002 James Gowen – GM – Granville, NC, Stafford, Westmoreland, Va

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T H E G O W E N M A N U S C R I P T Page 101 http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~gowenrf/gowenms002.pdf
THE GOWEN MANUSCRIPT
File: GOWENMS.002, Page 101

James Gowen, [Edward, Jr.4, Edward3, William2, Mihil1] son of Edward Gowen, Jr, was born about 1725, probably in Charles City County. He was married about 1742, wife’s name unknown. It is believed that he also removed to Granville County, North Carolina about 1750.

“James Gowin” was a “sworn chain carrier” on a patent of 616 acres issued March 1, 1752 to James Hunt “on branches of Island Creek and Mitchell’s Creek, adjoining Davis’s corner, Hunt’s line, Collin’s line, Tynel’s line and Holly’s line,” according to Granville County Surveyor’s Book11, page 382.

“James Going” received a land grant from the Earl of Granville March 4, 1752, according to Granville County Deed Book B, page 439. James Gowen and William Gowen, his son were taxable in the 1759 tax list of John Pope and were delinquent taxpayers that year.

On November 29, 1760 “James Going” received a patent to 529 acres in Granville County located in St. John’s parish, “adjoining Winnirgum’s line, Melone’s line and Robert’s line,” according to Surveyor’s Book 14, page 108. The survey was signed by James Gowen and Joseph Gowen. “William Going, sworn chain carrier” was a witness.

“James Gowing and his son, William Going” were tithables in Fishing Creek District in the 1762 tax list of Granville County, page 45. James Going was recorded as “insolvent” from 1762 through 1764. “James Gowing refused to list his wife and children,” suggesting that he was regarded as “free colored” and that he argued that his wife and children were “white.” At that time, the law required that tithes were to be paid by all white men over the age of 16 on the blacks in their household, male and female, including “all mulattos, mustees, quadroons and all persons of mixed blood to the fourth generation over the age of 12.” Therefore, if a white man had a mixed blood wife, he paid a tithe on her and her children over 12. When a notation appeared on the tax list that a man refused to pay a tithe on his wife, he was arguing that she was “white.” This law was in force until 1786. James Going was recorded as “insolvent” from 1762 through 1764.

Dr. Virginia Easley DeMarce suggests that James Gowen may have moved back across the state line to Virginia to settle in adjacent Brunswick County. She reported that James Gowen received a land grant in Brunswick County in 1762, citing Virginia Land Office Book 15. If this is the same James Gowen, his finances and [perhaps his character] greatly improved. He went from insolvency to be a property owner, a slave owner and a taxpayer.

“James Gowin” received a grant of 376 acres “adjoining land of Brewer, Perry and Cook on Carter’s Creek” May 23, 1763, according to Brunswick County deed records.
It is believed that James Gowen was remarried about 1775. wife’s name Amy.

Greensville County was formed from Brunswick County in 1783 and James Gowen found himself in the new county. “James Going” was listed as the head of a household of seven people in the 1783 census of Greensville County, page 54, near the locations of “Drury Going” and “Thomas Going.” He was taxable in that year on “1 poll, 2 slaves, 2 horses and 8 cattle,” according to “The 1787 Census of Virginia,” page 778.

“James Gowing, Henry Gowing and Avant Massey jointly posted a bond of £50 “to Miherris Parish to help support the child of Mary Hill who was an unlawful child as yet to be born,” according to Greensville County Deed Book 1, page 173.

“James Gowing” was listed as surety for the marriage of “Amy Gowing” to William Harris December 19, 1805 in Greensville County, according to “Greensville County Marriages, 1781-1825” by Catherine Lindsey Knorr.

“James Gowing” was recorded as the head of a household in 1810, according to “Index to 1810 Virginia Census.” His household was composed of “2 whites and 7 slaves.”

“James Gowing, Sr.” wrote his will August 12, 1816, according to Greensville County Will Book 2, page 447. Mentioned in the will was “wife, Amey; son, James Gowing, Jr; grandson, James Alked Gowing; son, Henry Gowing; son, Benjamin Gowing; grandsons, Benjamin Howard, Harbart Howard, Hartwell Howard and James Howard and daughter, Amy Harris.” Benjamin Young was his executor.

Children born to James Gowen and his first wife are believed to include:

William Gowen born about 1743
Drury Gowen born about 1748
Thomas Gowen born about 1763
James Gowen, Jr. born about 1764
Frederick Gowen born about 1766

Children born to James Gowen and Amy Gowen are believed to include:

Nancy T. Gowen born about 1776
Henry Gowen born about 1779
Benjamin Gowen born about 1782
Amy Gowen born about 1785

William Gowen, [James5 , Edward, Jr4 , Edward3 , William2 , Mihil1 ] son of James Gowen, was born about 1743, perhaps in Charles City County. He was brought to Granville County, North Carolina about 1750. He was shown as “taxable” along with his father in the 1759 tax list of Granville County.

“William Gowing” along with his father were recorded as tithables in Fishing Creek District in the 1762 tax list of Granville County, page 45. He was married about 1768, wife’s name unknown.

Paul Heinegg suggests that he was the “William Going” who died in adjacent Chatham County, North Carolina in 1783. An inventory of the estate of “William Goan” was itemized in the Moore County Will Book A, page 322 and 323.

Children born to William Gowen include:

Nancy Gowen born about 1770
John Gowen born about 1771
Elizabeth Gowen born about 1772
Ann Gowen born about 1774
William Gowen born about 1775
Mary Gowen born about 1777

Nancy Gowen, [William6 , James5 , Edward, Jr4 , Edward3 , William2 , Mihil1 ] daughter of William Gowen, was born about 1770. After the death of her father, she was ordered “bound to William Cope” by the Chatham County Court on November 10, 1783.

John Gowen, [William6 , James5 , Edward, Jr4 , Edward3 , William2 , Mihil1 ] son of William Gowen, was born about 1771. He was about 12 years old when he was “bound as an apprentice farmer to William Riddle” by the Chatham County Court November 10, 1783. He was rebound to James Sutter in May 1785.

Elizabeth Gowen, [William6 , James5 , Edward, Jr4 , Edward3 , William2 , Mihil1 ] daughter of William Gowen, was born about 1772. She was about 12 years old when she was bound apprentice by the Chatham County Court to William Douglass November 8, 1784.

Ann Gowen, [William6 , James5 , Edward, Jr4 , Edward3 , William2 , Mihil1 ] daughter of William Gowen, was born about 1774. She was about 10 years old when she was bound apprentice to James Howard by the Chatham County Court November 8, 1784.

William Gowen, [William6 , James5 , Edward, Jr4 , Edward3 , William2 , Mihil1 ] son of William Gowen, was born about 1775. He was bound as an apprentice farmer to George Desmukes November 10, 1783 by the Chatham County Court. William Gowen was listed as “insolvent” in the 1806 tax list of Chatham County.

Mary Gowen, [William6 , James5 , Edward, Jr4 , Edward3 , William2 , Mihil1 ] daughter of William Gowen, was bound to the care of William Cope by the Chatham County Court. She was later removed from his care.

Drury Gowen, [James5 , Edward, Jr4 , Edward3 , William2 , Mihil1 ] son of James Gowen, was born about 1748, probably in Granville County. His father moved back to Brunswick County, Virginia about 1762. Drury Gowen was married about 1769, wife’s name unknown. When Greensville County was organized from Brunswick County in 1781, Drury was living in the new county.

“Drury Going” was enumerated as the head of a household of four in the 1783 census of Greensville County, page 55, adjacent to Thomas Going, according to “Heads of Families, Virginia, 1790.”

“Drury Going” was a taxpayer in Greensville County in 1787, according to “The 1787 Census of Virginia.” page 778. “Drury Going” was bondsman for the marriage of Robert Brooks Corn to Jinsey Jeffers March 26, 1795 in Greensville County. Robert Brooks Corn had been bondsman for the marriage of Mark Going, son of Drury Gowen, September 29, 1794. “Mark Going” appeared as a taxpayer in adjoining Southampton County in 1830, rendering a tax on “three pigs and Indian land.” For him to have Indian land, his mother would have had to have been a member of the Nottaway Indian tribe, a group that observed matriarchal succession.

Drury Gowen was regarded by Paul Heinegg as the father of:

Edmund Going born about 1770
Sherwood Going born about 1772
Allen Going born about 1773
Mark Going born about 1775

Edmund Going, [Drury6 , [James5 , Edward, Jr4 , Edward3 , William2 , Mihil1 ] regarded as a son of Drury Going, was born about 1770 in Brunswick County. On November 5, 1799 he purchased 200 acres on Sandy Creek in Mecklenburg County, Virginia, according to Mecklenburg County Deed Book 10, page 176.

He purchased 124 acres from Frederick Going, regarded as his uncle, July 6, 1801, according to Person County North Carolina Deed Book C, page 290.

Going sold this land shortly, according to deeds proved in Person County.

On June 5, 1804 Edmund Going mortgaged a slave named “Patty” and his livestock for £90, according to Person County Deed Book C, page 453.

“Edmund Gowen” was a taxpayer in 1805 on the Person County tax roll in “Capt. Street’s Company.”

“Edmund Gowen” was married October 21, 1807 to Lettice Gray, according to “Person County, North Carolina Marriage Records, 1792-1868.” Thomas Pool was the bondsman who signed Bond No. 107649, and John Halloway was a witness to the ceremony. Children born to Edmund Gowen and Lettice Gray Gowen are unknown.

Sherwood Going, [Drury6 , [James5 , Edward, Jr4 , Edward3 , William2 , Mihil1 ] son of Drury Going, was born about 1772 in Brunswick County. Sherwood Going was married to Ruth Bennett April 30, 1793, according to “Caswell County, North Carolina Marriages, 1759-1850,” Record 1108, witness Ald Murphy, Court Clerk, Bond No. 15503. James Gillaspy was the bondsman. Children born to Sherwood Going and Ruth Bennett Sherwood are unknown.

Sherwood Going was remarried to Betsy Coventon December 31, 1804, according to “Caswell County, North Carolina Marriages, 1759-1850,” Record 1108, witness Ald Murphey, Court Clerk, Bond No. 55676. James Gillaspy was again his bondsman. Of Sherwood Going and Betsy Coventon Going nothing more is known.

Allen Going, [Drury6 , [James5 , Edward, Jr4 , Edward3 , William2 , Mihil1 ] son of Drury Going, was born about 1773 in Brunswick County. He appeared in the 1793 tax list of Person County, North Carolina in St. Lawrence District, page 93, and paid a tax on one poll. The 1793 tax list is the earliest one on record in Person County which was created from land from Caswell County in 1791 and adjoined Granville County on the west.

“Allen Going” was bondsman for the marriage of Ezekiel Matthews to Sarah Cumbo, “free colored” May 7, 1793 in Caswell County.

“Allen Goins” was married April 7, 1795 to “Rebecca Goins,” according to “Person County, North Carolina Marriage Records, 1792-1868” by Katharine Kerr Kendall. “Guttridge Goins” and Jesse Dickins were securities for the marriage of Allen Going and Rebecca Goins Going. In 1795 “Allen Gowin” was a purchaser at the estate sale of Edmond Handley.
“Allin Goin, free colored” appeared as the head of an “other free” household of seven in the 1800 census of Person County. Since the household was free colored, no individuals were recorded. “Edward Goin, Household 196 of six members” and “Edwd. [?] Goin, Household 209” were also recorded as “free coloed” in the 1800 census.

“Allen Gowen” appeared in the 1805 tax list of Person County in “Capt. Pennick’s Company.” Allen Going was the head of a household of 10 “free colored” in the 1810 census of Person County, page 625. Children born to Allen Going and Rebecca Goins Going are unknown.

Mark Going, [Drury6 , James5 , Edward, Jr4 , Edward3 , William2 , Mihil1 ] son of Drury Going, was born about 1775, probably in Brunswick County. Mark Going was married to Sally Jones September 29, 1794 in Greensville County, according to the research of Hoyt Goin of Russellville, Arkansas. Thomas Jones, father of Sally Jones Going, gave his consent. Robert Brooks Corn appeared as security. Witnesses were Henry Mangum and Shadrach Jurnekin [Jernigan], according to “Greensville County, Virginia Marriages, 1781-1853.” Robert Brooks Corn was the son of Robert Corn, a prominent “free colored” who had fought in the French & Indian War and in the Revolutionary War and his wife Priscilla Corn.

Mark Going appeared as the head of a “free colored” household of three in the 1820 census of Greensville County. “Mark Going” paid tax in adjoining Southampton County in 1830 on “three pigs and Indian land.” His owning Indian land suggests that he was a member of the Nottaway tribe. Children born to Mark Going and Sally Jones Going are unknown.

Thomas Gowen, [James5 , Edward, Jr4 , Edward3 , William 2 , Mihil1 ] son of James Gowen, was born about 1763, probably in Brunswick County. “Thomas Going,” living alone, [or the head of a free colored household] was enumerated as the head of a household in the 1783 census of Greensville County, page 55, adjacent to his brother, “Drury Going,” according to “Heads of Families, Virginia, 1790.”

“Drury Going” paid the tax assessed on Thomas Gowen in 1787, according to “The 1787 Census of Virginia,” page 778. Thomas Going was married to Sarah Jones July 24, 1794 in Greensville County. Sarah Jones, a sister to Sally Jones, was born about 1776 to Thomas Jones and Rebecca Jones, “free colored.”

William W. Dungell, “free colored” was security, according to “Tyler’s Quarterly,” Volume 3.

Thomas Gowen was enumerated as the head of a household of six “other free” in the 1810 census of adjoining Halifax County, North Carolina.

Children born to Thomas Gowen and Sarah Jones Gowen are believed to include:

Frederick Gowen born about 1795
Drury Gowen born about 1798
Hartwell Gowen born about 1803
Jerry Gowen born about 1804

Frederick Gowen, [Thomas6 , James5 , Edward, Jr4 , Edward3 , William2 , Mihil1 ] regarded as a son of Thomas Gowen and Sarah Jones Gowen, was born about 1795, probably in Greensville County, Virginia.

“Frederick Gowen, free colored,” appeared as the head of a household of nine “free colored” in the 1820 census of Halifax County, page 18, according to “Index to the 1820 Census of North Carolina” by Dorothy Williams Potter.

Drew Gowen, free colored male, was enumerated in an adjacent listing on page 18.
“Fred Goins” sold land in Halifax County to Isham Mills by a deed proved November 21, 1836, according to Halifax County court minutes. Isham Mills was a son of Elizabeth Mills, “free colored.” Frederick Gowen purchased other land shortly after, and this deed was proved February 19, 1838.

“Frederic Gowins” reappeared in the 1840 census of Halifax County, page 4, as the head of a household composed of:

“Gowins, Frederic free colored male 36-55
free colored female 36-55
free colored female 10-24
free colored female 10-24
free colored female 10-24
free colored male 0-10
free colored female 0-10
free colored female 0-10”

Twice the Halifax County Court authorized Frederick Gowan to carry a gun, once on August 17, 1841 and again on November 23, 1843.

“Frederick Going” was recorded in the 1860 census of Halifax County as the head of a household:

“Going, Frederick 66, born in VA, farmer, mulatto, $100 real estate, $148 personal property Roda 70, born in NC, mulatto”

Children born to Frederick Gowen and Roda Gowen might include:

Sally Gowen born about 1816

Sally Gowen, [Frederick7 , Thomas6 , James5 , Edward, Jr4 , Edward3 , William2 , Mihil1] regarded as a daughter of Frederick Gowen and Roda Gowen, was born in Halifax County about 1816. “Sally Goins” was married January 13, 1814 to Guilford Mills in Halifax County, John Jordan, bondsman. Guilford Mills was born about 1785 to Daniel Mills, “free colored” Revolutionary soldier. Guilford Mills, “16-year-old orphan of Daniel Mills,” was ordered bound apprentice August 18, 1801 by the Halifax County Court.

Drury Gowen, [Thomas6 , James5 , Edward, Jr4 , Edward3 , William2 , Mihil1 ] regarded as a son of Thomas Gowen and Sarah Jones Gowen, was born about 1798, probably in Greensville County.

“Drew Goings, free colored,” appeared as the head of a household of 11 “free colored” in the 1820 census of Halifax County, page 17, according to “Index to the 1820 Census of North Carolina.”

“Drew Going” was recorded as the head of Household 720 in the 1830 census of Halifax County:

“Going, Drew free colored male 36-55
free colored female 36-55
free colored female 10-24
free colored male 10-24
free colored female 10-24
free colored male 0-10”

Hartwell Gowen, [Thomas6 , James5 , Edward, Jr4 , Edward3 , William2 , Mihil1 ] regarded as a son of Thomas Gowen and Sarah Jones Gowen, was born about 1803. He was permitted to carry a gun by the Halifax County Court August 17, 1841.

Jerry [Jeremiah] Gowen, [Thomas6 , James5 , Edward, Jr4 , Edward3 , William2 , Mihil1 ] regarded as a son of Thomas Gowen and Sarah Jane Gowen, was born about 1804 in Halifax County.

“Jerry Gowins, free colored,” appeared as the head of a household in the 1840 census of Halifax County, page 2. The family was composed of:

“Gowins, Jerry free colored male 24-36
free colored female 10-24
free colored male 0-10
free colored female 0-10”

Jerry Gowen was permitted to carry a gun by Halifax County Court August 17, 1841.
“Jerry Going, mulatto” was recorded as the head of Household 292-268 in the 1860 census of Halifax County:

“Going, Jerry, 57, born in NC, farmer, $264 real estate, $328 personal property, mulatto, illiterate
Louvenia 50, born in NC, spinner, mulatto, illiterate
Carolina 20, born in NC, spinner, mulatto
Anderson 15, born in NC, farm lab, mulatto
Hilliard 16, born in NC, farm lab, mulatto
Henry 13, born in NC, mulatto
Lemuel 12, born in NC, mulatto
Emma 12, born in NC, mulatto
Safronia 11, born in NC, mulatto
James 10, born in NC, mulatto
Margarett 9, born in NC, mulatto
Jeramiah 8, born in NC, mulatto
Louann 3, born in NC, mulatto
Monford, Joshua 21, born in NC, train-hand, $15 personal, property, mulatto, illiterate”

Children born to Jerry Gowen and Louvenia Gowen include:

Carolina Gowen born about 1840
Anderson Gowen born about 1845
Hilliard Gowen born about 1844
Henry Gowen born about 1847
Lemuel Gowen [twin] born about 1848
Emma Gowen [twin] born about 1848
Safronia Gowen born about 1849
James Gowen born about 1850
Margarett Gowen born about 1841
Jeremiah Gowen born about 1852
Louana Gowen born about 1857

James Gowen, Jr, [James5 , Edward, Jr4 , Edward3 , William2 , Mihil1 ] regarded as a son of James Gowen and Amy Gowen, was born about 1764 in Brunswick County. “James Going” was married November 24, 1785 to Rebecca Adams, according to “Greensville County, Virginia Marriages, 1781-1850.” Security was Reuben Adams. James Gowen, Jr. was mentioned in the will of his father written August 12, 1816.

James Gowen, Jr. removed across the state line into adjoining Northampton County, North Carolina. “James Gowing” was listed as the head of a household in the 1820 census of Northampton County, according to “Index to the 1820 Census of North Carolina.”

“James Gowing” wrote his will there October 11, 1836, and it was proved in the following December, according to Northampton County Will Book 4, page 147.

In his will he mentioned “wife, Rebecca; daughters, Martha, Mary and Jane and brother, Benjamin Gowing in Virginia.”

The household of “Rebecca Goings” was enumerated in the 1840 census of Northampton County, page 103:

“Goings, Rebecca white female 60-70 white female 30-40”

Eight slaves were also reported in the household of which five members were in agriculture.

Children born to James Gowen, Jr. and Rebecca Adams Gowen include:

Martha Gowen born about 1788
Mary Gowen born about 1790
Jane Gowen born about 1801

Frederick Gowen, [James5, Edward, Jr. .4, Edward3, William2, Mihil1] son of James Gowen, was born about 1766, probably in Brunswick County, Virginia.

When Greensville County was organized in 1783, Frederick Gowen was a resident of the new county. William Powell paid tax for him in 1787 in Greensville County, according to “The 1787 Census of Virginia,” page 779.

“Frederick Goen” secured a marriage bond in adjacent Mecklenburg County March 9, 1789 to marry Susey “Sookie” Chavous [Chavis], according to Mecklenburg County, Virginia Marriages, 1785-1850.” Henry Chavous, Sr, father of the bride, gave consent. Robert Singleton, James Stewart and Belar Chavous witnessed his letter of consent. Security was Frederick Ivey, and Phillip Cox was the minister. Henry Chavous, Sr. was the head of a large, prominent “free colored” family in Mecklenburg County. Children born to Frederick Gowen and Susey “Sookie” Chavous Gowen are unknown. Frederick Ivey, a prominent “free colored” individual was married there December 14, 1795 to Prissy Stewart, Frederick Gowen purchased 250 acres “on the east side of Blue Wing Creek” in Person County, North Carolina September 16, 1793, according to Person County Deed Book A, page 147. He sold 124 acres of this land July 6, 1801 to Edmund Going, regarded as his nephew, while a resident of Mecklenburg County, according to Person County Deed Book C, page 290.

“Frederick Goen” secured a marriage bond December 29, 1800 in Mecklenburg County to marry Mary Brandon, according to Mecklenburg County, Virginia Marriages, 1785-1850.” They were married January 1, 1801 by William Richards, minister. Security was Ephriam Ivy. The minister’s return showed the name of the groom as “Frederick Gowen.” The bride was regarded as a daughter of William Brandon and Elizabeth Brandon, a free colored family of Mecklenburg County.

“Fedrick Gowen” paid tax on “1 poll” in the 1805 Person County tax roll in “Capt. Street’s Company.”

Frederick Gowen, “free colored” enlisted in Revolutionary service in the Virginia Continental Line in Brunswick County, according to “Genealogical Abstracts of Revolutionary War Pension Files” abstracted by Virgil D. White who stated that he lived in the part of the county that became Granville County, North Carolina after the Revolutionary War.

Frederick Gowen, “free colored male” was listed in the 1830 census of Lauderdale County, page 206, as the head of a household:

” Gowen, Fred free colored male 55-100
colored female 55-100
colored male 24-36
colored female 24-36″

On March 21, 1838 he lived in Lawrence County, Alabama where he made an application for Pension No. R4167.

Frederick Gowen of Lawrence County, Alabama made an application for a Revolutionary War pension in a “non-military capacity.” The pension was rejected, according to “Report on Rejected and Suspended Pensions Reported to Congress” in 1852. The report was printed in “Revolutionary Soldiers in Alabama.”

The State of Alabama}
County of Lawrence } SS

On this 21 day of March 1838 personally appeared in the Circuit Court now holden for the said County of Lawrence Frederick Gowen a free man of Color a resident of said County of Lawrence aged about 78 years who being first duly sworn according to Law doth on his oath make the following declaration in order to obtain the benefit of the provision made by the act of Congress passed June 7th 1832:

That he served in the troops of the state of Virginia various terms of duty during the Revolutionary War, of which he will give as precise an account as his memory will permit him.

That he was born in Bellfield on Maherin River [sic: Belfield on Meherrin River] in what was called Brunswick County untill after the revolutionary war when that part of it was struck off into a new county called Greensville. He does not know what year he was born as no record of his birth was preserved. I lived in Brunswick when I was drafted under No. 7, was then about 16 years of age, but do not recollect how long it was before I was called into service.

I served as near as I can recollect five tours of duty of six weeks each. The first tour was under Capt. James Robertson or Capt. Cock. Nothing memorable happened during this tour. We formed no junction with the regular army, but spent the time mostly in Camp at Stone’s Mills [near Jamestown] & Cabin Point [in Surry County] The second tour was under one of the above named Captains. The third or fourth tour of duty was performed under Capt. Lewis[?] House, Maj. William Boys [sic: Boyce] of Surry and Col. Austin commanding. This was about the time of the Battle at Guilford [Guilford Courthouse NC, March 15, 1781]. We had been stationed at Cabin Point where I acted as a cook when we received order to march to Petersburg. On the march I was sent by Major Boys to a house near the road to have some horses fed and Corp. John Woodruff & a private were sent in company. The only reason I mention this is that Corp. Woodruff was killed on our arrival in Petersburg. There we found great confusion, the inhabitants were flying in every direction and our troops were ordered to form.

I was there ordered away with four horses, Maj. Bais[?] Col. Aufling, Capt. House & my own to take care of them somewhere near the rendezvous ground which was in the direction of Chesterfield Courthouse. I crossed the Pocahontas Bridge and while in sight, the British commenced the attack – our troops came up and were preparing to act near Chesterfield Courthouse when there was an alarm that the British light horse were upon us and we immediately marched and at Richmond fell in with a part of Gen’l. Washington’s command called the Morgan’s army. [See note below.]

In a short time I received my discharge & returned home where I found the country in great confusion from the march of the British army through it from Guilford.  I served two tours of duty under Capt. Turner Bynum. There was nothing worth mentioning except in the last tour. We were stationed 30 miles South of Jamestown.

Sugar Bynum, brother of the Captain was taken sick and returned home on the captain’s horse. Before the horse was sent back we were ordered to little York, and I was directed to remain for the horse and joined the army at York in some 8 or 10 days. I found my company stationed up the river to prevent the British from returning that way. This was about a week before the Cornwallis surrender [October 19, 1781].

That he has no documentary proof & that he knows of no person whose testimony he can procure who can testify to his service.

He hereby relinquishes every claim whatever to a pension or anuity except the present; and he declares that his name is not on the pension roll of any agency in any state.

Frederick [his X mark] Gown

Carmi Illinois 2nd December 1842
Sir [James L. Edwards, Commissioner of Pensions]

An old colored man by the name of Frederick Goin has come here well recommended from Alabama and has applied to me to aid him in geting a pension. I suppose from what I can learn that a declaration for him has been forwarded to you from Alabama a few years ago. The object of these lines is to ask information from you whether that is the case and what are the objections that have to be removed before he can get the pension or whether his case is a hopeless one.

He is quite inteligent for a person of his colour and age and I cannot doubt but what he served in the Revolution as he represents. That is, that being a free man of color he was subject to militia duty, that he belonged to class No. 7 in his company and was called out to serve five tours of six weeks each under Captains Robinson, Bynum, Cock & House. That he resided in Brunswick County Virginia. Will you please answer these lines and let me know whether it is likely I can do anything for him.

Respectfully your ob’t ser’t
Daniel Hay”

NOTES:
The British under Lord Cornwallis entered Virginia beginning on May 10,1781.  On the 23rd of that month Banastre Tarleton’s feared Legion [probably the “light horse” referred to by Gowen] raided Chesterfield Courthouse and captured many militiamen.

The “Morgan’s army” referred to may have been the rifle corps raised and commanded by Gen. Daniel Morgan, although he did not join the main army under Washington until July 6.

There is no further information in the file relating to the rejection of this application.
Southern Campaign American Revolution Pension Statements Pension Application of Frederick Gowen (Going): R4167

Transcribed and annotated by C. Leon Harris
Children born to Frederick Gowen and Mary Brandon Gowen are unknown.

Nancy T. Gowen, [James5, Edward, Jr..4, Edward3, William2, Mihil1] regarded as a daughter of James Gowen and Amy Gowen, was born in Brunswick County about 1776. She was married December 26, 1794 to Edwin Howard. Benjamin Gowen was bondsman for the marriage. It is believed that she died prior to the date of her father’s will written August 12, 1816.

Four grandsons were mentioned in the will of James Gowen:

Benjamin Howard born about 1789
Harbert Howard born about 1791
Hartwell Howard born about 1793
James Howard born about 1796

Henry Gowen, [James5, Edward, Jr..4, Edward3, William2, Mihil1] regarded as a son of James Gowen and Amy Gowen, was born about 1779 in Brunswick County. “Henry Gowyn” was married February 22, 1810 to Mrs. Martha Tomlinson, a widow, according to Greensville County Marriage Book 8, page 7. He was mentioned in the will of his father written August 12, 1816. Children born to Henry Gowen and Martha Tomlinson Gowen are unknown.

Benjamin Gowen, [James5, Edward, Jr..4, Edward3, William2, Mihil1] regarded as a son of James Gowen and Amy Gowen, was born about 1782 in Brunswick County. He was the bondsman for the marriage of Nancy T. Gowen to Edwin Harris in 1794. “Benjamin Going” was married March 29, 1806 to Cathrine Harris, according to “Greensville County, Virginia Marriages, 1781-1850.”

Susan Gregory was security. Cathrine Harris Gowen is regarded as a sister of William Harris who was married to Amy Gowen.

On January 26, 1809 Benjamin Gowen received Grant No. 58 for seven acres of land “adjoining Peter Avant and Isaac R. Walton, Jr,” according to Greensville County Deed Book 1809, page 249.

Benjamin Gowen was mentioned in the will of his father written August 12, 1816. James Gowen, Jr. mentioned “brother, Benjamin in Virginia” in his will written October 11, 1836 in Northampton County, North Carolina. Children born to Benjamin Gowen and Cathrine Harris Gowen are unknown.

Amy Gowen, [James5, Edward, Jr.4, Edward3, William2, Mihil1] daughter of James Gowen and Amy Gowen, was born about 1785 in Greensville County.

“Amy Gowing” was married December 19, 1805 to William Harris, according to “Greensville County, Virginia Marriages, 1781-1850.” “Amey Harris” was mentioned in the will of her father written August 12, 1816.

Edward Gowen, [Edward, Jr.4, Edward3, William2, Mihil1] son of Edward Gowen, Jr, was born about 1727, probably in Charles City County. He was probably brought to Brunswick County, Virginia by his father about 1744. He was married about this time, wife’s name unknown. He appeared in the 1753 tax list of adjoining Granville County, North Carolina in the list of Osborn Jeffreys.

“Edward Gowen, mulatto” appeared on the October 8, 1754 muster roll of the 83 men in the Granville County militia under Capt. Osborn Jeffreys:

“Osborn Jeffery, Captain Richard WHITE, Lieut. John McKISSICK, Ensign

1. Francis BRADLEY, Sgt.
2. Howard WORLEY, Sgt.
3. John FARRELL, Sgt.
4. Wm McBEE, Corpl.
5. Thomas COOK, Corpl.
6. William PERRY, Corpl.
7. John MARTIN, Corpl.
8. John SANDLAND, Sr.
9. Peter VINSON
10. Philemon BRADFORD, Jr.
11. John SUTTON
12. Arthur FULLER
13. Timothy FULLER
14. Joseph FULLER
15. James SUTTON
16. James WADE
17. John SANDLAND, Jr.
18. Robert ALLEN
19. Joseph FARRELL
20. Wm. MOXLEY
21. Robert MORGAN
22. Isaac WINSTON
23. Wm WHITE
24. John GREEN
25. Thomas HULAND
26. Thomas MULLINS
27. John YOUNG
28. Wm PORCH
29. Thomas BRIDGES
30. Jeremiah PERRY
31. Ambrose CRANE
32. Francis PERRY
33. John PERRY
34. William RIDINGS
35. William SMITH
36. Ezekiah MASSEY
37. James BROGDEN
38. John GOLDING
39. Thomas BROGDEN
40. John DAVIS
41. Julius ALFORD
42. Jacob POWEL
43. Wm MAYNARD
44. Gibson MARTIN
45. John BRADLY
46. Nathaniel PERRY
47. Wm. CADE
48. Andrew HARFIELD
49. John MOONEY
50. Michael PERRY
51. William BREWER
52. Francis JOHNSTON
53. John BOOKER
54. Benjamin ARUNDEL
55. Thomas ARUNDEL
56. James ARUNDEL
55. Thomas ARUNDEL
56. James ARUNDEL
57. Austin HONEYCOT
58. Joseph BRIDGES
59. Roger REESE
60. Thomas JONES
61. William TAUNT
62. George MAYNARD
63. Nathaniel JONES
64. Andrew MARTIN
65. Joseph NORRIS
66. Richard RAYBORN
67. John DUNCAN
68. Wm ADKINSON
69. Joseph MEDLIN
70. James BOLTEN
71. Wm WINSTON
72. John WRIGHT
73. Samuel CARLISLE
74. John WILDER
75. John GARRET
76. Anthony LEWIS
77. Nathan GRIMES
78. Thomas GOWEN, Mulatto
79. Michael GOWEN, Mulatto
80. Edward GOWEN, Mulatto
81. Robert DAVIS, Mulatto
82. Wm BURNEL, Mulatto
83. Wm. MOONEY

“Edward Gowing” was “sworn chain carrier” on a patent survey done for William Kinchen September 25, 1755, according to Granville County Surveyor’s Book 11, page 426. “Edward Gowan” was sued by Robert Parker June 7, 1757, according to Granville County Court minutes.

“Edward Gowen and wife, black” were taxable in the 1771 tax list of Philemon Hawkins in Bute County, along with his brother, Michael Gowen. Bute County was organized in 1764 with land from Granville County, and Edward Gowen found himself in the new county.
By June 3, 1778 Michael Gowen had removed to Craven County, North Carolina and had permitted Edward Gowen to move to his land in Bute County on Taylor’s Creek. On that date Michael Gowen deeded 80 acres on Taylor’s Creek to Jenkins Gowen with the proviso that Edward Gowen and his wife be permitted to live there as long as they lived. Jenkins Gowen left for Revolutionary service about this time, and the sheriff sold the land for unpaid taxes August 3, 1779, according to Deed Book M, page 179.

By 1782 Edward Gowen was back in Granville County where he was taxed on 90 acres on Ford Creek District. Paul Heinegg considered Edward Gowen related to Elizabeth Bass because on October 14, 1788 he conveyed his interest in her estate to his nephew, Thomas Gowen, according to Granville County Will Book 2, page 79.

“October 14, 1788. Know all men by these presents that I Edward Gowen of the County of Granville for divers good causes and considerations thereunto [me] moving more especially for the sum of £25 to me in hand paid, the receipt of which I do hereby acknowledge, hath bargained, sold & made over, and by these presents, do bargain, sell and make over to my nephew, Thomas Gowen all the estate, right and interest I have or hereafter may have to the estate of Elizabeth Bass, deceased, or any part thereof, and do hereby make over the same to the said Thomas Gowin, his heirs and assigns from the claim of me, the said Edward Gowen or any other person whatever claiming under me. In witness whereof I have hereunto set my hand & seal the 15th day of October, 1786.

Edward Going

Witnesses:
Henry Meghe
Allin Hudson
Jhn. [X] Simmons”

John Simmons later appeared in Granville County Court to prove the deed of “Edward Gowing” to “Thomas Gowing,” according to “Court Minutes of Granville County, North Carolina, 1746-1820,” page 28 by Zoe Hargett Gwynn.

Two months earlier, “Thomas Goin,” regarded as a kinsman of Edward Gowen, applied to the County Court of Greene County, Tennessee for the administration of the estate of Elizabeth Bass, according to “Bulletin of the Watauga Association,” Volume 10:

“August 1788. On motion of W. Avery, Esqr. atto. for Thomas Going for obtaining letter of administration on the Estate of Elizabeth Bass, decd. ordered that the same be laid over until next term, for proof of sanguinity [kinship, blood relationship] & that a dedimus potestatem [a commission to take testimony] issue in favour of said Thomas Going to Anson & Richmond Counties & to the State of South Carolina by giving fifteen days notice to Jeremiah Bass of the time & place where such testimony will be taken, ditto for Levi Bass to South Carolina giving Thos. Going fifteen days notice at least.”

Edward Gowen was enumerated in the 1786 state census of Granville County as the head of a household composed of “2 free males and three free females.” He reappeared there in the 1810 census as the head of an “other free” household composed of five people.

Children born to Edward Gowen include:

Edward Gowen, born about 1745
Reeps Gowen born about 1749
Jenkins Gowen born about 1761
Jesse Gowen born about 1762
Goodrich Gowen born about 1764
David Gowen born about 1766
Isham Gowen born about 1770
Patsy Gowen born about 1772

Edward Gowen, [Edward5, Edward, Jr.4, Edward3, William2, Mihil1] son of Edward Gowen, was born about 1745, probably in Brunswick County, Virginia.

He was taxable as a “black poll” in his father’s household in Granville County in the 1755 and 1761 lists of Robert Harris. “Edward Gowing” was “sworn chain carrier” on a patent survey done for William Kinchen September 25, 1755, according to Granville County Surveyor’s Book 11, page 426.

“Edward Gowan” was sued by Robert Parker June 7, 1757, according to Granville County Court minutes. “Edward Gowin, Sr, mulatto, Edward Gowin, Jr. and Reps Gowin” were recorded in the 1762 tax list of St. John’s Parish, Granville County.

He appeared in his own household in 1767 as “one black poll” in the tax list of John Pope.

Edward Gowen, “one black poll” appeared in the 1769 tax list of Granville County. “Edward Gowin was listed in the 1771 tax list of Granville County. “Edward Going” appeared in the 1771 tax list of Bute County. His household included two members. “Thomas Gowin” was listed as a purchaser at the estate sale of James McGehee November 23, 1774, according to Granville County Deed Book 1, page 49.

“Edward Going” enlisted in the North Carolina forces in Bute County in 1778.

He was listed in “Balloted Men & Volunteers from Bute County to serve 9 months as Continental soldiers, beginning March 1, 1779,” page 2. Bute County was organized in 1765 and abolished in 1779, and its land used to create Franklin and Warren Counties.
Edward Going appeared in an article entitled “Continental Soldiers from Bute County, North Carolina, 1779” by Ransom McBride which was published in “North Carolina Genealogical Society Journal,” Vol. 15, May 1989. The entry read: “Edward Going, Prvt; Place of Abode, Bute; Where Born; Virga [Virginia?]; Hgt: 5’7″; Age: 35; Hair: Black; Eyes: Black.”

On August 3, 1779 “Edward Gains” received 75 acres on South Hyco Creek in nearby Caswell County. He was taxed there in 1784 on “1 black poll and 100 acres on Hyco Creek in St. Lukes District.” “Edward Goine & wife, blacks” were enumerated about 1787 in Caswell County.

Andy Blackard wrote April 15, 2001, “Hyco Creek is located about five miles north of my home on old North Carolina 15, going from Durham City to Roxboro, about 10 miles north of I-85.”

“Edward Going” was listed in the North Carolina state census of 1786, page 56:

“Going, Edward white male 21-60
white female
white male 21-60
white female
white female

In 1786, Edward Goins and John Goin were included in a list of “insolvents” in Ft. Creek District of Granville County.

Edward Gowen was listed in the Granville County Will Book 2, page 79, October 15, 1788, as “Edward Goen” when he conveyed to his nephew, Thomas Gowen, “for £25 all my right in the estate of Elizabeth Bass, deceased.” John Simmons Allen Hudson and Henry Meghee witnessed the deed, according to “Abstracts of Early Deeds of Granville County, 1746-1765.”

Person County, North Carolina was organized from Caswell County in 1791, and Edward Gowen found himself in the new county. Edward Gowen joined his brother Jenkins Gowen in selling their claims for Revolutionary pay to John Hall of Hyco, North Carolina in Caswell County April 27, 1791.

“Edward Gowing” reappeared in the records of Caswell County, North Carolina in 1791 and in the records of Orange County, North Carolina, its parent county, in 1792. These two counties were located a short distance west of Bute County.

“Edward [X] Goen” signed an affidavit there April 27, 1791, according to “Revolutionary War Service Records and Settlements” abstracted by Ransom McBride and published in “North Carolina Genealogical Society Journal,” Vol. 9, November 1983. He stated that he and “Jenkins Goen” sold their “claims against the United States to John Hall of Caswell County [Hico] and empowered said John Hall to draw such claims from the Treasurer.” The affidavit was witnessed by Catherine Brown and Rebeckah Blake.

“Edward [X] Goen of Orange County, North Carolina” executed a power of attorney in the favor of Hall June 7, 1792. The document read, “I, Edward Goen, late a soldier of the Continental Line of North Carolina appoint John Hall of same county and state, attorney, to settle the claims arising from said Goen’s service as a Private in the Fifth Regiment of New Levies under the command of Gen. Sumner in 1778 and 1779.”

Capt. Robert Temples, perhaps a company commander certified before Samuel High, J.P. in Wake County, North Carolina July 20, 1792 “that Edward Going served as a soldier in the nine months service of North Carolina.”

“Prvt. Edward Going,” was serving in Col. William Eaton’s Fifth North Carolina Regiment of the Continental Line on May 1, 1792.

“Edward Goins” was taxed on “1 black poll and 245 acres in Person County in 1793. “Ed. Goins” paid tax on “two white polls” and 245 3/4 acres of land according to the 1794 tax list of Person County. “Edward Goins” was a taxpayer in 1795 in Person County. He was enumerated as the head of a household of “6 other free” in the census of 1800.

Two free colored families, one headed by “Edward Goins”, page 2 and another headed by “Edward Goins”, page 23, appeared in the 1820 census of Moore County, North Carolina.

Edward Going was receiving a yearly pension of $120 on May 4, 1831. This Revolutionary pensioner, a veteran of the “Fifth Regiment under Col. William Eaton of Granville County,” was still drawing compensation in 1835, at the age of 92, according to “Report on Pensioners, 1835.”

“Edward Goen/Going/Gowing” of Orange and Caswell Counties appeared several times in “Comptrollers Papers, Revolutionary War, Final Settlements” deposited in Box 15 D-G, North Carolina Archives, Raleigh. The entries are dated in the 1770s, 1780s and 1790s. Orange County was formed from Granville County in 1752, and Caswell County was formed from Orange County in 1777.

The wife of Edward Going, name unknown received Widow’s Pension W-6899 after his death. In her application she stated that Edward Going entered the service at Warren Courthouse, North Carolina as a captain. He joined the Fifth North Carolina Regiment at Halifax, North Carolina. He later enlisted at Lewisburg, North Carolina and fought at Guilford Courthouse under Gen. Nathanael Greene. She mentioned that his messmates were Ozzy Ball, Drew Jones and William Smith. She spoke of residence in Franklin County and in Granville County.

Edward Gowen is suggested as the great-grandfather of Daniel Goins, born about 1816, who made an affidavit in Randolph County, North Carolina in 1882 that he was “the son of William Goins, the grandson of William Goins and the great-grandson of Edward Goins” who was “Slitly mixt about an eighth,” according to “Randolph County Genealogical Society Journal” winter 1980.

Children born to Edward Gowen include:

Edward Gowen born about 1761
William Goins born about 1765

Edward Gowen, [Edward6 , [Edward5, Edward, Jr.4, Edward3, William2, Mihil1] son of Edward Gowen, was born about 1761, probably in Granville County. He was married there on a bond dated October 31, 1807 to Rebecca Anderson, daughter of mulatto Lewis Anderson and Winifred “Winnie” Bass Anderson. Her brother, George Anderson was their bondsman, according to “Granville County, North Carolina Marriages, 1753-185.”

Rebecca Anderson was the great-great-granddaughter of Kate Anderson, a Negro slave whose manumission created a great stir in the Virginia House of Burgesses.

Her owner, John Fulcher of Norfolk County directed in his will of October 12, 1712 that his 15 slaves be freed. He directed his executor, Lewis Conner to give “to my Negroes, men and women and children, there freedom,” according to Paul Heinegg writing in “Free African Americans of North Carolina and Virginia.”

Kate Anderson and 14 other members of her extended family were also bequeathed by the will 640 acres of land in Norfolk County to the consternation of the Virginia legislators and planters. The House quickly moved to squelch the idea of freeing slaves in Virginia. They wrote legislation to “provide by a law against such manumission of slaves, which may in time by their increase and correspondence with other slaves . . . endanger the peace of this Colony,” according to “Henning’s Statutes,” Volume III.

The authorities could not legally undo the damage that Fulcher had done, but they felt they could discourage it from ever being repeated. Conner sought to minimize the problem for Virginia by exporting it to North Carolina. He swapped the 640 acres in Norfolk County for a section of land in Chowan County, just across the colony line. The Anderson family was reluctant to leave Virginia, so the executor “sweetened the deal” with an extra 300 acres of North Carolina land. Five years later the Andersons were still in Virginia, the deed to the promised North Carolina land not having materialized.

The family filed suit against Conner in 1717 in York County and produced Fulcher’s will in court in an effort to obtain title to the land. The Andersons won the case, the court declaring that the wishes of a dying man were inviolate. But Conner appealed to the superior court in Williamsburg, and the verdict was reversed.

Edward “Ned” Anderson, one of the children freed by Fulcher was back in court in 1734 trying to get title to the North Carolina land. Twenty-two years after the date of Fulcher’s will, the North Carolina land lay in Bath County.

Shortly afterward, Bath County itself was dissolved, and the Anderson family apparently gave up on the effort to secure its inheritance.

The Colony of Virginia was not victorious in the matter either. It could not long hold back manumission, either by law or by delaying tactics such as was used on the Andersons and the Gowens. When Pres. George Washington died in December 1799, he had already specified in his will that his slaves were to be given their freedom. Patrick Henry, Thomas Jefferson, John Adams, Alexander Hamilton and other statesmen took a stand against slavery. The northern states, one by one, abolished slavery beginning with Vermont in 1777 and ending with New Jersey in 1804.

Lewis Anderson and Winifred “Winnie” Bass Anderson died without inheriting any of the Fulcher land.

Edward Going was mentioned as a purchaser at the estate sale of Mrs. Winifred Anderson February 9, 1810, according to Granville County Will Book 7, page 116. “Edward Going & wife, Rebecca Going, heirs of Lewis Anderson, deceaseed” were mentioned April 12, 1814 in Granville County Will Book 8, pages 365 and 366.

Two free colored families, one headed by “Edward Goins”, page 2 and another headed by “Edward Goins”, page 23, appeared in the 1820 census of Moore County, North Carolina.
Children born to Edward Gowen and Rebecca Anderson Gowen are unknown.

William Goins, [Edward6 , Edward5, Edward, Jr.4, Edward3, William2, Mihil1] son of Edward Gowen was born about 1765, probably in Granville County.

Children born to him include:

William Goins born about 1785

William Goins, [William7, Edward6, [Edward5, Edward, Jr.4, Edward3, William2, Mihil1] son of William Goins, was born about 1785. Children born to him include:

Daniel Goins born about 1816

Daniel Goins, [William8 , William7 , [Edward6 , [Edward5, Edward, Jr.4, Edward3, William2, Mihil1] son of William Goins, was born about 1816. His family was living in Randolph County, North Carolina at that time.

Dr. Virginia Easley DeMarce in “Verry Slitly Mixed” suggests that Edward Gowen was the great-grandfather of Daniel Goins, born about 1816. Daniel Goins made an affidavit that he was “the son of William Goins, the grandson of William Goins and the great-grandson of Edward Goins who was “slitly mixed about an eight.” as recorded in the “Randolph County, North Carolina Genealogical Journal,” Winter 1980.

Reeps Gowen, [Edward5, Edward, Jr.4, Ed-ward3, William2, Mihil1] son of Edward Gowen, was born about 1749 in Granville County. He was taxable there in 1761 in his father’s household in the list of Robert Harris. “Reeps Going” enlisted in the Second South Carolina Regiment under Capt. Thomas Hall July 1, 1779, according to “Roster of South Carolina Patriots in the American Revolution” by Bobby Gilmer Moss.

Jenkins Gowen, [Edward5, Edward, Jr.4, Edward3, William2, Mihil1] son of Edward Gowen, was born about 1761 in Granville County. He was described as a “17-year-old mulatto” in 1778 when he enlisted in the militia company of Capt. John Rust.

“Jenkins Gowan, mulatto” was included in a “Descriptive List of Men Raised May 25, 1778” in a North Carolina militia group, according to “Roster of North Carolina Soldiers in the American Revolution.” Information given included name, age, height, color of eyes, color of hair and trade.

“Jenkins Gowen, mulatto” and also rendered as “Jenkins Goin” of Halifax District, Granville County” was shown as a member of the North Carolina Continental Line in a company commanded by Capt. John Rush.

Jenkins Gowen was shown as one of three Gowen men listed in “North Carolina Heads of Households, 1790,” page 90 [probably taken from the state census of 1786] as the head of a household of non-whites living in Ft. Creek section of Hillsborough District of Granville County. Adjoining him was the household of Abraham Jones. In nearby Goshen District was enumerated “Stephen Beezley.” This census shows a total of 966 households in Granville County at that time.

On June 3, 1778 Michael Gowen, his uncle of Craven County, North Carolina, deeded 80 acres in Bute County on Taylor’s Creek to Jenkins Gowen with the proviso that the parents of Jenkins Gowen, Edward Gowen and his wife be permitted to live there as long as they lived. Jenkins Gowen left for Revolutionary service about this time, and the sheriff sold the land for unpaid taxes August 3, 1779, according to Deed Book M, page 179.

Jenkins Gowen joined his brother Edward Gowen in selling their claims for Revolutionary pay to John Hall of Hyco, North Carolina in Caswell County April 27, 1791.

Jesse Gowen, [Edward5, Edward, Jr.4, Edward3, William2, Mihil1] son of Edward Gowen, was born in Granville County about 1762. He was married June 9, 1784 to Sealey Bearden, according to Caswell County, North Carolina marriage records. John Going was their bondsman. Children born to Jesse Gowen and Sealy Bearden Gowen are unknown.

Goodrich Gowen, [Edward5, Edward, Jr.4, Edward3, William2, Mihil1] son of Edward Gowen, was born about 1764 in Granville County. On November 1, 1784 he bought 175 acres on Cane Creek in Caswell County, according to Caswell County Deed Book, according to Caswell County Deed Book C, page 3. He was taxed on this land and one poll in St. Lawrence District of Caswell County in 1784.

On September 6, 1791, he was married to Betsey Matthews in Caswell County. His brother, “Allen Going” was their bondsman. Person County was taken from Caswell County in 1791, and Goodrich Gowen was located in the new county.

He was enumerated there in 1800 as the head of a household of “seven other free.” In 1810 his household was recorded as “five other free” living adjacent to the household of Fanny Goin. Fanny Goin, “of color” headed a household in Person County composed of “2 other free and 2 white women.”

David Gowen, [Edward5, Edward, Jr.4, Edward3, William2, Mihil1] son of Edward Gowen was born in Granville County about 1766. “David Gowing” was surety for the marriage of his brother-in-law James Matthews to Molly Curbo, daughter of Thomas Curbo July 29, 1790 in Halifax County, Virginia. Thomas Curbo was the head of a large “free colored” family there.

Isham Gowen, [Edward5, Edward, Jr.4, Edward3, William2, Mihil1] son of Edward Gowen, was born about 1770 in Granville County. Isham Gowen had an uncle by the name of Reps Gowen, according to the research of Pat Elder.

He was married November 26, 1792 to Fanny Going, according to Person County marriage records. Patrick Mason, his brother-in-law, was their bondsman.

Isham Gowen was enumerated in the 1800 census of nearby Orange County, North Carolina household of “4 other free.” In the 1810 census of Orange County, his family consisted of “6 other free.”

“Isham Goings, free colored” farmer, was enumerated as the head of a household in the 1840 census of Moore County, page 167:

“Goings, Isham free colored male 36-55
free colored female 24-36
free colored male 24-36
free colored male 0-10
free colored female 0-10
free colored female 0-10”

Children born to Isham Gowen and Fanny Going Gowen are unknown.

Patsy Gowen, [Edward5, Edward, Jr.4, Edward3, William2, Mihil1] daughter of Edward Gowen, was born about 1772. She was married to Patrick Mason December 3, 1790, Zachariah Hill, bondsman, according to “Caswell County, North Carolina Marriages, 1759-1850.” Zachariah Hill, a “free negro,” had married Sally Mason, daughter of Thomas Mason July 20 1798 in Halifax County, Virginia and was an uncle of the groom.

Patrick Mason was taxable in the 1790 tax list of Caswell County. Patrick Mason was the bondsman for the marriage of Isham Going to Fanney Going November 26, 1792, according to “Person County, North Carolina Marriages, 1787-1850.” Patrick Mason signed their bond, No. 107639. H. Harralson was a witness to the marriage of Isham Going and Fanney Going Going. In 1800 Patrick Mason was head of a Person County family of “6 other free.”

On May 28, 1828 he gave an affidavit to obtain a pension for his Revolutionary services. He stated that he enlisted for 12 months April 1, 1780.

Children born to Patrick Mason and Patsy Gowen Mason include:

Patrick Mason born about 1807

Patrick Mason, son of Patrick Mason and Patsy Gowen Mason, was born “about 1807 on the border between Halifax County, Virginia and Person County, North Carolina. He was married in 1836 to Catherine Delaney in Halifax County.

They were enumerated there in the 1850 census.

About 1854, Patrick Mason removed to Albany, Ohio in Athens County where he continued to work as a wheelwright. He was enumerated there in the 1860 census, but apparently left before the 1870 census.

Children born to Patrick Mason and Patsy Gowen Mason include:

Mary Mason born about 1838
Joseph Mason born about 1839
Missouri Ann Mason born about 1841
Martha V. Mason born about 1843
Mark Mason born about 1846
Patrick H. Mason born about 1848
Catherine Mason born about 1851
Virginia Mason born about 1854
George Mason born about 1858

Thomas Gowen, [Edward, Jr.4, Edward3, William2, Mihil1] son of Edward Gowen, Jr, was born about 1729, probably in Virginia. “Thomas Going” received a deed May 30, 1752 to 150 acres “on both sides of Taillors Creek, being the lower part of a grant [of 600 acres] to McKisick for “six pounds Virginia money,” from John McKisick, according to Granville County Deed Book B, page 53. Witnesses were Thomas Hunter, Francis Maly and Broadhead Trulove.

“Thomas Gowen, mulatto,” was a militiaman in Capt. Osborn Jeffrey’s company October 8, 1754, according to “Colonial and State Records of North Carolina,” Volume 22.

He appeared on the 1755 tax list of Granville County as “one white poll,” and “Thomas Gowin” appeared on the 1762 tax list, page 42. Thomas Gowen was listed as the head of a household with “three white polls” in the 1769 tax list of Granville County. In the 1771 tax list he was recorded with “two white polls.”

Thomas Going, Sr, Thomas Going, Jr, Moses Going and John Going were listed as soldiers in a Granville County militia company commanded by Capt. Sol Alston October 3, 1771.
Thomas Gowen appeared in Granville County Court in August 1774, according to court minutes. “Thomas Gowin” was a purchaser at the estate sale of James McGehee, deceased, November 23, 1774, according to Granville County Will Book 1, pages 114 and 115.

“Thomas Gowing” was enumerated as the head of a household in the state census of North Carolina of 1786, according to “State Census of North Carolina of 1786” compiled by Mrs. A. K. Register. His household was reported in Oxford District, page 2 as:

“Gowing, Thomas white male 21-60
white male under 21 or over 60
white male under 21 or over 60
white male under 21 or over 60
white female
white female
white female
white female
white female”

Additionally nine blacks were included in the household.

Thomas Gowen deeded 250 acres to John Simmons, Jr. February 7, 1788, according to Granville County deed records. John Simmons witnessed the deed.

On January 25, 1788 “Thomas Going of Granville County” deeded to John Simmons, Sr. “of this county” the 150 acres on Taylor’s Creek that he had received from John McKissick in 1752.

Children born to Thomas Gowen are unknown.

Joseph Gowen, [Edward, Jr.4, Edward3, William2, Mihil1] son of Edward Gowen, Jr, was born about 1730, probably in Charles City County. He was taxable in his own household in the 1752 tax list of Field Jefferson in Lunenburg County, Virginia, according to “Sunlight on the Southside.”

He was a “black” taxable in the 1755 tax list of Granville County. In 1759 he was described as a “mulattoe” on the list of John Pope in adjacent Granville County, North Carolina.

On December 1, 1760 he received a patent to 680 acres “on both sides of Taylor’s Creek,” according to Granville County Deed Book E, page 143. He sold the land August 11, 1761, according to Granville County Deed Book D, page 253. Joseph Gowen, born in Stafford County, son of John and Mary Gowen, is also shown as the owner of this land. Additional research is needed to delineate between the two Josephs. They were third cousins, both being great-greatgrandsons of Mihil Gowen.

In 1761 he was again listed in John Pope’s tax list with the notation, “refuses to list his wife.” This indicates that he regarded her as “white.”

John Pope recorded Joseph Gowen on his tax list again in 1764. Additionally he showed James Harrison, a “taxable mulatto” in the household of Joseph Gowen, according to the research of Paul Heinegg. He suggests this individual is the James Harrison who was the head of “5 other free” in the 1810 census of Colleton District, South Carolina.

In 1765, John Pope wrote on his tax list, “Mulattoe, has wife and other family not listed.”

n the 1768 tax list John Pope recorded, “Joseph Gowin, his [son] Nat 2 tithes.” He was last taxed in Granville County in 1771.

Children born to Joseph Gowen are believed to include:

Nathaniel “Nat” Gowen born about 1755

Nathaniel “Nat” Gowen, [Joseph5, Edward, Jr4, Edward3, William2, Mihil1] regarded as a son of Joseph Gowen, was born about 1755 in Granville County. He was listed as tithable in the 1768 tax list of Granville County in the house-hold of his father. He and Robert Locklear were arrested in Granville County in 1773, but were released upon paying “their prison charges” when no one appeared to press charges.

Ann Gowen, [Edward, Jr4, Edward3, William2, Mihil1] daughter of Edward Gowen, Jr, was born about 1735, probably in Charles City County. She was living in Granville County September 5, 1753 when the Granville County Court ordered her “mulattoe child, Cooper” be bound to John Parnall. She was living in nearby Cumberland County, North Carolina in November 1761 when the County Court ordered her to “keep in her possession a mulattoe boy which she now has in order that she may have him here next court.

Paul Heinegg suggests that she may have been the “Ann Goin” who received 100 acres “on Broad River and both sides of Fannin’s Creek” in District 96, South Carolina September 23, 1786. When Union County, South Carolina was created in 1798 the land lay in that county, according to Union County Deed Book B, page 112.

On April 3, 1799 the Robeson County Court ordered John Ford Esquire of South Carolina to take the deposition of Ann Gowen in connection with the case “James Terry vs. William Barfield.”

Children born to her are believed to include:

Cooper Gowen born about 1752
John Gowen born about 1758
Oliva Gowen born about 1779
William Gowen born about 1787

Cooper Gowen, [Ann5 , Edward, Jr4, Edward3, William2, Mihil1] regarded as a son of Ann Gowen, was born about 1752 in Granville County. He was bound September 5, 1753 to John Parnall by the Granville County Court.

John Gowen, [Ann5 , Edward, Jr4, Edward3, William2, Mihil1] regarded as a son of Ann Gowen, was born about 1758, in Granville County. He was married about 1781, wife’s name Sarah. In 1800, they were living in Robeson County, North Carolina. He wrote his will there February 19, 1800, according to Robeson County Will Book 1, page 60.

Sarah Gowen became his administratrix April 6, 1802, according to the county court minutes. The will left the farm of John Gowen to his wife until his son, John Gowen became 21 years old. Sarah Gowen conveyed land to Elizabeth Gowen, perhaps a daughter, by a deed which was proved in Robeson County Court May 26, 1812.

Children born to John Gowen and Sarah Gowen are believed to include:

John Gowen born about 1783
Elizabeth Gowen born about 1785
Kitty Gowen born about 1790

John Gowen, [John6 , Ann5 , Edward, Jr4 , Edward3 , William2 , Mihil1 ] son of John Gowen and Sarah Gowen, was born about 1783, probably in Robeson County. He was summoned by Robeson County Court July 2, 1805 to answer a charge against him. There were three “John Goines” enumerated as white men in the 1810 census of Robeson County. It is difficult to delineate between them and their activities.

Elizabeth Gowen, [John6 , Ann5 , Edward, Jr4 , Edward3 , William2 , Mihil1 ] regarded as a daughter of John Gowen and Sarah Gowen, was born about 1785, probably in Robeson County. Sarah Gowen conveyed property to her May 26, 1812.

Kitty Gowen [John6 , Ann5 , Edward, Jr4 , Edward3 , William2 , Mihil1 ] regarded as a daughter of John and Sarah Gowen, was born about 1790 in Robeson County. “Kitty Goins was married January 29, 1829 to Lewis Morgan, “free colored” as his second wife, according to Robeson County marriage records. Findley Ivy was the bondsman.

Oliva Gowen, [Ann5, Edward, Jr4, Edward3, William2, Mihil1] regarded as a daughter of Ann Gowen, was born about 1780. She was listed as the head of a household of “2 other free” in the 1800 census of Robeson County, page 381.

William Gowen, [Ann5 , Edward, Jr4 , Edward3 , William 2 , Mihil1 ] regarded as a son of Ann Gowen, was born about 1787. On April 3, 1798, he was bound apprentice to James Alford by the Robeson County Court. He was head of a household of “3 other free persons” in the 1810 census of Robeson County, page 232. He was granted permission to carry a gun by the Robeson County Court November 23, 1841. Fourteen other “free colored” men were given permission to carry a gun by the Robeson County Court.

==O==

Mihil Gowen, Jr, [Mihil1 ] son of Mihil Gowen, was born about 1656, probably in James City County. He may have been the grantor of “37 acres of escheat land” to Robert Hubbard February 2, 1718, according to James City County Deed Book 9.

==O==

Daniel Gowen, [Mihil1 ] son of Mihil Gowen, was born about 1657, probably in James City County. Daniel Gowen received a patent May 1, 1679 to 100 acres in Kingston Parish, Gloucester County, “adjoining his own land,” according to Gloucester County Deed Book 6, page 679. He received another grant of 52 acres April 26, 1698, according to “Irish Settlers in America” by Michael J. O’Brien.

Daniel Gowen is regarded as the grandfather of:

James Gowen born about 1728
Sarah Gowen born about 1737

James Gowen, believed to be a descendant of Daniel Gowen, was born about 1728, probably in Gloucester County He appeared on the 1770 tax list of Gloucester County, according to “Records of Colonial Gloucester County.”

Mary Gowen, regarded as his widow, was taxable on 120 acres in the tax list of 1784.

James Gowen and Mary Gowen are regarded as the parents of:

Sarah Gowen born January 16, 1759

Sarah Gowen, a namesake of her aunt, Sarah Gowen, was born to James Gowen January 16, 1759, according to “Abingdon Parish, Gloucester County Register. 1678-1761,” page 175.

Sarah Gowen, regarded as a descendant of Daniel Gowen, was born about 1737.

She was married to Panranparabo Boswell February 1, 1756, according to “Kingston Parish Register of Gloucester and Matthews Counties, Virginia, 1749-1827.”  page 227 compiled by Emma R. Matheny and Helen K. Yates.

Christopher Gowen, [Mihil1 ] son of Mihil Gowen, was born about 1658, probably in James City County. He may have been named in honor of Capt. Christopher Stafford, former master of Mihil Gowen, according to Paul Heinegg. He was married about 1681, wife’s name Anne.

Children born to Christopher Gowen and Anne Gowen include:

Michael Gowen born in January 1679
Philip Gowen born about 1684
Christopher Gowen, Jr. born about 1688

Michael Gowen, [Christopher2 , Mihil1 ] son of Christopher Gowen and Anne Gowen, was born in January 1679, according to “Abingdon Parish, Gloucester County, Virginia Register, 1678-1761,” page 275. “Michael Gowin” and his brother “Phillip Gowin” were serving in the militia July 4, 1702 in nearby New Kent County. They were serving under Col. John Lightfoot. Created in 1654, New Kent County then encompassed territory included in the present counties of King William, King and Queen, Hanover, and New Kent.

“Michael Gowing” was mentioned in an entry dated July 14, 1720 in the “Vestry Book of St. Pauls Parish, Hanover County, Virginia, 1706-1786:”

“In obedience to an order of New Kent County, July 14, 1720, it is ordered that the precinct whereof Jere: Parker is Surveyor be divided into two precincts and that Peter Harrilson be Surveyor of the lower precinct, beginning at Ash Cake Road, thence up the road to Magirts path and that he have Michael Gowing’s male tithables, Mrs. Mary Anderson’s tithables at the Quarter adjoining to that, those of George Butler, Henry Taylor and his own tithables to assist him in the clearing & keeping that road in good order.”

Children born to Michael Gowen are believed to include:

John Gowen born about 1705

John Gowen, [Michael3 , Christopher2 , Mihil1 ] regarded as a son of Michael Gowen, was born about 1705, probably in New Kent County. In that year the colony of Virginia enacted a law which stated:

“No Negro, Mulatto or Indian shall hold any public office, civil, ecclesiastical or military, in said colony. The child of an Indian and the child, grandchild or great-grandchild of a Negro shall be deemed, accounted, held and taken for a Mulatto.”

He is believed to be the “John Gowin” who leased land from “Shurley Whatley” in St. Martins Parish in adjoining Hanover County, Virginia on June 7, 1734, according to “The Valentine Papers.” Volume 3, page 71.

Shirley Whatley was a close associate with the Gowen family, perhaps a kinsman, according to Dr. Virginia Easley DeMarce. Shirley Whatley reappeared with them in Granville County, North Carolina. In 1755 he signed a petition along with other prominent white men of Granville County requesting the state legislature to repeal a North Carolina statute which required mulattos and free negroes to pay a tax on the white women in their households.

Philip Gowen, [Christopher2 , Mihil1 ] son of Christopher Gowen and Anne Gowen, was born about 1684 in Gloucester County. “Phillip Gowin” was serving in “the Lower Company of Foot” under the command of Col. John Lightfoot in New Kent County July 4, 1702, according to “Virginia’s Colonial Soldiers.”

Philip Gowen is regarded as the father of:

George Gowen born about 1715
Philip Gowen born about 1740

George Gowen, [Philip3 , Christopher2 , Mihil1 ] regarded as a son of Philip Gowen, was born about 1715, probably in New Kent County. He was married about 1736, wife’s name Sarah.

“George Gowan and his wife Sarah Gowan,” were residents of New Kent County, Virginia September 3, 1738 when a son, “Aaron Gowan” was christened there in St. Peter’s Parish, according to International Genealogical Index, Family History Library, Salt Lake City, Utah.

They removed to nearby Goochland County, Virginia about 1743. “George Going” paid tax on “one tithe” June 10, 1744, according to “Goochland County, Virginia Tithe Lists 1735-1749.” George Gowen appeared in court in July 1764 to prove a deed of trust given by his son, Aaron Gowen.

“George Going” filed suit against William Chamberlayne in August 1752, according to “Goochland County, Virginia Court Orders, 1750-1757,” page 84.

“Sarah Going” was a defendant in a case tried before Goochland County Court in July 1751, according to “Goochland County, Virginia Court Orders, 1757- 1761,” page 429.

Children born to George Gowen and Sarah Gowen include:

Aaron Gowen born July 31, 1738

Aaron Gowen, [George4 , Philip3 , Christopher2 , Mihil1 ] son of George Gowen and Sarah Gowen, was born July 31, 1738 in New Kent County. Another source shows his date of birth as June 9, 1738. He was baptized there September 3, 1738, according to St. Peters Parish Register, page 134. The birth was also recorded in the vestry book of James City County.

Aaron Going was married November 21, 1761, wife’s name Mary. Aaron Going and his wife, Mary Going were the parents of John Going, born July 31, 1763 in Goochland Parish, their first child, according to “Douglas Register.” W. Mac. Jones, editor of “The Douglas Register” described the volume as “Being a detailed record of Births, Marriages and Deaths together with other interesting notes, as kept by the Rev. William Douglas from 1750 to 1797, An Index of Goochland Wills, Notes on the French-Huguenot Refugees who lived in Manakin-Town.”

In July 1764 Aaron Going gave a deed of trust to Thomas Underwood. It was proved in court by George Gowen.

“Aron Going” received 410 acres “on the head of Matrimony Creek of Dan River and on Paw Paw Creek of Mayo River” from the State of North Carolina May 16, 1786, according to Rockingham County Deed Book A, page 33. “Arron Gowin” sold the land for £200 October 21, 1786 to Turbefield Barnes, according to Rockingham County Deed Book A, page 139. On November 8, 1788, “Aaron Gowin” gave a confirmation deed to Barnes as recorded in Rockingham County Deed Book C, page 13.

Children born to Aaron Going and Mary Going include:

John Going born July 31, 1763

Philip Gowen, [Philip3, Christopher2, Mihil1] regarded as a son of Philip Gowen and Sarah Gowen, was born about 1740, probably in New Kent County, according to Paul Heinegg. He was brought to Goochland County about 1743 by his parents. “Philip Going” was taxed in adjoining Hanover County in 1763 on 220 acres. He was married about 1768 to Judith Potter.

“Phillip Going” was enumerated as the head of a household of 13 “whites” in the 1783 census of Amherst County, page 48. “Phillip Going” was taxed on “4 horses, 3 cattle” in 1787, according to “The 1787 Census of Virginia” by Netti Schreiner-Yantis. He was taxed on “2 polls and 3 horses” in the 1800 tax list of Amherst County. The 1800 census of Amherst County also included the households of “Landon Going.” “Aaron Going” and “William Going” as well.

The entire family of Philip Going” was recorded as “white” in the 1810 census of Amherst County.

Children born to Philip Gowen and Judith Potter Gowen include:
Molly Gowen born March 4, 1770

Molly Gowen, [Philip4 , Philip3, Christopher2, Mihil1] daughter of Philip Gowen and Judith Potter Gowen, was born March 4, 1770 in Goochland County. She was baptized May 27, 1770, according to “The Douglas Register,” page 87.

Christopher Gowen, Jr. [Christopher2, Mihil1] son of Christopher Gowen and Anne Gowen, was born about 1688. Christopher Gowen, Jr. purchased 150 acres “on the north side of Roanoke River” in Bertie County, North Carolina, March 25, 1728, according to Bertie County Deed Book C, page 23.

Jason Gowen, [Mihil1] regarded as the son of Mihil Gowen, was born about 1659, probably in James City County. It is believed that he joined his brother, Thomas Gowen about 1696 in a move to Westmoreland County, Virginia.

When he became indebted there to Gowin Corbin, he apparently “skipped the country.” It is believed that he removed across the Potomac River to Maryland.

“Gowin Corbin, Gentleman, obtained an attachment against the estate of Jashen Goeing for 815 pounds of tobacco, and the sheriff made return that he had attached one gray horse branded on both buttocks with obscure brands which horse he had in custody and a bridle and saddle in the hands of Abraham Smith. Jashen Goeing having absented himself out this county, and for that it appeared by the oath of Mr. James Ellis that Jashen Goeing stands indebted to Gowin Corbin, judgment is granted him for the debt, the horse being appraised at 800 pounds of tobacco. Ordered the sheriff doe deliver him to Mr. Corbin in part of the satisfaction of the debt.”

Ray Corbin wrote February 14, 2002 to identify “Gawin Corbin” as the son of “Thomas Corbyn.”

“In the will of Thomas Corbyn written in June 1638, he identified his father, George and his [Thomas’] five children: George, Henry, Gawin, Charles and Lettice. One of the executors was Winifrede Grosvenor Corbin, his widow. At this time apparently all sons were under 24 years of age. This will was proved in Warwickshire, England. Father George’s mother was Mary Faunt. One of the witnesses of the will of Thomas Corbyn was Gowen Grosvenor, his father-in-law.”

“Gowen Corbin” owned a slave who died July 20, 1736, according to Christ Church Parish, Virginia Death records in Middlesex County, Virginia. Corbin Gowin owned two slaves by the names of Phebe and Ben. Phebe died December 25, 1736 and Ben died April 24, 1737.
“Gowen Corbin, dec’d” was mentioned as a neighbor in a mortgage written October 23, 1765 from John Darnal to Francis Tennell, according to Fauquier County, Virginia deed book 1759-1778.

“Gowen Corbin” was a taxpayer in Hanover County, Virginia on the 1790 tax list.
When Thomas Gowen, brother to Jason Gowen, was challenged as to whether he was a “free man” or an escaped slave, he made a trip to Maryland, perhaps to obtain documents from Jason Gowen proving that he was born free.

It is believed that descendants of Jason Gowen were:

Zadock Gowen born about 1732
Jason Going born about 1780

Zadock Gowen, regarded as a descendant of Jason Gowen, was born in Maryland about 1732. He, “age 24, born in Maryland” enlisted on February 20, 1756 in Baltimore in the militia company commanded by Capt. Christopher Gist July 13, 1756 to serve in the French & Indian War. He first appeared on the company payroll in March 1756. He was described as “a hunter, very dark, stout, well set” in “Virginia Colonial Soldiers, French and Indian War, 1754-1763.”

Zadock Gowen was listed as a soldier in Capt. Robert Spotswood’s Company at Ft. Young October 4, 1757, according to “Virginia Colonial Soldiers.” At that time he was described as “Age 25, 5’6”, planter of Baltimore, Maryland, dark, well made, dark hair.” (Note:  “Zadock” sounds  close to “Shadrack”.  This may be the Shadrack Gowen that was born about 1725)

Jason Going, regarded as a descendant of Jason Gowen, was born about 1780. He appeared as the head of a “free colored” household of four people in the 1810 census of Albemarle County.

Thomas Gowen, [Mihil1] son of Mihil Gowen, (Note:  I believe this is incorrect.  Mihil Gowen does not appear to be the father of Thomas Gowen – see Thomas Gowen‘s page on this site)  was born about 1660, probably in James City County. By 1697 he was living in Westmoreland County, Virginia [organized in 1653 from Northumberland County] where he appeared in several court records. In the case of “Abraham Smith vs. Thomas Goen,” Smith appeared in court and “withdrew in person” the charge against the defendant May 31, 1693.

On July 28, 1697, “Thomas Goen” received a judgment against Joseph Bragg in the amount of 1,300 pounds of tobacco. On September 29, 1697, “Thomas Goen confessed judgment” to Charles Lucas in the amount of 1,250 pounds of tobacco “due by bill.”

In 1703 Thomas Gowen gave security of 2,000 pounds of tobacco for Chapman Dark to assure “that he would return to the county after traveling to Maryland to get testimony that he was a free man.”

On August 25, 1703, the probate of the estate of Capt. Thomas Atwell revealed that “Thomas Goen” was listed among the creditors of the estate.

“Thomas Gowing” was listed as one of the owners of the “Josiah & Bettey,” according to “List of Ships Entering Inwards in Potomack District, January 25-September 29, 1703.” The ship was described as “pink, built in Salem in 1689, 50 tons, Josiah Novell, master, Mr. Henry Coan, Thomas Gowing, Edw. Billing, owners.”

On March 1, 1704/05 the Westmoreland County Court ordered Thomas Gowen to pay to Edward Barrow 1,200 pounds of tobacco which Thomas Gowen had lost to him in a horse race.

Shortly afterward, Thomas Gowen, Mathew Martin and Mark Chilton were arrested and required to post bond in connection with part in a jail break in connection with a plea made by Stephen Jones, according to “Westmoreland County, Virginia Order Book 1705-1721” by John Frederick Dorman:

“Thomas Goen, being bound by recognizance to answer our Soveraigne Lady the Queen of a force and rescue of a prisoner out of the custody of Wm. Chandler, constable for Machotique precinct, this day upon examination the Court do sett upon him the fine of 20 shillings sterling. It is also ordered Thomas Goen enter into recognizance for his personall appeareance and in the mean tyme to bee of good behaviour.

Tho. Goen assumes in the summe of £20 sterling. Mathew Martin in the sume of £5 sterling. Mark Chilton in the summe of £5 sterling.”

“Thomas Goin of Westmoreland County” received Grant No. 42 from the proprietors June 8, 1707 to 653 acres in Stafford County. The land was located “below the falls of the Potomac,” according to “Virginia Northern Neck Land Grants, 1694-1742,” page 39. The land lay adjoining the land of Maj. Robert Alexander, according to a Prince William County, Virginia deed written May 29, 1739. Maj. Robert Alexander did not live on this land, but lived at “Boyd’s Hole,” according to the research of Col. Carroll Heard Goyne, Jr. Later this land returned to the proprietors and was regranted in 1767 to Col. George Mason.

“Thomas Goen” was a witness to the will of John Spencer of Nominy in Westmoreland County written August 29, 1708. On October 19, 1708 the probate of the estate of John Spencer showed that “Thomas Goen and John Wright, Gent.” were indebted to the estate in the amount of 473 pounds of tobacco.

Col. Carroll Heard Goyne, Jr, Editorial Boardmember of Shreveport, Louisiana wrote:

“The Northern Neck of Virginia was originally known by its Indian name of Chickacoan. In 1648 the name was changed to Northumberland County. In 1653 Westmoreland County was formed from Northumberland County. In 1664 Stafford County was formed from Westmoreland County. In 1727 Prince William County was formed from Stafford County. In 1742 Fairfax County was formed from Prince William County. On May 8, 1669, the Northern Neck of Virginia was granted by King Charles II to a group of four men, including John Lord Berkeley. Subsequently, title passed to Thomas Lord Culpeper. On September 27, 1688, King James II confirmed the patent held by Thomas Lord Culpeper. On Culpeper’s death, title passed to his daughter and heir Katherine Culpeper and to Alexander Culpeper.

These two proprietors appointed Phillip Ludwell, Esq. to act as proprietor. Ludwell granted the first parcel of land [under his authority] to John Smith August 29, 1690, according to Nell M. Nugent in “Cavaliers and Pioneers,” Vol. 1, page 44. Thereafter, Northern Neck patents were recorded and taxed separately from the rest of Virginia. In 1669, Virginia Governor John Berkeley issued a patent to Robert Howsing, a Welsh sea captain, for 6,000 acres of land. The patent described the location as follows: “Upon the ffreshes of Powtomack River, on the west side thereof, above the dividing branches of ye same, beginning at a red oak standing by a small branch or a run of water neare opposite to a small island commonly called and known by the name of My Lord’s Island, [also Mason’s Island] . . . extending down Potomack River . . . to a creek named Indian Cabin Creeke.” [also Hunting Creek.]

In the same year, Howsing transferred this patent to John Alexander, surveyor in Chotank, according to “Virginia Land Patents,” Vol. 6, as recorded in Bessie Wilmarth Gahn’s “Colonial Days, Rock Creek to the Falls.”

Northward and westward along the Potomac River from the Alexander tract, the first permanently recorded land grant was given to Thomas Ousley.

In 1696, Ousley received a patent for 640 acres on the Potomac River running up to the mouth of Spout Run, according to Charles W. Stetson in “Four Mile Run Land Grants.”

“Thomas Going” owned property adjoining James Brechin “two miles below the falls of the Potomac” December 20, 1716, according to Northern Neck Deed Book 5, page 44. “Thomas Going” owned property adjoining Simon Pearson February 18, 1729, according to Northern Neck Deed Book 6. page 28.

“Thomas Going and James Going, mullatos” were mentioned in a deposition given by Charles Griffith in Fairfax County May 8, 1767, according to “Patents and Northern Neck Grants in Fairfax County, Virginia” by Beth Mitchell.

“The deposition of Charles Griffith, aged 70 years or thereabouts of Loudoun County, formerly of Stafford County, now called Fairfax County, taken between John Carlyle, plaintiff and Charles Alexander, defendant, the 8th day of May 1767.

The deponent, first being sworn for the Defendant, Charles Alexander, saith that about 43 years ago he was overseer for one Phillip Noland and that Maj. [Robert] Alexander came up from Bayshore [?] and called in at Noland’s house when a conversation relative to the said Alexander’s land happened, and the said Noland then told Alexander that one Robertson, the Goings and several others had surveyed and taken up land within his great patent, upon which the said Alexander seeming very angry, swore he would make them suffer and let them know his land ran a great way farther out than they imagined.

He, this deponent, further saith that when Noland told Maj. Robert Alexander that the Goings [Thomas and James] were taking and surveying his land, he, the said Alexander, replied to the said Noland that he had a great mind to turn the mulatto rascals [who were then his tenants] off his land he would [when he had a little time] survey his land and shew them how his land ran . . . ”

Virginia Easley DeMarce wrote in “Land Records of Long Standing, Fairfax County, Virginia, 1742-1770” that Griffith added in his deposition:

“I was at a race in the same year where the Goings were [who then were running horses] and that the old people were talking about the Goings taking up Alexander’s land and selling it to Thomas and Todd which land the old people then said was in Alexander’s back line or at least the greater part of it . . . and if it were not for Alexander’s land . . . the Goings would not be so lavish of their money of which they seemed to have plenty . . .”

Additionally Griffith reported on conversations he had had with Thomas Gowen and James Gowen.

“Thomas and Todd” mentioned by the deponent owned 1,215 acres of land in Stafford County on Four Mile Creek adjoining the land of Robert Alexander on August 3, 1719 which was land “formerly surveyed for Thomas, James, John and William Goins,” according to “Virginia Northern Neck Land Grants, 1694-1742.”

Children born to Thomas Gowen are believed to include:

William Gowen born about 1683
James Gowen born about 1684
John Gowen born about 1689

William Gowen, [Thomas2 , Mihil1 ] son of Thomas Gowen, was born about 1683, probably in James City County. He accompanied his father in a move to Westmoreland County about 1695.

“William Gowing, James Gowing and John Gowing” were included in the roster of a company of dragoons commanded by Capt. John West and Lt. John Peake. They were on duty in Stafford County in 1701, according to “Virginia Colonial Soldiers” by Lloyd Bockstruck. The dragoons who were mounted infantrymen, received their name from their weapons. The troops carried a musket called the “Dragon” and accordingly were called dragoons. William Gowen was married about 1704, wife’s name Catherine.

“William Goins, Thomas Goins, John Goins and James Goins” jointly received a land grant of 1,215 acres in Stafford County “located on Four-Mile Creek adjoining Maj. Robert Alexander” about 1710. On August 3, 1719, the land was granted to Evan Thomas and John Todd, “both of Stafford County,” according to “Grants by the Proprietors of the Northern Neck of Virginia.”

On the 23rd, 11th month, 1714 William Gowen and Thomas Evan received a grant of 124 acres in Stafford County from the proprietors, members of the London and Plymouth Companies who had received a grant to all land between the 34th and the 45th parallels, from the Atlantic Ocean to 200 miles inland. At this time William Gowen made his home in Overwharton Parish of Stafford County. The land was described as “lying on both sides of the main run of Jonathans Creek, which creek issues out of the west or upper si the road lead de of Occoquan Riv-er, beginning at a white oak on the west side of the run nearing to Dogue Island neck and in the line of Mr. Giles traverse,” according to Northern Neck Deed Book 5, page 8.

“William Going” and Evan Thomas received Grant No. 60 for 124 acres November 23, 1714. The land lay in Overwharton Parish “on both sides of the main run of Jonathans Creek, which creek issued out of the west or upper side of Occoquan River, beginning at a white oak on the west side of the run near the road leading to Dogue Island neck and in the line of Mr. Giles’ traverse,” according to “Grants by the Proprietors of the Northern Neck of Virginia, 1694-1742.”

Five years later, on the 28th, 2nd month, 1719, “William Goin” received Grant No. 91 for 180 acres “on the main run of the Accontink, beginning at a white oak at the mouth of Long Branch.” according to “Grants by the Proprietors of the Northern Neck of Virginia, 1694-1742.” The grant was recorded in Northern Neck Deed Book 5, page 229. Accontink Creek is believed to be a tributary of the Rappahannock River which forms the southern boundary of Stafford County.

“William Goings” gave a deed to 90 acres of land located on the east side of the main run of Jonathans Creek on 6th, 5th month, 1724 to William Godfrey, [regarded as his son-in-law by Addie Evans Winn] according to the index of Stafford County Deed Book 1, page 122-125 and “Stafford County, Virginia Deeds, 1722-1728.”

On the 13th, 5th month, 1724, one week later, William Gowen appointed his “well-beloved friend, Lewis Sanders, of the County of Stafford, attorney,” to acknowledge the transfer, according to Stafford County Deed Book 1, page 125.

“William Gowin” owned land adjoining Thomas Ford “on Popeshead Run and Occoquan Creek” February 12, 1725, according to Northern Neck Deed Book A, page 200. “William Goings” received Grant No. 131 November 12, 1725 for 112 acres “on Rattlesnake Branch of Popeshead,” according to “Grants by the Proprietors of the Northern Neck of Virginia.”

“William Gowin” owned land “adjoining Terrence Ryley on Popeshead Run and Rattlesnake Branch,” according to Northern Neck Deed Book B, page 79, as reported in “Patents and Northern Neck Grants of Fairfax County, Virginia.”

This land was regranted in 1767 to George Mason, with 19 “surplus” acres, according to Northern Neck Deed Book O, page 89.

William Gowen received another land grant on Pope’s Head Run in Fairfax County, Virginia. Although no legal record of the grant has been found to date a reference is made to the grant in a lease made by “Ambrose Gowing to Kathrine Gowing, widow.” Ambrose Gowen leased land from his mother described as a “grant to William Gowing, father of the said Ambrose Gowing by patent bearing date 12th, 11th month, 1725.”

The lease, recorded 8th, 3rd month, 1726 in Stafford County Deed Book 1, page 353, was witnessed by George Mason, Joseph Haines and Brent Hutnall. A release appears in Stafford County Deed Book 1, page 354. Later John Gowen, son of William Gowen, inherited a portion of this grant, according to Fairfax County deed records.

The toll of time has destroyed most of the early records of Stafford County and with them most of the story of William Gowen. For the most part only the indices of these records remain. Fragmentary records of the land transactions of William Gowen are retained in Stafford County Deed Book 1 reposing in the Virginia State Library.

William Gowen died sometime between 12th, 11th month, 1725 and 6th, 3rd month, 1726, at about age 42. His will and probate records have not been found to date in Stafford County records.

On the 8th, 3rd month, 1726 Catherine Gowen leased to her son “Ambrose Going of Stafford County, Overwharton Parish, planter 100 acres on the branch issuing out of Pope’s Head Run, said branch known as Rattlesnake Branch.” It is believed that Catherine Gowen was remarried about 1728, husband’s name Padderson [or Patterson] and removed to adjoining Prince William County, Virgnia.

Apparently the marriage was short-lived. Catherine Patterson next appeared October 23, 1738 in Brunswick County, Virginia where she, Mary King and Cornelius Keife/Keith were witnesses to the will of Thomas Stroud, according to Brunswick County Will Book 2, page 1.

Cornelius Keife\Keith had appeared in the legal records of Brunswick County March 26, 1736 when he was a witness to the will of John Nipper, Sr. of St. Andrews Parish of Brunswick County.

She wrote her will 21st, 5th month, 1739, and it was presented for probate 23rd, 7th month, 1739, indicating that she had died in the two-month period, according to “Prince William County Will Book C” by John Frederick Forman. The will left her estate, valued at £36:2:4.75, to two younger children and named her son John Gowen as administrator.

The will read:

“I, Catherine Padderson, being sick and weak in body. Unto my well beloved son, Elixander Going, one negro man named Robin and one horse and a horse colt and one cow and calf and a cow yearling and halph of my movable houshold stuf and one parcel of land whereon I now live containing sixty-six acres, it being part of a tract containing one hundred and thirty-two acres.

Unto my well beloved daughter, Susannah Going, one negro man named Jackey and one mare and saddle, cow and calf and two cow yearlings and one feather bed and bolster, a rugg and one pare of blankits and half the household stuf.

My crop of tob: which is now in my house after my debts is paid I bequeath to be equally divided between my son Elixander Going and my daughter Susannah Going.

I leave my well beloved son, John Going, whole and sole executor of this, my last will and testament.

Catherin Padderson

Witnesses: Thomas Ford, Jane Ford, Ann Gladding”

Probate records in Will Book C show:

“23, July, 1739. Presented in Court by John Going, sole executor herein named, who prayed certificate for obtaining a probate thereof, but it being suggested that the deceased’s husband is living, on the motion of the said John Going and giving security for his just and faithful administration of the said deceased’s estate, certificate is granted him for obtaining letters of administration.”

“Bond of John Going, William Scutt and John Hollis unto Denis McCarty, Gent., justice. For £100, 23 July, 1739. John Going is administrator of Catherine Padderson, deceased.

John Going
John Hollis
William Scutt

Witness: John Bowie, 23 July, 1739, Acknowledged and Ordered”

The inventory of the estate, which included two negro men valued at 25 pounds, totaled 36 pounds, 2 shillings, 4 3/4 pence and was presented to the court by John Gowen August 27, 1739. The account which was allowed and ordered by Prince William County Probate Court, read:

“The estate of Catherine Pattison, deceased.
To 2 levs. pd. Edwd. Barry 116 (tobo.)
To pd. Capt. Val Peyton 364
To pd. Thomas Ford 40
To pd. Alexander Gowin 330
To pd. Susanna Gowin 250
To bal due per John Gowin 468
To pd. Mr. Wm. Dunlop 7:4:-
John (X) Gowin”

[“To” is apparently an abbreviation for “Total;” “tobo” is apparently an abbreviation for “tobacco”.]

From the fragmentary records available in Stafford County, is believed that William Gowen and Catherine Gowen were the parents of:

Ambrose Gowen born about 1705
Thomas Gowen born about 1706
[daughter] born about 1707
John Gowen born about 1709
Alexander Gowen born about 1715
Susannah Gowen born about 1718

Ambrose Gowen, [William3 , Thomas2 , Mihi1 1 ] son of William Gowen and Catherine Gowen, was born about 1705 probably in Stafford County. It is believed that he was the eldest son since he assumed the operation of the family farmland after the death of his father. Later he lived in Overwharton Parish, Stafford County, Virginia.

“Ambrose Gowing, Planter,” sold to [his mother] “Catherine Gowing” for £20, land granted to “William Gowing, father of Ambrose,” 12 November 1725. The deed was signed by “Ambrose Goin, according to Stafford County Deed Book 1722-1728, page 354.

A lease recorded there 8th, 3rd month, 1726 in Stafford County Deed Book 1 also documents the relationship of Ambrose Gowen to his parents. Stafford County records searched to date reveal nothing further of him, and he was not mentioned in the will of his mother.

“Ambrose Gowan” appeared in Henry County, Virginia during the Revolutionary War in 1776, when Ambrose Gowen would have been about 71 years old. “Ambrose Gowan” of Henry County sold to the government “four double fortified six-pounders,” March 3, 1776.

On March 18, 1776 he “furnished wheat to the Hampton troops,” according to “Virginia Magazine of History & Biography,” Volume 28.

On April 5, 1786 “Ambrose Goins” appeared on a jury panel in Davidson County, North Carolina [later Tennessee] in which Peter Barnett sued John Rice. He may have been influenced to move to Tennessee by William Gowen, regarded as his kinsman, who arrived there in the winter of 1779. It is believed that Ambrose Gowen did not long remain in Davidson County.

Thomas Gowen, [William3 , Thomas 2 , Mihi11 ] son of William Gowen and Catherine Gowen, was born about 1706 in Stafford County. He removed to Fairfax County about 1743 along with his brother, John Gowen. Of this individual nothing more is known.

It is believed a daughter, name unknown, was born to William Gowen and Catherine Gowen about 1707. She is believed to have married William Godfrey about 1724 in Stafford County. On May 6, 1724 William Godfrey received a deed from William Gowen to 90 acres of land located on Jonathans Creek.

The 90-acre tract was described as a plot taken up by William Gowen and Evans Thomas in Overwharton Parish. Both were residents of Stafford County. John Wilson and Moses Linton were witnesses to the transaction. William Gowen later gave a release on the property.

William Godfrey received a grant from the proprietors to 105 acres “on the south run of the Pohick,” according to “Northern Neck Land Grants,” Book B, page 40. On February 25, 1729 William Godfrey received another grant from the proprietors to 266 acres “on the south run of the Pohick, adjoining Joseph Jones, according to “Northern Neck Land Grants,” Book C, page 35.

He appeared on Green’s tax list of 1730 with “3 white tithables and 2 black tithables” and was recorded as “formerly Vestryman and Justice, Lower Parish.”

On November 4, 1731, he was commissioned a justice of the peace in adjoining Prince William County. He was a vestryman there from 1733 to 1744.

William Godfrey wrote his will January 16, 1749, and it was recorded March 20, 1753, according to Fairfax County Will Book B, page 13.

Gowen Research Foundation Phone:806/795-9694
5708 Gary Avenue E-mail: gowen@llano.net
Lubbock, Texas, 79413-4822 gowen@sbcglobal.net
GOWENMS.002, 01/19/13
Internet: http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.com/~gowenrf
http://www.lllano.net/gowen

___________________________________________________________

NOTE:  The above information produced by the Gowen Research Foundation (GRF), and parts of the “Gowen Manuscript” they worked on producing.  It has tons of information – much of it is correct, but be careful, some of it is not correct – so check their sources and logic.  I’ve copied some of their information in the past researching my own family, only to find out there were some clear mistakes.   So be sure to check the information to verify if it is right before citing the source and believing the person who researched it before was 100% correct.  Most of the information I found there seems to be correct, but some is not.

Their website is:  Internet: http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.com/~gowenrf

There does not seem to be anyone “manning the ship” at the Gowen Research Foundation, or Gowen Manuscript site any longer, and there is no way to contact anyone about any errors.   The pages themselves don’t have a mechanism to leave a note for others to see any “new information” that you may have that shows when you find info that shows something is wrong, or when something has been verified.

Feel free to leave messages about any new information found, or errors in these pages, or information that has been verified that those who wrote these pages may not have known about.

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