100 South Carolina

SOUTH CAROLINA

Following English custom, before 1837, most colonial South Carolina marriages took place in the parish church, following the publication of banns [the announcement in church on three successive Sundays], or by license, according to Sherry Irvine, BA, CGRS, FSA. There were two proper ways to get married, by banns or by license. If the couple obtained a marriage li-cense from one of the ecclesiastical offices, banns were not re-quired.

In South Carolina hardly any Colonial licenses survive because the license was given to the groom to present to the officiating minister. The license contained statements made on oath that both parties to the union were over the age of 21 [or they supplied the proper permission] and that there was no known impediment to the marriage. The bond, originally required, was for a sum of money to be forfeited if any part of the allegations were false.
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In 1810 the Gowen/Going/Goins/etc. family, free since the mid-seventeenth century, headed 40 “other free” households with 105 persons in Virginia, 62 persons in North Carolina, 11 in South Carolina, and 10 in Louisiana.
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Gowan Campbell was born in 1820 in South Carolina of par-ents unknown. He was enumerated in the 1850 census of Cass County, Georgia with Sarah Campbell, his wife, according to the research of Wendy Campbell.

They were recorded in the Twelfth Division, page 137 as Household No. 532-533:

“Campbell, Govan 30, overseer, born in SC
Sarah 30, wife, born in SC

Gowan Campbell was enumerated in Roseborough, South Carolina in Laurens County in 1860 with a second wife, Della Campbell. They were recorded on page 323 as Household 1652-1616:

“Campbell, Gowan 45, overseer, born in SC
Della 30, wife
A. 8, daughter
William M. 5, son
Callie 3, daughter
James 2, son
[infant] 6/12, son”

In 1870 Gowan Campbell and his family were recorded in Cross Keys, South Carolina in Union County, page 350, Household No.26/27:

“Campbell, Gowen 53, white male, born in SC
Della 36, wife
William W. 14, son
Callie 13, daughter
Jesse 12, son
James W. 11, son
Johnny 4, son”

Gowan Campbell was enumerated at Woodruff, South Carolina in Spartanburg County, page 361B:

Campbell Govan, 60, farmer, born in SC, father born in
SC, mother born in SC
Della 46, wife, keeping house, born in SC,
father born in SC, mother
born in SC
Wm. 24, son, farm laborer, born in SC, fa-ther born in _ SC, mother born in SC
Callie 23, daughter, born in SC, father born
in SC, mother born in SC
Jesse 22. son, farm laborer, born in SC, fa-
ther, born in SC, mother born in SC
Walter 21, son, farm laborer, born in SC, fa-
ther born in SC, mother born in SC
Jack 14, son, born in SC, father born in SC,
mother born in SC”

Children born to them include:

A. Campbell born about 1852
William W. Campbell born about 1855
Callie Campbell born about 1857
Jesse James Campbell born about April 1858
James Walter Campbell born about February 1859
Johnny “Jack” Campbell born about 1866

Jesse James Campbell, son of Gowan Campbell and Della Camp-bell, was born in April 1858 in South Carolina. He was married about 1883 to Ella Splawn who was born March 12, 1869 in North Carolina. He died about 1905, and she died January 14, 1948 at Greer, South Carolina.
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Accounts Audited of Revolutionarv War Claims Against the State of South Carolina Published in 1935.

Volume /
Name Page Date Notes
John Gowen 1/8,9 24 May 1786 Sworn before Justice of the Peace Baylis Earle (Then ortater John’s fatherin law)

John Gowen 1 / 9 10 June, 1786

John Gowen 1/146
Capt. John Gowen 2/89 As witness

John Keating 2/54 As bonder

3. Biographical Directory of the South Carolina Senate, 1776‑1985 John William Gowen, In vol 1, page 447 Listing for Sen. Baylis Earle, mentions that John William Gowen married his daughter Miriam. Her birthdate was not stated, but by comparison to brothers and sisters would have been about 1776. When? Where?

5. Original Index Book of Revolutionary Claims Filed in South Carolina 20 Aug 1783 ‑ 8 March 1786, Library of Congress 68‑56356

Name Page Notes
Gowen, John 74, 75, 114 No. Returns
Gowen, David 114
Gowen, Edward 114
Goyen, John 15
Goyen,William 1 5
Goyen, Henry 15
Goyen, Daniel 15

11. South Carolina Lovalists in the American Revolution 224297 Gowan’s Fort mentioned. On upper Pacolet river; Indian battle 11/1781. Later mention of “massacre”. Note: The Pacolet River is a 30 mile long never, rising (today) in a lake north of Spartanburg and running near Cowpens; further south becomes part of the Broad River.

“Roster of South Carolina Patriots in the American Revolution”

By Bobby Gilmer Moss, 1983

Gowen, David
He served in the militia under Col. Roebuck before the fall of Charleston and was dead prior to August 1786. A.A.3012B‑ A.A 3012A; X3520.

Gowen, Edward
He served in the militia under Col. Roebuck after the fall of Charleston. A.A.3012B; X3521 .

Gowen, Isham
He served under Capt. William Alexander, Col. Wade Hampton andGen. Sumter. A.A.3012C; M215.

Gowen, William
He served as a captain in the militia during 1782. (A.A.1076).

Gowin, Frederick
He enlisted in the Second Regiment on 1 Au­gust 1779 under Capt. Thomas Moultrie. At sometime, he was a sergeant. Saffell, p. 292; N.A.246; N.A.853.

Goyne, James

S30442 b. 30 May 1755, Mecklenburg County, Va. While residing in Camden District, he was drafted during 1776 and served under Lt. William Daugherty, Capt. John Smith and Col. John Winn of the militia. In late 1779, he volunteered to serve under Capt. John Nixon and marched into the Indian country. Next, he volunteered under Capt. Charles Lewis, Lt. Col. Patrick McGriff and Col. Lacey and was in the battle at Biggin Church. In June 1782, he was drafted and served under Lt. Charles Pickett and Maj. Odear (?). (Moved to Ga. and Miss.
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Gen. Samuel McGowan was commander of the Gowan’s Brigade during the Civil War. His command was the subject of a book written by James Fitz James Caldwell, according to Damon Van Vliet, a book dealer of Manchester, New Hampshire:

“The History of a Brigade of South Carolinians, Known First as “Greggs” and Subsequently as “Mc-Gowan’s Brigade.” Dayton, Ohio: Press of Morning-side Bookshop, 1974 was originally published in 1866 in 247 pages. Caldwell, who served as an officer in the 1st South Carolina Infantry, composed this very early, but still useful history that chronicles the activities of his brigade.

Beginning in 1862, the brigade was comprised of the same five regiments and saw action throughout the complete record of the Army of Northern Virginia. The five regiments commanded by Maxcy Gregg and then by Samuel McGowan were the 1st, 12th, 13th and 14th South Carolina Infantry and Orr’s Rifles. It is altoge-ther the best history of a brigade in Lee’s Army, and the best unit history from the Palmetto State. The author describes all of the brigade’s many engagements and adds enough personal material to make the account both personal and human in scope.

Chapters include the following: the Five Regiments Constituting Gregg’s Brigade; The Battles Around Richmond, June and July, 1862; From the Battles Around Richmond to the Second Battle of Manassas, July and August, 1862; Second Battle of Manassas, the Battle of Ox Hill, and the Capture of Harper‘s Ferry. August 29-September 15, 1862; Battles of Sharpsburg and Shepherdstown; The Repose in the Valley, the March to Fredericksburg, and the Battle of Fredericks-burg; The Brigade in Winter-Quarters, Battle of Chan-cel-lorsville; From the Battle of Chancellorsville to the Battle of Gettysburg; The Battle of Gettysburg – the Retire to Virginia; From the Return to Virginia to the Affair at Mine Run; From November 26, 1863, to the Opening of the 1864 Campaign; The Battle of the Wil-derness and Spottsylvania Court House; From May 12 to July 1, 1864. Battles of Jericho Ford, Riddle’s Shop, and on the Weldon Railroad, Return to North side of the James, Battles of Deep Bottom and Fussel’s Mills, July 1 to August 16; Return to Petersburg, Battles of Ream’s Station and Jones Farm, The Expedition to Jar-rett’s Station; The Condition of M’Gowan’s Brigade During the Winter of 1864-65; Active Operations until April 1, 1865; The Battle of Sutherland’s Station and the Retreat of the Army; The Surrender of the Army of Northern Virginia, Includes a list of Casualties Among Officers at Second Manassas and at Fredericksburg.”
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Ann Goin was married October 17, 1771 to James Fenney, according to “South Carolina Marriages, 1688-1799.”
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Irene G. Goin was married about 1850 to James Adams Hooper as his second wife [of four], according to “Welch Family History” by June Rayfield Welch. James Adams Hooper was born January 12, 1821 in South Carolina and died January 26, 1908 in Texas.
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John Goin enlisted in the Fourth South Carolina Regiment Septembr 15, 1777, according to “Roster of South Carolina Patriots in the American Revolution” by Bobby Gilmer Moss. He served as a captain under Gen. Pickens in 1781.
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William Goin served as a sergeant in the light dragoons under Lt. Col. Samuel Hammond, according to “Roster of South Carolina Patriots in the American Revolution”
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David Going enlisted in the South Carolina Sixth Regiment October 22, 1776, according to “Roster of South Carolina Patriots in the American Revolution.”
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Frederick Going was killed in the seige of Charleston in 1780, according to “Roster of South Carolina Patriots in the American Revolution.” His widow, Mary Going, applied for a pension.
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Levi Going was mentioned as a soldier in “South Carolina Abstracts of the Revolutionary War, War of 1812 & Indian Wars,” page 21.
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Rapes Going enlisted in the South Carolina Second Regiment July 1, 1779 in the company commanded by Capt. Thomas Hall, according to “Roster of South Carolina Patriots in the American Revolution.”
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Sheried Going enlisted in the South Carolina Fifth Carolina Regiment August 10, 1779, according to “Roster of South Carolina Patriots in the American Revolution.”
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William Going, born about 1766, was mentioned in “South Carolina Abstracts of the Revolutionary War, War of 1812 & Indian Wars,” page 53.
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William Going, Co. H, Fifth South Carolina Infantry Regiment, was among the Confederate soldiers sur­endered at Appomattox Courthouse April 9-15, according to “The Appomattox Paroles.”
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John Tillman Goins was married February 7, 1860 to Jane Thompson, according to “South Carolina Magazine of Ancestral Research,” Volume 11. Children born to John Tillman Goins and Jane Thompson Goins are unknown.
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J. Gowan was married to Mary Carrie Linley Decemer 26, 1868, York County, according to “South Carolina Newspaper Marriage Notices 1823-1865.” Children born to J. Gowan and Mary Carrie Linley Gowan are unknown.
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Private A. G. Gowen was listed in the Seventh South Carolina Calvary Regiment in the Civil War, according to the Civil War military roster.
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Private P. Gowen was listed in the 25th South Carolina Infantry Regiment, according to the Civil War military roster.
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Private William H. Gowen joined the South Carolina Confederate troops June 4, 1861 at Orangeburg Compound. He was transferred to Co. A, Ninth South Carolina Infantry Regiment. He served in the Palmetto Sharpshooters be­tween December 31, 1861 and June 30, 1962. The com­pany was commanded by Lt. Col. B. E. Bee.
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Sally Gowens was married to John Martin October 3, 1819, according to South Carolina Marriages, 1600-1820.”
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J. C. Gowin, Co. K, Fifth South Carolina Infantry Regiment, was among the Confederate soldiers surrendered at Appomattox Courthouse April 9-15, according to “The Appomattox Paroles.”
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Thomas Gown immigrated into the United States June 5, 1764, according to “Original Lists of Protestant Immigration to South Carolina.” page 26 by Jamie Revill.

ABBEVILLE COUNTY, SOUTH CAROLINA

William B. Going was married about 1857 to Ida Gilmer, ac-cording to Abbeville County probate records. Their marriage was reported in “7500 Marriages from 96 and Abbeville Districts, South Carolina, 1774-1890.” Children born to William B. Going and Ada Gilmer Going are unknown.
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Benjamin Goun, Sr. who was born in South Carolina about 1769 was enumerated as the head of a household in Abbeville County, according to “Heads of Families, South Carolina, 1790.”
==O==
James McGowen and Elizabeth Haygood McGowen lived in North Carolina in 1754 when a daughter was born. They were residents of Abbeville County when it was created in 1785 from District 96. He operated a ferry on the upper Savannah River, according to Jan McChesney, Foundation member and descendant of Portsmouth, New Hampshire. He is mentioned in the deed records of Elbert County, Georgia which lay across the Savannah River from Abbeville County, according to Deane McGowen.
He wrote his will there December 4, 1802:

“In the name of God Amen:

I, James McGowen of South Carolina and Abbeville county, being in perfect health of body, mind and memory, thanks be given unto God, calling to mind the mortality of my body and knowing that is appointed for all men once to die, do make and ordain this my last will and testament:

That is to say, principally and first of all, I give and commend my soul into the hand of almighty God that give it, and my body I commend to earth to be buried in decent christian burial at the discretion of my executors. Nothing doubting but I shall receive the same . . . in the general resurrection by the might and power of God
And touching such wordly estate wherewith it hath pleased God to bless me within this life, I give and bequeath to Elisabeth, my dearly beloved wife and all and singular my lands, manages, tenements and moveables by her freely to be possessed and enjoyed till death or marriage, and then by virtue of this my last will and testament, I give and leave the above mentioned lands, tenements and moveables in every part and parcel to my son Elijah M. McGowen to him and fully possessed of them, save only my negro man Joe which I leave to my wife so long as she lives, and to be at her disposal at her death to whom she will.

And to everyone of my sons and daughters, Mary, William, Robert, John, James, Susannah, Sarah and Elijah M.h, I give and leave to . . . . . one . . . . to have and to hold at my death out of my estate,
And I do make, constitute and ordain the above named Elisabeth my wife and William Carothers, my son-in-law the executors of this my last will and testament and I do hereby utterly disavow, revoke and disannul all and every other former testament, will, legacies and executors by me in any wise before named.
Ratifying and confirming this and no other to be my last will and testament in witness whereof I have hereunto set my hand and seal this Fourth day December 1802 in the year of our lord one thousand and eight hundred and two.
Signed pronounced and declared by me, James McGowen to be my last will and testament done in the presence of one who is in the presents of each other and have unto set their names.
James McGowen

Witnesses:
Joseph Chipman
Hannah [X] McGowen
Mary Carithers”

James McGowen died December 20, 1802 in South Carolina, according to “DAR Patriot Index.”

Children born to James McGowen and Elizabeth Haygood McGowen include:

Mary McGowen born September 8, 1754
William McGowen born about 1756
Robert McGowen born about 1757
John McGowen born about 1759 [1764]
James McGowen born about 1761
Susannah McGowen born about 1764
Sarah McGowen born about 1768
Elijah M. McGowen born about 1773

Mary McGowen, daughter of James McGowen and Elizabeth Hagood McGowen, was born September 8, 1754 in North Carolina. She was married about 1771 to William Carithers who was born April 12, 1754. He died at Abbeville, South Carolina March 23, 1855 at age 100. William Carithers had brothers: Robert, born in 1744 in Lancaster, Pennsylvania. He was married to Mary Luckie; John, born in 1745 in Baltimore, Maryland; Hugh, James and Samuel, all Revolutionary soldiers. They received land grants at Abbeville, according to Jan McChesney, a descendant of Portsmouth, New Hampshire.

Children born to them include:

William C. Carithers born October 7, 1788

William C. Carithers, son of William Carithers and Mary McGowan Carithers, was born October 7, 1788. He was married about 1813 to Mary Ann Griffith. In 1821 they were residents of Madison County, Georgia where he later died.

Children born to them include:

James Yancy Carithers born March 16, 1821

James Yancey Carithers, son of William C. Carithers and Mary Ann Grifith Carithers, was born March 16, 1821 in Madison County, Georgia. He was married about 1844 to Mary Elizabeth Ball. He died June 6, 1867.

William McGowen, son of James McGowen and Elizabeth Haygood McGowen, was born about 1756.

Robert McGowen, son of James McGowen and Elizabeth Haygood McGowen, was born about 1757.

John McGowen, son of James McGowen and Elizabeth Haygood McGowen, was born about 1759. He was married about 1782, wife’s name Hannah.

Children born to John McGowen and Hannah McGowen in-clude:

John McGowen born about 1784
Jane McGowen born about 1786
Elbert McGowen born about 1788
Samuel McGowen born in 1790
Hamilton McGowen born about 1793
` Robert McGowen born about 1796
Emily McGowen born about 1800
Louisa B. McGowen born about 1805

John McGowen, son of John McGowen and Hannah McGow-en, was born about 1784. He removed to Mississippi. John McGowen and John McGowen, Jr. was enumerated in the 1820 census of Monroe County, Mississippi. It is believed that John McGowen died there in 1827.

Robert McGowen, Samuel McGowen, John McGowen and William McGowen were enumerated in the 1830 census of adjoining Loundes County, Mississippi.

Children born to John McGowen include:

James Elbert McGowen born about 1836

James Elbert McGowen, son of John McGowen, was born about 1836 in Loundes County. It appears that he removed to Louisiana. He was married in 1854 to Mary J. Hough in Nat-chitoches Parish, Louisiana. He was enlisted about 1862 from Moorehouse Parish, Louisana in the Confederate Army.

James Elbert McGowen was enumerated in the 1880 census of Blanco County, Texas.

Children born to James Elbert McGowen include:

James Henry McGowen born about 1876

James Henry McGowen, son of James Elbert McGowen, was born about 1876.

Children born to James Henry McGowen include

Archie McGowen born about 1911

Archie McGowen, son of James Henry McGowen, was born about 1911.

Children born to him include:

Deane McGowen born about 1941

Jane McGowen, daughter of John McGowen and Hannah McGowen, was born about 1786.

Elbert McGowen, son of John McGowen and Hannah McGowen, was born about, 1788.

Samuel McGowen, son of John McGowen, was born in Elbert County, Georgia in 1790. He died in Texas in 1853 and was buried in Camilla, Texas.

Hamilton McGowen, son of John McGowen and Hannah McGowen, was born about 1793.

Robert McGowen, son of John McGowen and Hannah McGowen, was born about 1796.

Emily McGowen, daughter of John McGowen and Hannah McGowen, was born about, about 1800.

Louisa B. McGowen, daughter of John McGowen and Hannah McGowen, was born about 1805.

James McGowen, son of James McGowen and Elizabeth Haygood McGowen, was born about 1761.

Susannah McGowen, daughter of James McGowen and Elizabeth Haygood McGowen, was born about 1764.

Sarah McGowen, daughter son of James McGowen and Elizabeth Haygood McGowen, was born about 1768.

Elijah McGowen, son of James McGowen and Elizabeth Haygood McGowen, was born about 1773.

In my greatgrandfather James Elbert’s
death certificate it says his father was John Mc Gowen born in Georgia.

Beverly Giles Loffler of a will
of a James Mc Gowan proved 1844 it lists James siblings as being Samuel,
John, Jane, Elbert,Hamilton, Robert, Emily and Louisa B. This would also
make Samuel and John brothers, of course, and

Our family Journal has the information from James Elbert on to the present,
through James Henry and my father Archie Mc Gowen.

==O==
Rev. James Gowan Patterson was born in Abbeville District October 6, 1803 of parents unknown. He was married about 1826 to Laura Evans who was born at Winnsboro, South Carolina May 6, 1809. He died July 18, 1866 in Spaulding County, Georgia. She died there December 26, 1879 and was buried beside her husband in the City Cemetery at Griffing, Georgia.

BEAUFORT COUNTY, SOUTH CAROLINA

Jacob [James?] M. Gowan was enumerated as the head of a household in the 1820 census of Beaufort County.
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William Gowen was recorded as the head of a household in the 1800 census of Beaufort County, page 86:
“Gowen, William white male 26-45
white female over 45”
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William Gowen was enumerated as the head of a household in the 1830 census of Beaufort County, page 289:

“Gowen, William white male 20-30
white female 20-30
white male 0-5”

“William Gowan” reappeared in the 1840 census of Charleston County, page 247:

Gowan, William white male 30-40
white female 20-30
white male 5-10
white female 5-10
white male 0-5
white female 0-5
[4 slaves]”
==O==
The 1850 census of Beaufort District listed in St. Peters Parish on July 15, 1850 the household of William Gowin, No. 38-38:

“Gowin, William 45, born in SC, planter, $300 real
estate
Nancy 42, born in SC
Wilson 12, born in SC, attending school
Benjamin 10, born in SC, attending school
Mary 8, born in SC, attending school
Hampton 6, born in SC
Hetty 2, born in SC
Mary A. 1, born in SC”

BERKELEY COUNTY, SOUTH CAROLINA

Berkeley County was created in 1882 from Charleston County.

CHARLESTON COUNTY, SOUTH CAROLINA

Dr. William Moreau Goins of Columbia, South Carolina is the son of Elsie Taylor Goins, Foundation member and genealogist.

William Moreau Goins was born about 1961. He was graduated in 1979 from Gonzaga College High School in Washington, D.C. He was mentioned in “Good News Gonzaga,” publication of the high school alumni:

“Bill Goins ’79 performs under his middle name, Mo-reau. As Moreau, the multi-talented Goins sings, dances and acts. Included among his acts are tradi-tional dances of Native Americans. He was chosen to represent the National Native Network of Talent to carry on a legacy started by Iron Eyes Cody, the leg-endary tearful Indian of the ‘Keep America Beautiful’ campaign. Also Moreau has performed with the Wash-ington Metropolitan Opera and authored, directed and starred in a production at Washington’s Source The-atre.”

Elsie Taylor Goins was interviewed in February 1999 by a Charleston newspaper reporter:

“Family traces roots to slavery”

By Herb Frazier
Post and Courier staff
Charleston, South Carolina

Columbia–The twisted branches of Elsie Taylor Goins’ family tree lead a black American family to its roots – an English slave trader buried in West Africa.

From there, the branches spread to two mulatto women who sailed from Africa into Charleston in 1764 as “free people of color.” They later owned slaves and rice plantations in Berkeley County.

Goins’ lineage, spanning three centuries, is meticulously drawn on a large tan canvas she created after seeing her family’s “freedom papers,” declaring that her ancestors from Africa were never held as slaves.

It is the perception that most black Americans are the descendants of enslaved Africans, said Goins, a retired budget analyst with the Department of the Navy in Washington, D.C.

Other black families probably could tell of ancestors who arrived as free people, if memories and records had not been lost in time, she said.

“My family is unique because we had the freedom papers that gave us information about four generations,” she said, sitting in the den of her home among the records she has gathered in researching her family’s history.

What sets Goins’ family history apart from other descendants of free people of color is that her ancestors came to Colonial America already free, and she has an unusual document to show it.

Dr. S. Max Edelson, an assistant professor of history at the College of Charleston, said Goins’ story is unique.

“Similar stories could be waiting for historians to uncover,” he said.

“It is an invitation for further research.”

Not all free black people had papers attesting to their freedom, said Dr. Bernard Powers, a professor of history at the college. Powers said “freedom papers” is a generic term for court documents that stated a person purchased his freedom or was given it. Real estate transactions also served as freedom papers because slaves couldn’t own property, he said.

Freedom papers were obtained depending on a person’s circumstances, he explained. Some black people felt they needed them as protection against kidnappers who’d sell them into slavery. The freedom papers in Goins’ family were issued to her great-grandfather Andrew Henry Dibble, a Camden tailor. Goins said he probably got them to reaffirm his freedom even though the importation of African slaves to the United States had been outlawed long before.

The governor and secretary of state signed Dibble’s “certificate of freedom” on Aug. 24, 1860.

Dibble’s freedom papers are unique because high-ranking state officials signed them, and it indicates he was an influential person who had a white person to vouch for him, said Dr. Mark Smith, a U.S. history professor at the University of South Carolina.

The year Dibble got his freedom papers was a tense time in South Carolina. The anti-slavery movement was rising. Abraham Lincoln was elected president in November. The next month, South Carolina seceded from the Union. On April 12, 1861, shots were fired on Fort Sumter, starting the Civil War.

Smith speculates that Dibble obtained his “certificate of freedom” because he was afraid of an anti-slavery backlash that could have affected him even though he had never been a slave.

Dibble was born Jan. 1, 1825, in Charleston. The freedom papers do more than just list four generations of his ancestors. It links Goins’ family with Africa in a way far different than most other black families.

Dibble’s freedom papers include a December 1807 affidavit that Catherine Cleveland, his great-grandmother, and Elizabeth Cleveland Hardcastle, her aunt, were free people of color. Hardcastle was the daughter of William Cleveland, a white slave trader from Devonshire, England.

In the 1730s, William Cleveland arrived on the Banana Islands just off the coast of Sierra Leone in West Africa.

He was shipwrecked, and he took refuge on the island.

King Skinner Caulker, ruler of the Sherbro people, took him in. Caulker was an African who traded in ivory, gum, redwood and slaves. Cleveland eventually got into slave trading, too.

For a white man to be an independent slave trader, he was expected to marry into an African family, said Joe Opala, a scholar-in-residence at the Penn Center on St. Helena Island.

“When you came from Europe, you were expected to attach yourself to a local king and from him you took protection,” said Opala, who lived in Freetown, Sierra Leone, for 20 years. “He gave you land and a place to do business. In return, you had to marry a girl from his family. That tied you into the system.”

Cleveland married Kate Caulker, King Caulker’s only child, Goins said. They had two children, John and Elizabeth. Cleveland died Dec. 6, 1758. He is buried on Bunce Island, Sierra Leone, the site of a former British slave-trading post.

After his death, Elizabeth Cleveland and her niece Catherine came to the South Carolina Colony. Elizabeth Cleveland later owned Wampee, Brick House, Raccoon Hill, Tucker and Pierce’s Old Field plantations in Berkeley County, Goins said. When she died in 1808, she owned about 30 slaves on the Tucker Plantation. She willed Raccoon Hill to Catherine Cleveland.

The fair-skinned Elizabeth Cleveland was identified as a white female in the 1790 and 1800 census. She was married to a white doctor, William Hardcastle.

Being a descendant of a black woman who owned black slaves is not a badge of shame, Goins said.

“I don’t feel like I have to run and hide,” she said. “It is un-fortunate they were in the slave business, but I can’t change history. They were doing what society dictated. I assume if they felt it was undesirable, they would not have done it.”

Goins and her sister, Catherine Taylor McConnell, began researching their family’s history 30 years ago. McConnell died in 1996. This year, Goins hopes to publish a book about her family.

“Most people don’t realize that some [Africans] arrived as free people. It is a part of history that should be written because so much of history has been lost.”
==O==
Perhaps the earliest recorded individual of interest to Gowen chroniclers in the state of South Carolina is Charles Gowing who died in Charleston in 1704. “George Chicken & James Ingerson executed a bond for Chicken’s proper administration of the estate of Charles Gowing, late of Charles Town. Warrant of appraisement was directed to Wm. Gibbon, Evan McFashion & John Goodwin,” according to “Abstracts from the Records of the Court of Ordinary of the Province of South Carolina, 1700-1712” by A. S. Salley, Jr.
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William Going signed a petition “to the Crown against the Proprietors” February 24, 1717, according to “South Caro-lina Historical Magazine.” The petition was signed by all of the members of the South Carolina House of Commons and many other citizens. A total of 568 signatures–one half of the white male population of colony of South Carolina–appeared on the document.
==O==
Mrs. Giles Gowan was the mother of John Johnston who men-tioned her in his will. John Johnston died in South Carolina April 21, 1739. His will also mentioned John Gowan, mer-chant of London, England. Abstract of this will is printed in “Abstracts of Wills of the State of South Carolina 1670-1740,” page 265, by Caroline T. Moore. The will was re-corded in Charleston Will Book 1736-1740, page 399.

Mrs. Giles Gowan, apparently was married at least three times. She wrote her will as Sarah Johnston, widow, in “Charles Town, South Carolina.” She died November 29, 1768, according to Charleston County Will Book TT, page 74. The will names her sons, John McCall, Robert Collins and Robert Johnston and grandsons, John McCall, James McCall and Hext McCall, minor. John McCall, son, was named ex­ecutor of the estate.

John McCall had been a witness to the will of Ann Air Sep-tember 28, 1763, according to Charleston County Will Book QQ, page 316.

James McCall had been a witness the will of Lloyd Caleb in Charleston County in 1766, according to Charleston County Will Book RR, page 98. He had also witnessed the will of Thomas Vardell in 1769, according to Charleston County Will Book SS, page 66.

Hext McCall was a witness to a deed in 1776 in Charleston County, according to Charleston Will Book TT, page 570. He was witness to a deed in 1782, according to Charleston Coun-ty Book WW, page 224. He was named a guardian in 1780, according to Charleston County Will Book WW, page 255.
==O==
Peter I. Gowan may have been the individual who was mentioned in the will of Prue Benson of Greenville County, South Carolina written October 19, 1819. Peter I. Gowan owned half interest in a “mill built between P. I. Gowan and myself,” according to the will which was recorded in Greenville County October 1, 1821. The abstract read:

“I give and bequeath unto my son-in-law, John Gowen four negroes, also half of a mill built between P. I. Gowen and myself, to my son William B. Benson, five negroes; to daughter Jane, five negroes; plantation tract of land and all the balance of my person perperty to be sold at public sale on a credit of 12 months, and the money arising from the sale therein to be divided between John Gowen, William B. Benson and Jane Benson. I do hereby appoint John B. Gowen and William B. Benson my lawful executors.
Witnesses: Prue Benson
Thomas Benson
Evalina Benson
Henry Hall”

The estate sale of Prue Benson was held December 1, 1821. John B. Gowen, William B. Benson, John H. Eas-ley and Thomas Wynn were among the purchasers.

“Peter Gowan” “took the oath of Naturalization” in Charleston November 1, 1819, according to “South Carolina Historical Magazine.” This indicates that he was foreign born.

“Peter Gowan” was married. wife’s name Sarah, date not giv-en, according to the “Charleston Observer.” The marriage date is estimated to be 1823. Children born to Peter Gowan and Sarah Gowan are unknown.

Hazel Dean Overstreet, family researcher and Foundation Member of Odum, Georgia, discovered in the South Carolina Archives abstracts of Charleston bills of sale for slaves in-volving Peter I. Gowan:

“February 28, 1823. Bill of Sale from Jehu Jones to Peter Gowan a slave named Richard, a tailor by trade. Warranted sound.

“July 15, 1824. Bill of Sale from Jacob De La Molte to Peter Gowan for a mulatto slave named Mary, about 40 years old.

July 18, 1826. Bill of Sale from Eliza Garner to Peter Gowan for a mulatto slave named Sally, about 22 years old and her two children named David and Mary.

June 14, 1828. Bill of Sale from Fleming Ross & Company to Peter Gowan for a slave named Ellen. Warranted sound.

April 9, 1829. Bill of Sale from M. A. Desoussure, ex­ecutor of estate of Alexander Gordon to Peter Gowan for a slave named Melia and her daughter Kate.”

Jehu Jones, Sr, conveyor in the first bill of sale, was a free Negro slave owner and a tailor in Charleston, according to “Black Slave Owners, 1790-1860″ by Larry Koger.

Peter I. Gowan was recorded as the head of a household in the 1830 census of the City of Charleston, Charleston County, page 38:

“Gowan, Peter white male 40-50
white female 20-30
white male 5-10
white female 0-5
white female 0-5
white male 40-50

He was the owner of six slaves, according to the enumeration:

female slave 24-36
female slave 10-24
female slave 10-24
male slave 0-10
female slave 0-10
male slave 0-10”

During the decade Peter I. Gowan continued to deal in slaves:

“March 10, 1837. Bill of Sale from Peter Gowan to Robert Walder for a mulatto slave named Betsey, with deed of assignment to Samuel Weston, a free black.

November 16, 1837. Bill of Sale from Edward Harvey to Peter Gowan, as guardian, for a slave named Maria.”

Peter I. Gowan reappeared in the 1840 census of Charleston County, page 19:

“Gowan, Peter white male 40-50
white female 30-40
white female 10-15
white male 10-15
white female 10-15
white male 5-10
white female 5-10
white female 0-5
white male 30-40
white female 20-30”

[5 slaves]

Two members of the family were engaged in trades and manufacturing.

Peter I. Gowan had two other slave transactions after the census:

“March 23, 1841. Bill of Sale from Charles Clarke, executor of John Redfern, to Peter Gowan for a slave named George.

July 3, 1844. Bill of Sale from C. Parknin to Peter Gowan for a slave named Patty.”

Peter I. Gowan later moved to Orangeburg County, South Carolina where he and his wife died at the home of their daughter, Mrs. Riggs.

According to his granddaughter, Miss Sarah Louise “Sally” children born to Peter I. Gowan include:

Alexander Gowan born about 1828
[daughter] born about 1830
John Gowan born about 1834
Peter I. Gowan, Jr. born March 13, [16?] 1843

Alexander Gowan, son of Peter I. Gowan, was born about 1828, probably in Charleston.

A daughter, name unknown, was born to Peter I. Gowan about 1830. She was married about 1847, husband’s name Riggs. Later they lived in Orangeburg County.

John Gowan, son of Peter I. Gowan, was born about 1834, probably in Charleston.

Peter I. Gowan, Jr, son of Peter I. Gowan, was born March 13 [or 16?], 1843, probably in Charleston. He became a Presby-terian minister and preached in several areas across the South.
He was married about 1874, probably in Charleston to Sarah Louise “Sally” Palmer, the daughter of Benjamin M. Palmer and Sarah “Sally” Sanneau Palmer.

On April 1, 1875 Sarah Louise “Sally” Palmer Gowan of Selma, Alabama gave a deed to A. Foster Axson, M.D. of New Orleans, Louisiana to 320 acres located on Childress Creek, tributary of the Bosque River for $800, according to McLennan County, Texas Deed Book U, page 519 and Bos-que County Deed Book O, page 422. The land lay astride the McLennan-Bosque county line, “formerly in Milam’s Dis-trict.” Sarah Louise “Sally” Palmer Gowan had inherited the property from her mother.

The deed made reference to the fact that Sarah “Sally” B. San-neau Palmer was the daughter of Bazile R. Sanneau of South Carolina who was perhaps an earlier owner of the land. The land was conveyed to Benjamin W. Palmer June 4, 1847 by James Temple Doswell, according to Bosque County Deed Book K, page 643. The deed made reference to the fact that Sarah B. “Sally” Palmer Gowan was the only living child of Benjamin M. Palmer.

It appears from the deed that her mother, Sarah B. “Sally” Sanneau Palmer had remarried, husband’s name Schindler. He, too, had died, and in 1875 she was a widow living in Nacogdoches, Texas.

Other relatives by the names of Mary J. Sanneau, Hamet W. Sanneau, Kate O. Sanneau, Alfred U. Sanneau lived in Charleston. Palmer Sanneau lived in Adams County, Missis­sippi.

Recorded in Bosque County Deed Book 19, page 392 was an affidavit of heirship of Sarah Louise “Sally” Palmer Gowan in the estate of Benjamin M. Palmer made April 30, 1892 by Alfred W. Sanneau of Charleston.

Rev. Peter I. Gowan, Jr. and Sarah Louise “Sally” Palmer Gowan were enumerated in the 1880 census of Dallas County, Alabama, Enumeration District 74, page 1, precinct 36:

“Gowan, P. 37, born in South Carolina
Sarah L. 39, born in South Carolina
Sarah L. 3, born in Alabama

This enumeration would probably reveal if his father was foreign born.

They later lived in Wesson, Mississippi. Sarah Louise “Sally” Palmer Gowan died there July 22, 1896 at the age of 55 and was buried in Wesson Cemetery, located in the extreme south-ern part of Copiah County, Mississippi. Rev. Peter I. Gowan, Jr. died there December 2, 1912, at the age of 69 and was bur-ied beside his wife.

Children born to Rev. Peter I. Gowan, Jr. and Sarah Louise “Sally” Palmer Gowan include:

Sarah Louise “Sally” Gowan born August 18, 1877

Sarah Louise “Sally” Gowan, daughter of Rev. Peter I. Gow-an, Jr. and Sarah Louise “Sally” Palmer Gowan, was born August 18, 1877, probably in Dallas County, Alabama. She appeared in the 1880 enumeration of her father’s household as a three-year-old.

She lived the remainder of her life at Wesson. She died there September 18, 1956, at age 79 and was buried beside her par­ents. She was unmarried.
==O==
Thomas Gowan, free colored, appeared in the 1830 census of Charleston Neck, Charleston District, page 128:

“Gowan, Thomas free colored male 55-100
free colored female 55-100
1 female slave 55-100
1 female slave 36-55
2 male slaves 24-36
1 female slave 24-36
3 male slaves 0-10
2 female slaves 0-10”

The household of Thomas Gowan did not reappear in the 1840 census.
==O==
Benjamin Gowen gave a mortgage securing the purchase of five slaves bought from John Calder and Capt. William Law-ton, planter of Edisto Island in March 1753, according to “South Carolina Magazine of History.”
==O==
J.[?] A. Gowen was listed as a laborer residing at 3 Mill in the 1888-90 Charleston city directories.
==O==
Sarah Gowen headed a family of nine colored people in the 1830 census of Ward 4, City of Charleston. They were listed on page 82 as:

“Gowen, Sarah free colored female 24-36
free colored female 24-36
free colored female 10-24
free colored female 10-24
free colored male 0-10
free colored male 0-10
free colored female 0-10
free colored female 0-10
free colored female 0-10”

The household of “Sarah Gowens” reappeared in the 1840 census of Charleston District, page 116. The free colored people were listed as:

“Gowens, Sarah free colored female 24-36
free colored male 24-36
free colored female 0-10
free colored male 0-10
l male slave 55-100
2 male slaves 24-36
1 female slave 24-36
1 male slave 10-24
1 female slave 10-24
1 male slave 0-10
4 female slaves 0-10”
==O==
Sarah Gowens, “free colored, aged 17 years, 4 months & 8 days,” died January 25, 1852 and was buried in Macpelah Burying Ground, according to “Private Register of Rev. Paul Trapier” published by Dalcho Historical Society of Charleston.
==O==
An unusual enumeration of a slave household headed by Ann Gowens was listed in the 1840 census of Charleston District, Ward 4, City of Charleston, page 72 as:
“Gowens, Ann female slave 24-36
male slave 10-24
male slave 10-24
female slave 0-10
female slave 0-10”
==O==
Massey Gowens, “a black woman” was married to Henry Barns May 1, 1796 in Charleston, according to “Register of St. Phillip’s Parish, 1754-1810.”
==O==
John Martin and Sally Gowens, “free persons of color” were married October 3, 1819, according to St. Phillip’s parish records and “South Carolina Marriages, 1800-1820” by Brent H. Holcomb.
==O==
Thomas Gown applied for a 100-acre bounty grant in the up­per Savannah River valley in Belfast township June 5, 1764, according to the records of the Charleston Treasurer. He re­ceived 35 pounds from the treasury in 1764.
==O==
Ann Guyone headed a household in Ward Four, city of Char-leston, page 102 in the 1830 census:

“Guyone, Ann white female 30-40
white female 15-20
white female 15-20
white female 15-20
white female 5-10
white female 5-10
white female 5-10
female slave 36-55”

This household did not appear in the 1840 census of Charleston.

==O==

Gowrie Plantation and 50 slaves were sold by the Potter family in 1833 to Charles Manigault for $40,000, according to “South Carolina Historical Magazine.” Gowrie Plantation was developed during the 1820s by the Potter family of Char-leston, Savannah and Princeton, New Jersey. The plantation included 220 acres of developed rice fields and a large water-powered rice-pounding mill.
==O==
Residing in Charleston in March 1961 were the following who were listed in the telephone directory.

Going, B. L. 26 Oreton
Going, Claude L. & Clara 65-C Legare Homes
Going, J. Gary Palmetto Gardens
Gowan, Phillip L. 205 Chase
Gowan, Carlisle W. 3 Peacock Avenue
==O==
Clelia McGowan of Charleston, age 47, arrived at Ellis Island in 1912, according to Ellis Island records.
==O==
James McGowin arrived in Charleston January 5, 1768 aboard the “Admiral Hawk, John McAdams, master, lately arrived from Londonderry with poor Irish protestants and had admin-istered the oaths.” “James McGown” was shown as age 21.

CHEROKEE COUNTY, SOUTH CAROLINA
Jane Goings was born January 8, 1866, place and parents un-known. She was married in 1881 to Richard Lovelace, ac-cording to Kevin Robert Wicasta Lovelace.

Jane Goins Lovelace, age 33, was enumerated in Spartanburg County in 1900 without her husband. She was recorded in Pacolet township, Cowpens Town, June 20, 1900, Dwelling 639, Family 542:

“Lovelace, Jane 33, head, white female, born in January 1866, married at age

19, 8 children born to her,
born in NC, father born in
NC, mother born in NC
John 16, son, born in December 1883
single NC NC NC
James 14, son, born in Mar 1886 single
NC NC NC
Gadie 11, daughter, born Aug 1888
NC NC NC
Maimie 9, daughter, born in 1890, NC
NC NC
Maybel 7, daughter, born in Sept 1892
NC NC NC
Ruth 4, daughter, born in June 1895
NC NC NC
Allen 2, son born in Mar 1898, NC
NC NC”

Jane Goings Lovelace was remarried to George Fortenberry. They appeared in the 1920 census of Cherokee County living in Limestone, South Carolina with their three daughters.

Jane Goins Lovelace Fortenberry died January 27, 1936. Her obituary appeared in the “Spartanburg Herald:”

“Gaffney, Jan. 29,–Funeral services were conducted here today for Mrs. George Fortenberry, 53, who died at the home of her daughter, Mrs. Harry Wilson on West Rob-inson Street, after a short illness. Mrs. Fortenberry, who had been married twice, is survived by her second husband and the following children: James Lovelace, Cramerton, N.C; Allen Lovelace, Kings Mountain, N.C; John Love-lace, Mrs. Martha Scoggins, Mrs. Mamie Johnson, Mrs. Mabel Johnson, Mrs. Ruth Sisk, Mrs. Joe Kendrick, Mrs. Zelia Meadows and Mrs. Wilson of Gaf-fney; and Mrs. Gatie Sprouse of Blacksburg.”

Children born to them include:

John Lovelace born in December 1883
James Green Long Lovelace born May 10, 1886
Gadie Lovelace born in August 1888
Mamie Lovelace born in 1890
Maybell Lovelace born in September 1892
Ruth Lovelace born in June 26, 1895
Allen Newton Lovelace born in March 1898

John “Jack” Lovelace, son of Richard Lovelace and Jane Goins Lovelace, was born about 1884 in North Carolina. He died in Gaffney November 5, 1936, according to his obituary in “The Greenville News” of November 6, 1936:

“John Lovelace, 52, died at his home in the Midway sec-tion last night. He was found dead in bed this morning. Mr. Lovelace is survived by the following sisters: Mrs. M.V. Johnson, Mrs. C. H. Scoggins, Mrs. A. C. Johnson, Mrs. I. E. Sisk, Mrs. Harry Wilson, Mrs. Joe Kendrick, Mrs. Dugless Meadows and Mrs. Bud Sprouse; two bro-thers Jim Lovelace and Allen Lovelace.

Funeral services will be held from the home of his sister Mrs. M. V. Johnson, Sixth street at 3 p. m. Friday. The Rev C. A. Kirby will officiate. Interment will follow in the Beaverdam Cemetery.”

James Long Green Lovelace son of Richard Lovelace and Jane Goins Lovelace, was born in North Carolina May 10, 1886. He registered for the World War I draft in Gaston County at age 32.

Maybell Lovelace, daughter of Richard Lovelace and Jane Goins Lovelace, was born in North Carolina in September 1892. She was married about 1912 to M. V. Johnson. They were living in Gaston County, North Carolina when an infant died March 2, 1916. They also had a son Coleman Johnson who died there February 23, 1925, according to Gaston County death records.

Ruth Lovelace, daughter of Richard Lovelace and Jane Goins Lovelace, was born in North Carolina, June 26, 1895. She was married to Ira Sisk who was born August 30, 1898. She died October 8, 1970, and he died September 8, 1971.

Children born to them include:

Carl E. Sisk born April 15, 1923

Carl E. Sisk, son of Ira Sisk and Ruth Lovelace Sisk, was born April 15, 1923. He was married about 1944 to Pearlie Katherine Humphries who was born May 20, 1923.

Children born to them include:

Carl Steve Sisk born March 16, 1964

Carl Steve Sisk, son of Carl E. Sisk and Pearlie Katherine Humphries Sisk, was born March 16, 1964. He became a minister. He was married to Eddie Carol Vaughn who was born January 10, 1946.

Children born to them include:

Steven Scott Sisk born March 16, 1964

Allen Newton Lovelace, son of Richard Lovelace and Jane Goins Lovelace, was born about 1898 in North Carolina. He was enumerated in Spartanburg County in 1900 as a two-year-old. He was married about 1921 to Ethel Geneva Lemming. He died in 1960 in South Carolina, according to Elizabeth Herndon, a great-granddaughter. His obituary appeared in the August 18, 1960 edition of “The Spartanburg Herald:”

Gaffney – Allen Newton Lovelace, 63, of Johnson City, Tennessee died unexpectedly Wednesday night in Char-lotte at a bus station. He was enroute to visit a daughter, Mrs. B. H. Love, in Gaffney.

A son of the late Richard Lovelace and Jane Goings Love-lace, he was a veteran of World War I. Surviving are: three daughters, Mrs. Leroy Sanders of Tokyo, Mrs. D. T. Gray, Jr. of Dahlgren, Va., and Mrs. Love of Gaf-fney; one son, Allen Lovelace, Jr. of Greenville; seven sisters, Mrs. A. C. Johnson, Mrs. Mabel Coyle, Mrs. Ruth Sisk, Mrs. Harry Wilson, Mrs. Joe Kendrick and Mrs. Zelia Mea-dows, all of Gaffney, and Mrs. Gartie Sprouse of Blacks-burg.”

Children born to Allen Newton Lovelace and Ethel Geneva Lemming Lovelace include:

Helen Iberia Lovelace born in 1923
Allen Newton Lovelace, Jr. born about 1930

Helen Iberia Lovelace, daughter of Allen Newton Lovelace and Ethel Geneva Lemming Lovelace, was born in 1923. She was married about 1946 to Douglas Taylor Gray, Jr. Children born to them include:

Jane Lovelace Gray born in 1953

Jane Lovelace Gray, daughter of Douglas Taylor Gray, Jr. and Helen Iberia Lovelace Gray, was born in 1953. She was married about 1974 to Donald Lee Herndon. Children born to them include:

Elizabeth Herndon born in 1980
==O==
Jane Goings Lovelace Fortenberry of Gaffney, South Carolina died January 27, 1936. Mentioned in her obituary was a “daughter, Martha Scoggins.”

Martha Lovelace born about 1886
Allen Newton Lovelace born March 27, 1898

Martha Lovelace, daughter of Richard Lovelace and Jane Goings Lovelace, was born about 1886. She was married about 1903, husband’s name Scoggins.

Allen Newton Lovelace, son of Richard Lovelace and Jane Goings Lovelace, was born March 27, 1898. He was married about 1918 to Virgie Mae Hartsoe who was born January7, 1900. He died August 17, 1960, and she died December 8, 1986.

Children born to them include:

Bobby Craig Wallace born October 20, 1937

Bobby Craig Wallace, son of Allen Newton Lovelace and Vir-gie Mae Hartsoe Wallace, was born October 20, 1937. He was married about 1960 to Peggy Joyce Chaney who was born May 11, 1933. He died September 11, 1984.

Children born to them include:

Kevin Robert Wicasta Lovelace born Sept. 5, 1965

CHESTER COUNTY, SOUTH CAROLINA

Jesse Lee Goins was born in Virginia October 8, 1808 of par-ents unknown. He was married about 1831 to Martha Jane Boyd. She was born in South Carolina January 1, 1801.
“Jesse Goings” was enumerated in the 1840 census of Chester County, Camden District, page 273. Two members of the family were engaged in agriculture. The family consisted of:

“Goings, Jesse white male 30-40
white female 30-40
white male 5-10
white male 5-10
white female 0-5
white female 0-5
male slave 24-36”

Jesse Lee Goins was enumerated as the head of a household in the 1850 census of Chester County:

“Goins, Jesse 41, born in VA, farmer, $1,664 real
estate
Jane 49, born in SC
J. A. 17, born in SC, male
J. B. 15, born in SC, male
M. J. 12, born in SC, female
R. J. 10, born in SC, male”

During the decade, Jesse Lee Goins removed to Drew County, Arkansas. He received land patents there in 1857 and in 1859. He was enumerated there as the head of a household in the 1860 census:

“Goyns, J. 52, born in VA, farmer, $7,000 real
estate, $800 personal property
Jane born in SC
J. B. 25, born in SC
R. J. 20, born in SC
Boyd, A. 20, born in SC

Martha Jane Boyd Goins died August 18, 1868 and was bur-ied in adjoining Lincoln County, Arkansas, according to Lin-coln County cemetery records. Jesse Lee Goins was remarried to Mary Elizabeth Boyd, sister to Martha Jane Boyd Goins who was born about 1839.

Jesse Lee Goins reappeared as the head of a household in the 1870 census of Drew County:

“Goins, Jessie 62, born in SC, miller
Elizabeth 31, born in SC, [daughter]”

Lincoln County, Arkansas was formed from Drew County in 1871, and Jessie Goins was enumerated as the head of a household in the new county in 1880:

“Goins, Jesse 72, born in VA
Elizabeth 41, born in SC
William 9, born in AR”

Jesse Lee Goins died May 3, 1890 and was buried beside his wife.

Children born to Jesse Lee Goins and Martha Jane Boyd Goins include:

John A. Goins born about 1833
James B. Goins born about 1835
Martha Jane Goins, Jr. born May 26, 1837
Robert Jesse Goins born about 1840

Children born to Jesse Lee Goins and Mary Elizabeth Boyd Goins include:

William Alexander Goins born March 4, 1871

John A. Goins, son of Jesse Lee Goins and Martha Jane Boyd Goins, was born in Chester County about 1833. It is believed that he accompanied his parents in a move to Drew County in the 1850s. He died in Confederate service March 2, 1862, ac-cording to his tombstone in Lincoln County cemetery records.

James B[oyd?] Goins, son of Jesse Lee Goins and Martha Jane Boyd Goins, was born in Chester County about 1835. He was enumerated at age 25 living in the household of his parents in the 1860 census of Drew County. He and his brother, Robert Jesse Lee Goins enlisted in Confederate service. Both were killed on the same day, August 11, 1862.

Martha Jane Goins, Jr, daughter of Jesse Lee Goins and Mar-tha Jane Boyd Goins, was born May 26, 1837 in Chester County. She appeared as a 12-year-old in the 1850 census of Chester County. She was married to James A. Owen about 1857. She died January 4, 1884, according to Lincoln County burial records.

Robert Jesse Lee Goins, son of Jesse Lee Goins and Martha Jane Boyd Goins, was born in Chester County about 1840. He appeared there as a 10-year-old in the 1850 census. He ap-peared at age 20 in the household of his parents in the 1860 Drew County census. He was killed in Confederate service August 11, 1862, along with his brother, James B. Goins.

William Alexander Goins, son of Jesse Lee Goins and Mary Elizabeth Boyd Goins, was born March 4, 1871 at Mountain Home, Arkansas , according to the research of Martha Wea-therford, a granddaughter. William Alexander Goings was a carpenter and farmer. After the death of his parents he lived with an aunt, Elcie [Alsey] Boyd who was born in Arkansas in April 1831. He was married to Martha Susanne Keahey July 28, 1901 in Garnette, Arkansas in Lincoln County in the home of James Keahey and and Permelia Campster. The bride was born there December 2, 1879.

William Alexander Goins died May 23, 1950 in Star City, Arkansas in Lincoln County and was buried Holly Springs Cemetery. Martha Susanne Keahey Goins died July 20, 1965 at McGehee, Arkansas in Desha County and was buried in Holly Springs Cemetery also.

Children born to William Alexander Goins and Martha Susanne Keahey Goins include:

Jessie Lee “Blondy” Goins born July 30, 1902
James Edward “Red” Goins born February 04, 1904
Elmer Eldridge “Chick” Goins born November 04, 1905
Ella Mae Goins born November 04, 1907,
Homer Travis Goins born December 30, 1909,
Dorothy R. V. “Dot” Goins born September 11, 1912,
Willie Woodrow “Bill” Goins born September 19, 1916;
Jay Kay Goins born March 16, 1918.
Mary Elizabeth Goins born September 17, 1921,

Jessie Lee “Blondy” Goins, son of William Alexander Goins and Martha Susanne Keahey Goins, was born July 30, 1902. He was married about 1925 to Mamie “Peggy” Robertson who was born September 15, 1905. He died September 17, 1963 in Jefferson Hospital, Pine Bluff, Arkansas and was buried in Memorial Park Cemetery. Mamie “Peggy” Robertson Goins died December 9, 1971 and was buried in Memorial Park Cemetery.

James Edward “Red” Goins, son of William Alexander Goins and Martha Susanne Keahey Goins, was born February 4, 1904 in Lincoln County. He was married July 7, 1928 to Elva Mae Davis, daughter of William Davis and Mattie Raley Da-vis. She was born there December 9, 1905. He died Septem-ber 26, 1984 in Star City, and Elva Mae Davis Goins died there June 10, 1983. They were buried in Leek Cemetery.

Elmer Eldridge “Chick” Goins, son of William Alexander Goins and Martha Susanne Keahey Goins, was born Novem-ber 4, 1905 in Monticello, Arkansas. He was married August 18, 1937 to Lillian Sue Nobles, daughter of A. Nobles and Mary McGehee Nobles. She was born August 21, 1913 in Star City. He died December 4, 1990 in Jefferson Regional Medical Center at Pine Bluff and was buried in Leek Ceme-tery at Star City. Lillian Sue Nobles Goins died December 14, 2001 and was buried beside her husband.

Ella Mae Goins, daughter of William Alexander Goins and Martha Susanne Keahey Goins, was born November 4, 1907. She was married in 1935 to Fred Eberle in Pine Bluff. She died August 23, 1999 in San Jose, California.

Homer Travis Goins, son of William Alexander Goins and Martha Susanne Keahey Goins, was born December 30, 1909 and was mar-ried to Blanche Mae Gilbert December 25, 1935. He died four months later April 10, 1936. No children were born to Homer Tra-vis Goins and Blanche May Gilbert Goins.

Dorothy R. V. “Dot” Goins, daughter of William Alexander Goins and Martha Susanne Keahey Goins, was born September 11, 1912. She was married to Frank T. Neal May 11, 1935. She died Febru-ary 15, 1947 in Davis Hospital, Pine Bluff and was buried in Holly Springs Cemetery in Lincoln County.

Willie Woodrow “Bill” Goins, son of William Alexander Go-ins and Martha Susanne Keahey Goins, was born September 19, 1916. He was married January 27, 1940 to Helene Massey who was born in 1919 in Nady, Arkansas. He died May 25, 2000 in Las Vegas, Ne-vada and was buried in Holly Springs Cemetery. Children born to Willie Woodrow “Bill” Goins and Helene Massey Goins are unknown.

Jay Kay Goins, son of William Alexander Goins and Martha Susanne Keahey Goins, was born March 16, 1918. He was married about 1946 to Betsy Ingraham. Children born to Jay Kay Goins and Betsy Ingraham Goins are unknown.

Mary Elizabeth Goins, daughter of William Alexander Goins and Martha Susanne Keahey Goins, was born September 17, 1921. She was married about 1946 to Richard Hood who was born July 19, 1917 in Drew County, Arkansas. He died July 10, 1987 in the Vet-erans Administration Hospital in Little Rock, Arkansas. Later she was remaried to J. O. Billingsley. She died January 24, 1991 in Monticello, Arkansas.
==O==
Mrs. Viola Ogle Floyd Gowan died in North Carolina and was buried in the city cemetery of Chester, South Carolina, accord-ing to the research of Richard Ogle.
==O==
Richard Gowan was recorded September 14, 1810 in the fed­eral census as the head of a household, page 277:

“Gowan, Richd. white male over 45
white female over 45
white female 10-16
white female 10-16
white male 0-10
white female 0-10
white male 0-10”

CLARENDON COUNTY, SOUTH CAROLINA

“Thomas Gowen” received a land grant of 200 acres August 23, 1774, according to “South Carolina Memorials, Volume 1, 1731-1776” by Katie-Prince Ward Esker. The property was described as “200 acres on waters, Coosahatchie & Cy-press Creeks, bounded on the west by Isaac Legare’s, and on the east by land patented to Mrs. Sarah Middleton.” The sur-vey was certified May 10, 1773. Quit rent was set at three pounds sterling or four pounds proclamation money for each 100 acres. The memorial, or deed abstract, was dated Febru-ary 9, 1775.

“Heads of Families, South Carolina, 1790” reports that Thomas Gowin was enumerated as the head of a household in Camden District, Clarendon County, page 19:

“Gowin, Thomas white male over 16
white female
white male over 16
white female
white male under 16
white male under 16
==O==
Oscar Goins was born May 27, 1913 in Clarendon County to Mattie Goins and Sylvester Mitchum. All children of Mattie and Sylvester carried their mother’s name instead of their fa-ther’s because apparently they were never married.

Oscar Goins was married to Jessie Mae Cubbage of Clarendon County. She was the daughter of Peter Cubbage and Gracy Iola “Ola” McCall of Plowden Mill area in Clarendon County.

Oscar Goins died February 5, 1975 at Tuomey Hospital in Sumter, South Carolina. He is buried at Oak Grove Cemetery in Clarendon County.

COLLETON COUNTY, SOUTH CAROLINA

Henry F. Gowan was enumerated in the 1880 census of Col­leton County, Enumeration District 101, page 10, Broxson township:

“Gowan, Henry F. 33, born in NC
Bell 23, born in SC
Ann D. 1, born in SC
Gowan, Ann 77, born in NC, grandmother
==O==
In March 1753 Benjamin Gowen gave a note “for 300 pounds securing five slaves to Capt. William Lawton of Edisto Island, St. John’s Parish, according to “South Carolina Historical Magazine,” Volume 50 [1959]. Edisto Island is located in Colleton County, between Beaufort and Charleston.

DARLINGTON COUNTY, SOUTH CAROLINA
W. Gowan King was born about 1850. He was married in 1878 to Addie Campbell, sister to John J. Campbell, in Wesley Chapel of the Methodist Church in Lydia, South Carolina.

DILLON COUNTY, SOUTH CAROLINA

On May 5, 1998, Melissa Earl, 40-15 12th Street, Long Island City, New York wrote that she was the great-great-granddaughter of Jim Goings of Dillon, South Carolina who died there in the 1940s. “His daughter was Ella Clara Goings, my great-grandmother. He was a truck driver, a mixed Indian whose family had come from North Carolina, probably Rockingham County.”

EDGEFIELD COUNTY, SOUTH CAROLINA

Robert Gowan was a witness to a deed of Job Padgett in which he conveyed to William Jones 92 acres of land December 9, 1810 for $10, according to Edgefield County Deed Book 30, page 450. The land lay on Mores Creek of Clouds Creek, adjoining the lines of Samuel Dean, Wilkin Smith and Job Padget.
==O==
Mary Gowen was married to Henry Barnes May 1, 1796 in Edgefield County, according to Cecille Gaziano, researcher of Minneapolis, Minnesota.

Gowen Research Foundation Phone:806/795-8758, 795-9694
5708 Gary Avenue E-mail: gowen@sbcglobal.net

Lubbock, Texas, 79413-4822 GOWENMS.100, 02/21/03

Internet: http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.com/~gowenrf

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