 90 For SC Revolutionary Service

Levi Gowen, Mulatto/Melungeon son of Daniel Gowen and Rebecca Gowen, was born in Fairfield County, South Carolina in June 1762. He is identified as the grandson of Alexander Gowen of Stafford County, Virginia and Orange and Rutherford Counties, North Carolina and the great-grandson of William Gowen and Catherine Gowen of Stafford County.

When his father died as a soldier in the South Carolina militia during the Revolutionary War, Levi Gowen signed up, perhaps to avenge his father’s death. “Levi Goines” enlisted “about the time of the fall of Charleston” [May 12, 1780] at age 17 from Fairfield County “where he lived” as a Revolutionary soldier in the South Carolina line, according to his pension application. His statement continues:

“He recollects the names of many officers and soldiers with whom he served, but does not know many regu-lars. The following are some of them: Maj. John Pear-son, William W. Morey, James Steel, Joseph Kennedy, John Greggs, Lt. Andrew Gray and Samuel Croslin [the latter was a Regular]. He knows of no person living whose testimony he can procure who can testify to his Service having removed from the State of South Carolina to North Carolina, Moore County soon after the close of the Revolutionary War where he has resided ever since.

He has never been positive until recently that he was entitled to a Pension. Several years since a Gentlemen informed him that he was entitled and he would pro-cure a pension for him, but as nothing was done, he concluded that he was not entitled to anything and made no further effort until now.

He hereby relinquishes every claim whatever to a pen-sion except the present and declares that his name is not on the Pension Roll of the agency of any State.

Sworn to and Subscribed the day and year aforesaid in open Court.
Test. Aron A. F. Leavell Levi [X] Goines”

Duncan Murchison attached an affidavit to the pension application of Levi Gowen:

“State of North Carolina
Moore County

On this 19th day of February AD1852 personally ap-peared before me, a Justice of the Peace within and for the County and State aforesaid, Duncan Murchison, be-ing duly sworn according to law declared that he has been acquainted with Levi Goins for forty-five years, during which time he has resided in the county and state aforesaid, that when he came to this county, he understood and believed that he came from the State of South Carolina.

He is a man of good character whose oath can be relied upon. He is reputed to have been a soldier in the Revo-lutionary War while living in South Carolina of which there is no doubt.

Sworn to and subscribed before me this 19th day of February AD1852.

Duncan Murchison
John C. Jackson, J. P.”

Gen. W. D. David provided a corroborating affidavit to accompany the pension application to the Pension Department:

“State of North Carolina
Moore County

On this 28th day of June AD1852 personally appeared before me, a Justice of the Peace within and for the county and state aforesaid Gen. W. D. David who being duly sworn according to law declared that he is well acquainted with Levi Goines of said county and from his general character has no hesitation in saying that he is entitled to full credit upon his oath, that he has recently been requested to examine said Goines relative to his Services as a Soldier in the Revolutionary War, that he has examined and conversed with him on that subject at various times and with great particularity and has no doubt that said Goines volunteered in the State of South Carolina for and during the War and continued in actual service in the Revolutionary War for nearly or quite two years, that he has inquired of said Goines when he entered the service.

Said that he could not tell, but it was about the time the British took Charleston, that he inquired what was his age now, he said he was Ninety Years this month, that he then discovered he must have been under twenty-one years when Charleston was surrendered to the British.

That without making a single intimation to said Goines of that fact [nor can he read a single word of history] that he inquired how old he was when he volunteered, to which he replied that he was about Nineteen years old, that he then referred to the History of the Revolu-tion and found that the time Charleston was surren-dered [May 12, 1780]. Said Goines was about Nine-teen years old [actually 17].

That he then inquired what general officers he knew. He said ‘Green, Sumter, Wynn, Lee.’ That he then in-quired what battles he was in. He said that he was in but one, which was at the Congaree Fort. That he again referred to the history and finds that this fort was called Moultree, near the confluence of Congaree and Santee Rivers. Gen. Lee was dispatched to this place. That from these facts, together with many other incidents of said war related by said Goines, the conclusion was irresistible that said Goines is one of those Veterans who stood up for his country in the hour of danger and has never yet received a pension.

That said Goines with his aged companion are living along in a very humble condition in life, barely able to afford themselves the comforts which their advanced age require. That it is the universal opinion of all who converse with him that he was a faithful soldier in the Revolutionary War.

W. D. David”

“By reference to history, I find that the Battle of Kings Mountain was fought October 7, 1780 after which Lord Cornwallis left Charlotte and fell back to Winnsboro, the very place and year that Mr. Goines mentions in his declaration. –W. C. Thagard.”.
W. C. Thagard provided an affidavit to accompany the pension application:

“State of North Carolina
Moore County
Pension Office Department

The declaration of Levi Goines, a Revolutionary Sol-dier with proof of his Services, hereunto annexed, is respectfully submitted for your Consideration. It is be-lieved, that under the Several Acts of Congress, he is entitled to a Pension for life from the 4th of March 1831, to back pay since that time and to Bounty Lands, having volunteered during the War and served, as he believes, until its close or until discharged by his Offi-cers, which several claims he respectfully asks the De-partment to allow him.

He has no living nor documentary evidence of his Ser-vices, but has transmitted a correct statement, under oath, showing as near as frail memory will allow, the time, place and manner of his Services, the Officers un-der whom he served and with whom he was acquainted.

He also produces the Certificates of three of the most respectable and intelligent men in his County who establish beyond doubt his good character and general reputation as a Soldier, and I imagine there are but few of those Veterans who have been mercifully spared un-til this day that would swear falsely.

This proof I trust will be sufficient to establish his claim. Time has so reduced the number of these Veter-ans and of the witnesses of their services and sufferings that to require of them positive proof, independently of their own statement, would be to deprive them of the benefit of the Acts. An early investigation of this claim is respectfully Solicited, if consistent with the Regula-tions of the Department.

His humble condition in life and very feeble health re-quire it. All of which is respectfully submitted. My address is Carthage, N. C.
W. C. Thagard”

An additional certificate was provided by Duncan M. R. McIntosh, Esquire:

“State of North Carolina
Moore County

On this 16th day of July AD1852 personally appeared before me, a Justice of the Peace within and for the county and State aforesaid Duncan M. R. McIntosh, Esq. who being duly sworn according to law declares that he has been acquainted with Levi Goines for about Twenty-five years, that he is a man of good character for truth and veracity. There are but few men more to be relied upon, on their oath, than he is.

He is reputed to have served as a Soldier in the Revolu-tionary War in the State of South Carolina, that he has no doubt of that fact. He is a man of about Ninety years of age.

D. M. R. McIntosh
Sworn to and Subscribed before me the day and year above written.
Wm. Barrett, J. P.”

Alexander C. Curry, clerk of Moore County Court attached his own certificate:

“State of North Carolina
Moore County

I, Alexander C. Curry, Clerk of the Court of Pleas and Quarter Sessions in an for the County and State afore-said, do hereby certify that the declaration of Levi Goines hereunto annexed was duly executed and sworn to in open court by the identical Levi Goines named in said declaration who is reputed and believed to have been a Revolutionary soldier.

I further certify that Duncan Murchison, Esq, D. M. R. McIntosh, Esq. and Gen’l W. D. David whose names appear to the annexed certificates are citizens of said county of high standing whose regard for truth cannot be doubted. Said Murchison is a Prominent Elder in the Presbyterian Church, and each of them has been promoted to distinguished places of trust in their county and state. Said signatures being in their own proper hand writing.

From GRF Newsletter Sept 1998:

Levi Gowen Pensioned at Age 90 For SC Revolutionary Service

Levi Gowen, Mulatto/Melungeon son of Daniel Gowen and Rebecca Gowen, was born in Fairfield County, South Carolina in June 1762. He is identified as the grandson of Alexander Gowen of Stafford County, Virginia and Orange and Rutherford Counties, North Carolina and the great-grandson of William Gowen and Catherine Gowen of Stafford County.

When his father died as a soldier in the South Carolina militia during the Revolutionary War, Levi Gowen signed up, perhaps to avenge his father’s death. “Levi Goines” enlisted “about the time of the fall of Charleston” [May 12, 1780] at age 17 from Fairfield County “where he lived” as a Revolutionary soldier in the South Carolina line, according to his pension application. His pension papers continue:

“I further certify that John C. Jackson, William Barret and Donald Street whose names appear to the annexed certificates of Duncan Murchison, D. M. B. McIntosh and W. D. David were at the time of signing the same acting Justices of the Peace in an for the county afore-said, duly commissioned and qualified according to law and that their signatures to the same are genuine.

In testimony whereof I have hereunto affixed my Seal of Office and subscribed my name the 6th day of Au-gust AD1852.

Alexander C. Curry, Clerk
Moore County Court”

The pension application of Levi Gowen and accompanying af-fidavits were mailed to Hon. W. Dockery, House of Represen-tatives with the request that his pension check be mailed to Dockery’s Store, N. C.

After a year had passed, W. C. Thaghard wrote a letter on the behalf of the application of Levi Gowen:

“Carthage, N.C, April 8, 1853
Dear Sir,

Some months since I presented through Gen. Dockery to the Department the declaration of Levi Goines, a Soldier in the War of the Revolution, asking to be al-lowed a pension for his services in said war. I stated in my letter that the advanced age and feeble health of the old Veteran present Strong claims to the Department for an early investigation. I have waited with great pa-tience, and as yet the Department has not seen fit to ad-dress me on the subject.

If there is any informality in the declaration or any lack of testimony that prevents the claim being allowed, will the Department please to inform me or if it has not yet been investigated or has been allowed and no information given, I ask respectfully to be informed thereof.

Very respectfully,
W. C. Thagard”

Levi Gowen received Pension No. R3865 approved August 4, 1852. It is unknown how long Levi Gowen and his wife re-ceived the pension. Of Levi Gowen and descendants nothing more is known.

Mention of the “Goings families” in Moore County appeared in “Ancient Records of Moore County, North Carolina:”

“By strange coincidence, there were two Goings fami-lies in Moore County in 1790, one being white; the other listed under the heading of “all other free persons,” that is free negro, mulatto or Indian. Both fami-lies were headed by William Goings. One William, of course the white one, was later made a justice of the peace for the county. Within the writer’s recollection, some of those families held themselves above associa-tion with negroes, and their white neighbors accepted them as several notches above their black brethren.

An examination of the 1850 census will show the in-crease in this clan, all of whom are there listed as mu-latto. Briefly, the Goings were classed exactly as were the so-called “Lumbee” Indians of Robeson County. In later years, certain of these families intermarried with negroes, and their descendants now living in Moore County are as black as the pot. Others, however, have maintained the complexion and characteristics of their more ancient ancestors. The free family lived on or about Pocket Creek, in Lee County [organized from Moore County and Chatham County in 1907] or be-tween there and Lemon Springs.

The writer’s father once pointed out to him their lo-cation and casually remarked, ‘they were not negroes, but probably Indians.’

What became of the white fam-ily of Williams Goings, the writer has been unable to determine. A few years ago, a writer in the “Saturday Evening Post” wrote a story on the ‘Melungeons’ [maybe from the French ‘melange,’ a mixture] who had a colony on the Clinch River in North Central Ten-nessee, and among whose members were Goings.”

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