1745-50 William Going b. abt 1745-50 died in Chatham Co, NC

William Going b. 1745-50 died in 1783 in Chatham Co, NC

Parents: 

Unk

Children: 

  • Nancy Going b. 1770, orphan child of William, bound out in 1783 at 13 yrs of age
  • William Going b. 1775, orphan child of William, bound out in 1783 at 8 yrs of age
  • John Going b. 1771, orphan child of William, bound out in 1783 at 12 years of age
  • Mary Going b. 1770-75, orphan child of William, bound out in 1783
  • Ann Going b. 1774, orphan child of William, bound out in 1783
  • Elizabeth Going b. 1772, orphan child of William, bound out in 1783

Siblings: 

Unk

Related Counties: 

FACTS and SOURCES:

1783 Nov William Going – Dec’d, died in Chatham County, North Carolina in 1783. An inventory of the estate of “William Goan” was itemized in the Moore County Will Book A, page 322 and 323.  Chatham Co, NC  1783 Nov – 1785 May https://www.familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:1:33SQ-LGHG-1LD?i=176&wc=32GS-7M3%3A169763701%2C169951501&cc=1867501  : Several Going/Gowing children of William Going, decd, are bound out as orphans:
Pg. 52B – Nov., 1783 NANCY GOING, O_______ (probably Orphan), of WILLIAM GOING be bound to WILLIAM COPE, untill she comes to lawfull age to learn the business of House Wifery she now being adjudg’d to be thirteen years of age.  https://www.familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:1:3Q9M-CS4T-YG2K?i=277&cat=144931
Pg. 52B – Nov., 1783 WILLIAM GOING, Orphan of WILLIAM GOING be bound to GEORGE DISMUKES untill he come of lawfull age to learn the Art of farming, he now being adjudged Eight Years of age.  https://www.familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:1:3Q9M-CS4T-YG2K?i=277&cat=144931
pg. 53A – Nov., 1783 JOHN GOING Orphan of WILLIAM GOING, dec’d be bound to WILLIAM RIDDLE to learn the art of farming untill he come to lawful age, he now being adjudged to be Twelve Years of age.  https://www.familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:1:3Q9M-CS4T-YGFX?i=278&cat=144931
Pg. 68B – May, 1784 MARY GOING, Orphan of WILLIAM GOING being heretofore bound to WILLIAM CAPE be removed from the said CAPE  https://www.familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:1:3Q9M-CS4T-YG8F?i=298&cat=144931
Pg. 90A – Nov., 1784 ELIZABETH GOWING, and orphan of WILLIAM GOWING, dec’d be bound to WILLIAM DOUGLASS, Esq., untill she come to lawfull age, she being now about twelve years to learn the mistry of housewifery.  https://www.familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:1:3Q9M-CS4T-YGKJ?i=333&cat=144931
Pg. 90A – Nov., 1784 ANN GOWIN, an orphan of WILLIAM GOWING be bound unto JAMES HOWARD, untill she come to lawfull age to learn the mistry of housewifery. She being on or about 10 years of age.  https://www.familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:1:3Q9M-CS4T-YGKJ?i=333&cat=144931
Pg. 99B – Feb., 1785 Any further proceeding to be stopped as to binding out ELIZABETH GOWING to WILLIAM DOUGLASS & that WILLIAM DOUGLASS have notice to show cause why the order should not be discharged.  https://www.familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:1:3Q9M-CS4T-YG98?i=350&cat=144931
Pg. 110A – May, 1785 JOHN GOWING, orphan of WILLIAM GOWING, be bound unto JAMES SUTTEN, the said GOWIN being given up by WM. RIDDLE, to whom he was formerly bound, untill lawfull age he being judged twelve years now, to learn the trade of a planter.  https://www.familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:1:3Q9M-CS4T-YL1J?i=366&cat=144931
ORPHAN’S INDENTURES & GUARDIANSHIP RECORDS IN COURT MINUTES
Taken from Chatham Co. Court of Pleas & Quarter Sessions- 1774-1800
NC State Archives film # C.022.30001
Updated 11-21-2000
Copyright 2000 – Sue Ashby
From http://www.ncgenweb.us/chatham/orphan.htm
NOTE: This William Going may have been the William Gowen that was born before 1748 since he was taxable in the Granville County household of his father James Gowen in 1759.
http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~gowenrf/gowenms.htm    1783 William Going – Dec’d, died in Chatham County, North Carolina in 1783. An inventory of the estate of “William Goan” was itemized in the Moore County Will Book A, page 322 and 323.  Chatham Co, NC

1783 Nov – pg. 52b, Minutes 1774-1800, Chatham County, North Carolina
Ordered that Nancy Going orphan of William Going be bound to William Cope until she comes to lawful age, to learn the … of house wifery, she now being adjudged to be 13 years of age. (note: b. abt 1770). https://www.familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:1:3Q9M-CS4T-YG2K?i=274&cat=144931

1783 Nov – pg. 52b, Minutes 1774-1800, Chatham County, North Carolina
Ordered that William Going orphan of William Going be bound to George Dismukes untill he come of lawfull age to learn the art of farming he now being adjudged 8 years of age. (note: b. abt 1775)
https://www.familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:1:3Q9M-CS4T-YG2K?i=274&cat=144931

1783 Nov – pg. 53a, Minutes 1774-1800, Chatham County, North Carolina
Ordered that John Going orphan of William Going decd be bound to William Riddle to learn the art of Farming untill he come to lawfull age he now being adjudged to be 12 years of age. (note: b abt 1771). https://www.familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:1:3Q9M-CS4T-YGFX?i=275&cat=144931

1784 May – pg. 68b, Minutes 1774-1800, Chatham County, North Carolina
Ordred that Mary Going orphan of William Going being heretofor bound to William Cope be removed from the said Cope.
https://www.familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:1:3Q9M-CS4T-YG8F?i=298&cat=144931

1784 Nov – pg. 90a, Minutes 1774-1800, Chatham County, North Carolina
Ordered that Elizabeth Gowing an orphan of William Gowen decd, be bound to William Douglass Esqr until she come to lawfull age, she being now about 12 years – to learn the mistry of housewifery. (note b. abt 1772) https://www.familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:1:3Q9M-CS4T-YGKJ?i=333&cat=144931

1784 Nov – pg. 90a, Minutes 1774-1800, Chatham County, North Carolina
Ordered that Ann Gowen an orphan of William Gowing be bound unto James Howard untill she come to lawfull age to learn the mistry of housewifry she being on or about 10 years of age. (note: b. abt 1774).
https://www.familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:1:3Q9M-CS4T-YGKJ?i=333&cat=144931

1785 Feb – pg. 99b, Minutes 1774-1800, Chatham County, North Carolina
Ordered that any further proceedings be stoped as to binding out Elizabeth Gowing to William Douglass and that W D have notice to show cause why the order should not be discharged.
https://www.familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:1:3Q9M-CS4T-YG9F?i=349&cat=144931

1785 May – pg. 110a, Minutes 1774-1800, Chatham County, North Carolina
Ordered that John Gowing orphan of William Gowing be bound unto James Sutton, the said Gowen being given up by William Riddle to whom he was formerly bound, until lawfull age he being judged twelve years now to learn the trade of a planter. (note: b. abt. 1773).
https://www.familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:1:3Q9M-CS4T-YL1J?i=365&cat=144931

1783 William Going – Dec’d died Chatham County, North Carolina in 1783. An inventory of the estate of “William Goan” was itemized in the Moore County Will Book A, page 322 and 323. Chatham Co, NC. Moore Co, NC. https://www.familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:1:33SQ-LGHG-1LD?i=180&cc=1867501&cat=169847

From GRF Newsletter May 1999:  (Note: Not sure parentage is correct on this. Publishing the following as it was written in the newsletter)

William Gowen Son of John and Mary Keife Gowen, Sired Five Sons Who Served in the Revolution

William Gowen, son of John Gowen and Mary Keife Gowen, was born about 1731 in Stafford County, Virginia. He removed to Lunenburg County, Virginia on the North Carolina border along with his parents and brother about 1750. It is believed that he was married about 1752, wife’s name Mary. Shortly afterward he appeared in Granville County, North Carolina.

A few months, later William Gowen and his family moved back across the state line to rejoin his father in Lunenburg County. On February 14, 1761 John Gowen deeded land to “beloved son, William” consisting of acreage which “aforesaid William now lives upon.” The land was 200 acres on Great Branch received on the same date by John Gowen in a grant from Gov. Francis Farquier, according to Lunenburg County Deed Book 6, page 379. Six months later he sold this land on December 30, according to Lunenburg Deed Book 7, page 153.

On July 6, 1762, he was a resident of Orange County, North Carolina when he sold an additional 100 acres in Lunenburg County which adjoined the 100 acres that he had sold in December, according to Lunenburg County Deed Book 7, page 302.

In November 1763, Alexander Gowen, regarded as an uncle of William Gowen, Jr, filed a complaint against him in Orange County Court, according to Minute Book 1, page 232. The particulars of the complaint, when the court minutes are found, might reveal additional information about the family.

About 1764, “William Gowen” received a land patent for 300 acres in Cumberland County, North Carolina, “on both sides of Pocket Creek.” “William Goins” appeared as “1 white taxable” in the 1767 tax list of Cumberland County.

Pocket Creek was later a landmark in Moore County which was created from Cumberland County in 1784. Lee County was created in 1907 from Moore County, and in 1999 Pocket Creek is a landmark in Lee County, near the town of Sanford, North Carolina, according to the research of Karen Matheson. She wrote, “There is an old, over-grown Goins cemetery in the area, with possibly 20-30 visible graves, only three or four of which currently have stones.”

“William Goings” was the head of a household in Moore County, Fayette District, page 44, according to “Heads of Families, North Carolina, 1790.” The “1790” census of North Carolina was actually taken in the late 1780s. The household was recorded as “Goings, William, 1 white male over 16, 4 white males under 16 and five white females.”

“William Goings, free colored,” was the head of a household also in Fayette District, Moore County, on adjoining page 43. It was recorded as “10 free colored persons,” according to “Heads of Families, North Carolina, 1790.” This second entry as “free colored,” possibly a duplicate enumeration, may have been made by the enumerator to avoid conflict and criticism. In several instances, families were sometimes referred to as “white” and at other times were designated as “free persons of color.”

Mention of the William Gowens families in Moore County appeared in “Ancient Records of Moore County, North Carolina:”

“By strange coincidence, there were two Goings families in Moore County in 1790, one being white; the other listed under the heading of “all other free persons,” that is free negro, mulatto or Indian. Both families were headed by William Goings. One William, of course the white one, was later made a justice of the peace for the county. Within the writer’s recollection, some of those families held themselves above association with negroes, and their white neighbors accepted them as several notches above their black brethren.

An examination of the 1850 census will show the increase in this clan, all of whom are there listed as mulatto. Briefly, the Goings were classed exactly as were the so-called “Lumbee” Indians of Robeson County. In later years, certain of these families intermarried with negroes, and their descendants now living in Moore County are as black as the pot. Others, however, has maintained the complexion and characteristics of their more ancient ancestors.

An inventory of the estate of “William Goan” was itemized in Moore County Will Book A, pages 322 and 323 in the late 1780s. His probate papers, if found, might reveal much about the family.

Children born to William Gowen and Mary Gowen are believed to include:

William Gowen, Jr. born about 1754
James Gowen born May 31, 1755
Daniel Gowen born about 1756
Bryan Gowen born about 1757
John Gowen born about 1759

Many of the descendants of William Gowen and Mary Gowen removed to Fairfield County, South Carolina. The five brothers listed above served in the Revolutionary War, according to the research of Margaret Frances Goynes Olson of Kingsville, Texas. She cites a newspaper interview held in 1905 with Susan Goynes Dickerson of Live Oak County, Texas at age 80. She was a great-granddaughter of John Gowen whose name was changed to John Goyne. In the newspaper account she stated that she knew her great-grandfather and that he and his four brothers had served in the Revolutionary War.

Another connection exists between Moore County, North Carolina and Fairfield County, South Carolina. Levi Gowen, [Newsletter, July 1998] mulatto son of Daniel Gowen and Rebecca Gowen, was born in Fairfield County in June 1762. He enlisted in Revolutionary service at age 17. He inherited the land of his brother, David Gowen who was killed by Indians in Davidson County, Tennessee in 1780. Shortly after 1792, he “returned” to Moore County, North Carolina and was enumerated there in the 1800 census. He was still a resident of Moore County in 1852 when he applied for a Revolutionary pension “aged about 90.”