049 Canada

CANADA

BRITISH COLUMBIA

Chase Going, also known as Mrs. E. J. Woodhouse, was born March 3, 1890, in Victoria, British Columbia, Canada; attended the public schools in San Francisco, California, Aberdeen, South Dakota, and Science Hill School, Shelbyville, KY. She graduated from McGill University of Montreal, Canada, in 1912. She took graduate work at the University of Berlin and the University of Chicago. She taught economics at Smith College in Northampton Massachusetts from 1918-1925, and at summer sessions at Teachers College of Columbia University in New York City. She was Secretary of State of Connecticut, 1941-1943; U.S. Representative from Connecticut 2nd District, 1945-47, 1949-51; and delegate to Connecticut state constitutional Convention 1965. Chase died in New Canaan, CN on December 12, 1984. Burial location unknown.
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Kenneth Reid Gowan was born in 1910 and died at the age of 91 December 18, 2001, according to his obituary published December 21 in “The Vancouver Sun:”

“Gowan, Kenneth Reid, 1910-2001, died peacefully December 18th. He will be dearly missed by his fam-ily: his daughter, Leslie Gowan McGee, her husband Darcy and their children, Darcy and his wife Katty, Pe-ter and Kate; his daughter, Elizabeth Gowan Marsh, her husband Bill Marsh and their son Elliott Marsh; his brother Victor Gowan and his wife Denise Gowan; his sister Ruth Gowan McKenzie and many nieces, ne-phews and relatives.

He was predeceased by his wife Margaret Gowan and his brothers Ted Gowan and Don Gowan. He enjoyed a long life, which included a successful career, interests in music, golf, bridge, church activities and spending time with family and friends. A memorial service will be held on December 24th, 10:00 a.m. at St. Johns Shaugh-nessy Anglican Church, Granville Street and Nanton Avenue, Vancouver. In lieu of flowers, donations may be made to the British Columbia Parkinsons Disease Association.”
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Ray Hyde Gowan was born October 6, 1898 in Vancouver, ccording to British Columbia vital statistics.
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Michael Gowan was enumerated as the head of a household in the 1901 census of British Columbia. He was born September 29, 1866 in Ireland. He was living in New Westminster, Brit-ish Columbia, having emigrated in 1891. His wife, Mary A. Gowan was born in England September 19, 1877 and had emi-grated in 1879.
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Jesse Hoey McGown, a female, was born February 7, 1897 in Vancouver, according to British Columbia vital statistics.
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Margaret Isabella McGown was born November 20, 1898 in Vancouver, according to British Columbia vital statistics.

MANITOBA

Mrs. J.H. Gowan was 47 in the 1901 Census of Canada, Province of Manitoba. She was born outside of Canada according to “Canadian Immigrant Records,” National Archives of Canada, Microfilm reel T6435, District 012—Winnipeg, City, Sub-District B04, page 1.
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M.E. Gowan was 22 in the 1901 census of Canada, Province of Manitoba. He was born outside of Canada according to “Canadian Immigrant Records,” National Archives of Canada, Microfilm reel number T6435, District 012—Winnipeg, City, Sub-District B04, page1.
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W.S. Gowan was 27 in the 1901 census of Canada, Province of Manitoba. He was born outside of Canada according to “Canadian Immigrant Records,” National Archives of Canada, Microfilm Reel number T6435, District 012—Winnipeg, City Sub-District B04, page 1.

LISGAR DISTRICT, MANITOBA

Johann Gowen was born in Russia September 5, 1865, and his wife, Helena Gowen was born there March 14, 1869. They were brought to Rhineland, Lisgar District, probably by their parents, in 1875. A great many Russian Mennonites emigra-ted to Manitoba in that year to escape religious oppression.

They were enumerated as heads of Household No. 45 at Rhineland in the 1901 census of Manitoba:

“Gowen Johann born in Russia September 5, 1865
Helena born in Russia March 14, 1869
Johann born in Manitoba, Dec. 19, 1888
Jacob born in Manitoba, July 30, 1890
Peter born in Manitoba, April 10, 1892
Helena born in Manitoba, Sept. 29, 1895
Margaretha born in Manitoba, May 6, 1898”

WESTBOURNE DISTRICT, MANITOBA

Daisy Frances Gowan was born in the Westbourne area of Manitoba in 1919. She was married about 1939, husband’s name Dunbar. She was remarried about 1944 to Frederick Douglas McKay who was born in 1915 to William James “Bal-doc” McKay and Myrtle Mary Anderson McKay. In 2002 Daisy Frances Gowan Dunbar McKay lived in the state of Washington.

NEWFOUNDLAND

Frederick Gowan Chafe, son of Mr. and Mrs. L. T. Chafe of Harbor Grace, Newfoundland, was married June 3, 1925 to Marjorie Wilcox, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. James Wilcox of Heart’s Content, Newfoundland.

The wedding was described in the June 13, 1925 edition of the “St. John’s Daily News:”

“It was a gloriously fine afternoon and as the friends of the bride and groom met at the church door, they re-joiced at the beauty of the scene. The interior of the old church looked very beautiful too, with its magnificent sanctuary fittings, and the lovely flowers upon the altar.

The bride entered the church upon her father’s arm, ac-companied by her bridesmaid, the sister of the groom. They met at the chancel steps by the bridegroom with his best man, Mr. Gower Rabbits, of the city. The offi-ciating clergy were Rev. A. B. S. Sterling, Rector of St. Mary’s, and the Rev. H. L. Pike, Warden of Field Hall.

The bride looked very charming in a traveling dress of navy gabardine, with a dainty hat of georgette, in shades of fawn and old rose. She wore a very handsome scarf, the gift of her mother, and carried and exquisite bouquet of white roses and carnations. The bridesmaid was tastefully attired in a dress of fawn satin crepe, with picture hat to match, and her bouquet was of pink carna-tions.

After the ceremony the party proceeded to St. Mary’s Rectory, where the reception was held. Loving hands had decorated the spacious rooms with masses of wild cherry blossoms, ferns, and sweet peas, while festoons of white ribbons completed the bridal effect. Refresh-ments, dainty and delicious, were served, the usual toasts were honored, and a very pleasant hour was spent before the happy couple, accompanied by the guests, proceeded to the station to take the train to Topsail, where the honeymoon is being spent. They were given a gay send-off, amidst showers of confetti and rose leaves, and with host of good wishes from a host of friends.

The groom’s gift to the bride was a very handsome es-critoire, to the bridesmaid a signet ring, and the best man a set of French ivory brushes. The wedding pre-sents were many and varied, and came from far and near. The sheaf of congratulatory telegrams received during the afternoon numbered fifty. Joy and gladness reigned supreme. May the years to come, though clouds be interspersed, be as full of sunshine as this wedding-day.”
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George Gowans was born in Newfoundland about 1907 of par-ents unknown. He died November 24, 2000 at the age of 93. He was a member of the Caldonian Society of Mississippi. He was survived by his wife, Willetta Gowans and their daughter Carolyn Gowans, according to the “Family Tree” of February 2001.

NOVA SCOTIA

Doyle Gowan was enumerated as the head of a household of two in the 1901 census of Colchester District. He was born in Nova Scotio March 23, 1844 and lived in Five Islands town-ship. His wife, identified only as Mrs. Doyle Gowan was born in Nova Scotia March 7, 1855. They had been married 30 years.
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J. L. Gowen was elected April 3, 1900 to the board of directors of the Northwest Arm Rowing Club which was incorporated in 1900, according to “Sketches and Traditions of the North-west Arm—Halifax, Nova Scotia” by John W. Reagan. J. L. Gowen was elected president of the St. Mary’s Athletic Asso-ciation & Aquatic Club in 1908.
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Charles Gowing, 14, was listed on a passenger list at the Port of Halifax in 1886 according to “Canadian Immigrant Records,” National Archives of Canada: Microfilm Reel No. C-4513, page 3. He arrived on the ship the “Sardinian.”
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John Gowing, 11, was listed on a passenger list at the Port of Halifax in 1886 according to “Canadian Immigrant Records,” National Archives of Canada: Microfilm reel No. C-4513, page 3. He arrived on the ship the “Sardinian.”

ONTARIO

Albert Gowan was born May 7, 1883 in France. He is listed as the head of a household in the 1901 Census in Mersea according to “Mersea Township, Essex South, Ontario Census, 1901,” film T-6467, division 1, page 2, entyr 8, family 12.
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Alfred Gowan, 38, born in England, was listed in the 1881 census of Gosfield in Essex District, Ontario, according to “Essex Distric, Ontario, Canada Census, 1881 (Kingsville, Colchester, Sandwich, Pelee, Gosfield).”
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Alice Gowan was 74 in the 1901 Census of Canada, Province of Ontario, according to the Lincoln and Niagra Census District. She was born outside of Canada according to “Canadian Immigrant Records,” National Archives of Canada (Ottowa), reel T-6480, District 85, Sub-District K08, page 4.
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Boyd Gowan was born October 19, 1850 in London City-Westminster, Middlesex County, Ontario, Canada according to 1901 Ontario Census Records.
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Boyd Gowan was born February 14, 1883 in London City-Westminster, Middlesex County, Ontario, Canada according to the 1901 Ontario Census Records.
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Charles Gowan was born August 18, 1858 in St. Mary’s, On-tario of parents unknown. He had siblings by the name of Jane Gowan, Annie Gowan, Walter Gowan, Jack H. Gowan, John Gowan and Cora Gowan.

Charles Gowan was married in 1895 in Mason County, Mich-igan to Mary Elida Lynn who was born in Sweden October 15, 1878. He died November 26, 1933 in Ludington, Michigan and was buried in Brookside Cemetery in Mason County. Ma-ry Elida Lynn Gowan died December 22, 1974 in Ludington and was buried beside her husband.

Children born to them include:

Walter Gowan born August 17, 1890
Esther Gowan born in 1910

Walter Gowan, son of Charles Gowan and Mary Elida Lynn Gowan, was born August 17, 1890 in Scottville, Michigan. He was married April 2, 1929 in Ludington to Anna Mathilda Anderson who was born May 30, 1892 near Buttersworth, Michigan to Olie Anderson and Carrie Korin Anderson. Wal-ter Gowan died May 9, 1961 in Ludington and was buried in Brookside Cemetery. Anna Mathilda Anderson Gowan died March 1, 1987 in Scottville. Children born to them are un-known.

Esther Gowan, daughter of Charles Gowan and Mary Elida Lynn Gowan, was born in 1910. She was married about 1928 to Hoyt Reagen. She died December 11, 1976 in Bay City, Michigan and was buried in an above-ground crypt.
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Charles Gowan who was born in Ireland about 1825, was enumerated in the 1871 census of in Bidulph, Ontario in the Middlesex North District. He was a farmer and a member of the Wesleyan Methodist Church.
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Charles E. Gowan was born in 1865 of parents unknown. He was married about 1888 to Mary Pommer who was born in 1863. Mary Pommer Gowan died in 1924 and was buried in Woodland Cemetery in Kitchener, Ontario. Charles E. Gowan died in 1930 and was buried beside his wife, according to Kitchener Woodland Cemetery records.
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Ellen Gowan “of the city of Toronto, spinster” was married August 16, 1847 by license to James Conron, “bachelor, of Springmount, in the township of York,” according to Ontario marriage records.
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Francis Gowan was born in 1827 in Ireland and migrated to Canada according to “The Illustrated Atlas of Simcoe County, Ontario,” and “Canadian Immigrant Records,” National Library of Canada: ref. F5498 S6136, page 47.
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George Gowan, 44, born in Ireland, was listed in the 1881 census of Pelee Island, according to “Essex District, Ontario, Canada Census, 1881 (Kingsville, Colchester, Sandwich, Pelee, Gosfield),” film number C-13280, division number 1, page 7, entry 21, family 33. His wife, Mary Gowan, 47, born in Ontario, was also listed, on page 22. According to the census William (75) and Mary Gowan (70), the parents of George Gowen, also lived in the household. Children born to George and Mary Gowan include:
Daniel Gowan 23
Ada Gowan 18
Mary Gowan 15
Andora Gowan 13
John Gowan 9
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John Gowan was born in Ireland in 1845 of parents unknown. He arrived in Canada and was enumerated in 1871 as a mariner living at Kingston, Ontario. He was a captain on the lake boats, according to Kenneth Wayne Berry, a great-great-grand-son of Toronto. He removed to Deseronto, Ontario where he died. Children born to him include Jack Gowan, Laura Gowan, William Gowan, Ellen Gowan, Jenny Gowan and Mary Jane “Molly” Gowan.

Sidney Gowan, “spinster of Toronto”, was married February 22, 1858 to James Campbell, “bachelor of Tecumseh,” accord-ing to Toronto marriage records.
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Robert Gowan was born December 26, 1856 in Ontario, Canada. He was listed as the head of a household in the 1901 Census of Mersea, according to “Mersea Township, Essex South, Ontario Census, 1901,” film T-6467, division 6, page 8, entry 18, family 86. Sarah Gowan, Robert’s mother, born June 12, 1828 in England, was also a member of the household. His wife, Agnes M. Gowan, was born July 30, 1863 in Ontario. Children born to Robert and Agnes M. Gowan include:
Lillian D. Gowen b. October 23, 1888
Martha B. Gowan b. September 14, 1890
Emma E.J. Gowan b. June 17, 1893
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Annie H. Gowans was 38 in the 1901 Census of Canada, Province of Ontario according to “Canadian Immigrant Records,” National Archives of Canada, Microfilm Reel No. T6498, District 116—Toronto, Centre, City, Sub-District a-34, Ward 3, page 6. She emigritated to Canada in 1879.
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John Gowans was 65 in the 1901 census of Canada, Province of Ontario, according to “Canadian Immigrant Records,” National Archives of Canada, Microfilm Reel No. T6498, District 116—Toronto, Centre, City, Sub-District a-34, Ward #, page 6. He immigrated to Canada in 1878.
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Margaret Gowans was 64 in the 1901 census of Canada, Province of Ontario according to “Canadian Immigrant Records,” National Archives of Canada, Microfilm Reel No. T6498, District 116—Toronto, Centre, City, Sub-District, a-34, Ward 3, page 6. She immigrated to Canada in 1879.
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Susan C. Gowans was 28 in the 1901 census of Canada, Province of Ontario, according to “Canadian Immigrant Records,” National Archives of Canada, Microfilm Reel No. T6498, District 116—Toronto, Centre, City, Sub-District a-34, Ward 3, page 6. She immigrated to Canada in 1882.
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William Gowen, a native of England, recorded in the “Historical Atlas of Peel County Ontario,” in 1877 in a list of emigrants extracted. This information was obtained from the National Library of Canada: reference G1148 P4 P6, page 72.
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Hazel Madeline Marshall Gowing, daughter of Ed Marshall and Stella Partridge, was born in 1909. She died June 17, 1999 according to Southern Ontario Newspaper Obituaries, 1999.
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Wray Gowing, son of Russell and Melinda Diebold Gowing, was born in 1932. He was married to Jean L. Beirnes Gowing. Wray Gowing died July 18, 1999 according to Southern On-tario Newspaper Obituaries, 1999.
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Florence Ethel Gowing Miller, daughter of Charles and Isabella Gowing, was born in 1908. She was married to Clayton Miller. Florence Ethel Gowing Miller died November 16, 1999 accord-ing to Southern Ontario Newspaper Obituaries, 1999. She was survived by her brother, Morley Gowing.
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James Fred Wilson and Adeline Gowan Wilson were the par-ents of Dorothy Wilson who was born June 20, 1900, according to Birth Registration No. 37364 in Alliston, Ontario. Also born to them was Harvey Lavern Willson in Allistonon October 17, 1902, according to Birth Registration No. 38837.
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Thomas Gowan Hopkins, of Toronto, bachelor was married July 31, 1851 to Mary Ann Vollor, spinster of Toronto.

ELGIN COUNTY, ONTARIO

J. E. Gowan was born August 12, 1877 in Ontario, Canada according to the 1901 Ontario census. He lived in Dunwich Township, Elgin County, Ontario, Canada.

ESSEX COUNTY, ONTARIO

George Going, born August 11, 1855, was enumerated as the head of a household, Family No. 119, in Windsor City, Ontario in the census of 1901. His wife, Caroline Going, born January 31, 1854, was recorded with him.

HASTINGS COUNTY, ONTARIO

Estella McGowan, 21, daughter of Mark McGowan and Elmire McGowan of Sidney, Ontario was married August 30, 1894 to John Wilson, 24, son of George Wilson of Belleville, Ontario.
Both bride and groom were born in Canada. Emma McGowan of Sidney was a witness to the ceremony.

MIDDLESEX COUNTY, ONTARIO

Sarah Gowan was born March 28, 1865 in London City, Mid-dlesex County, Ontario, Canada according to 1901 Ontario census records.

NORFOLK COUNTY, ONTARIO

Linus B. Gowan was married June 30, 1949 to Elsie Graydon Bowman in Norfolk County, according to the July 7, 1949 edition of the “Hagersville Press.” Children born to Linus B. Gowan and Elsie Graydon Bowman Gowan are unknown.
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Alma Gowan Heaslip was married April 28, 1949 to Gordon W. Slack, according to the May 5, 1949 edition of the “Hagersville Press” of Norfolk County, Ontario.

OXFORD COUNTY, ONTARIO

Jennie Stover, daughter of Ephraim C. Stover, farmer and Annie Gowan Stover, was born December 2, 1876 in South Norwick, Ontario, according to her Birth Registration No. 22036.

PERTH COUNTY, ONTARIO

Thomas Hunter Gowan, age 30, died March 8, 1866 at his residence at Gowanstown, Ontario, according to his obituary in the March 12, 1866 edition of “The Toronto Daily Leader:”

“On Thursday 8th inst. at his residence, Gowanstown, county of Perth, after a brief illness, age 30, Thomas Hunter Gowan, Esquire, JP, Postmaster, Merchant, de-ceased. He is deeply regretted by a large circle of friends and acquaintances. The deceased resided some-time in Toronto previous to his coming to Gowanstown and was well known and respected here.

In the Orange body of this city [Toronto] he held sev-eral offices and at the time of his death he was Grand Master of the Orange Lodge of Perth County. In that capacity he attended the Grand Lodge meeting at Owens Sound on the 20th of February last. His remains were conveyed to Toronto on the 10th of March and deposi-ted in the vault at St. James Cemetery. A number of sorrowing friends accompanied them.”

His widow, Mary Ann Gowan became postmistress at Gowans-town and was later remarried to George Blackstock who ran the hotel at Gowanstown.

Children born to Thomas Hunter Gowan and Mary Ann Gowan include:

Marguerite Gowan born about October 1865
Emily Ferguson Gowan born about 1866

Emily Ferguson Gowan, daughter of Thomas Hunter Gowan and Mary Ann Gowan, was born about 1866, perhaps shortly after the death of her father.

She was an attorney and a women’s rights activist and became the first woman magistate in the British Empire. She was one of the Famous Five of the Persons Case which gave women the right, among others, to serve in the Canadian Senate.

She was married before 1900, husband’s name Murphy.

She was a prolific author and wrote under the pseudonym of Janey Canuck. Susan Jackel wrote of her literary accomplish-ments in “The Canadian Encyclopedia.”

“Janey Canuck was her pen name under which she published ‘The Impressions of Janey Canuck Abroad’ in 1901, an account of a visit to England and Germany in which she repaid criticisms of Canada with her own on a certain type of English arrogance.

She pointed out some features of English life and man-ners that were distasteful to Canadians and gave a graphic description of a tour of the slums in which her perception of the tragedies of poverty and the plight of the wives and children of drunken husbands was closely allied to her fight for women’s rights and her methods as a magistrate.”

Other of her titles included: ‘Janey Canuck in the West,’ [1910], ‘Sketches of the Swan River District of Manitoba [1911], ‘Open Trails’ [1912], ‘Seeds of Pine’ [1914].

‘The Black Candle’ [1922] by Judge Emily Ferguson Murphy, was written under her real name as an expose of the drug trade.”

There is a photograph of Judge Murphy and the facsimile of a letter from Judge Emily G. Murphy of the office of the Police Magistrate of Alberta. The letter reads:

“Edmonton
January 7, 1927.

My Dear Mr Struthers,

I desire to thank you for a copy of ‘Ups and Downs,’and to take this opportunity of expressing my life-long appreciation of the work performed by Dr. Barnardo’s Homes in Canada.

In particular I write to congratulate you on the splendid super-vision of your boys and girls throughout the Do-minion.

The booklet itself is tastefully made up and full of most interesting material.

Wishing you all success in 1927.

Believe me,
Very sincerely yours,
Emily F. Murphy.”

Brian Rolfe wrote to explain about the underprivileged children of England who were transported to Canada to be placed in the Barnardo homes:

“A party of 76 boys and girls left March 18, 1927 aboard the SS Montrose. There is a photo of this group of children on the ship with presumably their escorts, John and Rose Hobday seated among the children.”

Norah Story wrote in 1967 of the life of Emily Ferguson Gow-an Murphy [1868-1933] which was published in the “Oxford Companion to Canadian History and Literature.”

“The photo of Emily Murphy in the Encyclopedia is identical to the photo that appears in the May 1927 edition of “Ups and Downs” opposite her testimonial to the good work of Barnardo’s in Canada.”

“Ups and Downs” was a house organ of the Barnardo organization.

SIMCOE COUNTY, ONTARIO

Ellen Gowan Banner and Tilder Banner, a butcher, were the parents of Alma Eliza Banner who was born at Creemore, Ontario in 1901, according to Simcoe County birth registrations.
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Delca Irene Gowan was born April 19, 1901 to William J. Go-wan, a drayman and Esther Cheskston Gowan, according to Simcoe County birth registrations.
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Adeline Gowan Wilson and her husband were the parents of Harvey Lavern Wilson who was born October 17, 1902 in Alliston, Ontario, according to Simcoe County birth registra-tions.
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Samuel Gowan was born about 1849 in Innisfil township. He was married about 1872 to Elizabeth Susan “Lizzie” Stone who was also born there October 18, 1852. She was a daugh-ter of William Stone and Martha Matilda Whittaker Stone. Elizabeth Susan “Lizzie” Stone Gowan was remarried to Sam-uel Gann, according to Kathy Hoeldke. Samuel Gowan was buried in New Westminster, British Columbia. She died De-cember 12, 1894 in Port Kells, British Columbia.

QUEBEC

Eliza T. Gowan was married about 1842 to James Dowler, probably in Quebec. Much information about their life together was included in his obituary:

“James Dowler. This respected pioneer of Minto, was born in Ireland, in 1819, and emigrated to Canada with his parents when six years old. The family settled in Quebec, and there young Dowler was raised and edu-cated. He learned the trade of stone cutter on the fortifi-cations of Quebec, and later, worked on the mason and construction work of the G. T. R[ailroad?] west of To-ronto. He also built many of the stone buildings in Rockwood.

In 1854, he took up 100 acres of land on con. 6, Minto, and the following year, came up and settled. He not on-ly followed the “blaze” in locating this land, but no roads had been cut out at that time, and he continued to follow the “blazed” path, in and out, for some months after he made his clearing, and and erected a habitable log house. James Dowler, cleared this farm, which, in 1871, he sold, and purchased 100 acres on con. 8, which is now owned and worked in conjunction by his sons, John and William J.

James Dowler was a consistent member of the Church of England, and in politics was a Conservative. He was a well-informed man, and had the confidence and re-spect of everyone who knew him. He died in 1896, age 77 years. He was married in Quebec to Eliza T. Gowan.

Children born to them include: Mrs. John Rixon, settled in Michigan; Mrs. Peter Marion of Wallace; Mrs. Dun-can McAchren, Mrs. Daniel Marion of Wallace; John Dowler who was married to Louisa Gibson of Minto; Mrs. Thomas Redpath of Howick; Mrs. John Young of Winnipeg, and William J. Dowler.”
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Elizabeth Gowan was 70 in the 1901 cennsus of Canada, Province of Quebec. She immigrated to Canada in 1837 according to “Canadian Immigrant Records,” National Archives of Canada, Microfilm Reel number T6520, District 153—Drummond & Arthabaska, Sub-District El-Kingsey, page 9.
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George Gowan was 60 in the 1901 census of Canada, Province of Quebec. He immigrated to Canada in 1865 according to “Canadian Immigrant Records,” National Archives of Canada, Microfilm Reel Number T6526, District 160—Labelle, Sub-District U—Portland West, page 8.
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Julia Gowan was 53 in the 1901 Census of Canada, Province of Quebec. She was born outside of Canada according to “Canadian Immigrant Records,” National Archives of Canada, Ottowa: Reel number T6546, District 193-Sherbrooke County, Sub-District Bo2, page 11.
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William Gowan was 40 in the 1901 census of Canada, Province of Quebec. He was born outside of Canada according to “Canadian Immigrant Records,” National Archives of Canada, Ottowa: Reel number T6546, District 193—Sherbrooke County, Sub-District B02, page 11.
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Fannie Gowans was 55 in the 1901 census of Canada, Province of Quebec aacording to “Canadian Immigrant Records,” National Archives of Canada, Microfilm Reel No. T-6534, District 175—Montreal City, Sub-District a51-St. Antoine Ward, page 3. She immigrated to Canada in 1886.
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Anna Gowen was 86 in the 1901 census of Canada, Province of Quebec. She immigrated to Canada in 1842 according to “Canadian Immigrant Records,” National Archives of Canada, microfilm reel #T6523, District 156-Huntingdon, Sub-District H1—Hinchinbrooke, page 3.
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James Gowen appeared on the roster of The Corps of Queens Loyal Rangers commanded by Lt. Col. John Peters December 14, 1780. He was reported to be “in the hospital at St. Johns.”

Richard Gowing was married to Marie Quenneville, January 21, 1822 in St. Joseph de Soulanges.

Children born to Richard Gowing and Marie Quenneville Gowin there include:

Caroline Gowing born October 19, 1824
Patrick Gowing born December 7, 1829

SASKATCHEWAN

The town of Gowan, Saskatchewan is the location of a Canadian veterans cemetery.

AUSTRALIA

The death of Sir Hyde Gowan was reported in the April 2, 1938 edition of the “New York Times.” He was described as one of the many Australians who gained distinction in the Indian Civil Service. He was governor of the central provinces of India and had seen service there since 1902. He, 59 years old, had been an invalid for 4 years.

NEW SOUTH WALES

John Gowen was born in England about 1761, according to Vickie Goldsmith, a descendant of Australia. She wrote April 30, 2002 that John Gowen was serving as a marine aboard the H.M.S. Sirius, flagship of the First Fleet which arrived in Australia in a convict flotilla January 26, 1788.

After the American Revolution, England was no longer able to dispose of its convicts in the New World. Instead, it turned its attention to Australia. The first installment of prisoners for Australia departed from England May 13, 1787. Most of the miscreants were sentenced to four years.

The accepted authoritative work on Australian convicts is Charles Bateson’s “Convict Ships.” In it, Bateson states that a total of 160,151 convicts were sent to Australia. Although most of the convicts were from the British Isles, some were also from various British colonies. The British government first sent convicts to New South Wales in 1788, after the American Revolution. New South Wales refused to accept convicts after 1842 because the population had grown after the success of free immigration.

Convicts were first sent to Tasmania [formerly Van Diemens Land] in 1803. Western Australian accepted male convicts only from 1850 to 1868. An attempt was also made to send convicts to Port Phillip [Melbourne, Victoria], but this failed.

This transportation scheme continued until 1868 and primarily involved three Australian states: New South Wales from 1788; Tasmania from 1803 and Western Australia from 1850.

Convicts of interest to Foundation researchers include:

George Going, age 18, single, a servant boy born in London, transported to New South Wales in 1834 aboard the ship “Surry 7.”

Clarissa Gowan was born in Cumberland in 1815. She, age 21, single, was transported to New South Wales in 1836 aboard the ship “Henry Wellesley.”

Gowen Bladen, age 21, a “kitchen gardener” born in Kent, was transported in 1839 to New South Wales aboard the ship “Parkfield.”

Hardly had the First Fleet of three ships arrived when the marine guards, claiming that their duties did not extend beyond the voyage out, refused to act any longer. Some of the seamen on the ships joined them and the prisoners in declaring that they would stay in New South Wales.

John Gowen was included in a list compiled by Kate Cunningham. In 1791, four years after his arrival, John Gowen received an initial land grant of 60 acres on Norfolk Island.

John Gowen received land grants in Van Diemen’s Land [Tasmania] and Norfolk Island, New South Wales between 1788 and 1809, according to a list edited by R. J. Ryan, B.A., Australian Documents Library, Sydney.

“The New Holland Morning Post,” of October 18, 1791, al-so reported on “the 86 settlers who have been granted land at Parramatta and Norfolk Island, comprising 31 marines, 11 sea-men and 44 convicts whose sentences had expired:”

Anderson, John 50 acres P’matta
Baffen, John 50 acres P’matta
Barrisford, John 60 acres N’folk Is.
Bell, William 10 acres N’folk Is.
Bishop, Joseph 50 acres P’matta
Bishop, Thomas 60 acres N’folk Is.
Bramwell, Thomas 60 acres N’folk Is.
Brand, Curtis 30 acres P’matta
Brown, John 60 acres P’matta
Burn, Simon 50 acres P’matta
Butler, William 50 acres P’matta
Castles, James 30 acres P’matta
Cavenaugh, Owen 60 acres N’folk Is.
Chipp, Thomas 60 acres N’folk Is.
Connell, Patrick 60 acres N’folk Is.
Cross, William 10 acres N’folk Is.
Dempsey, William 60 acres N’folk Is.
Dikes, Thomas 60 acres N’folk Is.
Drummond, John 60 acres N’folk Is.
Elliott, William 30 acres P’matta
Everingham, Mathew 50 acres P’matta
Fentun, Benjamin 10 acres N’folk Is.
Field, William 50 acres P’matta
Foley, John 60 acres N’folk Is.
Forrester, Robert 10 acres N’folk Is.
Gowen, John 60 acres N’folk Is.
Griffiths, Samuel 30 acres P’matta
Halfpenny, Thomas 60 acres N’folk Is.
Hambly, William 60 acres N’folk Is.
Hand, Abraham 60 acres N’folk Is.
Herbert, John 60 acres P’matta
Heritage, Charles 60 acres N’folk Is.
Hibbs, Peter 60 acres N’folk Is.
Hubbard, William 50 acres P’matta
Kelly, Thomas 30 acres P’matta
Kilby, William 50 acres P’matta
Kimberley, Edward 10 acres N’folk Is.
King, Samuel 60 acres N’folk Is.
Lisk, George 30 acres P’matta
Marshall, Joseph 30 acres P’matta
Martin, Thomas 30 acres P’matta
McCarthy, John 60 acres N’folk Is.
McManus, James 60 acres N’folk Is.
Mitchell, William 60 acres N’folk Is.
Morley, Joseph 50 acres P’matta
Moulds, William 30 acres P’matta
Munday, John 60 acres N’folk Is.
Nichols, John 30 acres P’matta
Night, Richard 60 acres N’folk Is.
O’Bryen, Thomas 60 acres N’folk Is.
Painter, James 60 acres N’folk Is.
Parish, William 60 acres P’matta
Parr, William 50 acres P’matta
Proctor, James 60 acres N’folk Is.
Pugh, Edward 70 acres P’matta
Ramsey, John 50 acres P’matta
Redman, John 60 acres N’folk Is.
Redmond, James 60 acres N’folk Is.
Reid, William 60 acres P’matta
Richards, John 30 acres P’matta
Richards, Lawrence 60 acres N’folk Is.
Roberts, John 60 acres N’folk Is.
Ruse, James 30 acres N’folk Is.
Schaffer, Phillip 140 acres P’matta
Scott, John 60 acres N’folk Is.
Sculley, Thomas 60 acres N’folk Is.
Silverthorn, John 30 acres P’matta
Simms, William 60 acres N’folk Is.
Spencer, Thomas 60 acres N’folk Is.
Standfield, Daniel 60 acres N’folk Is.
Standley, William 60 acres N’folk Is.
Stuart, James 20 acres P’matta
Strong, William 60 acres N’folk Is.
Summers, John 30 acres P’matta
Tonks, William 60 acres N’folk Is.
Turner, John 10 acres N’folk Is.
Varndell, Edward 30 acres P’matta
Walbourne, James 10 acres N’folk Is.
Watson, Robert 60 acres N’folk Is.
Webb, Robert 60 acres P’matta
White, James 10 acres N’folk Is.
Williams, Charles 30 acres P’matta
William, James 60 acres N’folk Is.
Williams, John 50 acres P’matta
Woodcock, Peter 10 acres N’folk Is.

On March 12, 1800 “John Gowan” appeared as a grantee of land registered in the Colonial Secretary’s office.

John Gowen was employed as a storekeeper at Sydney and was superintendent of stores at Parramatta in 1801.

On July 21, 1803 he was charged with embezzling government stores, but was later exonerated. An entry regarding his salary was recorded December 31, 1803.

On April 7, 1804 he signed a contract agreeing to the rules and orders of the Sydney Loyal Association. His name appeared on a list of civil and military officers in 1806-08, but his name was later crossed out.

The Return of the Sydney Association Company shows:

“Captain:
Rowley, Thomas

Lieut.
Smyth, Thomas

Sergeants:
Gowan, John
Bloodsworth, James

Corporals
Griffiths, John
Massey, Thomas
Wall, William

Privates

Chapman, William
Thorley, Samuel
Raby, Thomas
Roberts, William
Cunningham, Andrew
Jones, Lewis
Skinner, Samuel
Flood, James
Batty, David
Dowling, John
Owen, Felix
Mitchell, John
Baker, George
Evans, William
O’Neal, William
Matthews, George
Somerville, James
Morrison, John
Prosser, Joseph
Geary, Michael
Sparrow, John
Underwood, James
Meredith, Frederick
Miller, William
Cox, Fraser
Goode, Edward
Randall, Thomas
Peachy, William
Chambers, Daniel
Lewis, Joseph
Hockley, Samuel”

Return of the Parramatta Association

“Captain
Savage, John

S-Major
Evans, G. W.

Sergeants
Larra, James
Hassal, Rowland

Corporals
Stevenson, John
Wright, Charles

Drummers
Adams, –
Saunders, –

Privates

Cole, William
Whittear, John
Hodson, John
Thorn, Humphrey
Norris, John
Cosier, Thomas
Tate, John
Graham, John
Armstrong, Henry
Mayo, William
Haslem, Samuel
Bedford, Thomas
Wright, Edmond
Matthews, William
Elliott, Edward
Weavers, John
McKenzie, Thomas
Wright, James
Crook, William
Thorogood, John
Welling, Daniel
Terry, Samuel
Lewin, John
Hughes, Hugh
Munslow, William
Snowden, Andrew
Butcher, John
Wells, Richard”

John Gowen was married June 1, 1805 to Audrey Appleyard in St. Phillips in Sydney, New South Wales. She was born about 1778 in the United Kingdom. She had been transported to New South Wales on the ship “Earl Cornwallis” in 1800, according to Lincolnshire Archives. She had been sentenced to a seven-year term for theft.

She, a spinster, was tried at the Lindsey Quarter Sessions court on October 5, 1798, at age 21. She was convicted of stealing “a checked silk handkerchief, 2 cotton pocket handkerchiefs, a girl’s neck handkerchief, a woolen petticoat and a pair of women’s white [?], the property of Thomas Neal.” She had been previously imprisoned at the Kirton House of Correction.

On January 1, 1806 the name of John Gowen appeared on a “List of all Grants and Leases of Land registered in the Colonial Sectary’s office.

On January 28, 1808, it was recorded that “Goods delivered [by John Gowen] from the Stores, per Palmer’s order, not paid for nor entered in the Day Book.”

On January 3, 1810 John Gowen appeared on the “List of persons holding civil and military employment at Sydney and settlements adjacent, as Storekeeper.”

On June 7, 1810 a letter was written to William Broughton regarding “amendments to invoice for goods to Newcastle and Gowen’s adjustments.”

On July 2, 1810 John Gowen wrote a letter “asking permission to resign position of storekeeper & to be allowed the usual indulgences on taking up his farm.” Upon receipt of a reply, he resigned as storekeeper July 7, 1810.

On October 10, 1814 he was named foreman of a jury at an inquest on John Davis held at Sydney.

On March 25, 1815 John Gowen was “appointed storekeeper at Liverpool.”

On August 15, 1815, “John Gowen, Convict disembarked from ‘Canada’, assigned to Liverpool.” [This may have been a different individual of the same name.]

On March 17, 1817 John Gowen wrote, “requesting survey of damaged maize in Liverpool stores.”

On September 3, 1818 “John Gowan” wrote a letter “requesting a list of persons entitled to be issued with slop clothing.”

In 1819 John Gowen “Paid slaughtering duties.”

On January 25, 1819 and June 24, 1820, John Gowen was listed as a storekeeper on the “Returns of storekeepers & extra clerks in the Commissariat Department.”

On March 6, 1819 and March 27, 1819 “John Gowan” wrote “Regarding steer slaughtered at Cow Pastures from Government herd.”

Audrey Appleyard Gowen died October 17, 1819 in New South Wales.

On April 24, 1820 John Gowen received “Departmental Orders requesting duplicates & triplicates of store receipts issued since January 25, 1819 & respecting new method of attaching store receipts to vouchers.”

On August 15, 1820 John Gowen “Countersigned printed copy of Proclamation on the accession of King George IV; at Liverpool on August 7.”

On January 15, 1821 he wrote “Regarding a delivery of wheat.” On January 20, 1821 John Gowen wrote “Regarding dispatch of wheat and barley to Commissariat Department”

On November 15, 1821 he issued a receipt to J. Kelly.

John Gowen was remarried November 27, 1821 to Mary Wood.

About 1822, he paid money to Thomas Moore.

In January 1822 John Gowen wrote “Regarding payment to Thomas Moore of money received for the slaughtering of cattle.

On December 9, 1822 he wrote to “Request an equitable pension.” On December 28, 1822 he wrote again concerning his pension.

In 1823 and in 1825 John Gowen wrote concerning “land and premises in O’Connell Street, Sydney.”

On January 4, 1823 John Gowen certified that “William Carrol received no indulgences from H. M. Magazines.”

From Parramatta on July 8, 1823 John Gowen certified that “Alfred Sims had not received any indulgence.” The certificate was attached to the Memorial of Alfred Sims

A pension was paid to John Gowen on December 31, 1823 and on December 31, 1824. On February 19, 1824 he endorsed the petition of Thomas Taber for a pension. Ann Gowen, daughter of John Gowen, was married in that year to George Taber, son of Thomas Taber.

On October 29, 1824 John Gowen appeared on a “List of persons liable to serve as jurors in the District of Liverpool.”

The name of John Gowen appeared July 15, 1825 “on a list of lands granted & reserved by Sir Thomas Brisbane.”

In August 1825 John Gowen again appeared in the Liverpool jury pool.

John Gowen died April 28, 1837 and was buried at Kiama, New South Wales. No children were born to John Gowen and Mary Wood Gowen.

Children born to John Gowen and Audrey Appleyard Gowen include:

Mary Gowen born May 17, 1806
Ann Gowen born October 12, 1807
John Gowen born December 15, 1810
Frances Gowen born September 17, 1812
Elizabeth Gowen born April 24, 1816

Mary Gowen, daughter of John Gowen and Audrey Appleyard Gowen, was born May 17, 1806 in New South Wales. She was married about 1821 to William Henry Jones. On August 9, 1821 she filed affidavits regarding her marriage.

Ann Gowen, daughter of John Gowen and Audrey Appleyard Gowen, was born October 12, 1807 in New South Wales. She was married September 22, 1824, at the age of 16, to George Taber. He was born November 21, 1800 in Sydney Cove to Thomas Taber and Frances Medhurst Taber. Witnesses to their marriage ceremony were James Taber and Adah Harrex.

George Taber owned 640 acres of land at Menangle and was described as a farmer and an innkeeper.

He died March 22, 1885 in Medhurst Vale, Manangle, New South Wales and was buried at St. Peters in Campbelltown. Ann Gowen Taber died there September 22, 1900 at the age of 92 and was buried beside her husband.

Children born to George Taber and Ann Gowen Taber include:

Frances Rachael Taber born October 9, 1825
George John Taber born April 28, 1827
Sarah Elizabeth Taber born October 6, 1829
Ann M. Taber born in 1832
Elizabeth Deborah Taber born January 6, 1835
Mary J. Taber born in 1837
Emma Louise Taber born November 22, 1841
Clara Matilda Taber born August 23, 1845
Ada Taber born in 1848

Frances Rachael Taber, daughter of George Taber and Ann Gowen Taber, was born October 9, 1825 at Menangle. She died July 11, 1901, at the age of 75, at Picton New South Wales.

John Gowen Taber, son of George Taber and Ann Gowen Taber, was born at Menangle April 28, 1827. He died the following year.

Sarah Elizabeth Taber, daughter of George Taber and Ann Gowen Taber, was born October 5, 1829 at Menangle. She died in New South Wales in 1897.

Ann M. Taber, daughter of George Taber and Ann Gowen Taber, was born in 1832 at Menangle.

Elizabeth Deborah Taber, daughter of George Taber and Ann Gowen Taber, was born January 6, 1835 at Menangle. She died November 25, 1919 at Wagga Wagga, New South Wales.

Mary J. Taber, daughter of George Taber and Ann Gowen Taber, was born at Menangle in 1837. She died there in the following year.

Emma Louise Taber, daughter of George Taber and Ann Gowen Taber, was born November 22, 1841 at Menangle. She was married there December 31, 1864 to David Sneesby. He was born in 1838 to Joseph Sneesby and Susannah Warren Sneesby in Wilburton, Cambridgeshire, England. His emigration to Australia was sponsored by his great uncle James Sneesby. David Sneesby was a stonemason and a building contractor.

Emma Louise Tabor Sneesby died September 26, 1900 at Lidcombe. David Sneesby died September 26, 1913 at age 76 at Rookwood near Lidcombe and was buried in the Church of England Cemetery there.

Children born to David Sneesby and Emma Louise Taber Sneesby include:

Edith Ann Sneesby born in 1867
Emma Louise Sneesby born in 1869
John George Sneesby born in 1870
Henry Taber Sneesby born January 5, 1872
Albert Joseph Sneesby born in 1874
George W. Sneesby born in 1877
William David Charles Sneesby born in 1880
David Augustus Sneesby born in 1882

Edith Ann Sneesby, daughter of David Sneesby and Emma Louise Taber Sneesby, was born in 1867. She died in 1940.

Emma Louise Sneesby, daughter of David Sneesby and Emma Louise Taber Sneesby, was born in 1869.

John George Sneesby, son of David Sneesby and Emma Louise Taber Sneesby, was born in 1870 in New South Wales. He died there in 1936.

Henry Taber Sneesby, son of David Sneesby and Emma Louise Taber Sneesby, was born January 5, 1872 at Newtown, New South Wales. He was married September 23, 1890 to Amy Sinclair in Wesleyan Church in Homebush, New South Wales. She was born December 7, 1871 in Wooloomooloo, Sydney, New South Wales to John Sinclair and Jane Tucker Sinclair. Since Henry Taber Sneesby was only 18, his father gave consent for the marriage license to be issued. Jane Sinclair gave her consent for Amy Sinclair, age 19, to be married. Witnesses to the wedding were “E. Sneesby & E. Sinclair.”

Henry Taber Sneesby became a bootmaker.

Children born to Henry Taber Sneesby and Amy Sinclair Sneesby include:

Eva Sneesby born in 1891
Amy Sneesby born in 1894
Thomas Sneesby born in 1896
May Sneesby born in 1898
George Sneesby born October 24, 1900
Jane Sneesby born in 1904
Henry Sneesby born October 22, 1907
Arthur Sneesby born February 5, 1910
Allan Sneesby born September 1, 1912

Eva Sneesby, daughter of Henry Taber Sneesby and Amy Sinclair Sneesby, was born in 1891 in New South Wales.

Amy Sneesby, daughter of Henry Taber Sneesby and Amy Sinclair Sneesby, was born in 1894 in New South Wales.

Thomas Sneesby, son of Henry Taber Sneesby and Amy Sinclair Sneesby, was born in 1896.

May Sneesby, daughter of Henry Taber Sneesby and Amy Sinclair Sneesby, was born in 1898.

George Sneesby, son of Henry Taber Sneesby and Amy Sinclair Sneesby, was born at Rookwood, New South Wales October 24, 1900 at Rookwood. He was married December 29, 1934 to Eileen Mary Turner in St. Matthews Church in Manly, New South Wales. She was born January 1, 1905 in Randwick, New South Wales to Ernest Turner and Ethel Page Turner.

George Sneesby, a carpenter, died June 10, 1953 at Concurry, Queensland, Australia.

Children born to George Sneesby and Eileen Mary Turner include:

[stillborn child] born about 1945
Graham Taber Sneesby born in 1947

Graham Taber Sneesby, son of George Sneesby and Eileen Mary Turner, was born in 1947 in New South Wales. He was married in 1969 to Linda Ann Oakley. She was born in 1949 at Derby in England to Alfred Oakley and Bessie Jackson Oakley.

Children born to them include:

Deborah Sneesby born in 1969
Kerrie Sneesby born in 1974

Deborah Sneesby, daughter of Graham Taber Sneesby and Linda Ann Oakley Sneesby, was born in 1969 in New South Wales. She was married there in 1992 to Cameron Ranford. He was born in 1972 in Western Australia to Ernie Ranford and Vicki Edwards Ranford.

Children born to them include:

Jaiden Ranford born in 1995
Liam Ranford born in 1998

Jane Sneesby, daughter of Henry Taber Sneesby and Amy Sinclair Sneesby, was born in 1904 in New South Wales.

Henry Sneesby, son of Henry Taber Sneesby and Amy Sinclair Sneesby, was born October 22, 1907 at Granville, New South Wales. He died September 29, 1969 at Lidcome, New South Wales.

Arthur Sneesby, son of Henry Taber Sneesby and Amy Sinclair Sneesby, was born February 5, 1910.

Allan Sneesby, son of Henry Taber Sneesby and Amy Sinclair Sneesby, was born September 1, 1912 at Lidcombe. He died June 30, 1994 at Old Bar, New South Wales.

Albert Joseph Sneesby, son of David Sneesby and Emma Louise Taber Sneesby, was born in 1874 in New South Wales. He died there in 1923.

George W. Sneesby, son of David Sneesby and Emma Louise Taber Sneesby, was born in 1877 in New South Wales. He died there in 1943.

William David Charles Sneesby, son of David Sneesby and Emma Louise Taber Sneesby, was born in 1880.

David Augustus Sneesby, son of David Sneesby and Emma Louise Taber Sneesby, was born in 1882.

Clara Matilda Taber, daughter of George Taber and Ann Gowen Taber, was born August 23, 1845 at Menangle and died March 19, 1929 in Campbelltown.

Ada Taber, daughter of George Taber and Ann Gowen Taber, was born in 1848 in Menangle.

John Gowen, son of John Gowen and Audrey Appleyard Gowen, was born December 15, 1810 in Sydney. He died November 18, 1885 at Sandy Creek in Braidwood.

He and his son[?] were mentioned in “Greville’s Post Office Directory, 1872,” page 114, living at Charleyong, New South Wales, 198 miles south of Sydney.

“John Gowen, Sen.” was listed as a farmer living in the Tom-boy community with mail service at Charleyong. “John Gowen, jun.” was recorded as a labourer living in the Marlow community with mail service at Charleyong.

Their weekly mail service was described in the directory as:

“Mail closes at General Post Office Tuesday, via Braidwood, Saturday, via Nowra, 4 p.m.

Mail arrives at Post Town Wednesday, via Braidwood, 2.30 p.m., Tuesday, via
Nowra, 9 a.m.

Mail leaves for Sydney Tuesday, via Braidwood, 9 a.m., Wednesday, via Nowra, 2.30 p.m.

Mail arrives at Sydney Thursday, via Braidwood, Saturday, via Nowra, 7.15 a.m.
Route – Rail Goulburn, coach Braidwood, 12m. Charleyong.”

Frances Gowen, daughter of John Gowen and Audrey Appleyard Gowen, was born September 17, 1812. She died October 23, 1899.

Elizabeth Gowen, daughter of John Gowen and Audrey Appleyard Gowen, was born April 24, 1816. She died October 12, 1885.
==O==
Brady Gowin who was a convict transported to Australia aboard the “Greyhound” in 1818, was received by Sir John Jamison in New South Wales August 14, 1820. He was released November 17, 1821.
==O==
Kathleen Mary Gowen was born about 1920. She was married about 1938 to Arthur Reginald Yates who was born about 1918 to Frederick Yates and Mamie Morris Yates of Balgow-nie, New South Wales, according to Jennifer Robinson.
==O==
Mary Toft, daughter of James Toft and Elizabeth Mitchell Toft of Surrey, was born in 1795 at Cranleigh. Her father was sentenced to 14 years imprisonment and transportation to Australia for embezzlement. Her family followed him to Australia, and there she was married to Gowen Pickering in 1821, according to Lois Carrington. She wrote,

“James Toft was tried and convicted in Old Bailey court in March 1813. He was the London manager for a provincial grain merchant. He stole a large sum, £320 [over £10,000 in today’s money]) from his em-ployer, a provincial grain merchant. He was one of the many who suffered dread-fully on the “hellship” “General Hewitt, and died at sea. His family arrived in Sydney five months after his ship did, to be met with the doleful news of his death. His wife took a job as housekeeper to William Mannix, a kind man who offered her daughters a roof over their heads as well. She later married him, and they had a daughter, Jane in 1815.”

QUEENSLAND, AUSTRALIA

Mary Gowen arrived in 1865 aboard the ship “Golden Land” and settled in Marysborough, Queensland, according to “Ma-rysborough, Queensland Immigrants from the British Isles and Germany, 1861-1891.”

SOUTH AUSTRALIA

E. J. Gowan was the registrar for Ensign Nursing Home, located on Carrington Street in Adelaide in 1902, according to Dianne Baker.
==O==
Capt. Charles Joseph Shields MacGowan, alias George Gow-an, a retired British Army officer from India and a widower, arrived in South Australia about 1889. He was accompanied Florence Free-man who came as the nanny to his young son who was born in India about 1886. The couple was married shortly after arriving in Australia. Florence Freeman Mac-Gowan was born in London in 1856, according to Mary Shields Criddle.

NEW ZEALAND

“Mr. and Mrs. Gowen of steerage” were listed among the pas-sengers who arrived in Auckland, New Zealand March 22, 1871 aboard “The Caduceus” under the command of Capt. Roberts.

The local newspaper carried the following article:

“The ship Caduceus, a fine powerful vessel of over one thousand tons register, anchored off the wharf yesterday morn-ing, after a splendid passage from London, bringing an addition to our population of 102 souls, three of whom were born on the voyage. The Caduceus is commanded by Captain D. T. Rob-erts, a gentleman well known in this port, having made several voyages here in charge of the good ship “Maori.”

The Caduceus has arrived in harbour a model of cleanliness and the passengers are in excellent health. As a slight recogni-tion of his kindness to them during the voyage, the whole of the passengers have signed a congratulatory address to Captain Roberts, which they presented to him on his arrival in this port.

The voyage throughout has been very pleasant, very little heavy weather being met with since leaving the Channel. We understand that after discharging her inward cargo the Cadu-ceus will load for home.

The following report has been kindly supplied by Captain Roberts:

“Left Gravesend on 16th December 1870; experienced heavy weather in the Channel and put into Spithead; left Isle of Wight on 21st. Bad weather and very heavy seas crossing the bay, up to the 27th. Crossed the Equator on 13th January, thence had fair S E trades. The meridian of the west end of Australia was passed on 27th Feb, the 67th day out. The south end of Tasmania passed on 8th March at a distance of 100 miles, 76 days out and course was shaped for the Three Kings. Flying fish seen at the Poor Knights.”

The following is a copy of the address presented to Captain Roberts on his arrival:

“Ship Caduceus, 22nd March, 1871.
Captain Roberts.
Dear Sir,

We cannot leave the Caduceus without ex-pressing our cordial thanks for the many kind-nesses we have exper-ienced at your hands and at those of your officers. We are also indebted to you for your thoughtfulness on all occa-sions, which has, as far as in your power lay, lightened the tedium of a sea voyage. We hope you will convey to your officers our thanks for their kindness and courtesy and, wishing you and them all health and prosperity and a safe return to those near and dear to you, we remain, dear sir, yours sincerely,”

[Signatures of passengers]
==O==
John Gowan was listed in 1872 Post Office Directory for Greville as a “gardener, Broughtonsworth, Burrowa.”

DORSET TERRITORY, NEW ZEALAND

Albert Gowen was born in New Zealand about 1869 of parents unknown. He, an accountant, was enumerated at age 32 in the 1901 census of Branksome, Dorset Territory.

OTAGO TERRITORY, NEW ZEALAND

Announcement of a wedding which took place at Gowan Ha’, New Zealand appeared in the September 27, 1856 edition of the “Otago Witness:”

“Married. At Gowan Ha’, on the 18th inst., by the Rev. Thomas Burns, Mr. George Ross, Merchant, Dunedin, to Margaret Marshall, only daughter of Mr. James Mar-shall, Storekeeper, Dunedin.”

PHILIPPINES

Lorna A. Goins was born December 25, 1947 in the Philip-pines. She was married September 3, 1976 in Albuquerque, New Mexico to David A. Patterson who was born in Washing-ton February 25, 1952, according to Bernalillo County, New Mexico Marriage Book 172, page 106897.

Gowen Research Foundation Phone:806/795-8758, 795-9694
5708 Gary Avenue E-mail: gowen@sbcglobal.net
Lubbock, Texas, 79413-4822 GOWENMS.049, 05/06/02
Internet: http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.com/~gowenrf
http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.com/~gowenrf

Membership Application

Gowen Research Foundation 806/795-8758 or 795-9694
5708 Gary Avenue E-mail: gowen@sbcglobal.net
Lubbock, Texas, 79413

Website: http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.com/~gowenrf

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