080 York Co, Maine – B – John Gowen

John Gowen, [William Alexander1] son of William Alexander Gowen and Elizabeth Frost Gowen, was born November 19, 1668 at Kittery, Maine. He became a large landowner in that area, a substantial farmer, a selectman, a mariner and a land surveyor. In 1691 he was married to his first cousin, Mercy Hammond, daughter of Maj. Joseph Hammond and Katherine Frost Hammond, sister to Elizabeth Frost Gowen.

Mercy Hammond Gowen, was born in 1674 at Wells, Maine. Her father was born in 1646 at Wells, the son of William Hammond and Benedictus Hammond.

On October 3, 1693 a strange grand jury report was filed in­volving John Gowen and Mercy Hammond Gowen, according to “Province and Court Records of Maine.” The statement was recorded in “York Deeds,” Vol. 2, page 23. The grand jury indictment read, “Wee present John Gowen alias Smith and Mercy Hamon that was for fornication presentable per the law.”

“York Court Records” Volume 6, page 102 shows on Jan­uary 2, 1693-94: “Mercy Gowen alias Smith, being presented for fornication uppon her humble petition to excuse her ab­sence is fined thirty shillings and to pay five shillings (court) fees, which was paid”. This entry was also recorded in “York Court Records” Vol. 2, page 23.

It is interesting to note that James Warren, Jr. was fined for for­nication at the same time, according to “Province and Court Records of Maine” Vol. 4 by Neal W. Warren.

John Gowen failed to appear in court October 2, 1694, and the court clerk entered “warrant to be issued out for his con­tempt of authority and for his appearance at ye next sessions,” according to “York Court Records,” Vol. 2, page 35.

On March 14, 1700 John Gowen “alias Smith” paid three pounds, six shillings, eight pence to James Gowen “as his part of the estate of William Alexander Gowen as approved by the probate January 19, 1696-97,” according to “York Deeds.”

John Gowen “alias Smith” and Nicholas Gowen “alias Smith”, “both of Berwick in Kittery.” re­quested their neighbors to par­tition between them the land they had inherited from their fa­ther and from Tristram Harris, according to “Province and Court Records of Maine.” Their request, dated July 10, 1700 was to “provide allowance to our mother her thirds and to our brethren and sisters their portions.” John Gowen and Nicholas Gowen agreed January 19, 1702-03 to divide the in­heritance from Tristram Harris in equal halves.

Mercy Hammond Gowen witnessed a deed June 20, 1701, ac­cording to “York Court Records” Volume 6, page 3.

John Gowen was one of the 17 men who founded the First Church of Berwick, Maine December 21, 1701. He was car­ried on the church roll as one of the charter members of the congre­gation.

John Gowen appeared on a York County jury list April 7, 1702, July 7, 1702, October 6, 1702 and January 5, 1702-03. He wit­nessed a deed at Kittery January 21, 1704, according to “York Deeds,” Volume 7, page 28.

On March 5, 1711-12 John Gowen and Mercy Hammond Gowen received a settlement of her in­heritance from the estate of her father, Joseph Hammond.

The settlement contract read:

“These Presents Testify an agreement between Joseph Hamond, Administrator to ye Estate of Joseph Ham­mond, Esquire, late of Kittery in ye County of York de­ceased, on ye one part & John Gowen & Mercy, his wife, of ye Same Kittery aforesaid on ye other part Wit­nesseth that for & in Consideration of ye full Sum of Ninety Eight pounds thirteen Shillings & Seven pence to ye said John Gowen & Mercy, his said wife, in hand well & truely paid ye said Joseph Ha­mond they, ye said Gowen & his said wife. do Accept of ye Same in full Satisfaction for their whole right & Inter­est in ye Estate of ye said Joseph Hamond Es­quire de­ceased, and they, ye said John Gowen & Mercy his said wife, for them­selves, their heirs, Executors, Administrators & Assigns do by these presentments fully remise release & for Ever Quitt Claime Exoner­ate & discharge their brother Joseph Hammond abovesaid his heirs Executors and Administrators all & all manner of Suits, Actions, Cause or Causes of Actions, Accompts, reckonings, strifes, variences, Quarrells, Controver­syes Debts Dues & Claims what­soever of them, ye said John Gowen & Mercy his said wife, from ye begining of ye world to ye date of these presents referring to ye Estate Real & Per­sonal of their said father deceased, Excepting only out of this General release ye widows Dower or thirds in ye hou­seing & lands of ye decedent at ye Expiration of her Term for which ye said Joseph Hamond his heirs etc. ye Sum of Twenty four pounds fifteen Shillings & 3d within one year after ye Decease of their Mother.

It is also further Agreed by ye partys abovesaid that what Ever Debts or Claims Shall appear against ye above­said Estate real or personal ye said John Gowen & Mercy his said wife Shall refund & pay back their pro­portionable part thereof unto ye Administrator & for his Just Charge thereabout & ye said Joseph Ha­mond doth hereby Oblige himself to pay unto ye abovesaid Gowen ye full Sixth part of what Shall here­after Come to his knowledge not yet in ye Inven­tory, In witness where of ye partys have Set their hands & Seals this fifth day of March Anno Domini 1711-12.

Signed Sealed & Delivered Jos. Hamond
in presence of us: John Gowen
Mercy Gowen
John Hill
Bennoni Hodsden
Nicholas Gowen”

On the same day John Gowen sold to his brother Nicholas Gowen his half of the Tristram Harris in­herited land for 15 pounds, according to “York Deeds.” The conveyance cov­ered “Twenty five Acres Scituate in York Township of Kittery being ye one halfe of Fifty Acres of land known by ye name of Trustram Harris out Lot it being the westermost part of said Fifty Acres according as ye Same is Set forth and bounded in A Certain Agreement or Instru­ment in Writting under ye hands and Seals of us ye said John & Nicholas Gowen baring date ye Nineteenth day of January one thousand Seven hundred and two-three.” Mercy Ham­mond Gowen gave up her “right of dower and power of thirds” in the land in a separate acknowl­edgement.

On August 25, 1720 the York County militia ordered that “a garrison or a place of refuge be erected at the home of John Gowen.” The militia later ordered “that the home of John Gowen be made defencible and that Nicholas Gowen, Thomas Weed and their families lodge therein,” according to “Maine Historical & Genealogical Recorder.”

Mercy Hammond Gowen died about 1725. When John Gowen sold his farm, he reserved the “family burying ground.” John Gowen died in Berwick January 9, 1732-33, according to “Colonial Families in the United States.” Graves found at this location were marked only with field­stones. More recent graves there had a monument inscribed “Asa Gowen and wife.”

Children born to John Gowen and Mercy Ham­mond Gowen, according to “Colonial Families of the United States,” in­clude:

Dorcas Gowen born August 13, 1692
George Gowen born August 10, 1696
William Gowen born April 27, 1697
John Gowen born May 24, 1698
Mercy Gowen born January 27, 1700-01
Joseph G. Gowen born November 28, 1703
Jane Gowen born May 17, 1706
Lemuel Gowen born September 22, 1709
William Gowen born July 14, 1715

Dorcas Gowen, [John2, William Alexander1] daughter of John Gowen and Mercy Gowen, was born at Berwick, Maine August 13, 1692. About 1724 she accused John Treworgy of an unlaw­ful trespass, but “he could not be found,” according to court records. Dorcas Gowen died unmarried in 1732.

George Gowen, [John2, William Alexander1] son of John Gowen and Mercy Hammond Gowen, was born at Berwick, Maine August 10, 1696. He died June 30, 1712.

William Gowen, [John2, William Alexander1] son of John Gowen and Mercy Hammond Gowen, was born April 27, 1697 in Berwick. He died July 7, 1713.

John Gowen, [John2, William Alexander1] son of John Gowen and Mercy Hammond Gowen, was born at Berwick May 24, 1698. He became a mariner. He was married Jan­uary 31, 1719-1720 to his first cousin, Elizabeth Ferguson, daughter of Alexander Ferguson and Elizabeth Gowen Ferguson, aunt of John Gowen, ac­cording to “Colonial Families of the United States.” Both were of Kittery,” according to “Maine Histori­cal Genealogi­cal Recorder.”

John Gowen was sued in 1728 by his father-in-law for board­ing his daughter Jane Gowen for four and a half years. Eliza­beth Ferguson Gowen died be­fore 1731, and John Gowen died in 1732.

Children born to John Gowen and Elizabeth Fergu­son Gowen include:

Jane Gowen born September 23, 1721

Jane Gowen, [John3, John2, William Alexander1] daughter of John Gowen and Elizabeth Ferguson Gowen, was born September 23, 1721 probably at Kittery. Following the death of her mother about 1723 she lived with her grand­parents, Alexander Fer­guson and Elizabeth Gowen Ferguson. Her grandfather sued her father in 1727 for her board for four and a half years. When Alexander Ferguson wrote his will in York County April 28, 1731 he inserted ” I give to my grand­daughter, Jane Gowen, child of my daughter Elizabeth Gowen, deceased, one feather bed at age 18 or at marriage and five pounds of current money when she is 18. Of Jane Gowen nothing more is known.

Mercy Gowen, [John2, William Alexander1] daughter of John Gowen and Mercy Hammond Gowen, was born January 27, 1700-01. She was married March 19, 1726-27 in Gloucester, Massachusetts to Moses Riggs.

Joseph G. Gowen, [John2, William Alexander1] son of John Gowen and Mercy Hammond Gowen, was born November 28, 1703 at Kittery. In 1726 he was married to Elizabeth Ford, daughter of Stephen Ford and Elizabeth Hammond Ford, be­lieved to be a sister to Mercy Hammond Gowen. Stephen Ford and Elizabeth Hammond Ford were married in 1701. Stephen Ford was the son of William Ford and his wife, Mary who were married in 1663. William Ford, who was the son of Timothy Ford, died in 1682. Mary Ford was born in 1644 and died in 1708.

Joseph G. Gowen was a mariner all his life. After their mar­riage his wife was admitted to the church December 24, 1727.

Joseph G. Gowen paid taxes on his property in the years of 1727, 1734 and 1744. He gave to I. Foster, a mortgage and dis­charged it in 1736. His taxes were abated for 1735 and 1740. These were possibly years in which he was in the king’s service in the Royal Navy. In 1735 he purchased a house and lot from James Day and he deeded to three chil­dren Hammond Gowen, William Gowen and Elizabeth Gowen a house in 1747. In 1748 he was taken into court by Day in a suit concerning a levy “on part of.”

He was lost at sea in a storm off Cape Fear, North Carolina in 1747, according to “Genealogies and Estates in the Town of Charlestown, County of Middlesex, State of Mas­sachusetts, 1629-1818,” published by Thomas Wyman in Boston in 1879. Charlestown was later incorporated as part of Boston, Mas­sachusetts. Another source states that he was lost at sea in 1752.

Administration of the estate, valved at 72 pounds, was given to Hammond Gowen on June 19, 1752. [One source states 1753]. A notation in settlement mentions that Ham­mond Gowen had loaned 46 pounds to his father in North Carolina. The admin­istration account also shows payment to Robert Kelley for a coffin.

Children born to Joseph G. Gowen and Elizabeth Ford Gowen include:

Hammond Gowen born January 9, 1727
Joseph G. Gowen, Jr. born May 10, 1730
William Gowen born September 10, 1732
Elizabeth Gowen born June 8, 1734
Joseph Gowen Jr. [2] born May 22, 1736
Abigail Gowen born January 18, 1738
Abigail Gowen [2] born October 9, 1743

Hammond Gowen [Joseph G.3, John2, William Alexander1] Gowen, son of Joseph G. Gowen and Elizabeth Ford Gowen and a name­sake of his grandmother, Mercy Hammond Gowen, was born January 9, 1727 at Charlestown. He went to sea early in his life and became a sea captain.

On May 19, 1748, at age 21, he was married to Mary Croswell who was “admitted to the church January 5, 1756.” Mary Croswell was born in 1730, the daughter of Thomas Croswell. Thomas Croswell, was born in 1706 and in 1728 was married to Mary Pierce Pitts [1706-1730]. Thomas Croswell, was the son of Caleb Croswell [1679-1713] who in 1700 married Abigail Stimson [1679-1738]. The parents of Caleb Croswell were Thomas Croswell [1638-1708] and Priscilla Upham Croswell [1642-1717].

Hammond Gowen died of apoplexy on July 14, 1762. Mary Croswell Gowen was remarried in 1763 to Nathan Sargent.

Several legal records concerning Hammond Gowen were listed in “Genealogies and Estates.” Only a few of them have been checked. Tax records are listed for years of 1748, 1756, 1758 and 1761. Hammond Gowen was an extensive land owner in Middlesex County. The inventory of his estate totaled £2,754, and was administered to the widow Mary Croswell Gowen on July 5, 1762–ten days before his death! Very likely this is a cleri­cal error. Mystic River and Bunker Hill were mentioned as reference points in the legal description of the property.

The widow, Mary Croswell Gowen mortgaged “one-half of house, northerly part” to Nehemiah Rand on August 27, 1762. On October 27, 1767 Mary Croswell Gowen Sargent paid off the mortgage.

Children born to Hammond Gowen and Mary Croswell Gowen include:

William Gowen born September 13, 1749
Joseph Gowen born January 14, 1751
Hammond Gowen born January 26, 1754
Mary Gowen born May 21, 1755
Elizabeth Gowen born December 27, 1756
Abigail Gowen born April 9, 1759
John Gowen born July 31, 1760

William Gowen, [Hammond4, Joseph G.3, John2, William Alexander1] son of Hammond Gowen and Mary Croswell Gowen, was born September 13, 1749 Charlestown, Mas­sachusetts. In 1764, at age 15, he chose Nathan Sargent as his guardian. He became a goldsmith and a jeweler and became very successful. In 1771, he sold his home and land in Charlestown to Ebenezer Harnden and Michael Negels of Medford.

William Gowen was married April 29, 1772 to Eleanor Cutter, according to “Vital Records of Medford, Mas­sachusetts.” She was born August 7, 1753 at Medford to Ebenezer Cutter and Eleanor Floyd Cutter. On July 19, 1774, he was named the guardian of his younger brother, John Gowen, age 15. His bond for guardianship was cosigned by his brother, Joseph Gowen, apothecary.

“William Gowen,” turned in $289 in Revolution­ary bank notes for new currency in 1779 at “Town No. 96,” unidentified, in Massachusetts.

On April 12, 1783, William Gowen purchased a new home from Seth Blodgett for £500. On October 26, 1784, William Gowen and Eleanor Cutter Gowen sold the property to their brother-in-law, John Bishop. Elizabeth Gowen, his sister was a witness to the transaction.

On August 25, 1785, John Gowen and Eleaner Cutter Gowen sold a house for £500 to William Cutter, “distiller,” regarded as her brother. She conveyed the release of her dower rights, and the transaction was witnessed by Joseh Gowen.

William Gowen appeared as the head of a household in the 1790 census of Medfordtown, Massachusetts, according to “Heads of Families, Massachusetts, 1790,” page 149:

“Gowen, William white male over 16
white female
white female
white female
white female
white female
white female
white male over 16
white male over 16
white male under 16
white male under 16”

William Gowen sold to Isaac Bowers “Pew 14” in the Medford Meeting House June 10, 1790. On February 25, 1791 he repurchased “Pew 14” from Issac Bowers. On December 6, 1794 “William Gowen of Boston, Gentlemen” sold “Pew 14” in Medford Meeting House to Benjamin Hall of Medford. Eleanor Cutter Gowen signed her release of dower.

William Gowen died September 13, 1808 at Dorchester, Massachusetts. “Mrs. Eleanor Gowen, widow” died of apoplexy June 3, 1826 at age 72, according to “Vital Records of Medford, Mas­sachusetts.” She was buried at the Unitarian Church, First Parish.

Children born to William Gowen and Eleanor Cutter Gowen include:

Eleanor Gowen born January 19, 1773
Hammond Gowen born August 26, 1774
Polly Gowen born October 1, 1776
Elizabeth Gowen born January 22, 1778
Lucretia Gowen born January 22, 1781
William Cutter Gowen born September 21, 1783
Hammond Gowen born July 6, 1786
Mary Abigail “Maria” Gowen born in 1794

An apparent relative to William Gowen and Eleanor Cutter Gowen, Betsy Gowen, 33, died December 26, 1789 “of con­sumption in Boston,” according to “Vital Records of Med­ford, Massachusetts.” She was buried at the Unitarian Church Cemetery in the First Ward in Medford.

Eleanor Gowen, daughter of William Gowen and Eleanor Cutter Gowen, was born January 19, 1773 at Medford. Eleanor Gowen was married to William Hall October 16, 1791 in the Unitar­ian Church of Medford, according to “Vital Records of Medford, Massachusetts.” She died in Quebec City, Quebec in 1860.

Hammond Gowen, son of William Gowen and Eleanor Cutter Gowen, was born August 26, 1774. He died at 13 months, July 30, 1775, according to the records of Unitarian Church, First Parish published in “Vital Records of Medford, Mas­sachusetts.”

Polly Gowen, daughter of William Gowen and Eleanor Cutter Gowen, was born October 1, 1776 in Medford. Of this individual nothing more is known.

Elizabeth Gowen, daughter of William Gowen and Eleanor Cutter Gowen, was born January 22, 1778 in Medford. She was married about 1795, husband’s name McGee.

Lucretia Gowen, daughter of William Gowen and Eleanor Cutter Gowen, was born January 22, 1781 in Medford. She was married about 1799 to John Brooks, a merchant. She died September 1807, and he was remarried to her younger sister, Abigail “Maria” Gowen.

William Cutter Gowen, son of William Gowen and Eleanor Cutter Gowen, was born September 21, 1783 in Medford. As a young man, he went to sea, making voyages down the east coast to Cuba. Upon the death of his father in 1808, he gave his power of attorney to John Brooks, his brother-in-law. In 1810 he purchased a home on Spring Street in Medford from William Hawes.

About 1811, he removed to Cuba and established residence in Havana, then the third largest city in the western hemisphere. William Cutter Gowen saw the business opportunities in Cuba, but realized that the Spanish franchise system stifled free enterprise there and returned to Boston. On October 10, 1815, William Cutter Gowen, “former resident of Cuba, but now of Boston, merchant,” bought a new brick building on Fort Hill from his brother-in-law, John Brooks and his second wife, Abigail “Maria” Gowen Brooks who signed a release of her dower. In that year, he also bought “property in Hamilton” from James Hooper.

In 1817, the Cuban government suppressed the tobacco monopoly, and William Cutter Gowen immediately returned to Havana. In that year he, “former resident of Boston, now of Havana, Cuba in consideration of $1 paid by his mother, Eleanor Gowen of Boston and further consideration of love and affection; leases to her for and during her natural life the house and land on Fort Hill, Boston, being the whole of the estate conveyed to him by John Brooks, said premises late in occupation by said Brooks.”

John Brooks experienced severe financial reverses shortly afterward and died in 1823, leaving his widow, Abigail “Maria” Gowen Brooks and their children almost penniless. She immediately sailed to Cuba to join her brother, William Cutter Gowen who had established a large tobacco plantation at Matanzas, Cuba.

As the health of his mother began to fail, the Fort Hill property was returned to him. William Cutter Gowen, “of Matanzas, Cuba” in 1825 sold the property to Ann Hale and took her mortgage in the transaction.

William Cutter Gowen died the following year, and Abigail “Maria” Gowen Brooks inherited his large, successful tobacco plantation and sudden riches. With this wealth, she was able to enjoy travel and the pursuit of culture. She left the Cuban enterprise in the hands of elder son, Edgar Brooks and in 1829 was living in Hanover, New Hampshire.

Hammond Gowen, son of William Gowen and Eleanor Cutter Gowen, was born July 6, 1786. In 1831, he was a merchant living in Quebec City, Quebec.

Mary Abigail “Maria” Gowen, daughter of William Gowen and Eleanor Cutter Gowen, was born in 1794 in Medford. Her father died when she was 14, and her sister, Lucretia Gowen Brooks and her husband, John Brooks, a merchant tailor took her in and provided her education. Lucretia died in 1907, and John Brooks was remarried to the 16-year-old Mary Abigail “Maria” Gowen. Her baptismal name was simply Abigail Gowen. In 1819, the General Court of Massachusetts permitted her to take the name Mary Abigail Brooks and she was rechristened by that name at King’s Chapel in Boston July 31, 1819.

In 1823, John Brooks died in poverty and left his widow and their sons penniless. Her brother, William Cutter Gowen, immediately invited her and her sons to come and live on his tobacco plantation in Cuba. Three years later, William Cutter Gowen, died and left his immensely successful tobacco plantation to Abigail “Maria” Gowen Brooks.

It was there that she began to express her talent for poetry. Under the penname of “Maria del Occidente” she wrote the first canto of “Zophiel” which was soon published.

In 1829, she was living in Hanover, New Hampshire where she was actively seeking an appointment to the U.S. Military Academy for her youngest son, Horace Brooks. He wrote:

“My mother’s special characteristic was her individuality. She generally succeeded in her endeavors. For instance, she applied to have me sent to West Point, so sent me to Washington in 1829 with letters, etc. The appointment was promised, but by some influence was over-ruled. She then took me to Hanover, New Hampshire with a view to my entering Dartmouth College. In the meantime, she went with her brother Hammond Gowen of Quebec to Europe in 1830 where she visited Southey [Robert Southey, famous English poet of Bristol, Gloucestershire]. With Southey’s advice, she got out a London edition of “Zophiel.” She was introduced to the Marquis de Lafayette who was so pleased with her that he asked if he could be of any service to her. ‘Yes,’ said she, ‘you may get my son into West Point.’ Upon this, Lafayette wrote to Chief Engineer Bernard, and the appointment of a cadet came to me.”

Horace Brooks entered the Academy in 1831 and was graduated as a second lieutenant in 1835. Lt. Brooks was stationed at the Academy from 1836 to 1839, and Mary Abigail “Maria” Gowen Brooks lived with him. When he was transferred to Ft. Hamilton, New York in 1840, she accompanied him. During this period, she continued to write poetry and published “Idomen” in 1843.

Mary Abigail “Maria” Gowen Brooks sailed for Cuba for the last time in December 1843 and died at Matanzas November 11, 1845 at the age of 51. Horace Brooks wrote, “She was buried at Limonal by the side of my two brothers.” One of the brothers is suggested as a half brother, the son of Lucretia Gowen Brooks.

Of his mother Horace Brooks stated:

“My mother was quite a linguist. She read and wrote fluently in French, Spanish and Italian; she also sang many songs in these tongues. She was a hard student and a woman of much research, and very particular to obtain her authority from the original; and often attempted, with the assistnce of some friend, the translation of obscure languages. I remember how she kept by her a Persian grammar and often referred to it. She was also quite an artist, and several pieces painted by her in water-colours were hanging up about her rooms. She was a constant attendant at church and always carried with her an English edition of the services of the church. She was very particular about her own language, disliked all interpolations, and always referred to ‘Johnson and Walker.’ It was delightful to hear her converse. Her knowledge of present and past events and of the prominent characters of history was astonishing. She would tell anecdotes of persons so varied and interesting that her quiet and unassuming conversation was sought and listened to by many distinguished persons.”

Rufus Wilmot Griswold, critic, anthologist and editor of “Graham’s Magazine,” wrote of her work in “Encyclopedia of American Literature.” He described her as a “student of wide and accurate information, capable of thought and research quite unusual for a woman of her time.”

An account of the life and works of Mary Abigail “Maria” Gowen Brooks written by Zadel Barnes Gustafson was published in “Harper’s Monthly” in January 1879.

???????????
It is believed that among his chil­dren was:

………….

Medford Gowen born about 1795

Medford Gowen, [Hammond4, Joseph G.3, John2, William Alexander1] believed to be the son of William Gowen, was born about 1795, probably in Charleston. He became a gold­smith. Medford Gowen was married about 1820 to Eleanor Cutter, daughter of Ebenezer Cutter, Jr. Ebenezer Cutter, Sr, her grandfather, was born April 29, 1772 and died in June 1826.

Eight children were born to Medford Gowen and Eleanor Cut­ter Gowen, names unknown, however it is believed that their names are recorded in “Cutter Genealogy.”

Joseph Gowen, [Hammond4, Joseph G.3, John2, William Alexander1] son of Hammond Gowen and Mary Croswell Gowen, namesake of his grand­father Joseph G. Gowen, was born January 14, 1751 at Boston. Nothing more is known of this individual or de­scendants.

Hammond Gowen, [Hammond4, Joseph G.3, John2, William Alexander1] son of Hammond Gowen and Mary Croswell Gowen, was born Jan­uary 26, 1754 in Boston. He became a physician. It is believed that his will was administered April 2, 1783, probably at Charlestown. Nothing more is known of Dr. Hammond Gowen or descendants.

Mary Gowen, [Hammond4, Joseph G.3, John2, William Alexander1] daughter of Hammond Gowen and Mary Croswell Gowen, was born May 21, 1755, probably at Charlestown. In 1773 she was married to David Vinton, be­lieved to be a de­scendant of John Vinton who appeared in Lynn in 1648, ac­cording to “Vinton Memorial.” She died September 19, 1775, and he died December 3, 1778.

One son was born to them:

David Vinton born in January 1774

David Vinton, son of David Vinton and Mary Gowen Vinton, was born in Medford, Massachusetts in January 1774, ac­cording to Eleanor Vinton Clark Murray, a descendant. He was married in Providence, Rhode Island May 17, 1774 to Mary Atwell who was born May 10, 1773. In 1807, he died in 1830 in a visit to Kentucky. Mary Atwell Vinton died in Boston May 15, 1854.

Children born to David Vinton and Mary Atwell Vinton in­clude:

Alexander Hamilton Vinton born May 2, 1807

Alexander Hamilton Vinton, son of David Vinton and Mary Atwell Vinton, was born at Providence May 2, 1807. He be­came a Protestant Episcopal minister. He was married Oc­tober 15, 1835 to Eleanor Stockbridge Thompson, daughter of Ebenezer Thompson of Providence. He became rector of the Emmanuel Episcopal Church of Boston.

Children born to Rev. Alexander Hamilton Vinton and Eleanor Stockbridge Thompson Vinton include:

Mary Vinton born October 14, 1840

Mary Vinton, daughter of Rev. Alexander Hamilton Vinton and Eleanor Stockbridge Thompson Vinton, was born Octo­ber 14, 1840 in Providence. She was married about 1866, hus­band’s name Clark.

Children born to Mary Vinton Clark include:

Eleanor Vinton Clark born March 30, 1867

Eleanor Vinton Clark, daughter of Mary Vinton Clark, was born in Boston March 30, 1867. She was married about 1890 to Thomas Morris Murray. She died July 12, 1958 at the age of 91.

Elizabeth Gowen, [Hammond4, Joseph G.3, John2, William Alexander1] daughter of Hammond Gowen and Mary Croswell Gowen, was born De­cember 27, 1756, probably in Charlestown. Nothing more is known of this individual.

Abigail Gowen, [Hammond4, Joseph G.3, John2, William Alexander1] daughter of Hammond Gowen and Mary Croswell Gowen, was born April 9, 1759, probably in Charlestown. On April 22, 1779 she was married at Walden, Massachusetts to Lt. Thomas Locke, who was reared by William Locke and whose name he used. His real identity is unknown.

Lt. Thomas Locke was a revolutionary soldier from Lexing­ton, Massachusetts who was born June 11, 1754. In 1783 and 1790 they lived at Lexington. He died February 19, 1831 at age 78, according to “History of the Town of Lexington” Volume 2, page 381 by Charles Hudson. He was buried in Lot 27, East Village Cemetery in Lexington. Abigail Gowen Locke sur­vived until March 21, 1850 and died at age 91. She was buried beside her husband.

Children born to Lt. Thomas Locke and Abigail Gowen Locke include:

Abigail Locke born about 1780
Attie Locke born about 1781
Mary Locke born January 18,1783
Betsy Locke born about 1786
Sally Locke born about 1787
Zilpha Locke born about 1788
Martha Locke born about 1789
Otis Locke born February 1790

Mary Locke, daughter of Lt. Thomas Locke and Abigail Gowen Locke, was born at Lexington, January 18, 1783. About 1801 she was married to Elias Crafts of Lexington.

Sally Locke, daughter of Lt. Thomas Locke and Abigail Gowen Locke, was born about 1787, probably at Lexington. She was married about 1803, husband’s name Nichols.

Otis Locke, son of Lt. Thomas Locke and Abigail Locke, was born February 26, 1790 in Lex­ington. He was married to Kezie Harrington about 1815. He died June 25, 1851.

Children born to Otis Locke and Kezie Harrington Locke in­clude:

George Augustus Locke born in 1817
William Gowen Locke born in 1819

George Augustus Locke, son of Otis Locke and Kezie Har­rington Locke, was born in 1817 in Lexington. Later he moved to Charlestown and be­came a merchant and ship bro­ker. About 1840 he was mar­ried to Lucretia Orme Benson. George Au­gustus Locke died in 1873 probably at Boston in the area of the town previously called Charlestown.

Children born to George Augustus Locke and Lu­cretia Orme Benson Locke include:

Caroline Lucretia Locke born in 1842

Caroline Lucretia Locke, daughter of George Au­gustus Locke and Lucretia Orme Benson Locke, was born in 1842 in Boston. In 1875 at age 33 she was married to John Houston Swift, a civil engineer and an accountant, from Charleston, South Car­olina. The groom, a graduate of South Carolina Military Academy and a lieutenant in the Civil War, was 47.

Children born to John Houston Swift and Caroline Lucretia Locke Swift include:

Bonnell Locke Swift born in 1877
William Street Swift born December 30, 1878

Bonnell Locke Swift, son of John Houston Swift and Caroline Lucretia Locke Swift, was born in 1877, probably in Charleston. About 1900 he was married to Ethel Maud Wood­bury.

William Street Swift, son of John Houston Swift and Caroline Lucretia Locke Swift, was born December 30, 1878, probably in Charleston. He was married July 5, 1918 to Naomi Ordell Kline who was born in Yorkana, Pennsylvania February 17, 1892, the daughter of Uriah Lemon Kline.

In World War I Lt. William Street Swift com­manded Com­pany B, 328th Battalion, U. S. Tank Corps in 1918 in France. He was a Unitarian and made his home in Yorkana after the war.

Children born to William Street Swift and Naomi Ordell Kline Swift include:

William Street Swift, Jr. born April 13, 1919

William Street Swift, Jr, believed to be the only child of William Street Swift, Sr. and Naomi Ordell Kline Swift, was born April 13, 1919 in Yorkana. He was graduated from Penn­sylvania State College, class of 1940.

William Gowen Locke, son of Otis Locke and Kezie Har­rington Locke, was born about 1819.

John Gowen, [Hammond4, Joseph G.3, John2, William Alexander1] son of Hammond Gowen and Mary Croswell Gowen, was born July 31, 1760 at Charlestown.

Joseph G. Gowen, Jr, [Joseph G.3, John2, William Alexander1] son of Joseph G. Gowen and Elizabeth Ford Gowen, was born May 10, 1730. It is believed that he died prior to 1736, because in that year another son was born and he also was named Joseph G. Gowen, Jr.

William Gowen, [Joseph G.3, John2, William Alexander1] son of Joseph G. Gowen and Elizabeth Ford Gowen, was born September 10, 1732.

Elizabeth Gowen, [Joseph G.3, John2, William Alexander1] daughter of Joseph G. Gowen and Elizabeth Ford Gowen, was born June 8, 1734. It is believed that Eliz­abeth Emery was mar­ried to Caleb Emery about 1754. He was the grandson of Daniel Emery who was married to Mar­garet Gowen.

Joseph G. Gowen, Jr, [Joseph G.3, John2, William Alexander1] son of Joseph G. Gowen and Elizabeth Ford Gowen, was born May 22, 1736.

Abigail Gowen, [Joseph G.3, John2, William Alexander1] daughter of Joseph G. Gowen and Elizabeth Ford Gowen, was born Jan­uary 18, 1738 at Boston. Appar­ently she died before 1743. Another daughter, was also named Abigail.

Abigail Gowen, [Joseph G.3, John2, William Alexander1] daughter of Joseph G. Gowen and Elizabeth Ford Gowen, was born October 9, 1743 at Boston.

Jane Gowen, [John2, William Alexander1] daughter of John Gowen and Mercy Hammond Gowen, was born May 13, 1706, probably at Kittery. On June 26, 1724 she was married to her cousin, William Gowen. They were the grandparents of James Gowen of Westbrook, Maine. For an account of her life and descen­dants see his section.

Lemuel Gowen, [John2, William Alexander1] son of John Gowen and Mercy Hammond Gowen, was born September 22, 1709, at Kittery. He was married January 25, 1731-32 to Mrs. Judith Lord, a widow, according to “Colonial Families of the United States.” She was the daughter of Nathan Lord, and accordingly, was not a widow, according to “Old Kittery and Her Families,” by Everett S. Stackpole.

Lemuel Gowen wrote his will December 27, 1737 and died at sea shortly afterwards. Judith Lord Gowen was referred to as “a widow” again September 28, 1738 when she was admitted to full communion by the Second Church of Kittery, Maine. The will of Lemuel Gowen was proved Octo­ber 17, 1740.

Source Page: Probate Office, 5, 195.
Name: Lemuel Gowen
Will Text: In the Name of God Amen the twenty seventh Day of Decembr in ye Year of our Lord
one thousand seven hundred and thirty seven, I Lemuel Gowen of Kittery in the County of York
within his Majests Province of ye Massachusets Bay in New England Yeoman being bound a Voyage
to Sea and not Knowing wheather it will please God to preserve my Life and return me in safety to
my Native Country. I Do make and Ordain this my last Will and Testament.Imprimis I Do Resign
and submit both Body & Soul to God in hopes of his favour & Grace in Christ and as to such Worldly
Estate as it has been pleased God to give me in this Life I Will & bequeath in manner & form
following. That is to say I Give & bequeath unto my well beloved Wife Iudith all my Real & personal
Estate to her Disposall for ye benefit of my Children & I likewise appoint my sd Wife Judith my
whole & sole Executrix of this my last Will & Testament Disannulling all former Wills by me
heretofore made In Witness whereunto I have Set my hand & Seal ye Date above written.Signed
Sealed Pronounced & Declared by ye sd Lemuel Gowen as his last Will & Testament in psence ofJno
WatkinsJames fferguson.Thos Emery.Lemuel Gowen (Seal)Probated 17 Oct. 1740.

Judith Lord Gowen filed a marriage intent with Abel Moulton of York County December 2, 1748. They were married De­cember 22, 1748 “for a consideration of 2 shillings,” accord­ing to the records of First Church of Berwick. Abel Moulton of Cider Hill brought Judith Lord Gowen Moulton “and her Gowen children to York.”

Children born to Lemuel Gowen and Judith Lord Gowen in­clude:

John Gowen born November 20, 1732
Lemuel Gowen, Jr. born in 1734
Joseph Gowen born about 1735
Nathan Gowen born about 1736

John Gowen, [Lemuel3, John2, William Alexander1] son of Lemuel Gowen and Judith Lord Gowen, was born November 20, 1732, according to “Old Kittery and Her Families.”. He was baptized September 28, 1738 in the First Church of Berwick.

Following the marriage of his mother to Abel Moulton of York, in 1748 he was married May 5, 1766, at age 36, to Su­sanna Moulton, believed to the his step-sister. The couple filed intent April 19, 1766 showing both to be residents of York. The Rev. Isaac Lyman per­formed the ceremony.

“John Gowen,” Abraham Lord and Joshua Emery were im­prisoned in December 1769 at Berwick, Maine. They were Baptists who had separated from the “standing church” in 1768 and organized a church under the leadership of Joshua Emery. For refusing to pay their ecclesiastical taxes, John Gowen and Abraham Lord were jailed, according to “New England Dis­sent” by William G. McLoughlin.

The household of John Gowen appeared in the 1790 census re­siding at Berwick. According to “Heads of Families, Maine, 1790,” the household was recorded as:

“Gowen, John white male over 16
white female
white female
white male over 16
white female
white male under 16
white female”

Children born to John Gowen and Susanna Moul­ton Gowen are unknown.

Lemuel Gowen, Jr, [Lemuel3, John2, William Alexander1] son of Lemuel Gowen and Judith Lord Gowen, was born in York in 1734 probably at Berwick, according to the research of Flora Card Woodford, a descendant.

He was baptized September 28, 1738 in the First Church of Berwick. “Lemuel Gowen” was impressed into military service May 24, 1755 “to serve the King in guarding the stores up the Ken­nebeck River to Ft. Holifax,” according to “Maine His­torical & Genealogical Recorder.” He was married about 1774 to Sarah Hearle.

“Lemuel Gowing” was enumerated as the head of a household in the 1790 census of Kitterytown. The family was rendered as:

“Gowing, Lemuel white male over 16
white male over 16
white male over 16
white male over 16
white female
white female
white female
white female”

Children born to Lemuel Gowen, Jr. and Sarah Hearle Gowen include:

Nathan Gowen born in 1780

Nathan Gowen, [Lemuel, Jr.4 Lemuel3, John2, William Alexander1] son of Lemuel Gowen, Jr. and Sarah Hearle Gowen, was born in 1780. Nathan Gowen signed an intention of marriage with Jerusha Moulton March 13, 1806, according to “Vital Records of York, Maine.” Both were of York.

Jerusha Moulton was the daughter of Ebenezer Moulton5, [Samuel Moulton4, Joseph Moulton3, Jeremiah Moulton2, Thomas Moulton1]. In 1839 they were residents of Kittery.

Children born to Nathan Gowen and Jerusha Moulton Gowen include:

John Gowen born about 1808
Joseph Gowen born about 1810

John Gowen, [Nathan5, Lemuel Jr.4, Lemuel3, John2, William Alexander1] son of Nathan Gowen and Jerusha Moulton Gowen, was born about 1808 in York, according to Flora Card Woodford, a descendant of Cape Neddick, Maine. John Gowen and Hannah Witham, “both of York,” posted a marriage intent May 31, 1834, according to “Vital Records of York, Maine.” On June 21, 1834 the couple was married.

John Gowen died April 8, 1871 at “aged 67 years, 6 months,” according to his tombstone in the family cemetery on Cider Hill. Hannah Gowen died Jan­uary 29, 1873, “aged 69 years, 6 months.”

Children born to John Gowen and Hannah Witham Gowen are believed to include:

John Wesley Gowen born January 21, 1839
Lydia J. Gowen born February 10, 1841
Mary Elizabeth Gowen born in 1845
Julia M. Gowen born March 12, 1851
Laura A. Gowen born in December 1859

John Wesley Gowen, [John5, Nathan4, Lemuel3, John2, William Alexander1] son of John Gowen and Hannah Witham Gowen, was born in Kittery January 21, 1839. John Wesley Gowen is further identified as the grandson of Nathan Gowen and Jerusha Moulton Gowen.

He was married about 1869 to Hannah Jane Gerry [also ren­dered Gary]. Hannah Jane Gerry Gowen daughter of Joshua and Sally Gerry, was born in Kittery October 27, 1839.

She died of tuberculosis January 1, 1878, and John Wesley Gowen died January 16, 1880. They were buried in the fam­ily burial plot on Cider Hill.

Children born to John Wesley Gowen and Hannah Jane Gerry Gowen include:

Angevine Wesley Gowen August 30, 1869
Clarence Eastman Gowen born about 1871
Annie Jane Gowen born February 10, 1874

Angevine Wesley Gowen, [John Wesley6, John5, Nathan4, Lemuel3, John2, William Alexander1] son of John Wesley Gowen and Hannah Jane Gerry Gowen, was born August 30, 1869 in a house on Gorges Neck, named for Sir Ferdinando Gorges, a member of the Plymouth Company. The site was surveyed for Sir Ferdinando, “the Lord Proprietor of the Province of Mayne” November 11, 1641.

The house that he was born in and later died in was on the home lot of his maternal ancestor, Thomas Moulton. The house was built in 1714 on the York River by Joseph Moul­ton, son of Jeremiah Moulton and grandson of Thomas Moulton, according to Historian John Bardwell. Jeremiah Moulton purchased the property from Sir Ferdinando Gorges, in 1684 for £20.

The site was surveyed for Sir Ferdinando Gorges, “the Lord Proprietor of the Province of Mayne” November 11, 1641. It was described as “a division of 12,000 acres of land amongst the Patentee of Agamentics, made by us Thomas Gorges, Esq, Edward Godfrey and Roger Garde who are acting on behalf of Mr. Sayward’s Patentees.”

Angevine Wesley Gowen was born in a house on Gorges Neck at York. York was known as Agamenticus in 1641 and Georgeana in 1642. The Gowen home and 20 acres of land was later acquired by Old York Historical Society.

Of Jeremiah Moulton, his great-great-great-great-great grand­father, Angevine Wesley Gowen had to say,

“Jeremiah Moulton was a land grabber evidently and maybe some of his deals in real estate would not stand up to the ‘light of day’ any better than his attempt on October 3, 1693 to sell rum without a license. The court records show that he was fined £10 and put under bond of £50 to keep the peace “for threat­ening to shoot with a gun in his hands a constable and a justice of the peace.”

His son Abel Moulton was fined January 5, 1696-7 for “abusive speech.” Abel Moulton was stolen by the Canadian Abenaki Indians who often raided settlers in Maine. He was never returned and was supposedly drowned. Old Jeremiah Moulton was always buying the “piece of land next door” until he became a very large landowner.

Angevine Wesley Gowen, at age four, went to school at a little schoolhouse in Junkin’s Woods on Cider Hill. His first teacher was Miss Ellen Dennett. He was taken to Kittery, five miles away, to visit his Garey cousins and there was enrolled in a small red school­house on Spruce Creek,.

Orphaned when 10 years old, Angevine Wesley Gowen was brought up by his aunt, Miss Julia M. Gowen with whom he resided until her death in 1930, as well as with his uncle Joseph Gowen. Julia M. Gowen was named the guardian of the three orphans.

Angevine Wesley Gowen was a rare man, born with an innate ability to be successful at any project that he undertook. Al­though his schooling ended at age 16, he developed the skills to become a civil engineer and bridge-builder. As a young man he rebuilt Scotland Bridge in York Village, Maine where he was born.

He served a rod-and-chain apprenticeship in 1890 under Samuel W. Junkins, surveyor, and in a short time eclipsed his mentor as a surveyor and mapmaker, adding magnetic decli­nation to the skill. Beginning with his surveying instruments, he became an ardent astronomer and later built his own tele­scope.

When the art of photography began to develop, he plunged en­thusiastically into the field. Many of his photographs of the York area made on glass negatives still survive. He also re­ceived recogni­tion as a violin maker, musician, game warden, farmer, fisherman, astronomer, taxidermist and woodsman, ac­cording to John B. Bardwell.

His fame as a musical prodigy developed early. At age 9, al­though he never had a lesson and could not read music, he joined the town’s brass band. The band met for practice at “Fielding” in the loft of the shop of Capt. Timothy Young on Cider Hill. The band, composed of John Mitchell Moulton, trumpet; George Everett Moulton, bass horn, John Picott of Kittery, “tenor horn” and Charles Young who played the “alto horn,” quickly made room for the talented youngster with the coronet. He became a soloist for the band when it played for “town suppers” and “political speakings.”

The older men wore gala uniforms of blue and white with large brass buttons.

Later Angevine bought a violin for $3.50 from Oliver Jen­ness, a neighbor. He worked for 50c a day at odd jobs until he had the necessary cash. Then he marched proudly into his home and started to play. Initially his fiddle screeching caused his Aunt Julia to send him to the barn to practice. There he played to the cows, day after day, and when he emerged, he had mas­tered, entirely by ear, “The Irish Wash­erwoman.” Jenness was amazed when Angevine played “Pop Goes the Weasel,” for him, inserting difficult pizzicato with great skill. When he realized the limitations of his cheap vio­lin, Angevine went into the woods, selected some hardwood stocks and made his own violin, one that possessed vibrant deep rich tones.

His historical research brought him in touch with Col. Charles Edward Banks with whom he collaborated in writing “History of York, Maine.”

He had maintained a journal through his lifetime which he called “Cider Hill Annals.” His literary skills attracted the interest of Mrs. Catharine McCook Knox, a literary agent of Wash­ington, D.C. who recognized his genius. Thus began a fast friendship that lasted a lifetime. Flora Card Woodford of Cape Neddick, Maine wrote October 19, 1994 that also wrote “Unknown History of York, Maine” which exists only in manuscript form and was being preserved by a cousin.

Angevine Wesley Gowen was a master boat-builder and once mentioned to Mrs. Knox the difficulty he had in building and launching a sloop he constructed. She persisted that he should write an account of this endeavor, but he declined on account of his impending blindness that was beginning to take a toll on his activities. He replied to her inquiry October 26, 1934:

Dear Mrs. Knox,

I received your letter of inquiry this a.m. and am writing in my willow chair by the end of the table as usual. A poor light shines in which I fear will cut this letter short, at least for now. I will do my best how­ever in the few minutes that I am allowed to write.

Now about the boat, the “Winnie,” named after my boyhood friend Winn Campbell whose grave I vis­ited many years afterward at Georgetown, Maine while on detective duty for the State. All this I have told you be­fore. The boat was a 24-foot sloop, of 8-foot beam. It was built in what is now Mr. Emery’s shop and oc­cupied about the whole of the inside of it when onlited, for the shop was only 14’x24′. However, Frank Plaisted and I got her into the cradle and hauled her with his oxen down to the creek and launched her. However, my diary will tell more about that than I can now recall.

Aunt Julia lived in the house, while I built my boat in the shop annexed. And many a goody or wedge of pie or a pinch of black snuff she gave me. She was 80 then and always made me promise to bury her when she died, a promise that I religiously kept. I have many pictures of her and the small home that Milan prepared for her. It is now get­ting dark, and my blindness dictates that I will wait until tomorrow after­noon to continue.

“To write on both sides of the paper makes one bald­headed,” so says my editor, but I am not that yet, though perilously near it. So, ‘So long until tomor­row,’ as Low­ell Thomas says.

Of course, you have recognized Frank P. as the one who helped me launch my boat and to hoist the old Cider Hill Flag the year before. I could tell much more, but eyesight sternly forbids. I often shudder of when I think of climbing those rotten flagpoles and reeving the lines through the blocks for the flag. I, who now with diffi­culty climb a chair to replace an electric light bulb!

Also I shudder to think of my first boat ride in my new “Winnie” with a load of a dozen excited, glee­ful chil­dren and women, including Aunt Julia. The boat was not half ballasted, and a sudden squall would have meant catastrophe. But skillful sea­manship brought us all back safe and sound, and in fact, thus I have tra­versed the Great North [Woods] with canoe and paddle and sailed the briney deep in a 200-ton brigantine through some hard storms. I have yet to wet a stock­ing, and truly, my angel of good luck must have been con­stantly with me. Yet, I may drown in the first mug of beer I drink.

It is now 1:00 p.m, and the sky is fast becoming over­cast and dark again, so that I do not see a sin­gle word I am writing, but write mechanically, as it were, or more by instinct. Good luck. With kindest re­gards, I am, as ever,

A. W. Gowen”

On February 7, 1935, shortly before his death, he wrote again to Mrs. Knox:

“I am so blind now at this time of the year, 15 de­grees below zero here today. I have lost another relative, Willie Gowen, oldest son of Harry, died February 4 in Dover, N.H, leaving a little family, funeral today. I am too sick to go, and also on that account I am revis­ing my will, and relative to my diaries, I am fixing it so you will have full access to them until your work is done. I have failed much since Xmas, and if you will write date of di­ary and subject thereof, as in case of “Miss Taylor,” I can get someone to look it up, and I can dictate it more fully. We have very deep snow and much cold weather. I use only one door now to get out. The rest are all banked nearly to the eaves. Re­gards, A. W. Gowen”

On his property is an ancient white oak tree which was deeded in November 1990 to the Improvement Society of York, a par­ent organization of Old York Historical Society under the terms of Gowen’s will executed 50 years ago.. Gowen who was a surveyor, mapmaker and photographer, indicated that the tree may have been standing as early as 1641.

Gowen’s will also provided for family access to an early gravesite on the property.

“Notary Public Telephone Connection

ANGEVINE W. GOWEN
Civil Engineer and Land Surveyor
Special Attention Given to Magnetic Declinations and Retrac­ing of Old Lines

York Village, Maine
October 26, 1934
Dear Mrs. Knox,

I received your letter of inquiry this a.m. and am writ­ting in my willow chair by the end of the table as usual. A poor light shines in which I fear will cut this letter short, at least for now. I will do my best how­ever in the few minutes that I am allowed to write.

Now about the boat, the “Winnie,” named after my boyhood friend Winn Campbell whose grave i vis­ited many years afterward at Georgetown, Maine while on detective duty for the State. All this I have told you be­fore. The boat was a 24-foot sloop, of 8-foot beam. It was built in what is now Mr. Emery’s shop and oc­cupied about the whole of the inside of it when onlited, for the shop was only 14’x 24. However, Frank Plaisted and I got her into the cradle and hauled her with his oxen down to the creek and launched her. However, my diary will tell more about that than I can now recall. It was used for pleasure and fishing and finally sold to some­one.

Aunt Julia lived in the house, while I built my boat in the shop annexed. And many a goody or wedge of pie or a pinch of black snuff she gave me. She was 80 then and always made me promise to bury her when she died, a promise that I religiously kept. I have many pictures of her and the small home that Milan prepared for her. It is now get­ting dark, and my blindness dictates that I will wait until tomorrow after­noon to continue.

“To write on both sides of the paper makes one bald­headed,” so says my editor, but I am not that yet, though perilously near it. So, “So long until tomor­row,” as Lowell Thomas says

Saturday, October 27. Windy after the rain of last night, and the air is full of leaves–and I am full of company, so I will have to postpone this until later.

Sunday, October 28. Still windy, and the air is still full of leaves and rather dark for my eyes.

Of course, you have recognized Frank P. as the one who helped me launch my boat and to hoist the old Cider Hill Flag the year before. I could tell much more, but eyesight sternly forbids. I often shudder of when I think of climbing those rotten flagpoles and reeving the lines through the blocks for the flag. I, who now with diffi­culty climb a chair to replace an electric light bulb! Also I shudder to think of my first boat ride in my new “Winnie” with a load of a dozen children and women, including Aunt Julia. The boat was not half ballasted, and a sudden squall would have meant catastrophe. But skillful seamanship brought us all back safe and sound, and in fact, thus I have tra­versed the Great North [Woods] with canoe and paddle and sailed the briney deep in a 200-ton brigantine through some hard storms. I have yet to wet a stock­ing, and truly, my angel of good luck must have been constantly with me. Yet, I may drown in the first mug of beer I drink.

It is now 1:00 p.m, and the sky is fast becoming over­cast and dark again, so that I do not see a sin­gle word I am writing, but write mechanically, as it were, or more by instinct. So, good luck. With kindest re­gards, I am, as ever,
A. W. Gowen”

On February 7, 1935, shortly before his death, he wrote Katherine McCook Knox, his literary agent,

“I am so blind now at this time of the year, 15 degrees below zero here today. I have lost another relative, Willie Gowen, oldest son of Harry, died February 4 in Dover, N.H, leaving a little family, funeral today. I am too sick to go, and also on that account I am re­vising my will, and relative to my diaries, I am fixing it so you will have full access to them until your work is done. I have failed much since Xmas, and if you will write date of di­ary and subject thereof, as in case of “Miss Taylor,” I can get someone to look it up, and I can dictate it more fully. We have very deep snow and much cold weather. I use only one door now to get out. The rest are all banked nearly to the eaves. Re­gards, A. W. Gowen”

Angevine Wesley Gowen died in the summer of 1937 and was buried in the family burial plot on Cider Hill.

Following his death, Katherine McCook Knox of Washing­ton, D.C. wrote a tribute to his life and accomplishments which was published in “Old York Transcript” September 3, 1937. An editor appended a note,

“The following is an es­timate of the notable qualities of the late, great York figure, Angevine Wesley Gowen, who had he lived would have been 69 years old on Au­gust 30. Summation of Mr. Gowen’s many humanitarian and intellectual gifts are particularly appropri­ate at this time when the restoration of the old school house is in progress:

“Written August 23, 1937 at York Village, Maine
By Katharine McCook Knox

Rain, pushing straight down through the long dark pine needles, rain quivering slantwise in grey slashes across the white birth. Rain, rain and just the kind of day on which I loved to sit and talk to “Angie” at Cider Hill. Surely if it had been last summer, I would have been off bright and early to visit him. I would have found him at the end of Gowen lane, waiting qui­etly in his “willow chair” by the kitchen window. With his well-modeled head bent slightly forward, he would be listening, lis­tening.

Although from nearby my car looked to him “blue and misty, shining like a ghost,” he never mistook the sound of its motor of the turn of its tires as it rolled down the hill. His failing sight intensified the keen­ness of his hearing, and all his visitors were likewise summed up. As I would enter, he would rise, his strong sensitive fin­gers would unclasp from his gnarled walking-stick, and he would make me wel­come.

Hours of talk we would have, Angevine Wesley Gowen–farmer boy, taxidermist, artist, woodsman, carpenter, boat-builder, bridge-builder, surveyor, en­gineer–fantas­tic it sounds, but true nevertheless. He was as efficient as he was versatile.

A devoted son, brother and nephew who bravely nursed his family through piercing illnesses and never shirked a day’s work. But “Angie” died this past win­ter. Sixty-nine he would have been on this coming 30th of August. Last summer on his birthday we had a party, and he told me quite happily that his “interview with death” was not far away. He pulled out the ring from his piece of birth­day cake. “Now, will wonders never cease,” said he as he tested the metal with his teeth.

Native wit and shrewdness coupled with tenderness and an almost fierce independence of judgment gave his conversation never a dull lapse. Cider Hill 13 and a lit­tle red school house at Spruce Creek, Kittery were his two “Universities.” At the age of 16, he ceased school­ing. How interested he would have been this summer in following up the history and correct restoration of the old York school house which prob­ably opened its roughhewn door in the year 1747. His life as he told it to me was vivid, and Cider Hill and all its “folks” be­came a spreading world.”

Margaret Pearson Tate wrote “when I visited Mrs. Alice Free­man in his home in 1985 she showed me his “Cider Hill An­nals,” the journal he kept during his lifetime. I hope this has been turned over to some historical association.”

The most comprehensive work on this branch of the family has been published by Yvonne Gowen of Surrey, British Columbia, a member of Gowen Research Foundation. Over 10 years were spent in gathering data on the family. Mrs. Gowen, an ac­complished genealogist, assembled data from many sources. Among researchers who assisted were Mar­garet Pearson Tate of Exeter, NH; Almeda Gowen Schofield of Contoocook, NH; Bar­bara Clements of North Hampton, NH; Mary Driscoll of Spring­vale, ME and Mary Ellen Gowen Waugh of Riverdale, MD, also Foundation members.

The Gowen home and 20 acres of land was later acquired by Old York Historical Society.

A niece of Angevine Wesley Gowen, Mrs. Leslie Freeman of York, continued the work, building on his research. Helen Parker Gowen continued research on the family into the 1950s when blindness interrupted her work at the age of 84. She passed the torch to her younger cousin Viola Gowen Allen of San­ford, Maine.

Viola Gowen Allen, a registered nurse, wrote February 11, 1957 that she had an aunt by the name of Abbie Gowen Trafton. Viola Gowen Allen mentioned that she had a daughter by the name of Shirley Allen who was an invalid, having de­veloped polio in 1951. The mother of Viola Gowen Allen was a Hamilton of Waterboro, Maine. Viola Gowen Allen and her husband Robert S. Allen lived on Grammar Road, “1.5 miles from Sandford Square in Sanford, Maine.”

On April 7, 1957 Viola Gowen Allen wrote that her brother [unnamed] died in Minneapolis. “His only son has an infant son, and they are the only ones to carry on the family name. My brother died four years ago, and my father died this past December.” She mentioned a daughter “older than Shirley” who had a six-month-old daughter whose name was Kim Shirley.

On June 23, 1957 Viola Gowen Allen wrote, “Great-grandfa­ther Samuel Gowen deserted great-grandmother and remarried, living in the Chicago area; had children. Chester Gowen, my cousin, died May 2, 1957. His daughter and her husband are coming to live with Mrs. Gowen so the house won’t be sold.”

On August 12, 1962 Viola Gowen Allen wrote that her daugh­ter was a registered nurse and that her granddaughter was six years old. She mentioned that “Mrs. Chester Gowen had a shock [stroke?] and has difficulty speaking. Chester’s daughter and husband moved back from Tennessee to be with her mother.”

Evelyn M. Gowen of Minneapolis, Minnesota wrote May 8, 1956 that her husband, A. S. Gowen, a native of York County, died in Minneapolis May 8, 1956.

On February 8, 1957 Mrs. Chester Gowen wrote, “Stephen had 10 or 12 children, and not many of them here. I have had some correspondence from Mrs. Carroll Dow of Newburyport; she was a Gowen. My husband is one of 10 children, 9 of whom are living; the oldest one is 75, and the youngest is 57. Some the Gowens are in Chicago, Indiana and Washington state, all descendants of William Gowen who settled here.”

Julie Tuttle, a relative of Angevine Wesley. Gowen, lived at Ida Grove, Iowa in 1991. Another relative, Bradley B. Moulton, lived at Cape Neddick, Maine at that time, accord­ing to Mar­garet Pearson Tate.

The great white oak was used as a boundary maker in deeds written in 1641. Title to it was conveyed in his will.

Clarence Eastman Gowen, [John Wesley6, John5, Nathan4, Lemuel3, John2, William Alexander1] son of John Wesley Gowen and Hannah Jane Gerry Gowen, was born about 1871. He was married about 1894 to Mai Ethel Pray, daughter of John C. Pray and Jennie Hall Pray. She was born in Dover, New Hampshire April 7, 1873. She died in Portsmouth, New Hamp­shire October 7, 1928, according to her tombstone. It is believe that Clarence Eastman Gowen was remarried, to Lottie Smart about 1930. Children born to Clarence Eastman Gowen and Lottie Smart Gowen are unknown. Children born to Clarence Eastman Gowen and Mai Ethel Pray Gowen include:

Elizabeth Gowen born January 15, 1910

Elizabeth Gowen, [Clarence Eastman7, John Wesley6, John5, Nathan4, Lemuel3, John2, William Alexander1] daughter of Clarence Eastman Gowen, and Mai Ethel Pray Gowen, was born January 15, 1910. She was married about 1931, husband’s named Richardson. She was graduated from the University of Hampshire and received a master’s degree from Cornell Univer­sity.

In 1957 she removed to Ft. Lauderdale, Florida where she taught at Ft. Lauderdale Winter School and at Fern Hall, a pri­vate school. She died August 14, 1994 in Ft. Lauderdale and was buried in Oakland Park, according to her obituary pub­lished in the “Exeter Newsletter” of Exeter, New Hampshire in its August 19, 1994 edition.

Children born to her include:

Priscilla Richardson born about 1933
Nancy Richardson born about 1935
Carol Richardson born about 1938

Annie Jane Gowen, [John Wesley6, John5, Nathan4, Lemuel3, John2, William Alexander1] daughter of John Wesley Gowen and Hannah Jane Gerry Gowen February 10, 1874 on Cider Hill. She was reared by her aunt Julia M. Gowen when her par­ents died. She was married about 1891 to Edward E. Freeman who was born May 8, 1866. She died May 26, 1919, and he died August 18, 1936. They were buried in the family plot on Cider Hill.

Lydia J. Gowen, [John5, Nathan4, Lemuel3, John2, William Alexander1] daughter of John Gowen and Hannah Gowen, was born February 10, 1841. She died September 9, 1891 unmar­ried. She was buried in the Gowen Cemetery on Cider Hill.

Mary Elizabeth Gowen, [John5, Nathan4, Lemuel3, John2, William Alexander1] daughter of John Gowen and Hannah Witham Gowen, was born in York about 1845. She was mar­ried about 1866 to William Woodward.

Children born to William Woodward and Mary Elizabeth Gowen Woodward include:

Laura Gowen Woodward born in 1877

Laura Gowen Woodward, daughter of William Woodward and Mary Elizabeth Gowen Woodward, was born in 1877. She was married about 1897 to William B. Card.

Children born to William B. Card and Laura Gowen Woodward Card include:

Flora Card born about 1910

Flora Card, daughter of William B. Card and Laura Gowen Woodward Card, was born about 1910. She was married about 1930 to James Edward Woodford. In 1994, they lived in Cape Neddick, Maine where she, a member of Gowen Research Foundation, was active in the research of her Gowen family.

Julia M. Gowen, [John5, Nathan4, Lemuel3, John2, William Alexander1] daughter of John Gowen and Hannah Gowen, was born in Kittery March 12, 1851. She did not marry, but reared three orphan children of her brother John Wesley Gowen. She died October 19, 1930 and was buried in the Gowen Cemetery on Cider Hill.

Laura A. Gowen, [John5, Nathan4, Lemuel3, John2, William Alexander1] daughter of John Gowen and Hannah Gowen, was born in Kittery in December 1859. She died at “aged 15 years, 1 month,” according to her tombstone in Gowen Cemetery on Cider Hill.

Joseph Gowen, [Nathan5, Lemuel Jr.4, Lemuel3, John2, William Alexander1] son of John Gowen, was born in 1810. He died in 1886, according to his tombstone in the Gowen family plot on Cider Hill.
==O==
Lucy S. Gowen was born in 1819 to parents unknown. She was married to Dr. Benjamin S. Goodwin about 1838. Lucy S. Gowen Goodwin died in 1879. Her daughter Orabella Anna Goodwin was born in 1847 and died in 1911. They were buried in the Gowen family cemetery on Cider Hill.
==O==
Joseph Gowen, [Lemuel3, John2, William Alexander1] son of Lemuel Gowen and Judith Lord Gowen, was born about 1735, probably at Berwick. He was baptized September 28, 1738 in the First Church of Berwick. Of this individual nothing more is known.

Nathan Gowen, [Lemuel3, John2, William Alexander1] son of Lemuel Gowen and Judith Lord Gowen, was born about 1736, probably at Berwick. He was baptized September 28, 1738, ac­cording to records of the First Church of Berwick.

William Gowen, [John2, William Alexander1] son of John Gowen and Mercy Hammond Gowen, was born July 14, 1715, at Berwick. He was married about 1738 at Charlestown to Sarah Winkley, daughter of Sarah Winkley from Portsmouth, Maine, according to “Colonial families of the United States.” He was identified as a sea captain at Charlestown in 1746 by “Old Kittery and Her Families.” William Gowen “was warned” by church officials in Charlestown in 1759.

Children born to William Gowen and Sarah Wink­ley Gowen are believed to include:

William Gowen born June 18, 1739
Abigail Gowen born August 6, 1741
Joseph Gowen born July 1, 1744
Lemuel Gowen baptized in 1759

William Gowen, [William3, John2, William Alexander1] son of William Gowen and Sarah Winkley Gowen was born June 18, 1739, probably at Charlestown. Of this individual nothing more is known.

Abigail Gowen, [William3, John2, William Alexander1] daughter of William Gowen and Sarah Winkley Gowen, was born Au­gust 6, 1741, probably at Charlestown. Of this indi­vidual nothing more is known.

Joseph Gowen, [William3, John2, William Alexander1] son of William Gowen and Sarah Winkley Gowen was born July 1, 1744, probably at Charlestown. Of this individual nothing more is known.

Lemuel Gowen, [William3, John2, William Alexander1] son of William Gowen and Sarah Winkley Gowen, was baptized in 1759 at Charlestown. Of this indi­vidual nothing more is known.

William Gowen, [William Alexander1] son of William Alexan­der Gowen and Elizabeth Frost Gowen, was born about 1672 at Kittery. Accord­ing to the research of Margaret Tate Pearson, William Gowen was killed by the Indians October 12, 1691.

……..
move to proper William Gowen section
Other data reveals he witnessed a deed December 16, 1706, according to York Deeds. He witnessed a deed of Daniel Emery June 20, 1707. This deed give a history of the Emery family. He wit­nessed a deed January 1, 1709. William Gowen “of Kittery” witnessed a deed December 15, 1709.

Elizabeth Gowen, [William Alexander1] daughter of William Gowen and Elizabeth Frost Gowen, was born about 1673 at Kittery. She was married about 1695 to Alexander Ferguson. In 1697 the couple continued to live at Kittery. They were joined by Elizabeth Frost Gowen and Daniel Emery and Margaret Gowen Emery in the sale of property, probably an inheritance from William Gowen, there on February 6, 1696-97. The deed, recorded in York Deed Book 4, folio 97, read:

“To all Christian People to whome this present deed of Sale shall come greeting Know yee that wee Allexander fforgisson and Daniel Emery with ye Concent of our mother in Law Elizabeth Gowen and our wiues Elliza­beth fforgison and Margaret Emory, of ye town of Kit­tery in Yorke Shire in ye Province of ye Matta­chets bay in New England for and Consideration of the Sume of forty and three pounds money of New: England to them in hand paid att & before ye En­sealing and deliv­ery of these presents well and truely paid by Jabaz Jenkins of ye town of Kittery abouesd have given granted bar­gained Sold and by these pre­sents doe fully and abso­lutly give grant bargaine Sell release Enfeoffe and Con­firm unto ye sd Jabaz Jenk­ins for ye aboue sd Sume of money the which they hereby acknowledge to have Re­ceived two Sartaine parsels of Land bounded as fol­loweth viz one parsel being about Eleuen accres bounded on ye north with the land formerly Adrain fryers and Stirgion Creeke on ye west with maine River on ye South with John Morrels and on the East with John Morrell the other parsel being about forty nine accres bounded by Stir­gion Creek on ye South near bare Coue and on ye west and East with John Morrell and William Tom­sons Land, and on ye South as it may appeare on Rec­cord all ye aboue mentioned Sixty accres of Land butted and bounded as aboue or howeuer otherwise all ye Estate Right title Interest use propriety posses­sion Claime and demand whatsoeuer of them or Ei­ther of them of in and unto the sd land and Euery part or peace thereof, To have and To hold ye afore granted premises with ye liberties, priviliges Com­modityes benifits and appurtenances thereunto be­longing is in large and ample maner and Sou unto ye sd Jabaz Jenkins his heirs and Assigns for Euer to be unto ye only proper use benifit and behoofe of ye sd Jabez Jenkins his heirs and Assigns for Euer.

And ye sd Allexander fforgisson and Daniel Emery for them Selues their heirs and Assigns doe Couenant and promiss to and with ye sd Jabaz Jenkins his heirs and Assigns Shall and may at all times for Ever hereafter Lawfully peaceably and quietly have hold use occupie possesse and Injoy all ye sd peces of land with ye priv­ileges and apartenances thereof without ye lest let hin­derence or Claiming any Right or Euiction by or from them or Either of them or by or from all and Euery other person or persons having or Claiming any Right title or Interest therein by from or under ye sd Allexander ffor­gisson and Daniel Emory In Witness whareof they have hereunto Set their hands and Seales ye Sixth day of febry in ye year of our Lord one thou­sand Six hundred Ninty Six Seven and in ye Eighth year of ye Raine of our Soueren Lord William ye third, King of England & etc.”

Signed Sealed And Daniel Emory (his seal)
Delivered In Allexander fforgisson (his seal)
Presents of us. Ellizabeth Gowen allias Smith
(her seal)
John Belcher Ellizabeth ffergisson (her seal)
Charles ffrost Junr Margrit Emery (her seal)

This Instrument was acknowledged by the fiue persons Subscribing to be their voluntary act and Deed.

Kittery ffebry ye 6 1696-97 before me Charles ffrost
Justice of Peace”

In 1707, they lived in Eliot, Maine where a daughter, Sarah Ferguson was born. In 1719, they lived in Kittery, Maine where a daughter, Jane Ferguson was married.

Children born to Alexander Ferguson and Elizabeth Gowen Ferguson include:

Jane Ferguson born about 1700
Sarah Ferguson born May 17, 1707

Jane Ferguson, daughter of Alexander Ferguson and Elizabeth Gowen Ferguson was born about 1700. She was married January 31, 1719-20 to her first cousin, John Gowen, her mother’s nephew. John Gowen was a mariner and rarely ever was home. Jane Ferguson Gowen had to move in with her parents to survive. Her father filed suit against John Gowen in 1728 “for boarding her daughter, Jane Gowen for four and one-half years.”

Elizabeth Ferguson Gowen died in 1731, and John Gowen died in 1732.
Children born to them include:

Jane Gowen born September 23, 1721

Sarah Ferguson, daughter of Alexander Ferguson and Elizabeth Gowen Ferguson, was born May 17, 1707 in Eliot. She was married November 21, 1733 to Thomas Staples who was born January 9, 1711. He died before 1745 at Kittery, “leaving three children,” according to his father’s will. Names of the Staples children is unknown.

James Gowen, [William Alexander1] son of William Alexander Gowen and Elizabeth Frost Gowen, was born March 29, 1675 at Kittery, according to “History of York County, Maine.” He was married 1697, wife’s name Mary.

On March 14, 1700 James Gowen “alias Smith, received £3:6:8” from John Gowen “as his part of the estate of William Gowen as approved by the probate January 19, 1696-97,” according to “York Deeds.”

He appeared on a York County jury list July 7, 1702 and Oc­tober 6, 1702, according to “Province and Court Records of Maine.”

On December 14, 1702 “James Gowen of Wells, blacksmith,” and his wife, Mary Gowen, sold 10 acres of land, for 10 pounds, which he had inherited from his father to his brother Lemuel Gowen “shopkeeper of Kittery,” according to “York Court Records,” Book 7, Folio 19.

Legal description of the land which had been granted to William Alexander Gowen by the town of Kittery April 13, 1671 read, “beginning on ye East Side of the Stony brook which runs out of York pond a little to ye South of York high­way and runs from said brook two hundred rods East in Length and eighty-six rods in breadth North and South, con­taining 100 acres of land.” Mary Gowen made her mark in signing the deed. Joseph Hammond, Jr, Elizabeth Brock and Titus Joans were witnesses to the deed.

Margaret Gowen, [William Alexander1] daughter of William Alexander Gowen and Elizabeth Frost Gowen was born November 15, 1678 at Kittery. On March 17, 1695 she was married to Daniel Emery who was born September 13, 1667 at Kittery. On February 6. 1696-97 they joined her mother and sister, Elizabeth Gowen Ferguson and her husband in the sale of property, probably and inheri­tance from William Alexander Gowen at Kittery.

Daniel Emery was the son of James Emery and Elizabeth Emery. James Emery was born about 1660 in Romsey, Hamp­shire to Anthony Emery and Frances Emery, and emi­grated to the colonies with his parents in the ship “James” landing in Boston June 3, 1635. Anthony Emery second son of John Emery and Agnes Emery, was born at Romsey, Hampshire about 1630. He arrived in Boston in 1635, settled in Newbury, Massachusetts, removed to Dover, New Hamp­shire in 1640. In 1649 he removed to Kittery, where he served as a selectman, ju­ror and constable. In 1660 he was fined for entertaining Quak­ers and disfranchised. At that time he removed to Rhode Island where more religious freedom prevailed.

Daniel Emery was a land surveyor and in 1718 was named to a commission to mark the boundary between Berwick and Kit­tery, Maine.

He was deacon and later an elder in the Congregational Church. He was a selectman in 1704, 1712, and 1718. He was the church moderator in 1707 and 1718. He died Octo­ber 15, 1722. Margaret Gowen Emery died November 21, 1751. Her estate was appraised December 21, 1751 in York, County. James Gowen, nephew was one of the appraisers.

Caleb Emery, son of Caleb Emery and a grandson of Daniel Emery was married in 1764 to Elizabeth Gowen, daughter of James Gowen

A descendant of Daniel Emery and Margaret Gowen Emery is Harriett Godfrey Emery who was born in Bay City, Michi­gan.

Children born to Daniel Emery and Margaret Gowen Emery in­clude:

Daniel Emery born June 25, 1697
Noah Emery born December 11, 1699
Simon Emery born January 6, 1702
Zachariah Emery born March 12, 1704-05
Margaret Emery born March 3, 1707
Caleb Emery born October 17, 1710
Ann Emery born March 19, 1712-13
Joshua Emery born June 30, 1715
Tizrah Emery born September 19, 1717
Huldah Emery born August 4, 1720

Caleb Emery Gowen, believed to be a descendant of Caleb Emery who was born in York County, Maine October 17, 1710, was enrolled in Harvard University from 1874 to 1878, receiving his A. B. Degree in 1878. In 1910 he was a resident of Cleveland, Ohio, living on Magnolia Drive. He was engaged in “manufacturing and transportation” according to the alumni directory.

In the same edition Albert Younglove Gowen, believed to be a son of Caleb Emery Gowen, was listed as a student at Harvard University from 1903 through 1905. In 1910 he was listed in “manufacturing” and with address as 11120 Magnolia Drive, Cleveland. Albert Younglove Gowen was recorded in the “Guiness Book of Records” as the first to sail around the world in a motor-driven yacht in 1922.

In 1993 a son, Albert Younglove “Jaxie” Gowen, Jr. lived in Geneva, Switzerland. He was executive vice-president of Coutts & Company, the investment banking arm of National Westminster Bank Group, a British firm.

In 1999. Albert Younglove “Jaxie” Gowen, Jr, vice chairman of Sarasin Geneva, part of Bank Sarasin, a Swiss private bank. He was interviewed by a reporter of the “International Herald-Tribune” of Paris, France who was writing a news story on “money laundering” which was published October 18, 1999.

Lemuel Gowen, [William Alexander1] son of William Alexander Gowen and Eliza­beth Frost Gowen, was born February 9, 1680 at Kittery.

He witnessed a deed for 20 acres of land January 13, 1702-03 at Kittery purchased fromThomas Butler by his brother, Nicholas Gowen, [check original] according to “York County Records.”

On November 14, 1702 Lemuel Gowen “of Berwick” wrote a receipt to his brother, John Gowen, according to “York Deeds,” Volume 6, page 38:

“Received of my brother, John Gowen, the sum of 3 pounds, 6 shilling & eight pence, being in full of that part of my father, William Gowen’s Estate which he, ye said John Gowen, was appointed to pay me before ye decease of my mother, Elizabeth Gowen.
Lemuel Gowen”

On July 6, 1703 Lemuel Gowen appeared in Infe­rior Court of Common Pleas on behalf of his mother, ac­cording to York Court Records as abstracted in “Province & Court Records of Maine.” The court verdict was recorded as:

“Lemuel Gowen, assignee & attornye to Elizabeth Gowen, relict widow & administratrix to the estate of William Gowen, Late of Kittery, Yeoman, deceased, is plaintiff against William Goodwin, Executor to the Last Will and Testament of John Taylor & defendant in an action of the case for withholding and not paying unto the plaintiff the sum of three pounds money due from the estate of one James Berry decd. unto the Es­tate of Wm. Gowen decd as per attachment. The jury Finds for the Plaintiff the debt sued for and cost of Court allowed 3 pounds, 1s 4d.”

Lemuel Gowen purchased for 10 pounds, 100 acres of land at Kittery from James Gowen, his brother, December 14, 1702, according to “York Court Records,” Book 7, Folio 19. The land had been inherited from their father. James Gowen was identified as “James Gowen, blacksmith of Wells.”

Lemuel Gowen received a donation of “one shilling” from tax money in 1704 while living at Kittery. He was also men­tioned in “Manuscript of New England” by Vassall.

“Lemuel Gowen” was married January 5, 1709 to Sarah Wadsworth by Rev. Benjamin Wadsworth, ac­cording to “Boston Marriages” by Edward W. McGlenen. Of Sarah Wadsworth Gowen nothing more is known.

Lemuel Gowen must have remarried later because in his will he mentioned “my beloved wife, Judith.”

Lemuel Gowen wrote his will December 27, 1737 and it is recorded in York County Will Book 5, page 195, ac­cording to “Maine Wills, 1640-1760” by William M. Sargent:

“In the Name of God Amen the twenty seventh Day of December in ye Year of our Lord one thousand seven hundred and thirty seven, I, Lemuel Gowen of Kittery in the County of York within his Majesty’s Province of ye Massachusetts Bay in New England Yeoman being bound on a Voyage to Sea and not Knowing wheather it will please God to preserve my life and return me in safety to my Native Country. I do make and Ordain this my last Will and Testatment.

“Imprimis I do Resign and submit both Body & Soul to God in hope his favour & Grace in Christ and as to such Worldly Estate as it has been pleased God to give me in this Life and bequeath in manner & from form follow­ing.

“That is to say I give & bequeath unto my well beloved Wife Judith all my Real & Personal Estate to her Dis­posall for ye benefit of my Children & I likewise ap­point my said Wife Judith my whole & sole Executrix of this my last Will & Testament Disannualling all former Wills by me heretofore made.

“In Witness whereunto I have Set my hand & Seal ye date written above.
Lemuel Gowen [seal)

“Signed, Sealed, Pronounced & Declared by ye said Lemuel Gowen as his last Will & Testatment in the pre­sense of

John Watkins, James Fferguson, Thomas Emery.”

Apparently the fears of Lemuel Gowen were real­ized, and it is believed that he perished at sea because his will was probated October 17, 1740. Of Lemuel Gowen, Sarah Wadsworth Gowen and Judith Gowen and their children nothing more is known.

Sarah Gowen, [William Alexander1] daughter of William Alexander Gowen and Elizabeth Frost Gowen, was born March 30, 1684 at Kittery. She was married in 1698 to William Smith of Berwick, according to Kittery marriage records. Sarah Gowen Smith wrote a receipt to her brother March 16, 1700 acknowledging payment from the estate of her father:

“Sarah Gowen received of John Gowen [alias Smith] 35 shillings in part of what he was to pay me when I shall arrive at age 18 years, it being part of my portion, as ap­pears on Record by the distribution of my father’s estate, bearing date January 19, 1696-97.

Sarah [X] Smith
Witnesses: wife of William Smith
Elizabeth [X] Gowen
Mary Hammond”

On November 19, 1702 William Smith, a resident of Berwick, wrote the following receipt to John Gowen:

“Received of my brother, John Gowen, 4 pounds, 18 shillings, 4 pence, which makes in full of 6 pounds, 13 shillings 4 pence that ye said John Gowen was ap­pointed to pay my wife, Sarah Gowen, for her part of our father, William Gowen’s estate before decease of our mother Elizabeth Gowen.

Witnesses William Smith
Daniel Emery
Lemuel Gowen”

Gowen Research Foundation Phone:806/795-8758, 795-9694
5708 Gary Avenue E-mail: gowen@sbcglobal.net
Lubbock, Texas, 79413-4822 GOWENMS.080, 04/04/00
Internet: http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.com/~gowenrf

Researcher Descendants:

Barbara Clements, 38 Pine Road, North Hampton, NH, 03862, 603/964-8892
Mary Driscoll, Route 1, Box 69A, Springvale, ME, 04083
David Thomas Gowen, 804 Duck Pond Road, Westbrook, ME, 04092, 207/854-5753
Miller Abbott Gowen, P.O. Box 1289, 1211 Geneva [2], Switzerland
Yvonne Gowen, 15015-91 “A” Avenue, Surrey, BC, V3R 1B8
Victor Guy Jackson, 7728 W. 85th St, Playa del Rey, CA, 90293
Miriam Louise Nyquist Gowen, Box 165, Middleton, MA, 01949, 508/774-4170
Evelyn Hanson, Scituate Rd, York, ME, 03909, 207/363-2786
Debbie Krupke, 6 Strawberry Hill St, Bar Harbor, ME, 04609
Susan B. Liedell, 148 Kates Path, Yarmouth Port, MA, 02675, 508/362-0167
Almeda Gowen Schofield, Box 614, Contoocook, NH, 03229, 603/746-3395
Margaret Pearson Tate, 34 Washington Street, Exeter, NH, 03833, 603/772-3278
May Ellen Gowen Waugh, 6401 Auburn Avenue, Riverdale, MD, 20840, 301/474-4554
Flora Card Woodford, 1324 US Rt. 1, Cape Neddick, Me, 03902, 207/363-4479

Descendants of John Gowen [son of William Alexander Gowen] and Mercy Ham­mond Gowen

John Gowen [and Mercy Hammond Gowen] born in 1668
Dorcas Gowen born August 13, 1692
George Gowen born August 10, 1696
William Gowen born April 27, 1697
John Gowen born May 24, 1698
Jane Gowen born about 1721
Mercy Gowen born January 27, 1700-01
Joseph G. Gowen born November 28, 1703
Hammond Gowen born January 9, 1727
William Gowen born September 13, 1749
Medford Gowen born about 1795
Joseph Gowen born January 14, 1751
Hammond Gowen born January 26, 1754
Mary Gowen born May 21, 1755
Elizabeth Gowen born December 27, 1756
Abigail Gowen born April 9, 1759
John Gowen born July 31, 1760
Joseph G. Gowen, Jr. born May 10, 1730
William Gowen born September 10, 1732
Elizabeth Gowen born June 8, 1734
Joseph Gowen Jr. [2] born May 22, 1736
Abigail Gowens born January 18, 1738
Abigail Gowen [2] born October 9, 1743
Jane Gowen born May 17, 1706
Lemuel Gowen born September 22, 1709
John Gowen born in 1732
Lemuel Gowen, Jr. born in 1734
Nathan Gowen born in 1780
John Gowen born about 1808
John Wesley Gowen born January 21, 1839
Angevine Wesley Gowen born August 30, 1869
Clarence Eastman Gowen born about 1871
Annie Jane Gowen born February 10
Lydia J. Gowen born February 10, 1841
Mary Elizabeth Gowen born in 1845
Julia M. Gowen born March 12, 1851
Laura A. Gowen born in December 1859
Joseph Gowen born about 1810
Joseph Gowen born about 1735
Nathan Gowen born about 1736
William Gowen born July 14, 1715
William Gowen born June 18, 1739
Abigail Gowen born August 6, 1741
Joseph Gowen born July 1, 1744
Lemuel Gowen baptized in 1759
William Gowen born about 1672
Elizabeth Gowen born about 1673c
James Gowen born about 1675
Margaret Gowen born about 1677
Lemuel Gowen born about 1680
Sarah Gowen born about 1682

Membership Application

Gowen Research Foundation 806/795-8758 or 795-9694
5708 Gary Avenue E-mail: gowen@sbcglobal.net
Lubbock, Texas, 79413

Website: http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.com/~gowenrf

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in Gowen Research Foundation.

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