042 Minerva J. Gowen

Minerva J. Gowen, [William, Jr.7, Lt. William6, John5, William4, [William3, Thomas2, Mihil1], regarded as a daughter of William Gowen and Mary “Polly” Crutchfield Gowen, was born in 1827 probably in Rutherford County, Tennessee. She is believed to be the “white female 10-15” in the 1840 census enumeration of her mother’s household in Rutherford County. She appeared as “age 23” in the census return of her mother’s family in the 1850 enumeration of Rutherford County.

Minerva J. Gowen received a warranty deed from Joseph W. Dabbs February 5, 1852 for 20 acres of land on Mill Creek, according to Davidson County Deed Book 15, page 471. There was an affinity between the Dabbs family and Minerva J. Gowen.

Dr. Edison Davidson Stephenson, son of John “Jack” Stephenson, who was born July 2, 1820 in Morgan County, Alabama was married to Ellen M. Dabbs July 7, 1849, according to Davidson County marriage records. On June 2, 1864 Dr. Stephenson was remarried to “Manerva J. Gowen,” according to Davidson County marriage records. Later the Stephenson family removed to Lawrence County, Alabama and lived near Speak, Alabama.

Children born to Dr. Edison Davidson Stephenson and Ellen M. Dabbs Stephenson include:

John Randolph Stephenson born July 3, 1852
Eaton Stephenson born in 1859

Children born to Dr. Edison Davidson Stephenson and Manerva J. Gowen Stephenson include:

Charley Stephenson born November 16, 1866
Lula Stephenson born in 1868

It is believed that Minerva J. Gowen later returned to Rutherford County to keep house for her bachelor brother, George Washington Gowen. When he removed to Craighead County, Arkansas about 1871 she accompanied him and lived there until his death about 1885.

From Jonesboro, Arkansas Minerva J. Gowen wrote letters back to her relatives in Rutherford County. Two of these letters, retained by her brother John Gowen, are reproduced below:

“Jonesboro, Arkansas
April 29, 1876
Dear Girls,

I received your kind letter, was very glad to here from you all. This leaves all well. Jim’s health has ben good this spring so far. We had a warm winter and cold spring. We had a snow and then a hail storm. The hail was as long as guinea eggs. The peach crop is ru­ined. We haven’t a peach. Jim has finished planting. Jonny Owens has come to make a crop with him. He is a good hand and was glad to get back. I was very sorry Jonny Gowen [probably her nephew, John Jones Gowen] did not come. I want to here from him and all of you and Beky. What is he about? Tell her to send some mesag. We had a good rain this eavening, a gully washer. Jim’s wheat is looking fine. The nats [gnats] is so thick now. I had a letter from Bill’s [probably her brother, William Benjamin Gowen] girls. Ther ma and pa is not well. Benny sends a pease of his hair to Mal. He is growen fast, and smart–he can spell in three letters. He talks about goen to Tenn. You must excuse this. Jon is goen to town in the mourning. I will let you heare from us. Remember me to your ma and pa and Jonny. Write soon, all of you girls.
Yours truly,
M. Gowen”

Jonesboro, Arkansas
Dec. 30 [probably 1876]

Dear Mandy and Mary and Malie,

I got all of your letters. Was glad to here from you all. This leaves all well. We haven’t eny doctor bills this year. Jim is looken stout. Benie is growen fast and big. Jonny Owens will remain with us. He is a good fellow, he has no equals. I haven’t rot a letter in six mounths. I am so busy all day and desturbed at night. Fall was dry and fine for gathering crops. We mad three bales of cotton, got 11 cts. Carried it to Wittsburg [?]. We have a bundance to live on. We killed eight hogs. Have three milch cows–Rose, Biddy and White. Jim had a well dug this past fall, sixty feet deep and strong stream. We have cold weather and snow now, ten inches deep. Christmas passed merily, no one was hurt. I was at two weddings this fall. Was pleased with the plainness. The RR is near finished over here. We are expecting to heare the iron horse snort soon. I hope Jonny will make us a visit. Jon Owens has spent the yeare pleasantly. He is out visiting to night. I hope you will write to [us] often. I want Maly to send on her episle. Benie send a long mesage to Mal. Things are improving over here. Tha had a big fire in Jonesboro, burn seven houses. I would like to some see you all very much. I received a letter from Mrs. F. a few day ago. I will expect letters soon. Good night to all. Give my love to Beky.
Sincerely,
M. Gowen”

Minerva J. Gowen appeared in the 1880 census of Craighead County, page 30, living in Jonesboro township in the household of George Washington Gowen. She was shown in Household No. 276 as “age 53, born in Tennessee, father born in South Carolina, mother born in North Carolina.”

After the death of her brother about 1893, she returned to La Vergne, Tennessee and lived with a nephew, James Parmer Gowen. It is believed that when she died she was buried in the Gowen family cemetery, but no tombstone was found for her there.

George Washington Gowen, [William, Jr.7, Lt. William6, John5, William4, [William3, Thomas2, Mihil1], believed to be a son of William Gowen and Mary “Polly” Crutchfield Gowen, was born in 1829, probably in Rutherford County. It is believed that he was the “white male, 5-10” that was enumerated in his mother’s household in the 1840 census of Rutherford County. He reappeared in the 1850 census of his mother’s family in Rutherford County as “age 21, born in Tennessee, farmer, illiterate.”

Among the papers of John Gowen was a receipt issued to George Washington Gowen. It reads, “July 23, 1866, Received of Wash Goin $50 for all demands. /s/ John Harris.”

It is believed that he was influenced to move to Craighead County, Arkansas about 1871 by a brother, James Gowen who had moved there sometime before 1870. His sister Minerva J. Gowen accompanied him there as his housekeeper. When his brother and wife died, he was appointed guardian of his nephew, Benjamin P. Gowen who inherited an 80-acre farm.

George Washington Gowen appeared as the head of a house­hold in the 1880 census of Craighead County, Jonesboro township, page 30, Household No. 276-276, enumerated as:

“Goans, George Washington 50, farmer, born in TN, father _ born in SC, mother born in
NC
Minerva 53, housekeeper, born in TN, _ father born in SC, mother
born in NC
Benjamin 9, ward, born in AR,
father born in TN,
mother born in TN
Thom, Jesse 73, farmer, born in
SC, father born in
MD, mother born in SC”

Jesse Thom is unidentified. “G. W. Gowen was paid $13.75 for resetting 237 pannels of fencing and adding 720 new rails” April 4, 1888 by John W. Owens, guardian of Benjamin P. Gowen. George Washington Gowen apparently owned no land of his own. On April 10, 1889, he paid $1.00 poll tax and $2.10 personal property tax. Seventy cents of the personal property tax went to the county, 70 cents went to the state and 70 cents went to the schools.

George Washington Gowen received $97.34 “for repairs on Gowen place and feeding cattle and horses belonging to said minor” from John W. Owens, guardian June 11, 1892.

George Washington Gowen died at Jonesboro about 1893, un­married. James M. Herrin succeeded him as the guardian of Benjamin P. Gowen. It is believed that Minerva J. Gowen re­turned to her family in Rutherford County.

On June 6, 1885 James M. Herrin spent $18 for “repare on fense on the Going place as guardian for Ben Goins.” On September 10, 1885, James M. Herrin received a receipt for $31.50 for “repairs on well on the Goins place.” The receipts along with many other documents were placed in the guardian­ship file of Benjamin P. Gowen who inherited the 80 acres of his father. The documents deposited in the Craighead County probate files traces the ward and the property through the guardianship.

On October 5, 1885 Emma D. Frierson, teacher, gave a receipt to James. M. Herrin for “$2.00 for tuition for Ben Going.” She wrote another receipt for “$5.00, tuition in full up to December 31, 1885 for Ward, Ben Gowen.”

Caroline Gowen, [William, Jr.7, Lt. William6, John5, William4, [William3, Thomas2, Mihil1], believed to be a daughter of William Gowen and Mary “Polly” Crutchfield Gowen, was born in 1834, probably in Rutherford County. She is assumed to be the “white female, 0-5” who appeared in her mother’s household in the 1840 census of Rutherford County. She reappeared in the 1850 census of Rutherford County as a 16-year-old, attending school, in her mother’s household.

James Gowen, [William, Jr.7, Lt. William6, John5, William4, [William3, Thomas2, Mihil1], regarded as a son of William Gowen and Mary “Polly” Crutchfield Gowen, was born in 1836, probably in Rutherford County. It is unknown why he did not appear in his mother’s household in the 1840 census. He appeared in the 1850 census of her household as a 14-year-old. William Dirk Calvin, family researcher of Brentwood, Tennessee suggests that James Gowen and his brother, George Washington Gowen, served in an Arkansas infantry regiment in the Civil War.

About 1870 he was married, wife’s name, Frances C. She is believed to be Frances C. Owens, sister to John W. Owens who was later referred to as “uncle” to her son when he was named guardian. They moved to Jonesboro, Arkansas before 1870, however no Gowen individuals appeared in the 1860 census of Craighead County, according to “First U.S. Census, 1860, Craighead County, Arkansas” by Mrs. Willis Caldwell.

He was enumerated as the head of a household in the 1870 census of Craighead County, Arkansas living on the farmstead of John W. Owens, age 48, a farmer and smith who was born in Tennessee. Apparently the Owens family were neighbors to the Gowen family at LaVergne, Tennessee. It is noted that Minerva J. Gowen referred to “Jonny Owens” in her letters.

The household of James Gowen in the 1870 census of Craighead County, was listed as:

Gowen, James 34, born in Tennessee, farmer, $425 in _ personal property
Frances C. 18, born in Tennessee, wife”

John P. Goens, appeared in the 1870 census of Craighead County on August 24, 1870, living in the town of Jonesboro. Both John P. Goens and James Gowen were enumerated on the same day, suggesting that they were living in adjacent locations.

The household, No. 6-6, appeared as:

“Goens, John P. 43, born in TN, blacksmith

personal property $125

Margaret C. 33, born in GA”
“James Gowens” received a warranty deed from B. A. Elder and Mary “Mollie” Elder October 16, 1871 for 50 acres described as “the East part of Section 2 of the Northwest Quarter of Section 29, Township 14 North, Range 4 East” for $300, according to Craighead County Deed Book 14, page 192.

It is believed that both James Gowen and Frances C. Gowen died before 1875.

One son was born to them:

Benjamin P. Gowen born in 1871

Benjamin P. Gowen, [James8,William, Jr.7, Lt. William6, John5, William4, [William3, Thomas2, Mihil1], only child of James Gowen and Frances C. Gowen, was born in Craighead County in 1871. It is believed that his aunt Minerva J. Gowen referred to him in her letter of December 30, 1876 when she wrote, “Benny is growing fast.”

Apparently after the death of his parents, about 1875, his uncle, George Washington Gowen moved into the Gowen home and operated his farm.

On January 16, 1879 “Benjamin P. Gowens, minor heir of James Gowens, deceased,” received a quit claim deed from Dawson H. Thorn and Cora Thorn “to the west part of the S/2 of the NW4 of Section 29, Township 14, Range 4 East, 30 acres” for $100, according to Craighead County Deed Book 14, page 193.

Benjamin P. Gowen was enumerated at age nine as the ward of George Washington Gowen, in his household in the 1880 census of Craighead County.

Benjamin P. Gowen had inherited his father’s 80-acre farm east of Jonesboro, identified as “the south half of the northwest quarter of Section 29, Township 14, Range 4.” The farm was valued at $320 on the tax records of W. T. Lane, sheriff and tax collector in 1885. The Gowen farm is presently located inside the city limits of Jonesboro in its eastern section. Although frontage lots have been sold off, the farm is still identifiable, bounded on the north by Highland Drive, on the east by Brown’s Lane and on the south by the city limits.

When Dr. Connie Louise Gowen Hiers moved to Jonesboro in July 1985 to establish a plastic surgery practice, she purchased a home at 601 Arrowhead Drive, within 100 yards of the original homestead of James Gowen! She was not aware of the proximity of the farm until a search was made of the Craighead County deed records. When she built a surgery clinic there in 2001, her clinic was built on land which was originally included in the Gowen farm which had been subdivided

George Washington Gowen was succeeded by James M. Herrin as guardian of Benjamin P. Gowen. On June 6, 1885 James M. Herrin spent $18 for “repare on fense on the Going place as guardian for Ben Goins.” On September 10, 1885, James M. Herrin received a receipt for $31.50 for “repairs on well on the Goins place.” The receipts along with many other documents were placed in the guardianship file of Benjamin P. Gowen who inherited the 80 acres of his father. The documents deposited in the Craighead County probate files traced the ward and the property through the guardianship.

On October 5, 1885 Emma D. Frierson, teacher, gave a receipt to James M. Herrin for “$2.00 for tuition for Ben Going.” She wrote another receipt for “$5.00, tuition in full up to December 31, 1885 for Ward, Ben Gowen.”

On January 10, 1887, County Judge J. H. Edwards approved the “Fifth Settlement Report of James M. Herrin, guardian of Bennie Gowen.” The report showed a balance carried forward from the fourth report of $292.10. Rent from the farm for the year 1885 of $31.50 and rent of $18.00 for 1886 was added to the account that had a net balance of $341.60 after expenses. On the same date Benjamin P. Gowen, “having the right under the law to choose his own guardian” requested the court to appoint John W. Owens as his guardian. John W. Owens, joined by John Culberhouse, posted a $550 bond on that date to guarantee his performance as guardian.

On February 10, 1887 James M. Herrin paid taxes of $4.48 on the Gowen farm.

On January 11, 1888 he petitioned the Craighead County Probate Court, “It is the desire and wish of your petitioner, James M. Herrin to be discharged as Guardian of Bennie Gowens and that J. W. Owens be appointed in my place as Mr. Owens is a very suitable gentleman and is an uncle of my ward, Bennie Gowens.” His request was accepted, and he made a final report to the court showing assets of $266.28 belonging to the ward.

On April 6, 1888 John W. Owens paid taxes of $3.75 on the Gowen farm which was valued at $300, according to Probate Book E, page 186.

On July 11, 1888 John W. Owens made his first annual settlement report to the probate court.

John W. Owens became postmaster at Jonesboro and named Benjamin P. Gowen his assistant. On July 23, 1889 at Nettleton, Arkansas, Owens loaned his U.S. Post Office receipt pad to A. Thomas who wrote, “Received $7.50 of J. W. Owens, Guardian of B. P. Gowen, on 750 feet, board measure, for well curb.” On July 27, 1889 G. W. Phillips wrote, “Received of John W. Owens, guardian for B. P. Gowen, minor heir of James Gowen deceased $6.40 for making 64 feet wall curb at 10c per foot.”

On August 24, 1889, Owens paid M. V. Echols and G. W. Phillips $2.00 for “putting curb in well.” On August 23, 1889 he paid an additional $6.00 to J. F. Spence for “cleaning out and repairing well.” “Mr. J. W. Owens for Ben” received a statement for “1 well rope, $1.85 and 30 lbs. of wire nails, $1.50” from H. Watson August 1, 1989. H. Watson of Jonesboro dealt in “General Hard-ware, Tin-Ware and Farming Implements, Etc,” according to his printed billhead.

The farm of Benjamin P. Gowen produced $35.00 rent plus he received an accumulated interest account of $42.21 to September 11, 1889. After expenses of $30.95 were deducted, the ward had a net worth of $330.56.

On April 9, 1890 John W. Owens paid taxes of $5.40, evenly divided among state, county and school, for the Gowen farm. Net worth stood at $369.11 on that date. He paid $5.40 taxes again on April 9, 1891.

On April 12, 1892 John W. Owens made final settlement report to the probate court.

On July 5, 1892 Benjamin P. Gowen attained his majority and received final settlement from his guardian, “Received of John W. Owens $247.32 in full of all amounts and demands due me to date on last and final settlement as my guardian filed at the April term of the Probate Court of Craighead County.” Judge W. A. Maywood accepted the accounting and dismissed the guardian.

Benjamin P. Gowen, “age 21, of Jonesboro,” was married by J. M. Robertson, minister of Jonesboro Baptist Church September 22, 1892 to Lillie J. Carpenter, “age 17, of Jonesboro,” according to Craighead County Marriage Book E, page 200.

Benjamin P. Gowen and wife Lillie J. Gowen gave a warranty deed to A. J. Heath to 10 acres of his inherited property described as the “SW4 of the SW4 of the NW4 in Section 29, Township 14 North, Range 4 East” on November 2, 1893 for $100, according to Craighead County Deed Book 11, page 534.

On December 27, 1893 Benjamin P. Gowen and Lillie J. Carpenter Gowen gave a warranty deed to John W. Owens for their remaining 70 acres for $600, according to Craighead County Deed Book 16, page 8. The land was described as, “the southeast quarter of the northwest quarter and the northwest quarter of the southwest quarter of the northwest quarter of Section 29, Township 14 North, Range 4 East.” Perhaps this sale was in preparation for the Gowen couple to remove from Jonesboro.

A child was born to Benjamin P. Gowen and Lillie J. Carpenter Gowen March 7, 1895 in Adams County, Indiana, according to “Indiana Birth Records Index, 1880-1920,” Book H-3, page 32.

In 1894 and in 1897 John W. Owens was serving as Craighead County Clerk in the Jonesboro courthouse.

On September 28, 1898 John W. Owens and his wife Nannie E. Owens sold “a half acre from the Gowen farm” to B. K. Turner for $900, according to Craighead County Deed Book 16, page 562. It is believed that he was conveying the Gowen residence to Turner.

Names of children born to Benjamin P. Gowen and Lillie J. Carpenter Gowen are unknown.

Years later, Benjamin P. Gowen, feeling a debt of gratitude to his Aunt Minerva J. Gowen for helping to raise him, came to LaVergne for the purpose of erecting a monument at her grave. When he arrived at the front gate of the Gowen home, he explained his mission to his Uncle John J. Gowen, according to a letter written March 20, 1972 by Myra Luster Fleming Gardner.

“You’re a little early,” the uncle replied. “That’s her settin’ there rockin’ on the porch.”

John S. Gowen, assumed to be a son of William Gowen and his first wife, was born in 1797 in Tennessee, probably Davidson County. It is believed that his father died about 1827 in Rutherford County and that John S. Gowen continued to live there.

He was married in 1850 to the wife of Alfred P. Gowen, his kinsman. They were enumerated in the 1850 census of Barry County as Household No. 296:

“Gowen, John S. 53, born in TN, farmer, married within the year
Elizabeth 45, born in VA, illiterate, married within the year
Mary A. 25, born in TN, illiterate, married within the year
Elias 19, born in TN, married within the year”

It is believed that John S. Gowen died before the end of the decade because Elizabeth S. “Betsy” Lowe Gowen was listed as a widow in the 1860 census of Barry County.

Children born to John S. Gowen are believed to include:

Elias Gowen born in 1831
Sarah C. Gowen born in 1854

Elias Gowen, assumed to be a son of John S. Gowen, was born in Tennessee, probably Rutherford County, in 1831. He was married about 1850, wife’s name Mary A. They appeared living in the household of his father in 1850 and were recorded as “married within the year” by the enumerator. Nothing more is known of Elias Gowen, Mary A. Gowen or their descendants.

Sarah C. Gowen, daughter of Elizabeth S. “Betsy” Lowe Gowen and one of her husbands, was born in Tennessee in 1854. She was enumerated in the 1860 census of Barry County as a six-year-old living in her mother’s household.

Alfred P. Gowen, son of Lt. William Gowen and Martha “Patsy” Rains Gowen, was born in 1795 in Tennessee, according to the Rutherford County census of 1850. He first appeared in the legal records of Rutherford County June 21, 1819 when he witnessed a transfer of a certificate of survey, according to Rutherford County Court Minute Book N, page 210. On April 1, 1820 he was sued for $6.75 by George R. Nash, county jailer, who had “released to Alfred P. Gowen one William Barfield on a writ of capias ad respondem.”

On September 25, 1822 “Alfred T. Gowen” was commissioned First Major in the 53rd Regiment of the Tennessee State Militia in Rutherford County. On April 3, 1824, Alfred P. Gowen was promoted to lieutenant-colonel and named commandant of the 53rd Regiment.

John C. Gowan, unidentified was commissioned a captain in the 22nd Regiment of Tennessee State Militia in Rutherford County September 2, 1826.

On October 24, 1823, January 21, 1824 and January 28, 1824 Alfred P. Gowen was summoned to serve on the Rutherford County grand jury, according to Rutherford County Minute Book E, page 135. He was surety in the marriage of Tolbert Mayfield to Elizabeth Johnston September 29, 1824 in Rutherford County. Logan Henderson, justice of the peace, per-formed the ceremony.

In the inventory of the estate of Walter “Watt” Lowe, deceased, who left property valued at $1,298.11 on March 10, 1827 Alfred P. Gowen, brother-in-law, was believed to be among those indebted to the estate. Assets included notes signed by “Youree & Gowens, Crowder & Gowens, Williams & Gowens, Suttons & Gowens, White & Gowen, J. & E. Gowen, Wadkins & Gowen, Lark & Gowen and Lowe & Gowen.”

On July 20, 1827 Alfred P. Gowen, plaintiff sued Robert Barton in Case No. 53 over the sale of a sorrel horse, according to Rutherford County Court Minute Book V, page 43. “The court found in favor of the plaintiff and assessed $90 in damages and court costs of $20.23.”

On October 27, 1827 “Alfred P. Gowen, sheriff” won a judgment of $112.23 in a suit against “William Thomas, Bartlett Anderson, John Doak and Samuel S. Wilson,” according to Rutherford County Deed Book V, page 101.

On December 18, 1827 he was surety for the marriage of Alfred S. Harbin and Henrietta Lowe, daughter of John Lowe and his future sister-in-law. The Harbins later moved to Barry County, Missouri about 1840 and influenced Elizabeth S. “Betsy” Lowe Gowen to move there 16 years later. Alfred S. Harbin served as state representative in the Missouri Legislature during the 1840s and 1850s. Alfred S. Harbin died near Austin, Texas in 1867, according to the research of W. B. Landers of Massachusetts.

Alfred P. Gowen received a jury summons on four occasions in January 1829, according to Rutherford County Court Minute Book E, pages 199, 246, 249 and 250.

John F. Howland deeded 326 acres to “A. P. Gowen and Mary Howland” in 1829, according to Rutherford County Deed Book V, page 428. Sheriff A. P. Gowen” was referred to again in a deed dated in February 1830, according to Rutherford County Deed Book W, page 184. He left the sheriff’s office to run for the Tennessee House of Representatives.

Alfred P. Gowen, at age 34, was married January 14, 1829 to Elizabeth S. “Betsy” Lowe, age 22, born in Fairfax County, Virginia in 1807, according to Rutherford County Marriage Book 1804-1872, page 63. She was the daughter of John Lowe and “Miss Sutton.” He was one of two brothers who came to Rutherford County in 1812. In December 1971 Arlee Claud Gowen visited with Alvin Estell Lowe, an octogenarian and a great-great-grandson of John Lowe, who was planning a memorial to the pioneer members of the Lowe family. The marriage was performed by Jesse Stovall, J.P. Levi Reeves and Richard Allman were sureties.

The newly married couple appeared in the 1830 Rutherford County census, page 84, as one of the five Gowen households listed in the county. He was shown as the owner of 11 slaves. The enumeration read:

“Gowen, A. P. white male 30-40
white female 20-30”

Alfred P. Gowen was elected to the Tennessee House of Representatives in the 19th and 20th assemblies and served from 1831 to 1835 as a representative from Rutherford County. In 1975 Tennessee State Archives requested from the public any available data on Alfred P. Gowen for inclusion in a biography of the state legislature then in preparation. In response Arlee Claud Gowen submitted a sketch on him.

On August 11, 1832, “A. P. Gowen and Mary Howland” sold 326 acres of land to Washington Gibson and Henry Hoover for $500, according to Rutherford County Deed Book X, page 326. In 1835 he joined “William Gowen,” believed to be his half-brother, in deeding land to Jackson Fleming, according to Rutherford County Deed Book V, page 232.

Capt. John Rains, grandfather of Alfred P. Gowen died March 15, 1834, and the grandson was named administrator of the estate. In the probate proceedings Alfred P. Gowen was referred to as the only heir of Martha “Patsy” Rains Gowen. He received 1/11 of Rains Station and a lot in the city of Nashville and other valuables from the estate.

In 1836 Alfred P. Gowen owned land astride the Rutherford-Cannon County line and was a taxpayer in both counties. On April 15, 1836 “Alfred P. Gowen of Cannon County” was appointed to a committee to layout a road running into Woodbury, Tennessee, the county seat. On June 6, 1836 he was appointed to help develop a road to Murphreesboro, Tennessee. He was also named to other road committees on June 7, 1836 and July 4, 1836 in Cannon County. On November 19, 1836 he was named on a Cannon County jury panel.

In 1836 he was named as administrator of the estate of John Lowe, his father-in-law, and in that capacity on November 23, 1838 he sold to Col. William Lowe, his wife’s uncle, two slave children from the estate. Sold were “Willis, age 6, and Jack, age 4, for $600,” according to Rutherford County Deed Book X, page 138.

The household of Alfred P. Gowen and Elizabeth S. “Betsy” Lowe Gowen appeared in the 1840 census of Rutherford County as:

“Gowen, Alfred P. white male 40-50
white female 30-40
white male 20-30
white female 15-20
white male 10-15
white female 10-15
white male 0-5”

Eleven slaves were shown in the enumeration, making a total of 18 in the household, six employed in agriculture. Adjoining were the households of Walter S. Lowe, his nephew, single, age 30; and James Lowe, unidentified, age 20-30 with three children all under five.

Misfortune overtook Alfred P. Gowen in 1840 because he was forced to liquidate his holdings to settle four judgments against him involving 19 notes signed by him and Walter S. Lowe.

On July 2, 1840 he deeded to Gilliam & Fulks “upon the payment of $5, five hundred eighteen acres which William Gowen originally held in Rutherford County” and also the tract partly in Rutherford County and partly in Cannon County of 104 acres, and also slaves, Tom, about 37; Jude, 45; Adeline, 17; Silvy, 16; Jude, 47; Mely, 20; Dick, 47; Cabit, 60; Fanny, 40; Jack 13; and Ned, 17,” according to Rutherford County Deed Book Y, page 62.

This transaction was forced “because Alfred P. Gowen is in­debted to William Gilliam by four different judgments, three at $195.62 and one for $115.23, and all are stayed by Walter S. Lowe as security until September 1, 1840.”

On January 7, 1842 his troubles were apparently continuing because he sold one-half interest in 100 acres on Cripple Creek to Rubin Todd for $248, according to Rutherford County Deed Book Y, pages 120 and 143 and Deed Book Z, page 100. On February 2, 1842 he deeded 24 acres of land to Wal­ter S. Lowe for $75, according to Rutherford County Deed Book Z, page 144. In 1844 he deeded land “for Thyatire church” to David Patton, according to Cannon County Deed Book D, page 539.

A few years later, with the help of Walter S. Lowe, Alfred P. Gowen apparently regained some of his Rutherford County land. This he later sold to William H. Murry for $1,266, according to Rutherford County Deed Book Y, page 144 and Book Z, page 146. The land was described as “the tract of land known as William Gowen’s old place where Alfred P. Gowen now resides, 525 acres more or less.”

Billy J. Norman wrote:

“Walter S. Lowe was married October 28, 1840 to Nancy Malvina Amanda Norman who was born October 21, 1821. She was my great-grandfather’s sister. She was remarried November 25, 1847 to James C. Gill. She died November 1, 1852 at the age of 31.”

Children born to Walter S. Lowe and Nancy Malvina Amanda Norman Lowe include:

James H. B. Lowe born September 3, 1841
Elizabeth Lowe born November 9, 1843

In 1849 Alfred P. Gowen owned 125 acres of land, valued at $200, on which he paid 38c advalorem tax to Rutherford County. He was the only Gowen taxpayer listed in the Big Spring District.

On November 2, 1850 his household was enumerated in the Rutherford County census, page 212. The family, living in the May District near Murfreesboro, included:

“Gowen, Alfred P. 55, born in TN, farmer
Elizabeth 43, born in VA
Martha 15, born in TN
Burrell A. 12, born in TN
Walter L. 9, born in TN
Amanda Henrietta 3, born in TN
May E. 1, born in TN

Only two other Gowen householders were counted in the 1850 census of Rutherford County: Mary “Polly” Crutchfield Gowen, 58, page 212, May District and Catherine Gowen, [unidentified] 55, Page 323, May District.

Although Elizabeth S. “Betsy” Lowe Gowen was enumerated in the household of Alfred P. Gowen in the 1850 census of Rutherford County, she also appeared in the household of John S. Gowen, believed to be a kinsman of Alfred P. Gowen in the 1850 census of Barry County, Missouri.

According to Alvin Estell Lowe, Elizabeth S. “Betsy” Lowe Gowen suddenly and mysteriously removed to “somewhere in Missouri” before the death of Alfred P. Gowen. He suggested that “John S. Gowen influenced Betsy to run away with him.” Descendants of Elizabeth “Betsy” Lowe Gowen have, through the years, questioned this report.

Missouri descendants related that Elizabeth S. “Betsy” Lowe Gowen arrived in Missouri a widow, “her husband having died en route.” There is a strong suggestion that Alfred P. Gowen did not die in 1850 and survived for another six years. William B. Landers, a descendant of Pocasset, Massachusetts wrote October 16, 1995 that Alfred P. Gowen died December 25, 1856 in Tennessee.

His place of burial is unknown, but it is believed that he was buried on his father’s homestead. Manta Frost McCary, a granddaughter, in her “Remembrances” stated that when the family made the move to Missouri in 1856 that Alfred P. Gowen remained behind to attend to business. “He traveled three days with the family and then started back home. “He became suddenly ill, and seeing that he would not live, gave the family where he was staying his horse and saddle to take the body back to the old home.”

If Alfred P. Gowen died on Christmas Day, 1856, then the “remembrance” of Manta Frost McCary that he died in July 1856 while his family was en route to Missouri is questionable.

Martha Sarah Kelton Lowe received “a gift of handkerchief from Aunt Betsy Gowen after she removed to Missouri.” De­scendants also report that Martha Sarah Kelton Lowe purchased a cherrywood table with money paid to her by “Aunt Betsy Gowen for pulling fodder on the Gowen farm.”

When the enumerator took the 1850 census of the household of John S. Gowen he noted that he and Elizabeth S. “Betsy” Lowe Gowen Gowen were “married within the year.” The household, No. 296, was recorded as:

“Gowen, John S. 53, born in TN, farmer,
married within the year
Elizabeth 45, born in VA, illiterate,
married within the year
Mary A. 25, born in TN, illiterate,
married within the year
Elias 19, born in TN, married
within the year”

Elias Gowen, believed to be a son of John S. Gowen, and Mary A. Gowen were also “married within the year.”

Alfred P. Gowen died sometime before April 1857 without leaving a will. Alfred P. Lowe, believed to be a nephew, was appointed by the court as administrator of the estate on April 14, 1857. His report to the court, dated June 20, 1857 read:

“A. P. Gowen, Dcsd. The affects of A. P. Gowen: Money found in the hand of John Land, 38 cents; One note, 17 dollars and 97 cents against Daniel Bullard given in 1857, Insolvent; 2 notes against James Mangham, one for two dollars and the other for 50 cents given in 1843, Insolvent; 2 notes again Isham Pelham due in 1850 for twenty dol­lars cash, Insolvent; 1 note against Lewis Shipp for 23 dollars & 81 cents due in 1838, [Collected $10.40]; one note on David Paton for $6.40 due in 1843 [Collected]; one note on R. W. Lowe for Ten dollars due the 30th of Jany. 1858, Good; One note on Allen Jarnigan payable when A. P. Gowen Receives his the said Jarnigan’s land [illegible word] with other conditions & Insolvent for $25.00 this 20th day of June 1837.
A. P. Lowe, Adm.
of A. P. Gowen, Dec’d”

The above document was recorded June 30, 1857 by County Court Clerk John Jones in the Rutherford County Courthouse.

By 1860 Elizabeth S. “Betsy” Lowe Gowen Gowen, again a widow, had brought the remainder of her children to Missouri to live with her. Her household, No. 283-277, was enumerated June 12, 1860 in Sugar Creek Township, near Washburn Prairie, Missouri as:

“Gowen, E. 50, born in VA, $2,000 real
estate, $1,000 personal
property
Burrel A. 22, born in TN, farmer
M. L. 19, born in TN
Fanny N. 13, born in TN
Mary E. 10, born in TN
Sarah C. 6, born in TN”

[It is believed that “Fanny N. Gowen” above was actually Amanda Henrietta Gowen.

In an adjoining household, No. 284-278, was the family of her daughter, Martha A. Gowen Arnold enumerated as:

“Arnold, John G. 26, born in TN, farmer
Martha R. 22, born in TN
Frances C. 3/12, born in Missouri”

Elizabeth S. “Betsy” Lowe Gowen Gowen had returned to Tennessee for the birth of Sarah C. Gowen or else the censustaker erred in the place of her birth. The 1870 census enumeration for Elizabeth S. “Betsy” Lowe Gowen, when found, might give additional information.

In the census of 1880 the household of Elizabeth S. “Betsy” Lowe Gowen Gowen appeared on June 18, 1880 in Sugar Creek Township, Barry County, Missouri, Enumeration District 6, page 33 as:

“Gowen, Elizabeth 72, born in VA, widow, father
born ?, mother born ?
Smithey, Clay 25, born in TN, son-in-law
Amanda 30, born in TN, daughter,
father born in VA,
mother born in VA.
Arnold, Albert 18, born in MO, grandson,
father born in TN,
mother born in TN.
Fannie 20, born in MO, grand-
daughter, father born in
TN, mother born in TN
Colmore 2, born in MO, grandson,
father born in TN,
mother born in TN”

Elizabeth S. “Betsy” Lowe Gowen Gowen died November 25, 1889 at age 80 in Barry County, according to William B. Lan­ders. Her place of burial is unknown.

Children born to Alfred P. Gowen and Elizabeth S. “Betsy” Lowe Gowen include:

Martha Rains Gowen born August 18, 1835
Burrell Allen Gowen born in 1838
Walter L[owe?] Gowen born in 1841
Amanda Henrietta Gowen born in 1847
Mary E. Gowen born in 1849
Sarah Christianna Gowen born July 6, 1853

Martha Rains Gowen, daughter of Alfred P. Gowen and Eliza­beth S. “Betsy” Lowe Gowen, was born August 18, 1835 in Rutherford County. She was a namesake of her grandmother. She appeared in the 1840 census of her father’s household as “white female, 10-15,” and she reappeared in the 1850 census of Rutherford County as a 15-year-old. She was married April 1, 1859 to John B. Arnold, according to William B. Landers. He was born about 1834 in Tennessee.

They appeared in the 1860 census of Barry County, Missouri. The household, No. 284-278, shown as adjoining that of her mother in Sugar Creek Township, was rendered on June 21, 1860 as:

“Arnold, John B. 26, farmer, born in TN
Martha R. 22, born in TN
Frances C. 3/12, born in MO”

John B. Arnold was killed January 16, 1863 near Washburn.

The 1870 census of Barry County should give additional in­formation on the Arnolds. Following the death of John B. Arnold, she was remarried October 6, 1872 to John G. Harbin, nephew of Alfred S. Harbin. The marriage was performed by Daniel K. McClure, J. P.

John G. Harbin was born in 1815 in Rutherford County. His first wife, Nancy A. Pallett Harbin had died before 1865, according to Gayle Wilcox.

In 1880 her children were enumerated in the home of their grandmother, Elizabeth S. “Betsy” Lowe Gowen Gowen. John G. Harbin died in 1881 in Barry County.

Martha Rains Gowen Arnold Harbin died February 14, 1913. Her obituary was found in a scrapbook bought at the estate sale of Vivian Roller by Ted W. Roller

“Good Citizen and Mother Gone

Time has again stepped into our midst and carried off one of our best citizens, loved and respected by all who had the pleasure of her acquaintance. Her good face made sunshine in a shady place. If strangers felt the charm of her courtesy and joyous, sunny temperament, how much more so the members of her own family, upon whom she lavished all the sweet earnestness and careful culture of her mind and nature. Strong and potent was the influence of this loving heart, which bestowed with good so generously. The spirit of her love was not weakness, but strength. Gently, almost unconsciously, it coerced those coming in contact with it, to strive for, if not to attain the realization of her high ideal.

Mrs. Martha (Gowan) Harbin died suddenly at the home of her grandson, C. S. Arnold, 4 3/4 miles out on the Washburn road, Friday night, February 14, 1913, of acute indigestion and heart failure, aged 77 years, 7 months and 28 days.

She was born in Rutherford County, Tennessee August 18, 1835, and was a daughter of the late Mr. A. P. and Mrs. Elizabeth Gowan, who came to Barry county, Oct. 10, 1856, and located near Washburn. In 1859, she and the late John B. Arnold were married, and two children were born of this marriage, who are: J. A. Arnold, residing between Cassville and Exeter and Mrs. J. M. Mitchell of near Seligman. Mr. Arnold was killed near Washburn, Jan 16, 1863. In 1872, she and the late John G. Harbin of near Washburn, were married, and he died in 1881.

She was a sister of B. A. Gowan [Burrell Allen Gowen] of near Washburn, and the late Mr. Wm. Northcutt [Mrs. Mary E. Gowen Northcutt and Mrs. P. M. Frost [Sarah Christianna Gowen Frost.]

Since that time, she has made her home a part of the time on her farm near the Vanzandt school house, with her son, daughter and grandson. She had no enemies that we ever heard of, but enjoyed the good will and was held in the highest esteem by everybody.

Rev. Wardell of the M. E. Church, South, of which she had been a member for many years, conducted funeral services Sunday morning at the home of her grandson, after which the remains were laid to rest, in the Roller cemetery near Seligman, Sunday afternoon, Rev. Carter concluding the services at the grave.”

“Barry County Missouri Cemeteries” shows that Martha Rains Gowen Arnold Harbin is buried at Kings/Roller cemetery along with her second husband, John Harbin and his first wife, Nancy A. Harbin.

The Harbin family came to Southwest Missouri in 1845. The John G. Harbin home, one mile south of Washburn was the last stop in Missouri before entering Arkansas, for the Butterfield Stage Coach mail route. A historical marker on highway 37 now stands on the old home site.

Her burial place is unknown. Children born to her and John G. Harbin are unknown.

Children born to John B. Arnold and Martha R. Gowen Arnold include:

Frances C. “Fannie” Arnold born March 15, 1860
J. Albert Arnold born in 1862

Frances C. “Fannie” Arnold, daughter of John B. Arnold and Martha R. Gowen Arnold, was born in March 1860 in Barry County. She appeared as a three-month-old infant in the 1860 census enumeration. In the 1880 census she, at age 20, was the mother of Colmore “Col” Arnold, a son who was born November 1, 1876. Frances C. “Fannie” Arnold was married May 28, 1882 to James Monroe Mitchell, son of Joel Mitchell and Rosanna Simpson Mitchell who was born September 19, 1857 at Seligman. They lived initially in a two-room log cabin built by Joel Mitchell. In the summer of 1887, James Monroe Mitchell built a new home for his family, according to Gayle Wilcox.

Frances C. “Fannie” Arnold Mitchell died March 8, 1924 at Seligman. James Monroe Mitchell died there April 12, 1939.

Children born to James Monroe Mitchell and Frances C. “Fannie” Arnold Mitchell include:

Burrel Pleasant Mitchell born March 5, 1883
Jennie Pearl Mitchell born August 4, 1889
James Walter Mitchell born November 23, 1892

Additionally James Monroe Mitchell and Frances C. “Fannie” Arnold Mitchell reared Bill Brummett and Jim Brummett and John Pallett, Bill Pallett, Frank Pallett and Burt Pallett.

Colmore S. “Col” Arnold, son of Frances C. “Fannie” Arnold was born November 21, 1876. He was married December 23, 1896 to Mary Anna McClure, daughter of Thomas J. McClure, according to Gayle Wilcox. He died at his home February 13, 1915 “of pneumonia and heart trouble” at age 38.

His obituary appeared in the local newspaper:

“Died at his home 4 7/8 miles out on Washburn road, February 13, 1915, Colmore S. Arnold, aged 38 years, 2 months and 23 days, of pneumonia and heart trouble. He was born near Washburn and grew to manhood in the neighborhood where he died. He was born November 21, 1876.

In the death of Col Arnold we fully realize the loss to his family, the neighborhood and county. He was a true friend, and his devotion to those he loved would make a bright chapter in any life. Nothing but the thought of the loving hand that has removed him can reconcile his relatives and many friends to his absence. While he has gone from the scenes, the conflicts, the sorrows and pleasures of this life, he will live in the hearts of those who knew him best.

His retiring nature led him to hide his best qualities from public gaze, but they were revealed to those who enjoyed his acquaintance, yet it was in his home that his true worth was most conspicuous. He was a devoted husband and a loving father and was devoted to the family circle.

He was a man that commanded the respect and esteem of everybody that had the pleasure of his acquaintance. His word was his bond. His honesty and honor had never been questioned.

As a testimony of the high regard in which he was held by the citizenship of the south end of Barry county, never have we seen a more representative body of people assemble to pay the last respects to a departed friend, than met Monday at his funeral services at Exeter, conducted very feelingly by Rev. E. W. Love of this city. There were citizens from Seligman, Washburn and Cassville and the country between these places.

He was married December 23, 1896, to Miss Annie McClure, a daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Thomas. McClure old and highly respected citizens of this county, who resided near him. To this union was born one daughter Miss Lois, on September. 18, 1897, who both survive him.”
“Barry County Missouri Cemeteries” shows that Colmore S. “Col” Arnold and wife Mary Ann McClure Arnold are buried at Maplewood Cemetery.

Children born to them include:

Lois Arnold born September 18, 1897

Lois Arnold, daughter of Colmore “Col” Arnold and Anna McClure Arnold, was born in 1897. She was married about 1917 to Frank Miller of Texas. In October 1981 Lois Arnold Miller continued to live in Cassville, Missouri.

Children born to them include:

Eugene Miller born about 1919
Colmore “Bing” Miller born about 1922
Joe Miller born about 1925

Burrel Pleasant Mitchell, son of James Monroe Mitchell and Frances C. “Fannie” Arnold Mitchell, was born March 5, 1887 in the two-room log cabin build by his grandfather, Joel Mitchell. He was married to Artie Caroline Rubow, daughter of William Rubow and Hannah Rubow October 30, 1909. She was born August 29, 1886 in Iowa.

“Burl and Artie lived on the family farm until 1944 when they moved to the town of Seligman. Burl farmed until 1929 and then went to work for Seligman Farmers Exchange. He worked there until 1945. He was appointed Seligman Postmaster in March 1945 and served as postmaster until his retirement on March 31, 1957. Burl was ordained a deacon as a young man in Big Spring Baptist Church north of Seligman and continued as a deacon in the First Baptist Church at Seligman.”

He died March 24, 1962 in Barry County, according to Gayle Wilcox. His wife died November 22, 1962.

Children born to them include:

Earl Frank Mitchell born August 1, 1910
William Monroe Mitchell born September 6, 1912
Charlie James Mitchell born March 23, 1914
Alice Pauline Mitchell born about 1917
Clyde Gordon Mitchell born March 24, 1922
Erma Jean Mitchell born December 12, 1926

Earl Frank Mitchell, son of Burrell Pleasant Mitchell and Artie Caroline Robow, Mitchell, was born August 1, 1910 in Barry County. He was married to Lucy Anderson in June of 1927. He died there October 4, 1965.

Children born to them include:

Robert F. Mitchell born about 1929
Lavenna Belle Mitchell born about 1932
Willis Ray Mitchell born January 10, 1940

William Monroe Mitchell, son of Burrell Pleasant Mitchell and Artie Caroline Robow, Mitchell, was born September 6, 1912. He died June 6, 1918.

Charlie James Mitchell, son of Burrell Pleasant Mitchell and Artie Caroline Robow, Mitchell, was born March 23, 1914. He enlisted in the U.S. Army during World War II and was killed in Sicily August 7, 1943. Charlie James Mitchell was the first soldier from Barry County killed during World War II.

Alice Pauline Mitchell, daughter of Burrell Pleasant Mitchell and Artie Caroline Robow Mitchell, was born about 1917. She was married July 28, 1942 to John Padgett. In October 1981 Alice Pauline Mitchell Padgett lived near Billings, Missouri.

Clyde Gordon Mitchell, son of Burrell Pleasant Mitchell and Artie Caroline Robow, Mitchell, was born March 24, 1922 in Barry County. He served in the U.S. Air Force from 1941 to 1945 during World War II. He was married November 29, 1945 in Seligman to Loretta Jean Smith, daughter of Thomas Smith and Eva Gemmecke Smith. In October 1981 Clyde Mitchell was president of the bank at Seligman, Missouri. He was mayor of Seligman at that time. He died there November 28, 1998 and was buried in Seligman Cemetery.

Children born to Clyde Gordon Mitchell and Loretta Jean Smith Mitchell include:

Burrell Benton Mitchell born about 1948
Charlie James Mitchell II born about 1958
Sandra Jean Mitchell born about 1963
Mary Jane Mitchell born about 1965

Erma Jean Mitchell, daughter of Burrell Pleasant Mitchell and Artie Caroline Robow, Mitchell, was born December 12, 1926 at Seligman. She was married January 5, 1945 to Walter Fred Preston, son of William Preston and Helen Montgomery Preston. He was born in Barry County November 21, 1925. In 1946 she was a clerk at the Seligman post office. In 1972 she became postmistress at Exeter, Missouri.

Children born to them include:

Phillip Randal Preston born November 14, 1950
Johanna Preston born February 24, 1960

Jennie Pearl Mitchell, daughter of James Monroe Mitchell and Frances C. “Fannie” Arnold Mitchell, was born August 4, 1889 in Seligman. She was enumerated in the 1900 census of her father’s household in Sugarcreek township. She was married about 1916 to Ernest Webb who was born in Benton County, Arkansas in 1883. He died at Pea Ridge, Arkansas in January 1971, and she died there in July 1977.

Children born to them include:

Ora Webb born about 1919
Mitchell Webb born about 1921
Olen Webb born about 1924
May Lou Webb born about 1928

James Walter Mitchell, son of James Monroe Mitchell and Frances C. “Fannie” Arnold Mitchell, was born November 23, 1892 on a farm north of Seligman. He was married to Bessie Prudence Webb September 27, 1914 in Mayflower, Missouri. She was born December 31, 1894 in Pea Ridge, Arkansas to Tolbert Webb and Ada Patterson Webb.

JamesWalter Mitchell died at Seligman September 5, 1983, and she died there February 27, 1991. They were buried in King Cemetery. Children born to them include:

Burl Hugh Mitchell born August 1, 1915
Carl Webb Mitchell born September 10, 1917
Adah Frances Mitchell born March 25, 1921
Anna Ruth Mitchell born May 4, 1923
Mary Sue Mitchell born June 25, 1938

J. Albert Arnold, son of John B. Arnold and Martha R. Gowen Arnold, was born in 1862 in Barry County. He appeared in the 1880 census of Barry County as an 18-year-old living in the home of his grandmother, Elizabeth S. “Betsy” Lowe Gowen. Of this individual nothing more is known.

Burrell Allen Gowen, son of Alfred P. Gowen and Elizabeth S. “Betsy” Lowe Gowen, was born in 1838 in Rutherford County. His first name, possibly a shortened form of “Burleson,” which frequently appeared in the Gowen family in middle Tennessee.

He appeared in the 1840 census of his father’s household in Rutherford County as a “white male, 0-5” and reappeared in the 1850 census as a 12-year-old. He joined his mother in Barry County in the 1850s and appeared there on June 21, 1860 in the household of his mother in the 1860 census as a 22-year-old farmer.

During the Civil War he served the Confederacy. A grandson, Billy Blaine Gowen in April 1973 retained the musket carried by his grandfather in combat.

On an unknown date Burrell Allen Gowen was married to Sally Truelove January 11, 1872, according to W. B. Landers of Cape Cod, Massachuetts. Descendants report that Sally Truelove Gowen during the Civil War chopped off the hand of a Union soldier who threatened to break into their smokehouse. After her death and burial in Truelove Cemetery, Burrell Allen Gowen was remarried to Nancy Jane Durham, probably in Barry County. The couple settled on a farm about four miles northwest of Seligman, believed to be the point where his mother lived when she arrived from Tennessee.

Burrell Allen Gowen, a horse fancier, raised blooded horses on his farm which was noted for having a strong spring of water located on it. He died July 1, 1918 and was probably buried in the King Cemetery on Highway 37 between Seligman and Washburn, Missouri.

Children born to Burrell Allen Gowen and Sarah Truelove Gowen are unknown. Four children were born to Burrell Allen Gowen and Nancy Jane Durham Gowen, all after his sixtieth birthday:

William Durham Gowen born July 12, 1898
James Walter Gowen born March 23, 1890
Margaret Elizabeth Gowen born about 1900
Mary Etta Gowen born about 1902

William Durham “Willie” Gowen, son of Burrell Allen Gowen and Nancy Jane Durham Gowen, was born July 12, 1898 in Barry County. About 1920 he was married to Stella Mabel Webb who was born in Barry County January 6, 1898. He op­erated a farm about four miles north of Seligman most of his life. He died January 20, 1968. In 1973 Stella Mabel Webb Gowen continued to make her home at Washburn.

Children born to them include:

Bernard Wayne Gowen born November 1, 1922
Billy Blaine Gowen born June 14, 1924
Adella Jane Gowen born July 17, 1933

Bernard Wayne Gowen, son of William Durham “Willie” Gowen and Stella Mabel Webb Gowen, was born November 1, 1922 in Barry County. He was a storekeeper in Purdy, Missouri until his death February 23, 1970.

Billy Blaine Gowen, son of William Durham “Willie” Gowen and Stella Mabel Webb Gowen, was born June 14, 1924 in Barry County, Missouri. He was graduated from the University of Arkansas in 1951. In April 1973 he was employed by Boeing Aircraft Corporation and lived in Wichita, Kansas at 1021 Apache Street.

Adella Jane Gowen, daughter of William Durham “Willie” Gowen and Stella Mabel Webb Gowen, was born July 17, 1933 in Barry County. On May 16, 1953 she was married to Billy Horner. In April 1973 the couple lived on Route Two, Cassville, Missouri, where he operated a wholesale oil business.

Children born to them include:

David Horner born about 1963

James Walter Gowen, son of Burrell Allen Gowen and Nancy Jane Durham Gowen, was born March 23, 1890 in Barry County, Missouri. He did not marry and throughout his life farmed near Seligman. He attended school only two years, and although he was considered illiterate, managed his affairs in a very practical way, according to his nephew, Billy Blaine Gowen. He died February 23, 1969 and was buried in Barry County.

Margaret Elizabeth Gowen, daughter of Burrell Allen Gowen and Nancy Jane Durham Gowen, was born about 1900. She did not marry, but spent her adult life keeping house for her brother, James Walter Gowen. She died February 23, 1969 and was buried in Barry County.

Mary Etta Gowen, daughter of Burrell Allen Gowen and Nancy Jane Durham Gowen, was born about 1902 in Barry County. About 1922 she was married to Veril McGlothlin. The couple lived in Barry County until her death December 17, 1971. Veril McGlothlin in April 1973 lived at 833 South Green Street, Wichita.

Children born to them include:

Irene McGlothlin born about 1925

Irene McGlothlin, daughter of Veril McGlothlin and Mary Etta Gowen McGlothlin, was born about 1925 in Barry County. About 1950 she was married to a brother of Billy Horner. In April 1973 and in October 1981 they lived at Cassville, Mis­souri where she was a member of the Board of Education and of the Baptist Church.

Children born to Irene McGlothlin Horner include:

Joe Horner born about 1952
Burrel Horner born about 1954
Holly Horner born about 1957

Walter L[owe?] Gowen, son of Alfred P. Gowen and Elizabeth S. “Betsy” Lowe Gowen, was born in 1841 in Rutherford County. He appeared in his father’s household in the 1850 census as a nine-year-old. He joined his mother in Barry County during the 1850s and appeared in the 1860 census there in his mother’s household as a 19-year-old. Of this individual nothing more is known.

Amanda Henrietta Gowen, daughter of Alfred P. Gowen and Elizabeth S. “Betsy” Lowe Gowen, was born in 1847 in Rutherford County. She appeared in the 1850 census in her father’s household as a three-year-old. She did not appear in the 1860 census of her mother’s household in Barry County.

On September 7, 1879, she was married in Barry County to Henry Clay Smithey, a Tennesseean. He was born to James Smithey and Jane Ruth Matthews Smithey October 5, 1854. They had another child Margaret Smithey who was born February 25, 1856. She died December 5, 1928, according to Billey Smithey.

In the 1880 census they were living in the household of her mother in Barry County, Missouri. The age of Clay Smithey was recorded as 25, and the age of Amanda Henrietta Gowen Smithey was recorded as 30. They later “moved to Texas,” according to Stella Mabel Webb Gowen. Amanda Henrietta Gowen Smithey died June 21, 1896 in Fannin County, Texas.

After the death of Amanda Henrietta Gowen Smith, Henry Clay Smithey was married to Martha Adeline Pryor January 16, 1898.

Henry Clay Smithey died August 3, 1937 at age 82, according to Fannin County Death Record No. 40870. He was buried in Leonard Cemetery in Fannin County. Martha Adeline Pryor Gowen died in 1966.

Children born to Henry Clay Smithey and Amanda Henrietta Gowen Smithey include:

[infant son] born in 1880
Lillian Daphne Smithey born about 1882
James Burrel Smithey born about 1885
Jennie Elizabeth “Bess” Smithey born January 10, 1887
Cecil Clarence Smithey born about 1890
Mary Selena Smithey [twin] born January 30, 1891
Martha Christine Smithey [twin] born January 30, 1891

Children born to Henry Clay Smithey and Martha Adeline Pryor Smithey include:

Leonidas Clay Smithey born in 1900
[stillborn daughter] born in 1902
Sylvia Jerrine Smithey born in 1908

Henry Clay Smithey and Amanda Henrietta Gowen Smithey were the parents of an infant son who was born and died in 1880.

Lillian Daphne Smithey, daughter of Henry Clay Smithey and Amanda Henrietta Gowen Smithey about 1882. She died in 1944.

James Burrell Smithey, son of Henry Clay Smithey and Amanda Henrietta Gowen Smithey, was born in Missouri about 1885. He was married about 1908, wife’s name Dora. Burrel Smithey is reported to have lived at Stephenville, Texas by Dr. Mary Northcutt Newman Merideth. He died in 1975.

Children born to James Burrell Smithey and Dora Smithey include:

Ellen Elizabeth Smithey born about 1911
[infant son] born about 1915

Jennie Elizabeth “Bess” Smithey, daughter of Henry Clay Smithey and Amanda Henrietta Gowen Smithey, was born in Missouri about 1887. She did not marry, but lived most of her adult life with Martha Christine Smithy. She was the informant for her mother’s death certificate.

The obituary of Jennie Elizabeth “Bess” Smithey, appeared in the “Greenville Herald- Banner” October 9, 1980:

“Funeral services for Miss Elizabeth Smithey, 93, who died Wednesday afternoon in a Leonard nursing home, will be at 2 p.m. Friday in the Taylor Funeral Chapel.

The Rev. James Simpson will officiate the service. Burial will be in the Leonard Cemetery.
>
Miss Smithey was born January 10, 1887 in Seligman, Missouri, the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Henry Clay Smithey. She was a school teacher, retiring after 53 years in education. She was a follower of the Methodist faith.

She is survived by two sisters, Miss Christine Smithey of Leonard and Mrs. Jean Crosslin of Colorado Springs, Colorado; one nephew of Leonard, Worth Wilkerson and several other nieces and nephews.

Funeral arrangements are under the direction of the Taylor Funeral Home in Leonard.”

Cecil Clarence Smithey, son of Henry Clay Smithey and Amanda Henrietta Gowen Smithey, was born about 1890. He was married about 1913 to Ann Matthews.

Mary Selena Smithy twin daughter of Henry Clay Smithey and Amanda Henrietta Gowen Smithey, was born January 30, 1891. She died in 1966.

Martha Christine Smithey, twin daughter of Henry Clay Smithey and Amanda Henrietta Gowen Smithey, was born in Barry County, Missouri January 30, 1891. She accompanied her family in a move to Texas. She did not marry.

The following obituary appeared in the “Greenville Herald-Banner,” Greenville, Texas July 8, 1988.

“Christine Smithey — Funeral services for Christine Smithey, 97, will be at 2 p.m. today in Taylor Funeral Home Chapel with Charles Wrenn officiating. Burial will be in the Leonard Cemetery at Leonard, Texas.

Miss Smithey died Thursday in Bonham, Texas. She was born January 30, 1891, in Missouri to Henry Clay Smithey and Amona Gowan. She was a retired school teacher and a member of the Church of Christ.

She is survived by a sister, Mrs. Jean Crosslin of Colo-rado Springs, Colorado.”

Leonidas Clay Smithey, son of Henry Clay Smithey and Martha Adeline Pryor Smithey, was born about 1900. He was married about 1923 to Elsie Evelyn Rogers. He died in 1951.

Children born to them include:

Gene Gordon Smithey born about 1915

Gene Gordon Smithey, son of Leonidas Clay Smithy and Elsie Evelyn Rogers Smithey, was born about 1915. He was married about 1938 to Rachel Routte.

Henry Clay Smithey and Martha Adeline Pryor Smithy were the parents of a stillborn daughter, unnamed, who was born in 1902.

Sylvia Jerrine Smithey, daughter of Henry Clay Smithey and Martha Adeline Pryor Smithy, was born about 1908. She died in 2001.

Mary E. Gowen, daughter of Alfred P. Gowen and Elizabeth S. “Betsy” Lowe Gowen, was born in 1849 in Rutherford County. She appeared as “May E. Gowen,” age one, in the 1850 census of her father’s household. She appeared in the household of her mother in the 1860 census of Barry County as a 10-year-old. She was married about 1868 to William Thomas Northcutt probably in Barry County. She died about 1914 of “Bright’s disease.”

Children born to them include:

Joe Walter Northcutt born in 1869
Estella Northcutt born about 1871
Minta Northcutt born about 1875
Burrel P. Northcutt born about 1889

Joe Walter Northcutt, son of Thomas Northcutt and Mary E. Gowen Northcutt, was born in 1869, according to his daughter, Dr. Mary Northcutt Newman Merideth. He was married at age 41, in 1911, to Maude McMahan of Rocky Carpet, Missouri who was a descendant of Gowen ancestors in Alabama and Tennessee, according to Dr. Merideth. He died in 1954 at age 84, and she died in 1958 at age 76. Both were buried in Maplewood Cemetery, Exeter, Missouri.

One daughter was born to them:

Mary Northcutt born March 1, 1914

Mary Northcutt, daughter of Joe Walter Northcutt and Maude McMahan Northcutt, was born March 1, 1914 in Barry County. She was graduated from University of Arkansas School of Medicine about 1937. Following residency at Hospital of Woman’s Medicine in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania she returned to Cassville and opened a medical practice there in 1939.

She was married in 1940 to George W. Newman, M.D. They operated a private hospital in Cassville until his death in 1949. She was remarried in 1969 to Robert Merideth, high school music teacher, a native of St. Clair, Missouri. In October 1981 Dr. Mary Northcutt Newman Merideth continued her medical practice in Cassville in separation from her husband who lived in Georgia. At that time she was a member of the Board of Education and of the Cassville Methodist Church. No children were born to her.

Estella Northcutt, daughter of Thomas Northcutt and Mary E. Gowen Northcutt, was born about 1871, probably in Barry County. She was married about 1890, husband’s name Potts, and died soon afterward without children.

Minta Northcutt, daughter of Thomas Northcutt and Mary E. Gowen Northcutt, was born about 1875, probably in Barry County. She was married about 1895 to Clura Henbest.

Two children were born to them:

[son] born about 1877
Joe Henbest born about 1890

A son was born to Clura Henbest and Minta Northcutt Henbest about 1877 and died in infancy.

Joe Henbest, son of Clura Henbest and Minta Northcutt Henbest, was born about 1898, probably in Barry County. Later he was an attorney in Columbus, Kansas and died there about 1960.

Burrel P. Northcutt, son of Thomas Northcutt and Mary E. Gowen Northcutt, was born about 1899, probably in Barry County. He was married about 1920, wife’s name Margaret.

Children born to them include:

Cleo Northcutt born about 1921
Clinton Northcutt born about 1923
Thomas Northcutt born about 1925

Sarah Christianna Gowen, assumed daughter of Alfred P. Gowen and Elizabeth S. “Betsy” Lowe Gowen, was born July 6, 1853 in Rutherford County, according to William B. Landers. She appeared in the 1860 census enumeration of Barry County as a six-year-old in her mother’s household. It is unknown which of the Gowen brothers was actually her father. She was married September 9, 1869 in Barry County to Pleasant Miller Frost who was born November 20, 1844 in Cass County, Missouri to Andrew Jackson Frost and Adaline C. Ashcroft Frost. She died October 5, 1907 in Seligman. He died October 18, 1932 in Corpus Christi, Texas.

Children born to them include:

William Owen Frost born November 26, 1870
Thomas Burrell Frost born March 1, 1873
Manta May Frost born January 12, 1877
Daisy Grace Frost born October 24, 1884

William Owen Frost, son of Pleasant Miller Frost and Sarah Christianna Gowen Frost, was born November 26, 1870. He was married in 1912 to Gertrude Senter in Corpus Christi. He died there May 9, 1945.

Thomas Burrel1 Frost, son of Pleasant Miller Frost and Sarah Christianna Gowen Frost, was born March 1, 1873. He died in October 1875.

Manta May Frost, daughter of Pleasant Miller Frost and Sarah Christianna Gowen Frost, was born January 12, 1877 in Granby, Missouri. She was married in Barry County February 19, 1899 to Oran O. McCary. She died December 24, 1959 in Carthage, Missouri at age 82.

Manta May Frost McCary recalled some memories of her life and her family about 1950:

Remembrances

“My Mother’s name was Christina Gowen. She was born July 6, 1853 in Tennessee near Nashville in Rutherford County. She moved with her mother and brothers and sisters to southwest Missouri when she was three years old in the summer of 1856. They were three months on the road, had several wagons loaded heavy and drove their stock through.

One wagon turned over on the way and caused some delay. They came by the way of St. Louis. They fin­ished the journey on October 25, staying at the home of an aunt, Henrietta Harbin near Washburn, Missouri in Barry County. Word had reached there by letter of the death of her father, Alfred Gowen. He had remained in Tennessee to attend to business matters. He traveled three days with the family on their journey and on re­turning to the old home, became suddenly ill.

Seeing he would not live, he gave the family where he was staying his horse and saddle to take his body back to the old home. It was all very sad news for them, and they were very much dissatisfied and would probably have returned to the old home, but it was such a long hard journey in those days and my grandmother’s only sister lived in Missouri. There were six children in the family, two boys, Burrel and Walter, four girls, Martha, Amanda, Mary and my mother, Christina, the youngest child. They bought land, over two hundred acres and paid for it in gold, eighteen hundred dollars.

The family had been wealthy at one time and had owned slaves, but had lost most all they had. They never wanted slaves, having seen the distress and the wrong of slavery. My grandmother had to learn how to work and manage after she had grown children. Her children all knew how to work and wanted to make honest livings. They were all very agreeable and loved each other, helping in any way they could. Any one in distress could always depend on any of them for help.

When the Civil War came up, Burrell went to the army and served three years. Walter died; he had never been a very strong boy, Martha married John Arnold. They had two children, Fannie and Buddie. Their father was killed in the early part of the war. Their mother was remarried to John Harbin in 1870. Mary was married in 1867 to William Northcutt. Amanda married Clay Smithey in 1878. My mother was married in 1869 to Pleasant M. Frost. There were four children; Will, the oldest, was born November 26 1870; Tom Burrel was born March 1, 1873 and died in October 1875. My birth was January 12, 1877, and Daisy’s was October 24, 1884.

We lived on a farm most of the time. I didn’t have all I wanted, but I had the things that were good for me.

I remember my Grandmother Gowen would gather us all near her and tell stories. Some of them are the same I hear now being told to children at bedtime. As I got older I remember her looking old. I was ten years old when she died.

My father and mother always made a good living for us. We had plenty to eat and wear and a good Christian home. My mother’s life was short; she died at 54, just when they could have lived comfortable without such hard work. The family is all buried in a cemetery on a hill near the old home place, a beautiful place for a cemetery. There were 20 grandchildren; 15 are still living.

The family was Scotch or Irish and English. I was never told about this, but the names, Gowen, Lowe, Todd, Sutton and Rains are Anglo-Saxon. The Lowes first settled in Maryland and Virginia. They lived near the Appommatox Courthouse where my grandmother was born May 9, in 1809. Someone in of the family knitted a pair of silk stockings for George Washington, so they must have known him. They moved west to Tennessee in 1812 with a lot of other families. It was all new country then. I have heard my grandmother tell about the earthquake of 1811. It happened while they were making the trip. She said they were eating breakfast;, had their meal spread on the ground, and the dishes rattled and rolled together.

Tennessee was unsettled, so they got lots of land. There were many Indians, but hostilities had ceased by then. I never heard, but I think my grandfather was from one of the southern states. He was an only child and was raised in luxury and never knew how to manage. As soon as his father died, he lost all he had through bad management, co-signing notes, making risky loans and doing countless favors for the kinfolk. So his slaves were sold to pay his debts. He had wanted to free them and did not believe in slavery. The problem was compounded when they would come back and beg to stay. He hid some of them when they reported that the new owners whipped them unmercifully. It was hard for the family to hear of these old honest slaves being treated that way. My uncle was very small then, but was once discovered carrying bread and water to one hid in the cellar. He said he was feeding Mandy.”

Daisy Grace Frost, daughter of Pleasant Miller Frost and Sarah Christianna Gowen Frost, was born October 24, 1884. She died in Carthage February 18, 1980 at age 95.

Samuel Thomas Beavers, possibly a son [or a grandson] of William Gowen and his third wife, was born about 1817 in Rutherford County. He may have been adopted by Abraham Beavers and Delila “Dilly” Crutchfield Beavers because Sarah Crutchfield in her will referred to Samuel Thomas Beavers as “their son.” Abraham Beavers was appointed his guardian.

He and Harriett Gowen were mentioned in the will of their grandmother, Sarah Crutchfield May 5, 1826. The will read:

“In the name of God Amen.

I, Sarah Crutchfield, knowing that it is appointed for all persons once to die, Do make and publish this my last will and Testament, In manner and form following, Viz;

In the first place I will and bequeath to my Grand­son Samuel Thomas Beavers one half of the tract of land whereon I now live and the other half of Said Land I give and bequeath to my Granddaughter Harriet Gowen to be equally divided between them by my Executors on east and west lines.

2nd. It is my desire that my Grandson Samuel Thos. Beavers heretofore named shall have one Gray mare and her colt, also one yearling colt, a sorrel. I also give to my Grandson Samuel Thomas Beavers Four head of cattle, it being all of my stock, furthermore I do give the said Samuel my stock of hogs. It is further my Desire that my Daughter Delila Beavers be permitted to live on and have possession of the whole of my Land until my grandson Samuel Thomas Beavers arrives to the age of Twenty one, Then the Division to take place between him and Harriet Gowen.

3rdly. I will and bequeath to my Daughter Polly Gowen one dollar to be paid by my Executors after my Decease.

4thly. To my son John Crutchfield I give one dollar to be paid by my Executors after my decease.

5thly. To my son Charles Crutchfield I give one dollar to be also paid by my Executors.

Lastly I do make ordain constitute and appoint Abram Beavers, and Robert Burnett my Executors of this my last will and Testament hereby revoking all former wills by me made.

In witness whereof I have hereunto set my hand and seal this fifth day of May in the year of our Lord One Thousand Eight hundred and twenty-six, acknowledged to in presence of . . .”

Two days later, May 7, 1826, Sarah Crutchfield had an af­terthought and added a codicil to her will providing that “my grandson Samuel Thomas Beavers to receive all my stock of horses, cattle and hogs, and I direct that the above be left in the care of Abram and Delila Beavers for their own use until their son arrives at age 21.”

Abraham Beavers had been appointed guardian “pendente lite” for Samuel Thomas Beavers and Harriett Gowen, “minor heirs of Abram Beavers and William Gowen,” July 19, 1827, ac­cording to Rutherford County Court Minute Book V, page 22.

William Gowen, Jr. and Mary “Polly” Crutchfield Gowen questioned the will of Sarah Crutchfield, deceased, by filing suit in the Rutherford Circuit Court July 20, 1827. They were joined in the suit against Abraham Beavers and Delila “Dilly” Crutchfield Beavers by John Crutchfield and Charles Crutchfield. When the case came up for trial on July 23, 1827 it was “postponed to next term.” At that time the court appointed four men, Henry Ridley, James R. Ross, Carey Phelps and John Hill to arbitrate the matter, with the provision that if they could not reach a decision, they were to select a fifth man to umpire the decision.

On October 16, 1827 they agreed to binding arbitration, ac­cording to court records. It is believed that they were successful in modifying the will of Sarah Crutchfield in the arbitration process which was conducted by the Rutherford County men because in 1848 “Mary Gowen and Samuel T. Beavers” were joint defendants in a judg­ment suit which was decided against them in Rutherford Circuit Court. Since the two were jointly sued, it is assumed that Mary “Polly” Crutchfield Gowen had received some form of life estate in the property of her mother which probably passed in fee simple to Samuel Thomas Beavers, her nephew. It is suggested that Harriett Gowen had died prior to this date since she was not a defendant in the suit.

Of Samuel Thomas Beavers nothing more is known.

Harriett Gowen, regarded as a daughter of William Gowen and his third wife, was born about 1821. She and Samuel Thomas Beavers were mentioned in the will of their grand­mother written May 5, 1826. Abraham Beavers, regarded as her uncle, was appointed her guardian “pendente lite” July 19, 1827, according to Rutherford County Court Minute book V, page 22. Nothing more is known of Harriett Gowen.
==O==
John Gowen, son of John Gowen, was born February 13, 1775 probably in Fairfield County. “Grand, Pennsylvania” was in­scribed on the flyleaf of the bible of John Gowen retained in 1993 by Jacob Alvin Gowen, a great-grandson of Forrest City, Arkansas. This entry has caused some speculation that John Gowen was born in Grand, Pennsylvania, but the notation ap­parently applies to the wife of John Gowen, Lydia Shute Gowen whose family had lived in Pennsylvania for many years before coming to Tennessee.

The hamlet of Grand has not been found in any atlas of Penn­sylvania, and Daniel N. Rolph, staff genealogist for the His­torical Society of Pennsylvania wrote January 30, 1990 that he found no record of the existence of such a town. It is possible that the word “Grand” inscribed in the bible was intended as an adjective to describe the state of Pennsylvania.

Earliest known residence of the Gowen family in Pennsylvania was that of Hugh Gowen enumerated in Northumberland County in the 1790 census. The only other Gowen family enumerated in Pennsylvania in 1790 was that of Rachel Gowan who was recorded in York County as the head of a household composed of “four white females and one white male over 16.” “John Gowen” appeared in the 1800 census of Chester County, Pennsylvania and also in Armstrong County, Pennsylvania as the head of a household.

On May 12, 1798 John Gowen witnessed a bill of sale of “a negro wench named Judy” from Simon McClendon to John Blackman, according to Davidson County Will Book 1, page 148.

A marriage license was issued October 30, 1801 for the mar­riage of John Gowen to Lydia Shute, according to Davidson County Marriage Book 1, page 38. The marriage was performed on November 1, 1801, according to the family bible. “Marriage Book One of Davidson County,” a volume indexed, edited and published by Sarah T. Blair, lists all the marriages performed in Davidson County from January 2, 1789 to December 13, 1837.

Lydia Shute Gowen, a native of Pennsylvania, was the daughter of Phillip Shute, a resident of Fayette County, Pennsylvania.
==O==
The Shute family was settled in Pennsylvania early. “Phillip Shutt” was married in Pennsylvania in October 1745, according to “Pennsylvania Marriages.” The earliest mention of the Shute family in Pennsylvania was in 1684 in Philadelphia. William Shute, age 40, was shown as a Philadelphian in that year along with his son, Thomas Shute, age 19. On July 5, 1723 Thomas Shute of Philadelphia was indicted by the grand jury “for having rubbish in front of his house.” Jacob Shute who owned a cooper’s shop in Philadelphia, was indicted by the grand jury January 2, 1744 “for being a fire hazard.” This indictment was recorded in the handwriting of Benjamin Franklin who leased a lot in Philadelphia December 30, 1745 that adjoined the property of Thomas Shute.
==O==
Phillip Shute was born about 1734 in New Jersey. He was married about 1757 to Elizabeth Waller, according to the notes of Cleve Weathers, a descendant of Nashville, Tennessee. They removed to Fayette County, Pennsylvania, on the Virginia border about 1759. Elizabeth Waller Shute died there about 1789. He removed to Davidson County, Tennessee about 1790.

Phillip Shute first appeared in the legal records of Davidson County October 15, 1791 when he was named to a committee to maintain “a road from Thomas Ferry to Nashville.” He was reappointed to the committee January 10, 1792, according to Davidson County Court minutes which noted “the Shutes among those at Elijah Robertson’s.”

Patsy, a slave of Phillip Shute, provided some information about his life prior to coming to Tennessee. Although Pennsylvania was a “free” state, Phillip Shute was a slave-owner there, according to “Free African Americans in Pre-Civil War “Anglo” Alabama: Slave Manumissions Gleaned from County Court Records” by Gary B. Mills:

“Shute, Patsy: Greene County, Alabama,

Manumission of Patsy by Silas Dinsmore, U.S. Choctaw agent, January 1804, at Pooshapuckanuck [Mt. Dexter]. Patsy was born in Fayette County, Pennsylvania, near Bizon Town, as a slave of Phillip Shute who decided in 1791 to move to the Cumberland . . . now West Tennessee. Patsy, on account of the infancy of his youngest child whose mother had died . . . consented to accompany . . . Shute to nurse his children. She was to serve him during his natural life, then his family for ten or twelve years. Shute died, and Patsy was illegally enslaved by Richard Hall, a trader in the Six Towns of the Choctaw Nation who sold her to William Bradford of Ireland who took her into the Spanish Territory at or near Galvestown where they were arrested and their papers taken. When released, they went [returned] to Choctaw Nation [Mississippi] where they were again arrested for the want of papers. Patsy told Dinsmore that she was illegally enslaved. Dinsmore wrote to Fayette County, Pennsylvania, received confirmation of her story, and ordered her to be freed. On January 27, 1819, Dinsmore made a new affidavit for Patsy in Washington County, Alabama Territory. On January 15, 1829 her documents were filed in Greene County Deed Book C, page 308-09.”

Washington County and Greene County, Alabama were in the area of the Choctaw Nation in the southwestern part of the state.

Phillip Shute served on jury panels January 13, 1792, in May 1793, May 1794, August 1794 and May 1797. Phillip Shute and William Shute, probably his son, were witnesses to the power of attorney of Simeon Bell of Washington County, Pennsylvania [adjoined Fayette County] May 10, 1796. Simeon Bell appointed Robert Hazael Hewitt of Davidson County “my attorney to attend to my business,” according to Davidson County Will Book 1, page 49. Robert Hazael Hewitt was the son-in-law of Phillip Shute. About 1798 Phillip Shute was a justice of the peace for Civil District 11 in Davidson County.

Phillip Shute died in January 1811 at his residence on Charlotte Pike, Nashville, Tennessee, according to Cleve Weathers.

Children born to Phillip Shute and Elizabeth Waller Shute include:

Anna Shute born about 1759
Mary Shute born about 1760
William Shute born about 1761
John Shute born about 1763
Thomas Shute born about 1765
Margery Shute born about 1767
Mary Eliza Shute born about 1770
Elizabeth Shute born about 1772
Isaac Shute born about 1774
Asa Shute born about 1777
Lydia Shute born about 1779
Susannah Shute born about 1781
Phillip Shute, Jr. born about 1784
Rachel Shute born about 1787

Anna Shute, daughter of Phillip Shute and Elizabeth Waller Shute, was born about 1759 in New Jersey, according to the research of Cleve Weathers. She was married September 16, 1786 in Fayette County, Pennsylvania to Robert Hazael Hewitt who was born in Maryland about 1756. She died October 17, 1814 in Davidson County, Tennessee. He died March 3, 1837 in Wilson County, Tennessee.

Mary Shute, daughter of Phillip Shute and Elizabeth Waller Shute, was born about 1760 in Fayette County. She died there about 1777.

William Shute, son of Phillip Shute and Elizabeth Waller Shute, was born about 1761 in Fayette County. He was married about 1784 to Elizabeth Gurley, probably in Fayette County. He accompanied his father in a move to Davidson County about 1790. William Shute and his father were witnesses to the power of attorney of Simeon Bell of Washington County, Penn-sylvania [adjoined Fayette County] May 10, 1796. William Shute was remarried to Olive Collingsworth January 07, 1801, according to Davidson County Marriage Book 1, page 18.

John Shute, son of Phillip Shute and Elizabeth Waller Shute, was born about 1763 in Thorn Bottom, Pennsylvania in Fayette County. John Shute was married to Nancy Childress December 5, 1796, according to Davidson County Marriage Book 1, page 9. A bill of sale dated July 18, 1800 read, “I, Joshua Ballance sold unto John Shute a negro boy named Charles,” according to Davidson County Will Book 1, page 186. He died about 1844, and she died before 1850.

Thomas Shute, son of Phillip Shute and Elizabeth Waller Shute, was born about 1765in Fayette County, Pennsylvania. He died about June 1830 in Perryville, Tennessee.

Margery Shute, daughter of Phillip Shute and Elizabeth Waller Shute, was born about 1767 in Fayette County, Pennsylvania. Margery Shute was married December 24, 1794 to Beal Bosley in Nashville, according to Davidson County Marriage Book 1, page 1. She died July 04, 1851. Beal Bosley who was born in Baltimore, Maryland, died May 7, 1860.

Mary Eliza Shute, daughter of Phillip Shute and Elizabeth Waller Shute, was born about 1770 in Fayette County. She was married about 1791 to Henry Childress. She died Sep-tember 20, 1813 in Williamson County, Tennessee.

Elizabeth Shute, daughter of Phillip Shute and Elizabeth Wal-ler Shute, was born about 1772 in Fayette County. She was married to John Witherspoon January 31, 1796 in Nashville.

Isaac Shute, son of Phillip Shute and Elizabeth Waller Shute, was born about 1774 in Fayette County. He died about 1810.

Asa Shute, son of Phillip Shute and Elizabeth Waller Shute, was born about 1777 in Fayette County. Asa Shute and B. A. Stuart deeded 640 acres in Hickman County, Tennessee September 14, 1813, according to Hickman County Deed Book ABC. Millington Easley and John Easley, kinsmen of Maj. John “Buck” Gowen of Spartanburg County, South Carolina were, witnesses. Asa Shute died in 1815 in Tennessee.

Lydia Shute, daughter of Phillip Shute and Elizabeth Waller Shute, was born about 1779 in Fayette County. She was mar-ried November 1, 1801 to John Gowen in Davidson County. She died there October 26, 1811. For details of her life, see his section. He died March 26, 1835.

Susannah Shute, daughter of Phillip Shute and Elizabeth Waller Shute, was born about 1781 at Thorn Bottom, Pennsylvania in Fayette County.

She was married August 3, 1806 in Davidson County to John Harding who was born in Goochland County, Virginia. They established Belle Meade, the largest plantation in Davidson County before the Civil War. Belle Meade had 136 slaves in the 1860 census, according to “The History of Belle Meade” by Ridley Mills.

She died September 12, 1845 in Belle Meade, near Nashville. He died there in 1865.

Phillip C. Shute, son of Phillip Shute and Elizabeth Waller Shute, was born about 1784 in Thorn Bottom, Pennsylvania. Phillip C. Shute was married to Hannah Pricilla DeMoss January 19, 1832, according to Davidson County Marriage Book 1, page 441.

Phillip C. Shute was remarried November 30, 1837 to Mary E. H. Rains, according to Davidson County marriage records. He was married in August 1849 to Martha Elizabeth Bradford. They were enumerated in the 1860 census of Davidson County. He died October 28, 1862 in Tennessee, and she died there August 9, 1865.

Rachel Shute, daughter of Phillip Shute and Elizabeth Waller Shute, was born about 1787 in Thorn Bottom, Pennsylvania. She was married August 3, 1811 to Christopher Stump in Dav-idson County. He died July 12, 1821 in Nashville. She died July after October 14, 1859 in Davidson County.

Rachel Shute Stump wrote her will March 22, 1841, leaving everything to her son, Phillip Shute Stump. In the codicil to her will done on October 14, 1859, she left her “niece” Min-erva Gowen, [born Sept. 14, 1827] a legacy for taking care of her husband, Christopher Stump. Minerva was actually her grand-niece, the daughter of Wilford Burleson Gowen and Ursula Pillow Rains Gowen and the granddaughter of John Gowen and Lydia Shute Gowen, sister of Rachel’s Shute Stump.
==O==
On April 17, 1802 the Davidson County Court met and set prices for the Nashville taverns:

“Good Jimacah [rum] ½ pt. 50¢,
Good wine, per ½ pt. 50¢,
Good French brandy, per ½ pt. 50¢
Good Peach brandy, per ½ pt. 18½¢.”

John Gowen purchased “Lot 99” in Nashville at a sheriff’s auction July 15, 1802, according to Davidson County Deed Book E, page 378. John Gowen served on a jury panel October 18, 1802, and the county court minutes revealed that the “court met in the new courthouse.” Construction on the new building had been started in April 1801.

The Inferior Court of Pleas & Quarter Sessions had been organized October 6, 1783. It had jurisdiction over all legal, judicial, legislative, executive, military and prudential affairs of the county.

John Gowen was assessed for taxes in 1810 in Civil District 5. His property was “bounded by a line beginning at the crossing of Murphreeboro Road & Mill Creek, up Mill Creek to Antioch Church to Hamilton’s Creek to the crossing of Hamilton’s Creek by Stone’s River Turnpike, thence down that road to Murphreysboro Turnpike and down Murphreysboro Turnpike to the place of beginning.”

The property of John Gowen, 70 years later was owned by Tennessee Asylum for the Insane under the direction of J. H. Callender, superintendent. The property was described in 1880 in the following description in the “History of Davidson County, Tennessee:”

“The State Legislature provided for the hospital in legislation passed February 5, 1848.

Tennessee Asylum for the Insane is in the east part of the district [Civil District 5] on Murphreysboro Pike. Its grounds, nearly a mile square are finely located, and their appearance adds much to the district. The asylum is located on 480 acres and has a valuation of $400,000. The hospital has 24 octagonal towers top-ped with bat-tlements on the corners and wings of the building.

It stands 405 feet long, east to west and 210 wide, north to south. The building is four stories high and is 85 feet high at the top of the main tower. It has 265 rooms and accommodates 250 patients. It is ventilated by a fan 17 feet in diameter. It is driven by a steam engine and de-livers 70,000 cubic feet of air per min-ute throughout the entire building.

Grounds surrounding the hospital are among the most beautiful in the South. Lakes, fountains and splendid gravel roads and walks, lovely lawns, inviting arbors and a fine collection of the rarest exotic and domestic flowers and shrubbery, orchards and vineyards are found there.”

On July 1, 1811 John Gowen, “Daniel Vaulk,” Charles Hays, Edmund Owen and other neighbors were appointed to a jury panel by the Rutherford County Court to settle a dispute, “William Williams and wife vs. Joseph Burnett, admr.” Apparently the arbiters were not able to settle the dispute during three court terms, and the court finally decreed July 7, 1812 that the “deft. pay plf. $573.66½ with his costs expended.” The verdict was appealed to the Circuit Court.

Lydia Shute Gowen died October 26, 1811, about age 30.

John Gowen and William Gowen, his brother appeared in a tax census conducted in Davidson County in 1812. According to records of Davidson County Court they were recorded in the “company of Capt. Belk.”

In 1812, John Gowen, Edmond Owen and William Murphy were administrators of the estate of Daniel Vaulx, their neigh­bor, according to Davidson County Will Book 2, page 440. Four years earlier, Vaulx had purchased from James H. Gowen the 240 acres that he inherited from the William Gowen pre-emption.

“Catherine Vaulx, widow of Daniel Vaulx, deceased of Davidson County returned unto October term 1812. We laid off to Catherine Vaulx, widow, a support for 12 months from the death of said deceased, have laid off provisions, etc [several items listed].”

John Gowen was a witness to the partitioning of the land of Samuel Buchanan, deceased held August 24, 1813. He ac­knowledged that the heirs, Thomas Buchanan, John Buchanan, Robert Buchanan and Edward H. East drew lots for their inheritances, according to Davidson County Will Book 2, page 241. On September 14, 1813 he was a witness to the division of the estate of Nathan Peebles, deceased, according to Davidson County Will Book 2, page 255. He signed a further division of the estate August 13, 1814 as recorded in Davidson County Will Book 2, page 321.

John Gowen was a purchaser at the estate sale of Daniel Vaulx, deceased December 19, 1815, according to Davidson County Will Book 2, page 404. Other buyers at the sale included Catherine Vaulx, Mary Peebles, James Vaulx, William Vaulx, John Buchanan, Charles Hays, and David Hays. William Vaulx and his wife, Sarah Vaulx sold land in Holmes County, Mississippi to John Jones Gowen in 1840, which prompted the Gowen family to sell the last of their land in the pre-emption and leave Davidson County after four generations there.

On March 20, 1818 John Gowen received a deed to 200 acres of land located on Mill Creek for $2,300 from Lt. William Gowen, his uncle, according to Davidson County Deed Book M, page 338. This tract of land was located in the southwest corner of the original grant to John Gowen. The land was described as:

“Beginning at 2 post oaks marked as a corner between John Gowen and Daniel Vaulx, East with said Vaulx line 155 poles to a white oak marked as the corner be­tween David Vaulx and William Gowen, South 160 poles a white oak being the Southeast corner of William Gowen’s Preemption corner, West 200 poles with the South boundary line of said preemption to a stake in John Gowen’s East boundary line, North with said John Gowen’s line 160 poles to a stake, East 45 poles to the beginning.”

John Gowen was enumerated as the head of a household in the 1820 census of Davidson County, page 97:

“Gowen, John white male over 45
white male 16-26
white male 16-26
white male 16-26
white female 10-16
white female 10-16
white female 10-16”

John Gowen, a farmer, owned 15 slaves. An adjoining entry recorded the household of a neighbor, Margaret Buchanan. In the pioneer days of Nashville the farmstead was known as Buchanan Station:

“Buchanan, Margaret white female over 45
white male 16-26
white male 16-26
white male 16-26
white female 16-26
white male 10-16
white male 0-16”

John Gowen transferred 175 acres on Mill Creek January 21, 1824 to his son John Jones Gowen, perhaps as a wedding pre­sent, on a warranty deed, according to Davidson County Deed Book Q, page 482. The deed read:

“I make a gift deed of 175 acres for the natural love and affection I have for my son, John J. Gowen . . . beginning at a white oak at William Vaulx’s Southeast corner, South 160 poles to a white oak, being the Southeast corner of a pre­emption granted to William Gowen, West 200 poles to a stake, North 16 East 160 poles to a stake standing 5 poles West of 2 post oaks marked as a corner and Daniel Vaulx, East with said Vaulx line 150 poles to the beginning.”

Cleve Weathers, a Nashville attorney and a descendant of John Gowen, wrote February 19, 2001:

“A couple of weeks ago I found a John Gowen who was the real party in interest in a Sumner County, Tennessee lawsuit in 1826. The case is found in Sumner County Archives, Micro-film Reel 5092, case 6847. [Question marks are inserted where I am uncertain of the word and ______’s where I cannot even guess the word.] Quoting the court minutes starting with the caption:

‘State of Tennessee ) To the Sheriff of Davidson
Sumner County ) County Greeting:

Whereas William Reed lately? in our Circuit Court for the County aforesaid inpleaded? James Garrison as Administrator of all [and sundry] the goods & chattels rights & credits of Philip Shackler Decd in a plea of Covenant Broken. & at the September Term 1826 [pos-sibly 1821] of the Circuit Court for said County on the 21st day of Said month by a verdict of the jury in said case empanelled, a verdict of thirteen hundred eighty-Two Dollars and eighty cents was given in by said Jury in favor of the said plaintiff for his Damages. & the Jury further found that the said James Garrison Admin-istrator aforesaid has fully Administered the goods & chattels rights & credits of the said Philip Shackler dec’d which came to his hand except the sums of Three hundred & seventy five Dollars and forty cents. Wherefore it was considered by the said Court that the plaintiff William Reed have Execution against the said Administrator for the said sum of Three hundred and seventy-five and forty cents. to be levied of the goods & chattels rights & credits of the said Decendent in his hands.

And whereas John Gowen as it is said is heir at law of the said Philip Shackler Decd you are hereby Com-manded to make known to the said John Gowen, this process?: Commanding him to be & appear at the next Circuit Court to be held for the County of Sumner to be held at the Court house in Gallatin on the second Mon-day in March next to show cause, if any has or can say why the said William Reed should not have execution against him for One thousand & seven Dollars and forty two cents. . .’

“Since the estate had an administrator rather than a testator and since John Gowen was an heir at law rather than devisee or beneficiary under a will, we know that Philip Shackler died intestate. Since no other persons were summoned to pay off the balance of the debt, this suggests that either John Gowen or his wife received the entire net proceeds of the estate of Philip Shackler. I assume John Gowen likely received some real estate since real estate passes outside pro-bate estate, but can be brought back in if the personalty of the estate is insufficient to pay off all debts.

My tentative and speculative thought is that the John Gowen inheriting from Philip Shackler may have been the John Gowen, born Feb. 13, 1775 and died in Da-vidson County on March 26, 1835. He was married to Lydia Shute, daughter of Philip Shute, Sr. There is a Shackle Island community on Drakes Creek in the southern part of Sumner County about three miles north of the center of Hendersonville, Tennessee. Lydia Shute Gowen died in 1811. It is possible that John Gowen remarried a daughter of Philip Shackler. I mention this speculation only as one possible starting point for further research.”

John Gowen wrote his will May 31, 1829:

“In the name of God amen. I, John Gowen of the County of Davidson and State of Tennessee do make, ordain, constitute and appoint this my last will.

Item the first. I wish my remains interred in the space between the graves of my father and wife and the three graves to be enclosed with a stone fence or wall to be done at the expense of my two sons John J. Gowen and Wilford B. Gowen as soon as they can conveniently do the same after my decease.

I will and bequeath the farm I am now residing on to my two sons John J. Gowen and Wilford B. Gowen to be equally divided between them including the one hundred and seventy-five acres that I have heretofore given my son John J. Gowen.

My stock of cattle and hogs and farming utensils, household and kitchen furniture I will to my son Wilford B. Gowen.

What slaves I may possess at my decease I will and be­queath to my three daughters viz Amanda M. Dunn, Minerva Hays and Maria L. Rains, said slaves to be equally divided between them by lot to be laid off by three disinterested persons if my said daughters cannot agree in a division themselves.

My stock of horses I wish to be sold on a credit of twelve Months and what debts I may owe at my decease to be discharged from the proceeds of the sale of said stock of horses.

The residue of money, should there any remain after paying my just debts from said sale of horses, to be equally divided between my above named daughters.

I appoint my two sons John J. Gowen and Wilford B. Gowen my executors to this my last will to take effect immediately after my decease.

In Testimony whereof I have hereunto set my hand this 31st day of May in the year of our Lord 1829.

Attest: Thos. S. King John Gowen
W. H. McLaughlin”

The household of John Gowen reappeared in the 1830 census of Davidson County, page 249:

“Gowen, John white male 50-60
white male 20-30
white female 20-30
white male 10-15
white female 0-5
white female 0-5”

John Gowen apparently lived on the western portion of his grandfather’s original preemption survey.

John Gowen died March 26, 1835 at the age of 60. His death notice was published in the April 17, 1835 edition of “National Banner & Nashville Whig.” It read, “Mr. John Gowen, Sr. died near Nashville in the 61st year of his age.” It is believed that he was buried in the Gowen family cemetery on the preemption of William Gowen. Archaeologist Guy G. Weaver of Memphis reported that in the excavation of the family cemetery at the Gowen pre-emption on the Metropolitan Nashville Airport, he found a low stone wall that appeared to encircle three graves.

Frank Maxwell Gowen concluded [erroneously?] that John Gowen was buried in nearby Buchanan Cemetery. He re­quested his cousin, Mrs. Louis A. Shelton of Nashville make a visit to the Buchanan Cemetery in 1975. Reporting on her visit on July 1, 1975 she wrote:

“This week I visited the old cemetery at Buchanan Station. Though I did find a grave–or graves–enclosed in a rock fence, there was no indication of the number of graves or to whom they belonged. The ‘fence’ just seemed to be rocks and pieces of tombstones that had been piled up to form an enclosure. From the size of the enclosure, I would guess it could have contained, two, possibly three graves. I also searched through various books in the State Archives for listings. There I found nothing to lend a light to our quest.

Mary Clifton Shelton”

In April 1835 the will of John Gowen was probated in David­son County:

“State of Tennessee, Davidson County Court, April Session, 1835

A paper writing purporting to be the last will and Testament of John Gowen decd. was produced in open court for probate and proved thus: Thomas S. King and William H. McLaughlin, two of the subscribing witnesses to said paper writing being duly sworn, depose and say that they became such in the presence of the said John Gowen decd, and at his request and in the presence of each other and that they verily believe he was of sound mind and disposing memory at the time of executing said paper writing. Ordered that said paper writing be admitted as such will of the said John Gowen decd. Whereupon Wilford B. Gowen and John J. Gowen the executors named in said will came into court and gave bond in the sum of $3,000 with Aris Brown and Joel A. Battle, their securities, and qualified according to law.
Henry Ewing, clerk”

Children born to John Gowen and Lydia Shute Gowen include:

John Jones Gowen born August 13, 1802
Wilford Burleson Gowen born March 15, 1804
Amanda Malvina Gowen born March 6, 1806
Minerva Gowen born June 23, 1808
Maria Louise Gowen born January 26, 1810

John Jones Gowen, son of John Gowen and Lydia Shute Gowen, was born in August 13, 1802 near Nashville, according to the family bible. He is thought to be a namesake and a de­scendant of John Jones.

A John Jones appeared in Fairfield County, South Carolina. John Jones, a carpenter, wrote his will there January 21, 1779, and it was probated August 5, 1782. The will mentioned his daughter, Judy Jones, “under age 18,” and “friends Capt. Robt. Lyell and Lieut. Malachi Howell,” executors. The estate was appraised September 13, 1782 by Robert Goodwyn, William Howell and Richard Evans, according to “Camden District, South Carolina Wills and Administrations, 1781-1787.” Ralph Jones was a witness to the will of James Kelley written January 30, 1779 in Camden District. John Jones was listed as a creditor to the estate of William Kershaw June 22, 1786 in Camden District.

“John Jones” was elected as a member of the Commission of the Watauga Association in May 1772 “at James Robertson’s house.”

John Jones appeared on a jury panel October 5, 1785, according to Davidson County Court minutes. He was a security for Elizabeth Thomas to be the administratrix of the estate of Samuel Virnor July 4, 1786. In 1787 John Jones and James Jones were recorded in Davidson County. Recorded there in that year were 372 white males over 21 and 105 blacks, ages 12-60.

On January 5, 1789 John Jones was appointed to oversee a section of a road “between Stumps Mill and Hollis Mill.”

John Jones Gowen was married May 5, 1823 to Tabitha Hays, daughter of Charles Hays and Ann Hays, according to the May 14, 1823 edition of “Nashville Whig.” “Nashville Banner & Daily Advertiser” reported the wedding: “Mr. John J. Gowen married on the 8th inst. to Miss Tabitha Hays, daughter of Mr. Charles Hays, all of this county.” The marriage license for the wedding, performed by James Whitsett, was recorded in Davidson County Marriage Book 1, page 268. The death of Mrs. Ann Hays, “wife of Charles Hays died in Davidson County on the 8th instant” was reported in the July 11, 1831 edition of the “National Republican & State Gazette.”

John Jones Gowen received from his father 175 acres of land on Mill Creek on a warranty deed dated January 21, 1824, ac­cording to Davidson County Deed Book Q, page 482.

Dr. John Whittemore Gowen, a grandson of Ames, Iowa, re­ported that a son, John “Jack” Gowen was born to John Jones Gowen and Tabitha Hays Gowen. It is believed that she died about 1836.

On September 25, 1838, at age 36, John Jones Gowen was re­married to Amanda Malvina East, age 18, daughter of Edward H. East, Sr, according to family records. The marriage was performed November 25, 1838 at Nashville by Robert Boyte C. Howell, according to “Marriage Book I of Davidson County, Tennessee” by Sarah T. Blair.

Edward H. East, Sr. was born in Henrico County, Virginia in 1793 and arrived in 1806 in Nashville with his mother, Celia Buchanan East, at the age of 13. Edward H. East, Sr, at age 19, and Talton East, believed to be a brother, appeared in a tax enumeration in Davidson County in 1812 in a roll prepared by Capt. Jesse W. Thomas. The East plantation was located seven miles east of Ft. Nashborough near the present location of Metropolitan Nashville Airport.

Several children were born to Edward H. East, Sr. One of his sons, Dr. “Dutch” East, practiced medicine in the Nashville area. He died about 1886 without heirs, according to Dr. John Whittemore Gowen. Another son, Judge Edward H. East, Jr, a Nashville attorney, was graduated from Lebanon Law School in 1854. He, the ninth child of his parents, was later president of the Tennessee Hospital for the Insane and also president of the Tennessee School for the Blind. He was elected to the board of trustees of Vanderbilt University and was on the board of directors of its predecessor, the University of Nashville. He was the attorney for Chattanooga & St. Louis Railway. He was the Tennessee Secretary of State under Gov. Andrew Johnson during the Civil War. An Edward Joseph East, believed to be a descendant, died in Nashville September 6, 1965. William A. East was married May 5, 1846 to Elizabeth H. Searcy, and William C. East was married April 15, 1848 to Nancy A. Patrick, according to Davidson County marriage records.

John Jones Gowen was enumerated as the head of a household in the 1840 census of Davidson County, page 319:

“Gowen, John white male 30-40
white female 20-30
white male 20-30
white male 10-15
white male 0-5”

His household included 16 slaves, according to the census re­port. Nineteen members of the household were engaged in agriculture and two in trades. The “male 10-15” above is be­lieved to be John “Jack” Gowen, only child of John Jones Gowen and Tabitha Hays Gowen. The “male, under five” is believed to be Edward H. Gowen, son of John Jones Gowen and Amanda Malvina East Gowen.

On August 8, 1840 John Jones Gowen “of Davidson County, Tennessee” bought land in Holmes County, Mississippi from William Vaulx and his wife Sarah Vaulx for $5,000. In the contract William Vaulx had the right to repurchase the land at any time before October 15, 1840 for $5,000, according to Holmes County Deed Book F, page 299.

John Jones Gowen, “of Holmes County, Mississippi” purchased another 160 acres for $1,640 from William Vaulx and Sarah Vaulx “of Rutherford County, Tennessee,” November 8, 1841, according to Holmes County Deed Book F, page 682. On Octo­ber 21, 1842 William Vaulx gave power of attorney to John Jones Gowen, according to Holmes County Deed Book F, page 833.

His move to West, Mississippi, in Holmes County, was made in 1841. Descendants report that he became a large landowner, employing many slaves on his cotton plantation there. He died August 6, 1843 at the age of 41, according to “The Nashville Whig” in its edition of August 17, 1843. The article stated simply, “John J. Gowen, formerly of Davidson County, died at his residence in Holmes County, Mississippi on the 6th instant.” “John J. Gowen” was buried in the Hays family cemetery beside Tabitha Hays Gowen. The cemetery is located at the rear of the Charles Hay home and was visited May 6, 1996 by Cleve Weathers and Arlee Claud Gowen.

“Holmes County Tombstone Inscriptions,” inspected at the Holmes County courthouse in 1973 recorded no Gowen graves. No members of the family were in residence in Lexington, Mis­sissippi, county seat, in 1971.

Following his death, Amanda Malvina East Gowen returned to Davidson County. In 1850 she was enumerated in the house­hold of her parents:

“East, E. H. 57, born in VA, farmer,
$12,500 real estate
Celia 56, born in VA, wife
Louisa 21, born in TN
Eugene 22, born in TN
Hazard 18, born in TN
A. H. 16, born in TN
Gowen, Malvina 30, born in TN, daughter
Edward H. 10, born in TN
Charles H. 8, born in MS
Tabitha G. 6, born in MS”

Her household, No. 427-427 reappeared in the 1860 census of Davidson County, Fifth Civil District in Nashville:

“Gowen, A. M. 43, born in TN, farmer, female
E. H. 21, born in TN, teacher, male
C. H. 19, born in TN, student, male
T. J. 16, born in TN, student, female”

Amanda Malvina East Gowen received 90 acres from her father November 8, 1870 in the Third Civil District, according to Davidson County deed records. Her sister, Lucinda East, was married to James Buchanan, son of Archibald Buchanan and Agnes Buchanan. The family claims a relationship to Pres. James Buchanan of Pennsylvania. Sixteen children were born to them.

Children born to John Jones Gowen and Tabitha Hays Gowen include:

John H. “Jack” Gowen born in 1827

Children born to John Jones Gowen and Amanda Malvina East Gowen include:

Edward H. Gowen born in 1840
Charles Hays Gowen born in 1841
Tabitha Jones Gowen born in 1844

John H. “Jack” Gowen, son of John Jones Gowen and Tabitha Hays Gowen, was born in Nashville in 1827 in Davidson County. In the 1850 census he was recorded as “age 23, born in Tennessee, no occupation” living in the household of John W. Watkins, No. 212 in Davidson County.

On November 7, 1851, “John H. Gowen of the State of Ten­nessee, one of the heirs of John J. Gowen” received $356 from Leland Noel and Edmund B. Noel of Holmes County, Missis­sippi for 122 acres of land, apparently his part of the estate of his father, according to Holmes County Deed Book L, page 579. Of John H. “Jack” Gowen nothing more is known.

Edward H.[azard?] Gowen, son of John Jones Gowen and Amanda Malvina East Gowen, was born in Nashville in 1839. From 1841 until 1844 his family lived in West, Mississippi. After the death of his father, his mother brought her family back to the home of her father, Edward H. East where he was enu­merated in the 1850 census as a 10-year-old.

He was enumerated in the 1860 census of Davidson County as a 21-year-old teacher living in his mother’s household. He be­came a second lieutenant in Gen. W. B. Stokes’ Fifth Tennessee Cavalry Regiment, U.S.A. which was organized in Dekalb County, Tennessee. Thus, he aligned himself against most of his Tennessee cousins who fought under the “Bonnie Blue Flag.”

Following the Civil War, Edward H. Gowen was elected to the Tennessee State Legislature, according to Dr. John Whittemore Gowen, however no record of this service is found in the Ten­nessee State Archives.

Charles Hays Gowen, son of John Jones Gowen and Amanda Malvina East Gowen, was born in West, Mississippi in 1841. Following the death of his father in Mississippi in 1843, his mother moved her family back to the household of her father.

Charles Hays Gowen appeared in the household of his grandfather, Edward H. East in Davidson County in the 1850 census as “Charles H. Gowen, age 8, born in Mississippi.” In the census of 1860 he appeared in the household of his mother as “C. H. Gowen, 19, student, born in Tennessee.

On December 5, 1870 “C. H. Gowen of Holmes County, Mississippi” received a deed from O. S. Lee, sheriff, to 199 acres located in the county. Consideration was $190, ac­cording to Holmes County Deed Book T, page 391. In 1872 he was listed in the Nashville city directory as “Charles H. Gowen, clerk in the Chancery office, boards at 152 North Cherry.” On February 8, 1878 “Charles H. Gowen of Holmes County” received $1,213.52 for 142 acres from William B. Burwell, according to Holmes County Deed Book 4, page 562.

Charles Hays Gowen and his mother appeared in the 1880 census of Davidson County, Enumeration District 62, page 14, Civil District 2:

“Gowen, Haze 38, born in MS, father born
in TN, mother born in
TN, farmer
Amanda M. 61, born in TN, father born
in VA, mother born in
VA, widow
Adkins, Sarah 25, born in AL, father born
in GA, mother born in
AL, married, servant
Mallie 8, born in TN, father born
in TN, mother born in
AL
William H. 6, born in TN, father born
in TN, mother born in
AL
Laura J. 4, born in TN, father born
in TN, mother born in
AL
Hollice 1, born in TN, father born
in TN, mother born in
AL
East, Oliver 30, born in TN, father born
in TN, mother born in
TN, negro, servant, farm
laborer”

In 1881 he was listed as “Charles H. Gowen, salesman, 139 Church Street, boards at 13 N. Vine,” according to the Nashville city directory. Thomas E. McDonald maintained a grocery and his home at 139 Church Street. In 1886 the di­rectory carried two listings for “Charles H. Gowen” and a third for “Hays Gowen.” One read “Charles H. Gowen, Waller & Gowen, home 173 South Market.” The second read, “Charles H. Gowen, salesman, 213 Church Street, boards at 20 South Cherry.” The third read, “Hays Gowen [Waller & Gowen], boards at 137 South Market.” In 1887 the directory reported, “Charles H. Gowen, clerk, 213 Church Street, boards at 17 South Summer.” In the 1891 directory a listing appeared for “Charles H. Gowen, livestock dealer, 137 South College, home 1063 South Market Street.”

Charles Hays Gowen was married June 11, 1891, at age 49, to Gertrude Whittemore at Micanopy, Florida in Alachua County. In 1893 they lived in Evinston, Florida. He died in Memphis, Mississippi in 1909, at age 67. Later Gertrude Whittemore Gowen lived in Amherst, New Hampshire for three years and at Arlington, Massachusetts until 1911.

One son was born to them:

John Whittemore Gowen born September 5, 1893

John Whittemore Gowen, only child of Charles Hays Gowen and Gertrude Whittemore Gowen, was born in Evinston, Florida September 5, 1893. He lived for a short time in Mem­phis, Mississippi and three years in Amherst, New Hampshire. He attended grammar school and high school in Arlington, Mas­sachusetts. From 1911 until 1915 he attended the University of Maine at Orono. He received his B.S. degree in 1914 and an M.S. degree in 1915.

From 1915 to 1917 he attended Columbia University, New York City where he received a Ph.D. in 1917. He was married in that year to Marie Helena Stadler, also a geneticist. From 1917 until 1926 he was head of the biological laboratory at Maine Agricultural Experiment Station. From 1926 until 1937 he was a professor of genetics at Iowa State College and an associate member of the Rockefeller Institute for Medical Research. In 1964 he became a professor of radiology and radiation biology at Colorado State University, Ft. Collins, Colorado. At his death September 14, 1967 his home was located there at 1430 West Oak Street.

His obituary appeared in the September 16, 1967 edition of “Boulder Weekly News” which stated that “Dr. Gowen died Thursday after suffering a stroke a day earlier. He was known for his studies on inherited resistance to diseases and radiation. He had been a professor of radiation, biology and genetics at Colorado State University since retirement from Iowa State University in 1964.”

He was a member of the National Institute of Health, the Biometic Society, the American Genetic Association, Institute of Mathematical Statistics, American Academy of Arts and Sciences, Zoological Radiation Research Society, Genetics Society of America, Gerontological Society, Sigma Xi, Phi Kappa Phi and Phi Beta Kappa, according to “Who’s Who in America” in 1968.

Children born to Dr. John Whittemore Gowen and Marie He­lena Stadler Gowen include:

Helen Marie Gowen born in 1925
Elaine Stadler Gowen born about 1928

Helen Marie Gowen, daughter of Dr. John Whittemore Gowen and Marie Helena Stadler Gowen, was born in 1925, probably in Maine. She was married about 1950, probably at Ames, to Reid A. Cameron, Jr. In 1990 they lived in Grand Junction, Colorado.

Children born to them include:

Mercedes Cameron born about 1952
Reid A. Cameron, Jr. born about 1955

Elaine Stadler Gowen, daughter of Dr. John Whittemore Gowen and Marie Helena Stadler Gowen, was born about 1928, probably in New York City. She was married about 1953 to Jay T. Wakeley. In 1990 they lived in Raleigh, North Carolina.

Children born to them include:

John Wakeley born about 1955
James Wakeley born about 1958

Tabitha Jones Gowen [Mary Clifton Hunter Shelton identified her as Tabitha John Gowen], daughter of John Jones Gowen and Amanda Malvina East Gowen, was born in 1844 in West, Mississippi. She was named for her father’s first wife. In 1850 she was living with her family in the household of her grandfather, Edwin H. East near Nashville. In the census of 1860 she was enumerated in her mother’s household and was listed as “T. J. Gowen, 16, student, born in Tennessee.”

She was married about 1865 to William Payton Hunter. He died about 1867, and she was remarried to “Captain Patterson who had a brother by the name of E. E. Patterson,” according to Mary Clifton Hunter Shelton. Four children were born to the Pattersons, but only one survived infancy. Tabitha Jones Gowen Hunter Patterson died about 1898, probably at Nashville.

Children born to William Payton Hunter and Tabitha Jones Gowen Hunter include:

John Gowen Hunter born about 1866
Will Hunter born about 1868

Children born to the second union include:

Myrtle Patterson born in 1880

John Gowen Hunter, son of William Payton Hunter and Tabitha Jones Gowen Hunter, was born about 1866, probably at Nashville. He became a school teacher at age 17 and continued as an educator until his death about 1941. His wife and his children, all but two daughters, died in quick succession, suggesting that they were taken in an epidemic. Later he was remarried and became a college president.

Children born to John Gowen Hunter include:

Mary Clifton Hunter born about 1909

Mary Clifton Hunter, daughter of John Gowen Hunter, was born about 1909 and was married to Louis A. Shelton. In 1973 they lived at 2810 Natchez Trace in Nashville.

Will Hunter, son of William Payton Hunter and Tabitha Jones Gowen Hunter, was born about 1868, probably at Nashville. He, like his brother, became a teacher and continued in educa­tion until his death about 1935.

Myrtle Patterson, daughter of Capt. Patterson and Tabitha Jones Gowen Hunter Patterson, was born about 1880. In July 1902, she was married, husband’s name Scroggins. He was for 50 years a conductor on the Louisville-to-Nashville run of a railroad.

Children born to Myrtle Patterson Scroggins include:

Myrtle Scroggins born about 1905

Myrtle Scroggins, daughter of Myrtle Patterson Scroggins, was born about 1905 in Nashville. On November 20, 1932 she was married to John C. Estes in Nashville.

Children born to them include:

Milroy Estes born August 20, 1933
Robert March Estes born March 30, 1934

Wilford Burleson Gowen, son of John Gowen and Lydia Shute Gowen, was born in Nashville March 15, 1804, according to the family bible. On July 26, 1826, he was married to Ursula Rains, believed to be a granddaughter of Capt. John Rains, one of the founders of Nashville. Rev. William Hume officiated at the ceremony, according the September 29, 1826 edition of the “Nashville Whig & National Banner.”

Rev. William Hume was a Presbyterian minister who lived on Market Street in South Nashville. He was born in Scotland in 1769 and was educated at the University of Edinburgh. He was an early-day president of Nashville College and performed most of the early marriages in Nashville, living there for about 30 years. He was a close friend of Gen. Andrew Jackson who presented him with a walking cane following his dedicatory address at Hermitage Presbyterian Church. The cane was later presented to Tennessee State Archives by Georgie Hume Lord, Orange, Virginia, a descendant of Rev. William Hume who died at Nashville May 22, 1833.

When his father died in 1835, it is believed that Wilford Burleson Gowen inherited the western 200 acres of his father’s property, although no court order has been found to date con­firming the inheritance. It is this land, the western third of William Gowen’s preemption that contained the family ceme­tery, and it is this land that was later used for the hospital and airport site.

Wilford Burleson Gowen purchased from Lewis Williams et al seven acres of land on Brown’s Creek July 21, 1836, according to a warranty deed recorded in David­son County Deed Book Y, page 489.

Wilford Burleson Gowen was recorded as the head of one of two Gowen households in the 1840 census of Davidson County, page 317:

“Gowen, Wilford white male 30-40
white female 30-40
white female 10-15
white female 10-15
white male 10-15
white male 5-10
white male 5-10
white male 5-10
white male 0-5
white female 50-60”

Wilford Burleson Gowen was shown to be the owner of nine slaves by the census. Also on page 317 was enumerated the household of Wilford H. Rains, perhaps a namesake, in the 1840 census of Davidson County:

“Rains, Wilford H. white male 40-50
white female 30-40
white male 10-15
white female 10-15
white male 5-10
white female 5-10
white male 5-10
white male 0-5
white female 0-5”

Adjoining was enumerated the household of Blackman Hays, his brother-in-law who had married Minerva Hays. Cleve Weathers wrote in 1997, “My great-grandfather, Blackman Gowen Hays, was born at Locust Hill, the Hays ancestral home, in Davidson County July 29, 1839. He was the great-grandson of Capt. John Rains. In 1870 Peter Franklin Rives, born March 10, 1812 to Peter Rives, bought Locust Hill and in stayed in the Rives family until 1965.”

It is believed that Wilford Burleson Gowen accompanied his brother John Jones Gowen to West, Mississippi in 1841 or he may have moved to Holmes County, Mississippi upon the death of his brother in 1843.

On July 18, 1842 Wilford Burleson Gowen sold 200 acres of land to Jesse Collins for $6,000, according to Davidson County Deed Book 5, page 153. The land conveyed was part of the 640 acres patented to William Gowen on a preemption certificate by the State of North Carolina in 1788. It is this land that is affected by the expansion plans of Metropolitan Nashville Airport.

In this deed Wilford Burleson Gowen reserved an area of “5 square poles that includes the family grave yard, the right of which is reserved in me and my representatives forever.”

The land was described as:

“Beginning at a sassafrass tree in the land about 18″ in diameter near W. B. Gowen’s land and houses, running thence North 1 East 199.75 poles to Murfreesboro Pike, thense South 69.25 East 137.33 poles with said Turn­pike to a stake at Dickerson’s corner, thence South 16 West 7.8 poles to a stake, then South 57 East 5.25 poles to a stake, thence South .25 West 238.33 poles to a stake at Dickerson’s corner, thence West 91.5 poles to a stake at W. B. Gowen’s 2 white oaks a little West of a Sink Hole, thence North 1 East 98 poles to a stake in the field, W. B. Gowen’s other corner, thence West 42 poles to the beginning.”

Shortly after the death of his wife on July 18, 1844, Wilford Burleson Gowen sold his last remaining 25 acres to Charles Hays, his brother’s father-in-law, September 24, 1844 for $1,000, according Davidson County Deed Book 7, page 82. The land was described as:

“Beginning at a rock, the Southwest corner of John Gowen’s original tract and running North with Thomas N. King’s line 98 poles to a rock, thense East with Jesse Collins line 42 poles to a rock, thence South with said Collins’ line 98 poles to a rock, thence West 42 poles to the beginning.”

On October 17, 1845 “Wilford B. Gowen of Holmes County, Mississippi” was security on a note for Blackman Hays, his brother-in-law of Davidson County and John Wilson in a three-way trade involving five slaves, “Martha, age 25; Albert [age not given]; Nancy, age 10; Maryen, age 8; and Minerva, age 1,” ac­cording to Holmes County Deed Book H, page 228.

On October 27, 1848 “Wilford B. Gowen” bought 376 acres from W. B. Smart and his wife, Mary E. A. Smart, making payment with cotton delivered to Yazoo City, Mississippi at six cents per pound, according to Holmes County Deed Book I, page 536.

Wilford Burleson Gowen was initiated into Lexington, Missis­sippi Masonic Lodge No. 24 in Holmes County in 1848. He was member in 1849 and 1850. according to “Abstradex of Annual Returns, Mississippi Free and Accepted Masons, 1801-1851” by Jeanne Hand Henry.

On October 1, 1849 Wilford Burleson Gowen gave a deed to Ed S. Yerger for 17 slaves as security on a $4,000 note, according to Holmes County Deed Book I, page 760. The slaves were specified as “Beverly, age 21; Joe, age 24; David, age 45; Ellick, age 7; Harriett, age 20 and her child, Jane, age 4 and her unnamed infant; Elijah, age 18 and his one-year-old son; Rihen, age 17 and his two sons; Narcissus; Marva, age 25; Clarissa, age 20, her son George and another child [unnamed].”

Wilford Burleson Gowen was initiated into Lexington, Missis­sippi Masonic Lodge No. 24 in Holmes County in 1848. He was member in 1849 and 1850. according to “Abstradex of Annual Returns, Mississippi Free and Accepted Masons, 1801-1851” by Jeanne Hand Henry.

Wilford Burleson Gowen was listed as the head of a house­hold in the 1850 census of Holmes County, August 22, 1850. The household, No. 827-827, was enumerated as:

“Gowen, Wilford B. 46, born in Tennessee
Minerva 20, born in Tennessee
Phillip 17, born in Tennessee
James 16, born in Tennessee
William 14, born in Tennessee
Henry 11, born in Tennessee”

Wilford Burleson Gowen died July 18, 1851, seven years to the day after the death of his wife, according to the family bible. Tombstones for them have not been located in Holmes County.

The estate of “Wilford B. Gowen” was settled August 2, 1852 in Holmes County by James B. Owen, administrator. In the settlement William B. Smart, plaintiff, had sued James B. Owen, administrator, Phillip Gowen, James Gowen, Henry Gowen, Minerva Gowen and Christiana Gowen, defendants for $1,442. Apparently this amount of indebtedness remained on the land that Wilford Burleson Gowen had purchased from Smart October 27, 1848. The 376 acres were sold at a sheriff’s sale to pay the indebtedness, according to Holmes County Deed Book L, page 876. Probate records of Holmes County would probably reveal more of this estate settlement.

Children born to Wilford Burleson Gowen and Ursula Rains Gowen include:

Minerva Gowen born September 14, 1827
Christiana Gowen born January 24, 1829
Phillip Shute Gowen born October 12, 1830
James Hunt Gowen born March 28, 1832
William Rains Gowen born January 28, 1834
Hazael Hewett Gowen born October 23, 1835
Henry Clay Gowen born April 10, 1839
[daughter] born November 3, 1840

Minerva Gowen, daughter of Wilford Burleson Gowen and Ur­sula Rains Gowen, was born September 14, 1827, according to the family bible in the possession of Alvin Jacob Gowen of Forest City, Arkansas.

Rachel Shute Stump, great aunt of Minerva Gowen wrote a codicil to her will October 14, 1859 and left her “niece” Minerva Gowen, a legacy for taking care of her husband, Christopher Stump. Minerva Gowen was actually her grandniece.

She lived most of her life in Holmes County, Mississippi. She appeared there in the 1850 census as a 20-year-old. Upon her death, about 1920, her body was returned to Nashville for burial.

Christiana Gowen, daughter of Wilford Burleson Gowen and Ursula Rains Gowen and namesake of Christianna Gowen Rains, was born January 24, 1829 in Tennessee, according to the family bible. She appeared in the 1840 census of her fa­ther’s household as a “white female, 10-15.” She was recorded in the 1850 census of Holmes County as an 18-year-old. She died December 7, 1875.

Phillip Shute Gowen, son of Wilford Burleson Gowen and Ur­sula Rains Gowen and namesake of his great-grandfather, was born October 12, 1830 near Nashville. He appeared as a “white male, 10-15” in the 1840 census of Davidson County. He was listed in the 1850 census as a 17-year-old. He died in 1859 at the age of 18. His estate was settled by Henry Clay Gowen, his brother August 5, 1868 in Davidson County. His estate received $765.60 as proceeds from the estate of his mother.

James Hunt Gowen, son of Wilford Burleson Gowen and Ursula Rains Gowen, was born March 28, 1832 in Davidson County, according to the family bible. He appeared in the 1840 census of his father’s household as a “white male, age 5-10” In 1850 James Hunt Gowen appeared in his father’s household as a 16-year-old. He was married about 1861 to Margaret “Maggie” J. Richardson Johnson, assumed to be a widow, probably in Holmes County. She was a native of Anson County, North Carolina and “a sister to Dr. Richardson,” according to Dr. John Whittemore Gowen. Buried in Wheeling Cemetery in Holmes County is “W. P. Johnson, born in Anson County, North Carolina October 25, 1801, died September 11, 1859 and his wife, Eliza Pearson, born May 7, 1807, died October 1860.” An individual, possibly their grandson, “Dr. Robert P.[earson?] Johnson, born January 17, 1868, died July 31, 1940” is buried in an adjacent plot.

The marriage records of Holmes County were burned about 1887 in a courthouse fire. Several Gowen individ­uals appear in the later marriage records of the county, but they are all ne­groes, apparently descendants of the slaves of the Gowen brothers.

One child was born to James Hunt Gowen and Margaret “Maggie” Richardson Johnson Gowen in 1862. She died in 1864, according to descendants, and he was remarried about 1866 to Frances “Fannie” Richardson, her sister.

The estate of Margaret “Maggie” Richardson Johnson Gowen was sued in Holmes County January 7, 1870 by W. P. Johnson, assumed to be a relative of her first hus­band. To settle the case of “W.P. Johnson et al vs. Mar­garet J. Gowen” James Hunt Gowen paid $1,427.04 for 475 acres of land sold at public auc­tion, according to Holmes County Deed Book T, page 286. James Hunt Gowen was a commissioner of the Holmes County Cir­cuit Court at that time. He also held public office in Missis­sippi from 1853 to 1861, according to “Mississippi Secretary of State Register of Commissions,” page 289.

Since Olivia Richardson Gowen, daughter of James Hunt Gowen was reported as “born in Alabama” in the 1870 cen­sus, it is believed that James Hunt Gowen lived in Alabama briefly in 1867.

The household of James Hunt Gowen appeared in the 1870 cen­sus of Holmes County, page 77 on July 9 of that year. The family was reported in Durant District, at West’s Sta­tion, Missis­sippi as Household 636-663:

“Gowan, James H. 38, born in TN, farmer,
$5,000 personal property,
$2,000 real estate
Fannie R. 29, born in NC, wife
Mary J. 8, born in MS
Olivia 3, born in AL
William H. 1, born in MS
Johnson, Eliza J. 35, born in NC, teacher”

Living near James Hunt Gowen were three negro Gowen households, apparently his freed slaves.

On Christmas day 1870, James Hunt Gowen deeded land to Herbert P. Johnson, “both of Holmes County” for $800, accord­ing to Holmes County Deed Book 1, page 218. On January 1, 1876 James Hunt Gowen and “wife, Frances R. Gowen” sold land to Mrs. A. E. Green of Holmes County for $1,762.50, ac­cording to Holmes County Deed Book 4, page 96.

On December 2, 1874 James Hunt Gowen deeded to T. A. Bayliss “108 acres, less three acres sold to Wheeling Grave­yard” for $225, according to Holmes County Deed Book 3, page 80. On October 12, 1875 James Hunt Gowen “and wife, Fannie R. Gowen gave a deed of trust to Charles S. McKen­zie, trustee, of the county of Mont­gomery Mississippi for Mrs. Sarah R. Stew­ard of the State of Georgia.” Considera­tion was $1,075, accord­ing to Holmes County Deed Book 3, page 210.

On January 1, 1876 James Hunt Gowen and “wife, Frances R. Gowen” sold land to Mrs. A. E. Green of Holmes County for $1,762.50, ac­cording to Holmes County Deed Book 4, page 96.

The household of James Hunt Gowen appeared in the 1880 cen­sus of Holmes County, Enumeration District 3, page 25 at West Station:

“Gowan, James H. 48, born in TN, father
born in TN, mother
born in TN, bookkeeper
Fannie R. 35, born in NC, father
born in NC, mother
born in NC, wife
Irene 8, born in MS, daughter
Olivia R. 13, born in AL, daughter
Woolford H. 11, born in MS, son
Richardson, Martha 33, born in NC, father
born in NC, mother
born in NC, cook,
sister-in-law
Lucy D. 8, born in MS, daughter
Sam 6, born in MS, son”

A female boarder, a music teacher, age 26 was shown in the household in the enumeration.

On February 4, 1889 James Hunt Gowen sold a house, lot and wagon shop to James H. Green for $2,000, ac­cording to Holmes County Deed Book 12, page 409.

One daughter was born to James Hunt Gowen and Mar­garet “Maggie” Richardson Johnson Gowen:

Mary Jennie Irene Gowen born in 1862

Two children were born to James Hunt Gowen and Frances “Fannie” Richardson Gowen:

Olivia Richardson Gowen born in 1867
Wilford Hays Gowen born December 12, 1868

Mary Jennie Irene Gowen, daughter of James Hunt Gowen and Margaret “Maggie” Richardson Johnson Gowen, was born in 1862, probably at West. Following the death of her mother, her father was remarried to her mother’s sister, Frances “Fannie” Richardson who reared her. Mary Jennie Irene Gowen was listed in the 1895 city directory of Nashville and as employee of the Dun­can Hotel. Later she was married to W. D. Brock, a widower of West whose first wife had died May 5, 1908. W. D. Brock who was born September 25, 1842, died August 7, 1919 and was buried in Wheeling Cemetery in Holmes County beside his first wife who was born July 17, 1846. They were related to Mrs. Mattie A. Green of West. After the death of her husband, Mary Jennie Irene Gowen Brock removed to Car­ruthersville, Missouri to be near her brother, Wilford Hays Gowen. She died there in the latter part of 1932.

Olivia Richardson Gowen, daughter of James Hunt Gowen and Frances “Fannie” Richardson Gowen, was born in 1867 in Al­abama. She appeared as a three-year-old in the 1870 census of her father’s household. In the 1880 census she was reported as age 13. She did not marry. She was employed as a travelling saleswoman for California Perfume Co. She re­tired in 1920 and moved to Carruthersville to make her home with her sister, the widowed Mary Irene Jennie Gowen Brock. She made fre­quent trips to visit a cousin Minnie Dyson who lived in Nashville in 1924. Olivia Richardson Gowen died in October 1936 at age 71 in Carruthersville. Ja­cob Alvin Gowen, a nephew, reported that she was interested in the Gowen family history and had gathered considerable genealogical data, how­ever this material could not be lo­cated after her death.

Wilford Hays Gowen, son of James Hunt Gowen and Frances “Fannie” Richardson Gowen, was born December 12, 1868 in Mississippi, probably at West. He appeared in the household of his father as a one-year-old in the 1870 census. In the 1880 enumeration he was reported as “Woolford H. Gowen.” In the 1888 city directory of Nashville he was listed as “Wilford H. Gowen, surveyor, 411 Union Avenue, boards at 1063 South Market.” In 1892 his listing remained the same, except that his boarding house was located at 630 Woodland.

He was married November 6, 1901 to Mattie Elizabeth Brasher, daughter of Judge Joseph Meredith Brasher and Susan Huff­man Brasher of Cottonwood Point, Mis­souri. The town of Brasher, Missouri was named for this pioneer Missouri family.

Wilford Hays Gowen was a pioneer flood control engi­neer on the Mississippi River and tributaries. He was drowned on Christmas Eve, 1927 in a levee break on the White River near Devalls Bluff, Arkansas. Mattie Eliz­abeth Brasher Gowen died December 20, 1968 and was buried at Carruthersville.

Children born to Wilford Hays Gowen and Mattie Eliz­abeth Brasher Gowen include:

Joseph Hunt Gowen born in November 1903
Wilford Hays Gowen, Jr. born September 24, 1905
Herbert Pickett Gowen born in 1907
Jacob Alvin Gowen born September 23, 1909
Byron B. Gowen born in 1911
Mary Frances Gowen born January 14, 1913
Robert Hugh Gowen born September 30, 1914

Joseph Hunt Gowen, son of Wilford Hays Gowen and Mattie Elizabeth Brasher Gowen, was born in November 1903, proba­bly in Carruthersville. In his early years, like his father, he worked for the Corps of Engineers in flood control. Later he was married, wife’s name unknown, and moved to St. Louis, Missouri where he worked as a construction engineer. Later he owned a tailorshop there. He died childless, and his body was cremated.

Wilford Hays Gowen, Jr, son of Wilford Hays Gowen and Mat­tie Elizabeth Brasher Gowen, was born September 24, 1905 at Carruthersville. He attended the University of Missouri from 1923 through 1925. About 1933 he was married to Dorothy Driver. In 1971 he was an attorney living at 1318 Goodbar Avenue, Memphis, Tennessee.

Dorothy Brown Gowen died January 17, 1999, and her obituary was carried in the “Memphis Commercial-Appeal” of January 18, 1999:

“DorothyBown Gowen, 90, of Memphis, homemaker and musician, died Monday at Kirby Pines Manor after a stroke. Services will be at 11 a.m. Saturday at Memorial Park Funeral Home with burial in Memorial Park. She was a member of St. John’s United Methodist Church for 40 years. Mrs. Gowen, the widow of Wilford Hays Gowen, leaves a daughter, Sue Gowen Samson of Asheville, North Carolina, and three grandchildren. “

Children born to Wilford Hays Gowen, Jr. and Dorothy Driver Gowen include:

Sue Elizabeth Gowen born November 19, 1934
Wilford Hays Gowen III born June 26, 1938

Sue Elizabeth Gowen, daughter of Wilford Hays Gowen and Mattie Elizabeth Brasher Gowen, was born November 19, 1934 in Memphis. She was married March 19, 1961 to Jay B. Sampson. In 1971 they were living in Zurich, Switzerland where he was employed as a stockbroker. In 1999, Sue Elizabeth Gowen Sampson lived in Asheville, North Carolina

Wilford Hays Gowen III, son of Wilford Hays Gowen and Mat­tie Elizabeth Brasher Gowen, was born June 26, 1938 in Mem­phis. He was married September 18, 1961 to Gay Morris of Memphis. In 1971 they lived in Orlando, Florida where he was employed by Trust Company of Florida. In 1973, the couple had returned to Memphis to make their home there.

Children born to Wilford Hays Gowen III and Gay Morris Gowen include:

Mary Morris Gowen born October 30, 1967
Elizabeth G. Gowen born June 1, 1970
Robert Hays Gowen born March 18, 1972

Herbert Pickett Gowen, son of Wilford Hays Gowen and Mattie Elizabeth Brasher Gowen, was born in 1907 in Carruthersville and died in the same year.

Jacob Alvin Gowen, son of Wilford Hays Gowen and Mattie Elizabeth Brasher Gowen, was born September 23, 1909 in Carruthersville. He, like his father and older brother, was em­ployed by the Corps of Engineers in flood control. On Novem­ber 25, 1933 he was married at Elaine, Arkansas to Mrs. Julia Barrow Butler of Forrest City, Arkansas. They continued there in 1961. In 1971, he was living in Sheffield, Alabama in retire­ment. When he was visited in September 1971 by Arlee Claud Gowen he showed him the bible of his ancestor John Gowen. In 1993 he continued in Forrest City. No children were born Jacob Alvin Gowen and Julia Barrow Butler Gowen. He died in Dallas, Texas January 28, 1996, according to Dallas County death records.

Byron B. Gowen, son of Wilford Hays Gowen and Mattie Eliz­abeth Brasher Gowen, was born in 1911 in Carruthersville. He died in infancy.

Mary Frances Gowen, daughter of Wilford Hays Gowen and Mattie Elizabeth Brasher Gowen, was born in Carruthersville January 14, 1914. She was married about 1933 to D. C. Glad­ney who died in 1970. In 1971 she lived in Pitts­burgh, Penn­sylvania. In 1991 she lived in Fayetteville, Arkansas.

Children born to D. C. Gladney and Mary Frances Gowen Gladney include:

Mary Elizabeth Gladney born January 20, 1942
George Albert Gladney born September 24, 1946

Mary Elizabeth Gladney, daughter of D. C. Gladney and Mary Frances Gowen Gladney, was born January 20, 1942. She was married December 18, 1965 to Charles William Caldwell of Los Angeles. In 1971 they lived in Yugoslavia where he was em­ployed in university teach­ing and research. In April 1973 they were living in Fayetteville, Arkansas where he was on the faculty of the University of Arkansas.

Children born to them include:

Sara Elizabeth Caldwell born October 13, 1969
Claire Catherine Caldwell born March 29, 1975

George Albert Gladney, son of D. C. Gladney and Mary Frances Gowen Gladney, was born September 24, 1946. He was graduated from the University of Missouri school of jour­nalism about 1969. He was married to Sue Ann Roark of Chicago, Illinois November 8, 1969. In 1973 they lived in Los Angeles, California where he was employed by the “Los Angeles Times.”

Robert Hugh Gowen, son of Wilford Hays Gowen and Mat­tie Elizabeth Brasher Gowen, was born September 30, 1915. He was married about 1967, wife’s name un­known. In 1971 they lived in St. Louis. No children were born to them.

William Rains Gowen, son of Wilford Burleson and Ursula Rains Gowen, was born January 28, 1834, probably in David­son County. He appeared as a 14-year-old Au­gust 22, 1850 in the Holmes County census. He died there December 27, 1850 at age 16, according to the family bible.

Hazael Hewett Gowen, daughter of Wilford Burleson Gowen and Ursula Rains Gowen, was born October 23, 1835 and died one year later December 18, 1836, ac­cording to the family bible.

Henry Clay Gowen, son of Wilford Burleson Gowen and Ur­sula Rains Gowen, was born April 10, 1839, probably in Davidson County. He appeared as an 11-year-old in the 1850 census of Holmes County, Mississippi. “Corp. Henry C. Gowen” served in Company F, Headquarters Unit, 30th Ten­nessee Infantry Regiment, C.S.A. during the Civil War.

He appeared in Nashville to settle the estate of his brother, Phillip Shute Gowen August 5, 1868. After the war, he became a drygoods merchant in Saundersville, Tennessee. Later he was appointed postmaster in the town. He was married about 1875, at age 36, to Bettie Watson, probably in Sumner County, Tennessee. About 1877 they adopted a daughter.

The household of Henry Clay Gowen was enumerated in the 1880 census of Sumner County, Enumeration District 212, page 22, living in the home of his mother-in-law, Mrs. N. B. Watson. They were recorded June 10, 1880 in Saundersville:

“Watson, N. B. 66, born in TN, father born in
VA, mother born in TN,
widow
Gowen Henry 41, born in TN, father born in
TN, mother born in TN,
drygoods merchant
Bettie 31, born in TN, father born in
mother born in TN, wife
Mannie 3, born in TN, father born in
TN, mother born in TN,
adopted daughter”

Of Henry Clay Gowen, Bettie Watson Gowen and Mannie [Manerva?] Gowen nothing more is known. An unidentified “Clay Gowen” appeared in the 1881 and 1882 editions of the Nashville city directory, living next door to Dr. James J. Gowen. The listing read, “Clay Gowen, carpenter, home at 164 Fillmore.” In 1885 his listing read, “works at 205 Fillmore, home at 200 Fillmore.”

An unnamed daughter of Wilford Burleson Gowen and Ursula Rains Gowen was born November 3, 1840 and died 10 days later.

Amanda Malvina Gowen, daughter of John Gowen and Lydia Shute Gowen, was born March 6, 1806 in Nashville. She was married December 8, 1824 to Albert G. Dunn by the Rev. William Hume, V.D.M. She was mentioned in “Goodspeed’s History of Tennessee,” page 876. The volume, covering Sum­ner, Smith, Macon and Trousdale Counties, stated:

“Amanda Gowen Dunn was the wife of Albert G. Dunn and mother of John G. Dunn, farmer and stock dealer of near Hendersonville, Tennessee who was born in August 1826 in Sumner County. Amanda Gowen Dunn was born in 1806 where the asylum is now located near Nashville. She died in 1868.”

She was reported as a widow, a farmer and a contributor to “History of Davidson County, Tennessee–A Century of History, 1780-1880.”

Children born to them include:

John G. Dunn born in August 1826

Michael C. Dunn was married to Elizabeth Rains, daughter of Capt. John Rains and Christianna Gowen Rains, and they lived on the original pre-emption of Capt. Rains. Their son, Dr. William D. Dunn later practiced medicine in Mobile, Alabama.

Minerva Gowen, daughter of John Gowen and Lydia Shute Gowen, was born June 25, 1808 in Davidson County, according to her tombstone.

On January 20, 1825, at age 16, she was married to Blackman Hays, believed to be a brother of Tabitha Hays who was married to her brother, John Jones Gowen. The marriage ceremony was performed by James Whitsett, according to Davidson County Marriage Book 1, page 299. It is believed that two sons were born to them.

Blackman Hays was enumerated in the 1840 census of David­son County as the head of a household composed of:

“Hays, Blackman white male 30-40
white female 30-40
white male 15-20
white female 10-25
white male 5-10
white female 5-10
white male 0-5
white female 0-5
white male 60-70
white male 30-40
negro female 10-24”

Minerva Gowen Hays died May 26, 1843, according to her tombstone in the Hays family cemetery at the rear of the residence of Charles Hays. The inscription on her tombstone read, “This monument is erected to the memory of Mrs. Minerva Hays, wife of Blackman Hays and daughter of John Gowen, Born June 25th 1808, Died May 26th 1843, Aged 34 years, 11 months and 1 day,”

Blackman Hays was remarried December 31, 1843 to Nancy E. Blackman, according to Davidson County marriage records. Blackman Hays, “aged about 41 years, died in Davidson county on the 30th ultimate,” according to the July 11, 1851 edition of the “National Banner & Nashville Whig.”

Maria Louise [or Mariah Lydia] Gowen, daughter of John Gowen and Lydia Shute Gowen, was born January 26, 1810 in Davidson County. She was married November 5, 1828 to Wil­ford H. Rains, son of William Rains and grandson of Capt. John Rains and Christiana Gowen Rains.

On October 16, 1837 Wilford H. Rains bought 320 acres lo­cated nine miles south of Nashville, according to Davidson County Deed Book I, page 310. When his descendants sold the farm in 1969, they retained title to the family cemetery located on the farm.

The household of Wilford H. Rains, was enumerated in the 1840 census of Davidson County, page 317:

“Rains, Wilford H. white male 40-50
white female 30-40
white male 10-15
white female 10-15
white male 5-10
white female 5-10
white male 5-10
white male 0-5
white female 0-5”

On the same page was enumerated Wilford Burleson Gowen, brother to Maria Louise Gowen Rains. He was the owner of nine slaves. Christiana Gowen, daughter of Wilford Burleson Gowen and Ursula Rains Gowen and a namesake of her great-grandmother Christiana Gowen Rains, was born January 24, 1829, according to the family bible.

Maria Louise Gowen Rains died July 7, 1849, at the age of 39, during a cholera epidemic that spread from New Orleans up the Mississippi to Tennessee. Her youngest child was only 17 months old, according to Elizabeth Rains Webb, a descendant of Springfield, Tennessee. For details of their descendants, see his section of the manuscript.

Gowen Research Foundation Phone:806/795-8758, 795-9694
5708 Gary Avenue E-mail: gowen@sbcglobal.net
Lubbock, Texas, 79413-4822 GOWENMS.042, 02/18/03
Internet: http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.com/~gowenrf

Family Researchers:

Jimmie Kathryn James Black, 9645 Pine Forest NE, Bent Mountain, VA, 24059.
William Dirk Calvin, Box 58143, Nashville, Tennessee, 37205
Miriam Dendy, 1800 Ballard SE, Huntsville, Alabama, 35801, 205/534-0947
Susan M. Gilbert, Route 3, Box 196, Warrenton, VA, 21186.
Arlee Gowen, 5708 Gary Avenue, Lubbock, Texas, 79413, 806/795-8758, gowen@sbcglobal.net
Jerry A. Gowen, Box 641, Antioch, Tennessee, 37011
Thomas Mason Gowen, Route 7, Box 7904, Manchester, Tennessee, 37355, 615/728-7495
Pamela Hicks, isobel@aol.com
James A. Hughes, 112 Drummond Road, Huntsville, AL, 35802
Sally Gentry Johnston, Box 892, Jacksonville, Alabama, 36265, 205/435-8519
Sarah Foster Kelley, 567 Whispering Hills Drive, Nashville, TN, 37211
William B. Landers, Box 1174, Pocasset, MA, 02559
Michael McCary, 125 SE 11th, Portland, OR, 97214
Mary Northcutt Newman, M.D, Drawer H, Cassville, MO, 65625, 417/847-2624
Betty Buchanan Ragsdale, 500 Baxter Lane, Nashville, TN, 37220.
Betty Shea, 506 Front Street, Heber Springs, AR, 72543
Shari Lynn Southard, 5240 W. Las Palmaritas, Glendale, Ari­zona, 85302, 602/842-4419
Joy Jean Quimby Stearns, 618 Greenwood Circle, Mt. Olive, AL, 35117
Betty Stevens, 2804 W. Boyce, Ft. Worth, TX, 76133
Cleve Weathers,
Elizabeth Rains Webb, Route 2, Box 412, Springfield, TN, 37122

Membership Application

Gowen Research Foundation 806/795-8758 or 795-9694
5708 Gary Avenue E-mail: gowen@sbcglobal.net
Lubbock, Texas, 79413

Website: http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.com/~gowenrf

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