1733 William Goyne research by Carroll Heard Goyne, Jr. – ydna match

Carroll Heard Goyne, Jr. researched the Goyne family through William Goyne born 1733’s line.  He published a multiple part newsletter with his findings on the family.  I have posted the portions of those newsletters that dealt with William Goyne below:  (Also see William Goyne’s page on this website at:  https://goyengoinggowengoyneandgone.com/1733-william-goyne/ )

From: “Arlee Gowen” <gowen@llano.net>
Subject: Electronic Newsletter, Vol. 4, No. 6 
Date: Tue, 3 Jul 2001 16:54:15 -0500

(Web Location:  http://archiver.rootsweb.ancestry.com/th/read/GOWEN/2001-07/0994197255 )

Gowen Research Foundation Electronic Newsletter

June 2001 Volume 4No. 6

The Ancestry of William Goyne Of Wilkes/Warren County, Georgia

By Col. Carroll Heard Goyne, Jr. & Betty Brantley Goyne
Editorial Boardmembers
10019 Canterbury Drive Shreveport, Louisiana, 71106
318/798-7108 cgoyne@softdisk.com

William Goyne [4], who made his will in Warren County., Georgia in 1816 is this writer’s earliest documented ancestor. The purpose of this paper is to determine the ancestry of William Goyne [4] by documentation and, when that is lacking, by evaluation of available evidence. In this paper we have spelled the name as it appears in a specific record. On other occasions we have used a generic spelling of “Going.” The number in brackets following a name, e.g. [4], identifies the generation of that person descending from the immigrant ancestor.

ORIGIN OF THE NAME

The Goyne name is probably Iberian Celtic, having come to the British Isles from the Iberian Peninsula at some early time. Indeed, that is the tradition of some Goynes in England. Others hold that the name has its origins in the Cymric [Welsh] language, a language similar to Iberian Celtic. The name means “White” in the original language, probably in reference to a person’s complexion.

The name written in ancient Iberian Celtic Ogam has been found in a stone inscription. When the ‘sound’ of the Ogam letter-forms is converted into Latin letters they become: G-UI-N. [Book of Leinster, Irish Academy, Dublin]. These letters further evolved into G-W-N, or G-Y-N. When vowels are added,the name takes on a variety of spellings. [The ‘Rosetta Stone’ of Celtic Ogam is contained in the “Book of Ballymote,” housed in the library of the Irish Academy, Dublin.]

The name “White” in Cymric is spelled Gwyn/Gwyne/Gwynn/Gwynne. [Charles Wareing Bardsley, M.A., “A Dictionary of English and Welsh Surnames,” Baltimore: Genealogy Publishing Co, 1980 [London, 1901]. The name is said to date to “high antiquity” in Wales, probably dating to the Roman period. [Thomas Nicholas, M.A, Ph. D, F.G.S., etc., “Annals and Antiquities of The Counties and County Families of Wales,” Vol. 1, London: 1991, 1872, 1875.]

Since W and Y are semi-vowels in both Iberian Celtic and Cymric, one spelling is a variant of the other. An example of semi-vowel to vowel transition may be seen in the name Llwyd to Lloyd. This transition is documented in “History of Wales”, by Caradoc of Llancarvan; translated into English by Dr. Powell. Caradoc lived until the year ca. 1157. Dr. Powell added to Caradoc’s original work, and published it in the English language in 1584.

In Stirlingshire, Scotland the westernmost peak of the Campsie Fells is named Dumgoyne [Fort Goyne] Hill. “As the name suggests, there was once an Iron Age fort on the top.” [Discover Scotland, The Sunday Mail, p. 678] The Iron Age reached the British Isles about the time of Christ.

An interesting document in Britain confirms the derivation of the Goyne name. After World War II, when Arthur William Tedder, GCB, Marshal of the Royal Air Force, was knighted, he took the title “Tedder of Glen Guin; Guin is now Goyne.” [Provided by James N. Scott of Glasgow, Scotland.)

BRITAIN

The Goyne name appears in some of the oldest surviving parish records in England, dating to the 14th century. While the name is found in various parts
of the British Isles, it is clustered in Cornwall from an early time. Provided by Robert Goyen of Victoria, Australia.]

April 12, 1397. John Gowyn the elder, and John Goyen the younger of Fovent. Quit claim of all lands etc in Westmerton and Wodehouse within the parish  of Eblesborne Wake. Margaret Jove late his wife. Dated West Merton April 12, 20 Richard II.

October 3 1422. To Alexander of de Ferentines of the fellowship of Albertini dwelling in the City of London. Licence to make a letter of exchange for 5 marks payable in foreign parts to Patrick Brown chaplain and 40s to William Goyne, provided he send no gold or silver over sea in the lump nor money by colour of this command [Calendar of Close Rolls, Henry IV 1422-1429, p. 447.]

1429-36. William, Bishop of Coventry and Lichfield, Humphrey, Earl of Stafford, also Hugh Ardeswyk and Thomas Arblaster, Knight of the Shire for the County of Stafford. Commissioners to receive the oath of the following: Thomas Goyne, Esquire. [Calendar of Patient Rolls. Henry VI 1429-1436, Stafford, p. 309.

January 17, 1452. Letters of denization [naturalization] for John Goyne, born in parts of the land of Luque, and the heirs of his body, and for Richard, his son, a bastard, and his heirs. By p.s. etc. and for 4 marks paid in the hanaper. [Patent Rolls Henry VI 1452-61, Westminster] [Luque is located in southern Spain.]

April 3, 1542. Surrey, Thomas Goyne, Child of John & Jone.

August 7, 1597. William Goyen, Knight, buried.

1641. Peter Goyne, St. Kecerne. Declared non-Catholic.

Edna Reynolds, of Kent, England, whose mother was a GOYNE of Morval, Cornwall, wrote the following to this writer in 1996.

“My mother always said that her family came from the Spanish smugglers, and some must have stayed having met girls they fancied. Certainly their colouring suggests it could be right.”

What a surprise it is to learn that some presentday Goyne individuals in Cornwall have olive skin.

MARYLAND/VIRGINIA

It should be noted that there were no fewer than 30 men with a ‘Going-sounding’ surname who were immigrants to Maryland, South Carolina and Virginia prior to 1700. The earliest of record was William Gayne who was recorded as follows.

January 20-February 7, 1624/5, Muster Rolls of Virginia.

Elizabeth Cittie.

William Gayne and Robert Newman, their musters.

William Gayne, age 36, in the Bona Nova, 1620. [John Camden Hotten, Muster Rolls of Settlers in Virginia, 1624. The Original Lists of Persons of Quality, 1600-1700. Reprinted from 2nd Edition 1880 Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Co, 1962]

The first person for which there is the slightest bit of evidence for being the progenitor of this line of “Going” is Thomas[1] of Westmoreland / Stafford County, Virginia. This possible connection is found in the following record:

August 3, 1719, Stafford County Evan Thomas & John Todd both of Stafford County, 1215 acres in Stafford County on Four Mile Creek adjacent to Mr. Robert Alexander. Land formerly surveyed for Thomas, John, William & James Goins. Surveyed by Mr. Thomas Hooper. Grant Book 5, p. 212. [Gertrude Entz Gray, Virginia Northern Neck Land Grants, 1694-1742, Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Co, 1987, p. 69].

Four Mile Creek enters the Potomac River just south of Ronald Reagan Airport  [Washington National Airport]. Robert Alexander was the grandson of John Alexander, who originally patented his land in 1664. Robert Alexander’s sons, Gerard Alexander and John Alexander were the first Alexanders to actually reside on the Four Mile Creek property. John Alexander lived at Boyd’s Hole in King George County [formed from Richmond and Westmoreland Cos.in 1720] opposite Maryland Point.

Since the name of Thomas Going [1] name appeared in Westmoreland and Stafford County records several years before the other three, we have assumed that Thomas [1] was the father of the others. With the further assumption that Thomas [1] was an immigrant, we have looked for records that might identify him.

August 6, 1635. Thomas Going, age 18, was transported to Virginia in the Globe of London. [Michael Tepper, “Passengers to America,” Baltimore, Genealogical Publishing Co, 1977]

July 17, 1648, Isle of Wight County, Mr. George Hardy, 500 acres. Lying on the east side of Lawnes Creek, extending to the main river along land reputed Thomas Gaynes, along the great river to a creek dividing same from land of Alice Bennett. [Nell Marion Nugent, “Cavaliers & Pioneers, Abstracts of Virginia. Land Patents & Grants, 1623-1666, p. 177].

1652. Thomas Gayne transported by Micho George, Tho. Taberer and Humphry Clarke, ____ Co. [George Cabel Greer, “Early Virginia Immigrants, 1623-1666” Baltimore:  Genealogical Publishing Co, 1982]

August 7, 1657. Persons to be transported from London to Virginia by the Globe of London, Mr. Jeremy Blackman, after examination by the Minister of Gravesend: Thomas Gowen, 18. [Peter Wilson Coldham, “The Complete Book of Emigrants, 1607-1660,” Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Co, 1988]

1671, Thomas Going transported to Maryland. [Liber 16, Folio 135, in Gust Skordas, “The Early Settlers of Maryland,” Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Co, 1986

Stafford County, Virginia was formed from Westmoreland Co. in 1664.

Following is the earliest record of the Thomas Going [1] who may be the progenitor of this line.

April 7, 1693, Westmoreland County. At Court: Abraham Smith vs. Thomas Goen.  Defamation. Withdrawn in person. [John Frederick Dorman, Westmoreland County
Virginia Order Book 1690-1698, Part 2, 1962, p. 34]

The Thomas Going [1] name appeared in the records of Westmoreland & Stafford Counties until December 8, 1708, when he was granted 653 acres of land on “Potowmack” River in Stafford County. The warrant was dated June 8, 1707. The land was located on Lower Spout Run near Ousley’s land. [Book 3, p. 204 in Gray, op cit, p. 39] There is no evidence that Thomas Going actually lived on this land.

The above land is the same as that reported a bit differently in the following record:

Thomas Going patented 653 acres westerly from the mouth of Spout Run in 1703. (Book 3, p. 204 in Bessie Wilmarth Gahn, “Colonial Days, Rock Creek to the Falls,” 1940]

Spout Run enters the Potomac River west of today’s Interstate 66, and opposite the southwest corner of Georgetown University. “Ousley’s land” refers to a grant of 640 acres in 1696 to Thomas Ousley. This land is along the Potomac River extending easterly from the mouth of Spout Run.

The name of Thomas Going [1] name appeared in Stafford County records after 1708, but we have found no evidence to indicate that he was alive after that date.

As previously noted, the August 3, 1719 deed suggests that Thomas Going [1] had three sons: John [2], William [2] and James [2]. These presumed sons of Thomas [1] served in the Stafford County Militia, Company of Dragoons in 1701/02. [Lloyd DeWitt Bockstruck, “Virginia’s Colonial Soldiers,” Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Co, 1988] This record indicates that these sons of Thomas [1] were born before 1685. This writer descends from William [2].

November 23, 1714 is the date of the first grant of William Going[2] in Stafford County. This tract is on the “Main Run of Accotink Creek.” [A. Evans Wynn, “Southern Lineages: Records of Thirteen Families,” Brown Publishing Co, 1940, p. 320]

Other grants are listed as follows.

November 23, 1714, William Going [2] & Evan Thomas of Stafford County Warrant: September 10. 1713. Surveyed by Mr. Thomas Hooper, 124 acres on Jonathan’s Creek of Occaquan River in Stafford County, adjacent road to Dogue Island Neck, Giles Travers, Giles Tillett. Grant Book 5, p. 8. [Gertrude Entz Gray, “Virginia Northern Neck Land Grants 1694-1742,” Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Co, 1987,p. 54]

February 28, 1719, William Going [2] of Stafford County, 180 acres on main run of Accotink Creek in Stafford County on Goins or Turkey Branch. Surveyed by Mr. Thomas Hooper. Grant Book 5, p. 70. [Gray, op cit, p. 70]

Apparently William Going [2] died in Stafford County between November 12, 1725 and March 8, 1726.

March 8, 1726, Stafford County. Lease of Ambrose Gowing [3] to Kathrine Gowing, widow. George Mason, Joseph Haines, Brent Hudnall, wits. “Proprietors of the Northern Neck of Virginia unto William Gowing [2], father of the said Ambrose Gowing [3], by patent bearing date November 12, 1725.” Deed Book 1, recorded p. 358; release p. 354. [A. Evans Wynne, “Southern Lineages, Records of Thirteen Families,” Brown Publishing. Co, 1940, p. 320].

Ambrose Going[3] was the eldest son and heir of William Going [2].

Prince William County, Virginia was formed from Stafford County in 1727.

On an undetermined date between March 8, 1726 and October 23, 1738, Catherine Going, the widow of William Going [2], was married to a Mr. Patterson.

On October 23, 1738, in Brunswick County, Virginia, Thomas Stroud’s Will was witnessed by Cornelius Keith [2], Mary [x] King, and Catherine [x] Patterson. [Will Book 2, p. 1]. Since John [3] and Mary [Keith] Going had not yet moved to Brunswick County. This suggests that Catherine Patterson [widow of William Going [2]] was visiting with, and related to either Cornelius Keith [2] or his wife Elizabeth Johnson.

Catherine Patterson’s will was dated May 21, 1739 in Prince William County, Virginia. Catherine identified her children: son Alexander Going [3], daughter Susannah Going [3] and son John Going [3], who was named Executor. [John Frederick Dorman, Prince William County Will Book C, 1734-1744, Washington, D.C, 1956. pp. 180-199.] This indicates that John [3] was age 21 or older, or born before 1718. Son Ambrose Going [3] was not mentioned.

This writer descends from John Going [3].

On July 23, 1739, Catherine Patterson’s Will was presented to the Prince William County Court by John Going [3], sole executor. John Going [3] stated that Catherine’s husband was yet living. [Dorman, op cit].

John Going [3] was married to Mary Keith, daughter of Cornelius Keith [1]. This relationship is confirmed in Fairfax County, Virginia Deed Book B, p. 32. [A. Evans Wynn, “Southern Lineages: Records of Thirteen Families,” Brown Publishing Co, 1940, p. 322]

KEITH EXCURSUS

This excursus is presented to resolve a question concerning the spelling of the Keith name Spelling the name with a “T” suggests Scottish ancestry, while spelling it with an “F” suggests Irish ancestry. The spellings used herein were taken from source documents.

William Byrd [2] visited Cornelius Keith [2] on November 16, 1728, on his return from surveying the dividing line between North Carolina and Virginia. Evidently, Cornelius [2] had recently arrived at this site, as his house did not have a roof at the time of Byrd’s visit. Byrd wrote that Cornelius Keith [2] had a wife and six small children. They lived on Maj. Robert Mumford’s land near the Roanoke River in Brunswick County, Virginia. Byrd and
some of his party crossed the Roanoke River by boat at a point about one mile below the Horse Ford of the Trading Path. Thus, Cornelius [2] lived on the north side of the Roanoke River, about one mile below the Trading Path, and a short distance above the North Carolina line. In his “History of the Dividing Line betwixt Virginia and North Carolina Line,” and in his “The Secret History of the Dividing Line,” William Byrd [2] spelled the name Keith. (William K. Boyd, William Byrd’s “Histories of the Dividing Line,” Raleigh, The North Carolina Historical Commission, 1929]

At a later date, Robert Hicks, Sr. gave Cornelius Keith [2] 100 acres of land on the north side of Roanoke River below the Horse Ford of the Trading Path. [Brunswick County Deed Book. 1, p. 125]

Cornelius Keith [2] operated a ferry across the Roanoke River from this location, which was close to where he formerly lived on Maj. Mumford’s land.

In May 1739, Cornelius Keith [2] appeared before the Court of Brunswick County and made oath that “he had never made use of his Importation Right and this is the first time, and that is now thirty years ago since his importation, which is ordered to be certified.” Brunswick County Order Book 1, p. 241]

In her book “Southern Lineages” A. Evans Wynn cited a document in Brunswick County that referred to Cornelius Keith [2] as “Keiffe.” Jack Harold Goins of Rogersville, Tennessee visited Brunswick County and viewed the document in question. Jack informed this writer that the name on the document in question is spelled “Keith.” Evidently, Mrs. Wynn’s editor misread her handwriting.

The following is contained in “The Roster of Texas Daughters of Revolutionary Ancestors,” 1976, p. 1189:

“Cornelius Keith [3], born 1743 in Brunswick County, Virginia; died June 13, 1820 in Pickens County, South Carolina. Married Mary Laffoon in 1769 in Rockingham County, North Carolina and died in Pickens County, South Carolina on February 13, 1846.”

The above record connects the Keiths buried in Oolenoy Baptist Church Cemetery [see below] with the Brunswick County Keiths.

Grave markers in Oolenoy Baptist Church Cemetery in Pickens County appear to be those of Cornelius Keith [2] and several members of his family. If so, and considering the foregoing records, Cornelius Keith [2] came to America as a child. This would explain why he claimed Importation Rights in Brunswick County Court. His grave marker indicates that he married a second time.

“Cornelius Keith [2], born 1715, Loch Lomond, Scotland, died 1808. Of Royal Lineage. Coat of Arms 1715 to 1808, dating from 1010 A.D. Original pioneer of Oolenoy Settlement started about 1743. Married Juda Thompson, reared 12 children: one son was Col. Cornelius Keith, Revolutionary War hero whose wife was Mary Lafoone.”

In our opinion, this stone was placed long after Cornelius Keith [2] died, and probably after his son Cornelius Keith[3] died in 1820. Certainly, Cornelius [3] knew his highest rank was sergeant, not colonel. [See below]

“Cornelius Keith, Sr.[3], born 1743, died June. 13, 1820”

[On 15 June 1778, Cornelius Keith [3] enlisted in the 5th SC Regiment and became a corporal on December 18, 1778. He served as a sergeant under Capt. James Hogan and served 39 days in the militia during 1782. One source indicates he served in the 4th SC Regiment. [Bobby Gilmer Moss, Roster of SC Patriots in the American Revolution, 1983, p. 521)]

“Mary Keith, wife of Cornelius Keith, Sr.[3], born 1749, died February 13, 1846”

Returning to John Going[3], son of William GOING [2] of Stafford County, Virginia, we find the following records of interest.

Fairfax County, Virginia was formed from Prince William and Loudoun Counties in 1742.

Two deeds mark the departure of John [3] and Mary Keith Going from Fairfax County. Both deeds are recorded in Fairfax County Deed Book B.

June 9, 1746 John Going [3] and Mary, his wife, of Truro Parish, Fairfax County to Edward Kirkland, 268 acres on north side Occoquan Run, granted Richard Kirkland, deceased, and Cornelius Keif [1], father of the said Going’s wife. etc. JOHN [F] Going and Mary [W] Going signed this deed.

July 14, 1746, John [F] Going[3] of Truro Parish, planter, sells to Bond Veale, 144 acres granted John Going [3] from the Proprietor’s office. Recorded July 15, 1746. William Grove, George Dunson, John Duren, witnesses. Mary, the wife of John Going [3], relinquishes dower.

John Going’s [3] mark is usually printed as a F. Jack Goins who has seen John’s mark on original documents in Brunswick County stated that, in his opinion, John’s mark is a ligature, a “J” superimposed on a “G.”

Lunenburg County, Virginia was formed from Brunswick County May 1, 1745.

In June 1747, the Lunenburg County Court designated Lewis Deloney to take the list of tithables in the precinct “from Allen’s Creek to the extent of the County downward.” Allen’s Creek flows south through the approximate center of present Mecklenburg County. The land of John Going [3] was on the Great Branch of Allen’s Creek near its confluence with Layton’s Creek. This is in the approximate center of present Mecklenburg County.

Under Act 22, George II, October 1748, a tithable person was defined as: “All male persons of the age of 16 years & upwards, and all Negroes, mulatto & Indian women of the same age, except Indians tributary to this government and all wives of free Negroes, mulattoes, and Indians, except as before excepted.”

In 1748, John Going [3] first appeared on Lewis Deloney’s tithe list in Lunenburg County with two tithes. This indicates that John [3] had a son age 16 or older. That son was WILLIAM [4], who was born in 1732, or earlier. This writer descends from William Going [4].

In 1749, William Howard replaced Lewis Deloney as tithe taker. John Going [3] was again listed with two tithes, indicating that William Going [4] still resided with his parents.

The May 1751 Court of Lunenburg County appointed Field Jefferson tithe taker in the place of William Howard, who had died. On Jefferson’s 1751 tithe list, John Going [3] was charged with one tithe, while on the same page, a “Willism Boing” [sic] was charged with one  tithe. This indicates that William Going [4] had probably married and established his own home.

On a different page of Jefferson’s 1751 list, William Boing [sic] with the name of Jesse Boing [sic] indented below, was charged with two tithes. Thus, there were at least two William GOING individuals living in Field Jefferson’s District of Lunenburg County in 1751.

Also in 1751, in Richard Witton’s District a John Going with the name of Thos. Going indented below was charged with three tithes. Thus, there were at least two John Going individuals living in Lunenburg County in 1751.

In 1752, John Going [3] of Jefferson’s District was charged with two tithes. This indicates that the second son of John Going [3] had reached the age of 16. This son, John Going, Jr. [4], was born about 1736.

The following records show John Going [3] and Mary Keith GOING deeding part of their 400 acres to their two sons. June 10, 1761, John Going, Senr [3] & Mary of Lunenburg County to son William Going [4] of same place, love & affection, 100 acres, Lunenburg County, part of 400 acres by patent to said Going Sr. [3]. On both sides of Great Branch, where said William Going[4] now lives, adjacent to John Ruffin. Signed: John [JG] Going, Mary [M] Going.  Witnesses: Richard Brown, Sarah Going, Susie (x) Hubbard. Recorded: July 7, 1761. [Lunenburg County Deed Book 6, pp. 378-379]

June 10, 1761, John Going[3] & Mary of Lunenburg County to son John Going, Jnr [4], of same place, love & affection, 100 acres, Lunenburg County, part of 400 acres by patent to said Going Sr. [3] February 14, 1761, both sides Great Branch, where said John Jnr [4] now lives, adjacent Ruffin. [Signatures and witnesses are the same as above.] Lunenburg County Deed Book 6.

The “Great Branch” referred to is the Great Branch of Allen’s Creek.

The above deeds show that both William Going [4] and John Going, Jr. [4] were living in their own homes, and probably married.

On December 1,1761, John Going [3] and Mary Going sold the remaining 200 acres of their patent.

John Going [3] to Wm. Sandifur, both of Lunenburg County, 100 pounds, 200 acres, Lunenburg County, both sides Long [Great] Branch, adjacent William Hill, William Going [4] and John Going[3]. Signed: John [JG] Going. Witnesses: Thos Norell, John Farrer, Samuel Young, Benjamin Burton. Recorded: December 1, 1761. Mary, wife of Going, relinquishes her dower right. [Lunenburg County Deed Book 7]

On 18 December 1761, John Going, Jr.[4] sold the 100 acres he had received from his parents to his brother William Going[4] for 40 pounds. [Lunenburg County Deed Book 7, p. 48]

On December 30, 1761, William Going [4] sold the 100 acres he had received from his parents.

William Going[4] to William Hatsel, both of Lunenburg County, 40 pounds, 100 acres, Lunenburg County Great Branch of Allen’s Creek, adjacent John Going, new line to John Ruffin. Signed: William [W] Going. Witnesses: Samuel Young, Wm Roffe, William Sandefur, Peter Sandefur. Recorded: February 2, 1762. Lunenburg County Deed Book 7. [June Banks Evans, Lunenburg County, Virginia Deed Book 7, 1760-1761, Bryn Ffy liaid Publishers, New Orleans, 1990]

William Going [4] moved to Orange County, North Carolina by July 6, 1762.

Mecklenburg County, Virginia was formed from Lunenburg County in 1765.

On March 14, 1768, William Hatsel sold the land he had purchased from William Going [4].

William Hatsel of Mecklenburg County to Martin Phillips of Mecklenburg County for 50 pounds, a certain tract of land in Mecklenburg on both sides of the Long (Great) Branch that makes out of Allen’s Creek, bounded by John Going [3], new lines, John Ruffin, about 100 acres. Signed: William Hatsel. Witness: none. The deed was acknowledged by William Hatsel and Christiana Hatsel, his wife. Recorded in Deed Book 1, p. 547. Mecklenburg County, Virginia Deeds, 1765-1771, 1990.

The John Going mentioned in the above deed was John Going, Sr. [3], as John Going, Jr.[4] had moved to Orange Co., North Carolina by 1765.

End of Part 1 To Be Continued . . .
From: “Arlee Gowen” <gowen@llano.net>
Subject: Electronic Newsletter, Vol. 4, No.7
Date: Fri, 3 Aug 2001 13:23:19 -0500

(Web Location:  http://archiver.rootsweb.ancestry.com/th/read/GOWEN/2001-08/0996862999 )

Gowen Research Foundation Electronic Newsletter

July 2001, Volume 4 No. 7

THE ANCESTRY OF WILLIAM GOYNE OF WILKES/WARREN COUNTY, GEORGIA

By Col. Carroll Heard Goyne, Jr. & Betty Brantley Goyne
Editorial Boardmembers
10019 Canterbury Drive Shreveport, Louisiana, 71106
318/798-7108 cgoyne@softdisk.com

NORTH CAROLINA

In September 1753, Alexander ‘Going’ [3], youngest son of William [2] and Catherne [—] ‘Going’ of Stafford County, Virginia, first appeared in the records of Orange County, North Carolina.

“September 1753, Court of Orange County, Deed of gift from James Muse Sr. to James Muse Jr. for negroes, hogs, horses, cattle, beds & furniture, etc.

Witness: Alexander Going, Folio 11, p. 21. [Ruth Herndon Shields, “Orange County, North Carolina Abstracts of the Minutes of the Court of Pleas & Quarter Sessions of September 1752 – August 1766, Southern Historical Press, 1991]”

While Alexander ‘Going'[3] had acquired land in Orange County prior to the dates on the following deeds, these deeds give the location of his land.

“January 14, 1758, surveyed, Abstract No. 3904. Grant Book Page No. 407.

July 25, 1760, Alexander Gowing, 248 acres in Orange County in the Parish of St. Matthews on the north side of Dan River, joining Mayoes line and the courses of the said river. Original Record: /signature/. Witnesses: W. Churton, Henry Cool (?). Examined by: Tho. Jones and W. Churton. Sworn Chain Carrier: Moses Hollis, Enoch Robinson. Sher’d Haywood D Survey, Patent Book 14. [Margaret M. Hofman, “The Granville District of North Carolina, 1748-1763, Abstracts of Land Grants,” Vol. II, 1987]

July 15, 1760, Abstract No. 3897, Grant Book Page No. 405. Lord Granville to Alexander Going, 600 acres in Orange County in the Parish of St. Matthews on both sides of Hogan’s Creek. Original Record: /signature/ Wits: Jas. Watson, Willm Nunn. Examined by Tho Jones and Richd Vigers. Surveyed February 10, 1757. Sworn Chain Carrier: Wm Armstrong, Notley Holis. Sher’d Haywood, Deputy Surveyor. Patent Bk. 14. [Ibid]”

William ‘Going'[4], son of John [3] and Mary [Keith] ‘Going’ of Lunenburg County, Virginia, moved to Orange County, North Carolina by July 6, 1762. William[4] had previously sold his 100 acres, gift of his parents, while still living in Lunenburg County. William [4] had bought the 100 acres deeded to his brother, JOHN JR [4], by their parents for 40 pounds, and sold it in the following transaction.

“July 6, 1762, William Going of Orange County, North Carolina to Francis Norvell of Lunenburg County, Virginia, 45 pounds, 100 acres, Lunenburg County, Great Branch of Allen’s Creek, adjacent Wm Sandefur. Signed: William [W] Going

Recorded: 6 July 1762. Deed Bk. 7, pp. 302-04. [June Banks Evans, “Lunenburg County, Virginia, Deed Book 7, 1760-1761, Bryn Ffyliaid Publishers, NO, La., 1990]

In November 1763, William Going [4] and Alexander Going [3] were sued in the same Orange County, North Carolina Court. William’s [4] case is filed in Debt Folio 116 and Alexander’s [3] in Case Folio 123. [Ruth Herndon Shields, op cit]

On May 15, 1764, William Going [4] was granted 311 ½ acres in Orange County, North Carolina. [Eve B. Weeks, “Register of Orange County, North Carolina Deeds, 1752-1768,” & 1793, Heritage Papers, 1984]

The name of John Going [4] name first appeared in Orange County in May 1765 Court Records. [Folio 383] [Shields, op cit. He is identified as John ‘Going’ Jun. in the 1775 estate records of Alexander ‘Going’ [Sr][3]. [See below.]

The following record indicates that Alexander ‘Going’ Jr. [4] had reached the age of majority. Thus, he was born prior to 1745.

“May 13, 1766, Grantor: Alexander Going; Grantee: Roger Adkinson, 248 acres. Witness: Alexr Going. [Weeks, “Register of Deeds, Orange County, North Carolina,” op cit]

The following record identifies two ‘Goings’ who likely were the sons of Alexander ‘Going’ Sr[3].

The 1771 Pay Roll of “Capt Nathaniel Hart’s Company of the Orange County Regiment of Militia that were in the late expedition against the Insurgents of this Province.”
Name No. Days
Daniel Gwin 73
Hugh Gwin 73

[Walter Clark, “The Colonial Records of North Carolina,” Vol. 17, p. 416)

The 1773 Petition for the Partition of the Northern Part of Orange County, North Carolina includes the following signers:
Alexr Gowen [4]
John Gowen [Jr] [4]
Daniel Gowen [4]
Emos Gowen [4]
Alexr Gowen Senr [3]
(William L. Saunders, “The Colonial Records of North Carolina, Vol. 9, 1771-1775,” 1890, p. 809]

In the above petition, Alexr Senr [3] probably was the father of Alexr [Jr] [4], Daniel [4], and Emos [Amos] [4]. Most likely, John [Jr] [4] was the son of John [3] and Mary [Keith] ‘Going’ of Lunenburg/Mecklenburg County, Virginia.

William ‘Going’ [4], son of John [3] and Mary [Keith] ‘Going’ of Lunenburg / Mecklenburg Couny, Virginia, did not sign the 1773 petition. Evidently, he had moved from that area of Orange County, North Carolina prior to the date of the petition.

Following is the first sighting of the name of William ‘Going [4] name in Tryon/Rutherford County, North Carolina records:

“January 19, 1773, Tryon County, 592. William Going, 150 acres on both sides of Bryars Creek of Broad River near above John Kirkconnell’s land. Warrant 1133. SS 588. [Miles S. Philbeck, “Tryon County, North Carolina Land Warrants, 1768-1774,” 1987]

On September 5, 1774, a plot of land was surveyed for William ‘Going’ [4] on Ward’s Creek in Tryon/Rutherford County. Chain bearers were: William and John Brackett. This was an original land survey. This land was granted to William ‘Going’ [4] on March 4, 1775. (“Bulletin of Genealogy Society of Old Tryon County, North Carolina,”Vol. XXVII, May 1989]

In February 1775, a true inventory of the estate of Alexander Going [3] decd. was returned to the Court of Orange County, North Carolina. The inventory was signed by Sophia (x) Going, Administrator. [William Daub Bennett, “Orange County, North Carolina Records,” Vol. 13, 1758-1785, 1994, pp. 130, 135 & 136]

On May 2, 1775, the Account of Sales of the Estate of Alexander Going [3] deceased in Orange County, North Carolina, included the following names:

Alex Going [4]
Daniel Going [4]
John Going Jun [4]
Sophia Going
[Bennett, op cit]

These estate records are reasonable proof that Sophia ‘Going’ was the widow of Alexander ‘Going’ Sr. [4] widow, and Alex ‘Going’ [4] was his son. Daniel ‘Going'[4] was likely another son. John Going Jun [4] was likely the younger son of John Going [3] and Mary [Keith] ‘Going’ of Lunenburg / Mecklenburg County, Virginia.

After the death of Alexander ‘Going’ SR [3] death, members of this family group dispersed. Alexander ‘Going’ Jr. [4] went to live near his first cousin William ‘Going'[4] in Rutherford County, North Carolina. Alexander ‘Going’ JR [4] later joined his brothers and cousins in Fairfield County, South Carolina. Daniel Going [4] and his family moved to Fairfield County, South Carolina. It is reasonable to conclude that John ‘Going’ Jr [4] and his family also moved to Fairfield County, for several of his sons served in the Fairfield County, South Carolina militia in the Revolutionary War.

The following deed identifies the wife of William ‘Going’ [4]:

“August 23, 1779, William Going of Rutherford County. planter & wife Hester to Samuel Stockton of same, planter, for 3000 pounds. William Going [seal], Hester [x] Going. [Brent H. Holcomb, “Deed Abstracts of Tryon, Lincoln & Rutherford Counties, North Carolina, 1769-1786,” Deed Book A, AD, 1977]

The following tax record shows Alexander ‘Going’ Jr[4] living with or near his first cousin William ‘Going’ [4] in Rutherford County, North Carolina:

The 1782 Rutherford County, North Carolina Tax List, Capt. Whitesides’ Company

Taxpayer Land NegroesHorsesCattleAssessment

William Going 350 a 02393 pds
Alexandere Going 001313 pds

[File No. LP 46.1, NC Archives; also Brent H. Holcomb, 1782 Tax List of Rutherford Co., NC, NPD]

We have researched related families in our efforts to establish the lineage of William Goyne [4] of Wilkes/Warren County Georgia. For that reason, we have deemed it important to determine the location of the home of William Goyne [4] in Rutherford County, North Carolina, the road system of that area, and the location of the boundary between Rutherford and Lincoln Counties, North Carolina.

In 1779, Rutherford and Lincoln County, North Carolina were formed from Tryon County in the following manner:

“The County of Tryon shall be divided into two distinct Counties, by a Line beginning at the South Line, near Broad River, on the dividing ridge between Buffalo Creek and Little [First] Broad River, thence along said ridge, to the Line of Burke thence along said Line unto the Old Cherokee line, thence due West course into the top of a dividing ridge between the Eastering and Westering Waters, thence along said ridge unto the old line Claimed by South Carolina, and all that part of the said County which lies on the East side of the said line shall be called, and known by the name of Lincoln County and all that part of the County which lies on the other or West side thereof, shall be called and known by the name of Rutherford County.” “[David Leroy Corbitt, “The Formation of the North Carolina Counties, 1663-1943,” Raleigh: Division of Archives and History, NC Dept. of Cultural Resources, 1987 [1950], p. 138]

Buffalo Creek is to the east of the dividing ridge, and First Broad River is to the west of the dividing ridge. First Broad River trends south-southwest to its juncture with Broad River, while Ward’s Creek trends southwest to its juncture with First Broad River in a large curve of that river.

The following deed gives the approximate location of the home of William ‘GOING’s[4]:

“November 20, 1784, William Going of Rutherford County to Mark Brown of same, for 24 pounds 150 acres on both sides of Ward’s Creek, below the land he lives on.

William Going [seal],Haster Going [seal].

Witness: Uel Lamkins, Benj. [B] Bricket [Bracket], Abraham [S] Cobb.” [Holcomb, Deed Abstracts, op cit, pp 470-71)

William ‘Going'[4] lived on Ward’s Creek, northeast of its juncture with First Broad River, near or on the east-west public road, and near where Ward’s Creek crosses the Lincoln County line. [From “A Map of the Province of South Carolina” drawn between 1772 and 1776, the map includes portions of Tryon Co. [later Lincoln and Rutherford Counties], North Carolina from the Catawba River westward to the mountains.]

The 1816 Will of William Goyne [4] of Warren County, Georgia lists two daughters by the names of Rebecca Dick [5] and Alice King [5]. The following records identify two families with those surnames living as neighbors in Lincoln County, North Carolina. Perhaps these were daughters of WILLIAM GOYNE [4]:

“March 20, 1783, George Dick of Lincoln County to Joseph Aker of same, for 18 pounds … 66 acres on waters of Killians Creek adjacent Dick’s old line, part of a grant to said Dick 19 June 1772″. Recorded: January Term 1783. Vol. 2, pp. 639-640.

January 11, 1785, Robert Knox of Lincoln County to John Boggs, for 87 pounds specie land on branches of Killians Creek, at an old corner of William Cathey’s land, adjacent Seiths, Kinkaid, 160 acres granted Thomas Yeats, December 22, 1765 & conveyed to William Crocket March 6, 1761 & to William King July 2, 1774, to Robert Knox October 7, 1775
Robert Knox (seal).  Witnesses: James Johnston, Benjamin Armstrong.  Recd: October Term 1785. Vol. 2, p. 787.” [Brent H. Holcomb, “Deed Abstracts of Tryon, Lincoln & Rutherford Cos., NC, 1769-1786,” p. 109 & p. 122, 1977)

The 1782 Tax List of Rutherford County, North Carolina lists John King and Samuel King. [“North Caroline Tax Payers, 1679-1790, Vol. 2, 1987, pp. 114-115]. Perhaps these were members of the King family that Alice Goyne [5] married into.

William Goyne [4] of Wilkes/Warren County, Georgia married second Agnes ‘Nancy’ Stroder in Wilkes County, Georgia. In 1799, two of Nancy’s brothers traveled from Wilkes County, Georgia to Lincoln County, North Carolina to be married. This suggests that the Stroder family had lived in Lincoln County North Carolina prior to their move to Wilkes County, Georgia. We suppose that William Goyne [4] knew the Stroder family in North Carolina prior to their move to Georgia.

Alexander Going Jr [4] moved from Rutherford County, North Carolina by 1785, as he was not listed on the 1785 Rutherford County Tax List.

1785 Tax List, Rutherford Co., North Carolina:

“William Going Land, 150 acres White poll, 1”

[Brent H. Holcomb, “1785 Tax List of Rutherford County, North Carolina [Partial], 1974)

South Carolina records confirm that Alexander ‘Going’ Jr [4] moved to Fairfield County, South Carolina. [See South Carolina part of this paper.]

Alexander Going Jr [4] returned to Rutherford County, North Carolina by 1795 as seen in the following record:

“October 31, 1795, Rutherford County, North Carolina, James Huddleston of Rutherford County to Alexander Going of same, 100 pounds, 200 acres on Ward’s Creek granted to said Huddleston July 9, 1794. Witness: John Huddleston, John Smith. #1708. April 23, 1796. Deed Book O, p. 160. [“Bulletin of the Genealogy Society of Old Tryon County, North Carolina,” Vol. XXII, No. 3, August 1994, p. 136]

The following record indicates that William Going Jr [5] had reached the age of maturity by 1785, thus he was born before 1764.

“July 8, 1785, Benjamin Bracket of Rutherford County, planter, & Ann to Edward Francis of same, for 40 pounds … 200 acres both sides of Ward’s Creek, including the mouth of Coxes Creek & his own improvements … granted to said Bracket July 25, 1774. Benjamin Bracket [seal] Witnesses: William Goings, Sr, William Goings, Jr. [Holcomb, Deeds Abstracts, op cit, pp. 440-41]

On July 14, 1785, William Going, Jr [5] was married to Polly Griffin in Rutherford County, North Carolina. Bondsman was William Goinges [4]. [Record: 086 01 103, NC Marriage Bonds, NC Dept. of Cultural Resources, Division of Archives & History]

On July 14, 1788, William ‘Going’ [4] resigned from road maintenance duty in Rutherford County, North Carolina, suggesting that he was preparing to move. This is proof that William ‘Going’ [4] lived on or near the public road. Old maps depict this road as an east-west road that crossed Ward’s Creek near the Lincoln-Rutherford County line.

“William Going comes into open court & resigns being Overseer of the Public Road & appoints William Lewis Queen overseer in his place. To have the same hands and distance of road as said Going”. [Rutherford County Court of Pleas & Quarter Sessions, July 14, 1788]

Following is the last record of William ‘Going'[4] in Rutherford County, North Carolina:

“October 1,1788, William Going to Benjamin Bracket for 20 pounds tract of 100 acres on middle fork of No Business Creek. Land was granted to said Going by Patent dated January 5, 1786.”

Recorded August 10, 1792. Nathaniel Tracy, James Shepard. [Deed Book I, p. 104 (or 409). No. 954.]

Evidently, William ‘Going’ [4] moved from Rutherford County, North Carolina soon after he sold this land. Along with many other property owners, much of the land of William ‘Going’ [4] was taken for non-payment of taxes. The following describes the economic conditions of that time.

“The depreciation of currency during the [Revolutionary] war was a matter of grave concern. By December 1781, its value had declined by 725%. While the tax levy was placed as low as possible, many inhabitants found it impossible to pay even the small amount levied. Many of Rutherford County’s substantial citizens pled insolvency when approached for taxes during the next two years. On July 17, 1783, the Court of Pleas and Quarter Sessions of Rutherford County ordered David Miller, Collector of Public and County Taxes for 1782, to receive from the inhabitants the tickets for clothing for the eighteen months men in place of hard money. The law provided that any citizen furnishing clothing and supplies to certain troops should have the goods valued by the sheriff or other designated person, and tickets or due bills issued for them, which were to be redeemed in payment for taxes. No explanation occurs as to why Miller refused to accept the tickets.”

[Clarence W. Griffin, County Historian of Rutherford County, “History of Old Tryon & Rutherford Counties, North Carolina, 1730-1936, 1937]. Records of the sale of the confiscated property of William Going 4 read as follows.

July 14, 1791, Robert Irvin Esq., High Sheriff of Rutherford Co. to David Miller of same, per execution against William Going for 12 pounds, 15 shillings recovered by Joseph Carpenter, 200 acres at the head of a branch of Ward’s Creek including the head of the second fork on the south side of Stoney Creek run, ½ of a tract originally granted to David Miller and William Going, also 100 acres on Bryer Creek, also an entry of 200 acres on No Business, also ½ of 500 acres entered by Spruce McCoy and William Going on the head of ____ Creek. David Miller became high bidder-20 shillings.

Witnesses: John Irving, L. Moor. 27 May 1793. Deed Book J, p. 33. [“Bulletin of the Genealogy Society of Old Tryon County, North Carolina, Vol. XXII, No. 1, Feb. 1994]

July 14, 1791, Robert Irvin Esq., Sheriff of Rutherford County to David Miller as highest bidder at 20 shill, one-half tract of original grant of David Miller & William Going on head of a branch of Ward’s Creek including the second fork on the south side Stoney Creek, joining Going’s & Macay’s line, also the other tract of 200 acres entered by Spruce McCay & William Goings lying on Stoney Run including the head of Stoney Run and running down for complement; also one-half tract of 500 acres entered by Spruce McCoy & William Goings on head of Crooked Run begin at Moses Moor’s line. Recorded 27 May 1793. Witnesses: John Irvin, L. Moore” . Deed Book J, p. 35. No. 1029. [C. H. Davis, op cit, p. 67]

William Going [4] lived in Rutherford County, North Carolina from the winter months of 1772-73, until after 1 October 1788. Typically, in that day a person moved after he had gathered his crops, and arrived at his new location in time to plant the next year’s crops. Georgia tax records indicate that William Goyne [4] arrived in Wilkes County, Georgia after the 1789 tax list was prepared, and before the 1790 tax list was prepared.

End of Part 2. [To Be Continued] . . .

From: “Arlee Gowen” <gowen@llano.net>
Subject: Electronic Newsletter, Volume 4, No. 8 
Date: Sat, 1 Sep 2001 12:00:33 -0500

(Web Location:  http://archiver.rootsweb.ancestry.com/th/read/GOWEN/2001-09/0999363633 )

Gowen Research Foundation Electronic Newsletter

August 2001, Volume 4No. 8

THE ANCESTRY OF WILLIAM GOYNE OF WILKES/WARREN COUNTY, GEORGIA

By Col. Carroll Heard Goyne, Jr. & Betty Brantley Goyne
Editorial Boardmembers
10019 Canterbury Drive Shreveport, Louisiana, 71106
318/798-7108 cgoyne@softdisk.com

GEORGIA

In the North Carolina portion of this paper we saw where Willia ‘Going’ [4] lived on or near the east-west public road, close to the Lincoln-Rutherford County, North Carolina line. William Goyne [4] was assigned duty to maintain portions of that road, which duty he resigned on July 14, 1788. We have taken this to mean that William Goyne [4] was preparing to move from that area.

Finding that William Goyne [4] had forfeited much of his property due to non-payment of taxes further confirms this conclusion. The observant reader will have noted that the Collector of Public and County Taxes in North Carolina had the latitude to be lenient with tax collection during those turbulent years. However, David Miller, Collector of Taxes for Rutherford County, North Carolina, declined to be lenient in the case of William ‘Going’ [4]. The reader will also note that the man who bought much of the forfeited land of William Goyne [4] land was none other than David Miller. Miller was later removed from office.

In the previous part of this paper we gave evidence that the two daughters of William Goyne[4] probably married in Rutherford Co., North Carolina and lived in adjacent Lincoln County after their marriages.

We also noted that the family of the second wife of William Goyne [4] probably lived in Lincoln County prior to their move to Wilkes County, Georgia. We have not found a grouping of these same names in the Fairfield County, South Carolina area. This is circumstantial, but reasonable evidence that William ‘Going’ of Rutherford County and William Goyne of Wilkes/Warren County, Georgia were the same person.

By private correspondence, Mr. Frank Parker Hudson of Atlanta, Georgia provided the Wilkes/Warren County tax information presented in this paper, except where otherwise noted. Mr. Hudson is an eminent authority on early Georgia tax law, and how it was applied in the social structure of Georgia. Mr. Hudson limited his report to the early ‘Going’ individuals of Wilkes/Warren County. He identified the free-persons-of-color with a ‘Going-sounding’ surname. According to Mr. Hudson’s assessment none of the persons mentioned in this paper were free-persons-of-color.

Tax records indicate that when William Goyne [4] first arrived in Wilkes County and for a few years thereafter, he lived near Moses ‘Going,’ a free-person-of-color from Virginia. William Goyne [4] WILLIAM may have rented land from Moses ‘Going’ before purchasing his own land.

In Mr. Hudson’s tax records the two letters identify the militia district, and the sequential numbers identify the individual within that district, according to Timothy D. Hudson.

William ‘Going'[4] first appeared in the tax records of Wilkes County in 1790. William Goyne[4] probably arrived in Georgia after the 1789 tax list was prepared, but before the 1790 tax list was prepared. By our estimates, William Goyne [4] was about age 58 in 1790.

In 1790, William ‘Going’ [4] lived in Capt. Lucas’ District [LL-20], and was charged with one poll. This indicates that William Goyne [4] had no adult male children living with him, and owned no land in the state of Georgia.

In 1791, William ‘Going'[4] lived in Capt. Hubbard’s District [LL-60], and was charged with one poll.

In 1792, William ‘Going'[4] lived in Capt. Hubbard’s District [LL-68], and was charged with one poll. William ‘Going'[4] was not found in the tax records of Wilkes County in 1793.

In 1793, Jesse ‘Going’ lived in Capt. Hubbard’s District [LL-3], and was charged with one poll.

In 1794, William ‘Going'[4] lived in Capt. Hubbard’s District [LL-9] in newly formed Warren County, Georgia. He was charged with one poll, and paid 1 shilling, 9 pence. [Hudson, op cit, and Ruth Blair, State Historian and Director, Georgia Department of Archives & History, “Some Early Tax Digests of Georgia” 1926]

In 1796, John ‘Going'[5], son of William Goyne [4], lived in Capt. Turner’s District. He was listed as a tax defaulter. [Augusta Chronicle, 29 Jan. 1797, p. 2, col. 4]

In 1796, Drury ‘Going'[5], son of William Goyne [4], appeared in the tax records of Wilkes County. He lived in Capt. Turner’s District [MM-7], and owned 100 acres of land.

In 1797, William ‘Going'[4] lived in Capt. Turner’s District [MM-49], and was charged with one poll. Other ‘Going’ individuals living in Capt. Turner’s District in 1797 were:

Drury ‘Going'[5] [MM-65]
Hardy ‘Going'[5] [MM-140] “Widow” was written by his name.
Henry ‘Going'[5] [MM-38]
John ‘Going'[5] [MM-32]
William ‘Going'[5] [MM-111]

All of the above were sons of William Goyne [4], except Henry Going [MM-38]. We consider Henry ‘Going’ [MM-38] to be the son of John ‘Going’ Jr [4], and the grandson of John [3] and Mary Keith ‘Going.’ [See South Carolina part of this paper.]

In 1797 James Goyne[5] appeared in the records of adjacent Hancock Co. We consider that James Goyne [5] was the son of John ‘Going’ Jr [4], and the grandson of John ‘Going'[3] and Mary Keith ‘Going.’ James Goyne [5] was a purchaser at the estate sale of Meredith Price in early 1797 in Hancock County, Georgia according to “The Georgia Genealogy Magazine,” Winter 1974, p. 141]. In the summer of 1797, James Goyne assisted in the inventory of the estate of William Minor, Jr. in Hancock County, according to the same source.

In 1799, William ‘Going'[4] lived in Capt. Turner’s District [MM-135]. He owned 100 acres on Lick Creek that joined Meshack Turner. This land had been originally granted to Isaac Stokes. This is the first land purchased by William Goyne[4] in Wilkes County.

The 1799 List of Tax Defaulters in Wilkes County in Capt. Turner’s District, included Drury Goyne[5] and William Goyne Jr[5]. [Augusta Chronicle, April 12, 1800, p. 2, col. 3])

The names of James Goyne[5] and his oldest son John Goyne[6] appear in the following Hancock County record:

“1802 Tax Returns of Capt. William’s District, Hancock County: John Goyn and James Goyn-no entries except tax of 31½ cents each. [1802 Tax Returns, Records of Hancock Co., verified by the Nancy Hart Chapter, DAR, Milledgeville, GA, Georgia Society DAR, 1940-42]”

Goin individuals who entered the 1803 Land Lottery in Wilkes County, according to “Early Records of Wilkes County, Georgia,” Book 1 were:

Drury Goin[5]2 draws
William Jr[5]1 draw
John Goin2 draws

The 1805 Tax Records of Warren County in Capt. T. Mullins District, p. 97, list: “William Goying[4] poll 1, Acreage: 35 acres quality #2; 35 acres quality #3. rantee [sic]: Felps. Joiner: Aikins. [Blair, op cit]

In the 1805 Land Lottery, Warren County, William Goyne[4], held Registration No. 993, and drew two blanks. (1805 Land Lottery, p. 130)

The 1805 Land Lottery, Capt. Young’s District, Wilkes County, according to “Early Records of Wilkes County, Georgia,” Book 1, lists:

Drury Goin[5]2 draws
John “Bitnose” Goyne[5]2 draws

Qualifications for both the 1803 and 1805 Land Lotteries were the same:

“One draw–free, white and age 21, paid taxes and had been in the state for 12 months. Two draws–same as above, plus having a wife and a child.”

STRODER/STRAWDER/SCHRODER/etc.  Excursus

William Goyne[4] married Agnes “Nancy” Stroder in Wilkes County Georgia as his second wife. This excursus seeks to identify the Sroder family, and determine where they lived prior to moving to Wilkes County.

The following information is abstracted from photocopies of original documents provided by Nancy Strawder Bruce of Columbus, Georgia.

Isabella Schroder made her Will on October 6, 1793 in Wilkes County. She named her four sons: Alexander, John, William and Magnus; her four daughters: Agness, Isabel, Margaret and Esther her son-in-law Thomas Thomas; and her granddaughter Isabel Thomas. She signed her name Isabella (X) Schroder.

Family members making purchases from Isabella Schroder’s estate on April 10, 1794 were:

Isabel Strouder
Alexander Strouder
Agness Strouder

“William [W] Going” witnessed a transaction of Alexander Schroder in 1796:

“November ye 12th 1796. Recd of Henry Thompson Five pounds one shilling & 10 p Sterling With Interest it being in full of my part of the Estate by Me.

Test: Wm [W] Going Alexander Schroder

“William [W] Going and Jean Nancy Strouder Going” acknowledged the receipt of their portion of the estate:

“November ye 12th 1796. Recd of Henry Thompson Five pounds one Shilling & 10 p Sterling it being in full of my part of the Estate by Me.  Alexander Schroder,  Wm [W] Going, Jean Nancy [X] Going

The mark of William Goyne [4] on the above documents appears to be an embellished W.

By lining out her maiden name and replacing it with her married name in the following document, Jean Nancy Shroder Goyne gave a clue that she and William Goyne [4] had just recently married.

“November 16, 1796 Received of Hen Thompson five pounds one shilling and ten pence in full of my part of Isbel Schroders Estate By Me. Test: Agness [X] Schroder [lined out] Goeing Isbel [X] Shroder

On January 12, 1799, William Stroder married Dorcas Scarborough in Lincoln County, North Carolina. [Original record, NC Archives]

On March 30, 1799, Alexander Stroder married Catharine Wills in Lincoln County, North Carolina. [Original record, NC Archives]

Alexander Stroder signed his marriage document with a distinctive “A.” The “A” in Alexander Stroder’s signature on his marriage document is identical to the one on his mother’s estate documents, thus proving that this is the same individual.

Alexander Stroder was enumerated in the 1800 census of Lincoln County on page 829. Living nearby were the Burrel Wills family on page 832, and the Peter Scarborough family on page 850. This is compelling evidence that the Stroder family had lived in Lincoln County before moving to Wilkes County, Georgia.

William Stroder returned to Wilkes/Warren County, Georgia after his marriage in Lincoln County, where he appeared in records with members of the family of William Goyne[4].

We suppose William Goyne [4] knew the Stroder family while living in the  Lincoln / Rutherford County area of North Carolina.

***

William Goyne [4] made his will on January 4, 1816 in Warren County, Georgia. It was probated on September 1, 1817. He named his sons John Goyne, Drury Goyne, William Goyne, Hardy Goyne, Hiram Goyne and Tyra Goyne; and daughters Rebecca Dick and Alice King. He named grandsons John Goyne and Mount Hermon Goyne, sons of Hardy Goyne. His widow was given use of the estate during her widowhood. Afterward, the estate was to go to his son Hiram Goyne. [Judge Lucy Bryant of Warren County photocopied this fragile document for us.]

The following document identifies Nancy Goyne as executor of the estate of William Goyne [4].

“September 9, 1817, Warren County, Georgia.  William Goynne: Inventory & Appraisement of Personal Property. Appraisers: Noah Kelsey, Nelson Gunne, Allen Andrews: Total $493.77: Inventory of sale of property as ordered by Will: Executor: Nancy Goynne: Total: $110.00. [Daniel Nathan Crumpton, Warren County, Georgia, 1793-1900, Genealogy II. 1993, p. 267]

Nancy Goyne was taxed on the land William Goyne[4] left to her in his will:.

“1818 Warren County Tax List, Capt. Roger’s District, No. 159: Nancy Goine, widow;third quality land; Warren County; Grantee [sic]: Felps; Water Courses: Ogeechy; Adjoineers: Gunn; Tax: 13 cents, 0 ½ mills. For Lettice Strother, widow, 33 acres 3rd quality land; Warren County Water Courses: Ogeechy; Adjoiners: Kelsey; Tax: 4 cents, 9½ mils. [Blair, op cit])

Lettice [Letitia] Strother was the widow of Shadrach Strother. Their relationship to Nancy Stroder Goyne has not been determined.

Nancy Stroder Goyne was last seen in Georgia records in the 1830 census of Taliaferro County [formed from Warren Co. in 1825]. Apparently, she moved with her older son Hiram Davis Goyne [5] to Houston County, Georgia, and later to Union Parish, Louisiana. After the death of Hiram Davis Goyne [5] death in February 1852, Nancy Stroder Goyne lived with her grandson Henry Bradford Tyra Goyne[6] in Union Parish. Nancy Stroder Goyne received $50 support payment each six months from the Union Parish government. The termination of those payments in 1867 marks her death at age 99. Her grave has not been located.

John “Bitnose” Goyne [5] was the oldest of the children of William Goyne[4] and Hester Goyne. He lived in Jefferson County, Alabama, where he died in 1839. His wife’s name was Nancy.

Drury Goyne [5] was last seen in the 1830 census of Upson County Georgia.

William Goyne, Jr [5] has not been traced.

Hardy Goyne [5] was seen in the 1832 Gold Lottery living in the 602nd Militia District of Taliaferro County, Georgia. Soon after that date he moved to Hancock County, Georgia where he and his second wife, Caty Goyne were members of Island Creek Baptist Church.

Evidence suggests that the two daughters of William Goyne [4], Rebecca Goyne and Alice Goyne, were married in North Carolina, and lived in Lincoln County, after their marriages.

Hiram Davis Goyne [5], son of Nancy Stroder Goyne, was born in 1799 in Warren County. He was married in Warren County to Mary “Polly” Alllen on January 4, 1818. He moved to Houston County where he was married a second time to Susan Lupo on September 28, 1837. He then moved to Union Parish, Louisiana. Hiram Davis Goyne [5] died intestate in Union Parish on February 2.1852. His grave has not been located.

Tyra Alexander Goyne [5], son of Nancy Stroder Goyne, was born in January 1804 in Warren County. His wife’s name was Mary W. They moved to Coffee County, Alabama by 1860. He died there December 3, 1883. They and several of their children were buried in the Goyne Cemetery located in the woods south of Wesley Chapel Methodist Church in Coffee County. Others were buried in the Wesley Chapel Methodist Church Cemetery.

[To be Continued] . . .
From: “Arlee Gowen” <gowen@llano.net>
Subject: [Gowen] Electronic Newsletter, Volume 4, No. 9
Date: Mon, 8 Oct 2001 14:33:20 -0500

(Web Location:  http://archiver.rootsweb.ancestry.com/th/read/GOWEN/2001-10/1002569600 ).

Gowen Research Foundation ELECTRONIC NEWSLETTER

September 2001 Volume 4 No. 9

THE ANCESTRY OF WILLIAM GOYNE OF WILKES/WARREN COUNTY, GEORGIA

By Col. Carroll Heard Goyne, Jr. & Betty Brantley Goyne
Editorial Boardmembers
10019 Canterbury Drive Shreveport, Louisiana, 71106
318/798-7108 cgoyne@softdisk.com

SOUTH CAROLINA

In this part of the paper we will seek to identify the kin of William Goyne [4] who lived in Fairfield County, South Carolina during the latter part of the 18th and early part of the 19th centuries. It will be helpful to begin with a brief review.

Alexander ‘Going’ Sr[3], youngest son of William ‘Going’ [2] and Catherine ‘Going’ of Stafford County, Virginia, moved to Orange County, North Carolina by September 1753. The older brother of Alexander[3] was John ‘Going’ [3] who was married to Mary Keith.

Alexander ‘Going’ Jr.[4], son of Alexander ‘Going’ Sr. [3], was first seen in the 1773 Petition to Partition Orange County. Other ‘Going’ individuals signing the petition were:

Alexander ‘Going,’ Sr.[3]
Emos ‘Going’ [Amos]
Daniel ‘Going’
John ‘Going’

[William L. Saunders, “The Colonial Records of North Carolina,” Vol. 9, 1771-1775, 1890, p. 809]

We consider that Alexander Jr, Amos and Daniel were sons of Alexander ‘Going’ Sr. [3], while we consider John to be the younger son of John ‘Going’ [3] and Mary Keith ‘GOING’ of Lunenburg/Mecklenburg County, Virginia. Our conclusion regarding John is aided by his identification as “Jun” in the 1775 estate papers of Alexander ‘Going’ Sr. [3], and also by the fact that he and his older brother William ‘Going’ had lived near Alexander ‘Going’ Sr [3] in Orange County, North Carolina.

Alexander ‘Going’ Jr. [4] was mentioned in the 1775 estate papers of his father Alexander ‘Going’ Sr. [3] in Orange County. Other ‘Going’ individuals mentioned in those estate papers were Sophia ‘Going’OPHIA [the presumed widow], Daniel ‘Going'[4] and John ‘Going, Jr. [4].

[William Daub Bennett, “Orange County, North Carolina Records,” Vol. 13, 1758-1785, 1994, pp. 130, 135 & 136]

After his father’s death, Alexander ‘Going’ Jr [4] moved to Rutherford Company, North Carolina and lived near his first cousin Willism ‘Going’ [4].

Alexander ‘Going’ Jr [4] moved from Rutherford County before the 1785 Tax List was compiled. He arrived in Fairfield County, South Carolina before November 1784, as seen in the following record.

“November 5, 1784, an inventory of Widow Barber’s Estate, dec’d, sold by Public Vendue. Purchasers: “Alexander Goyne” [Fairfield County, SC, Apartment 119, Pack 2, SC Archives, and in “Early Wills of Camden District, South Carolina,” pp. 285-287]

Alexander ‘Going’ Jr [4] returned to Rutherford County by October 1795.

We will now consider the records of Fairfield County, South Carolina.

Since more is known about James Goyne [5] than any of the other ‘Going’ individuals in Fairfield County, we will begin with a review of his record. The following information was taken from the pension application of James Goyne [5] recorded in National Archives, Book E 2, Vol. 9, p. 14. [National Archives Microcopy, M 805, Roll No. 368]

James Goyne [5] filed for a military pension on May 18, 1836 in Kemper County, Mississippi. He stated that he was born in “Mulenburgh” County, Virginia May 30, 1755. [Apparently, James said “Lunenburg” because Mecklenburg Company was not formed until 1765.] He stated: “That he lived in Camden District, State of South Carolina at which place some time in June 1776 when he was drafted to go to Charleston in order to intercept the British fleet.” He further stated that he served under Col. John Winn. This information identifies his militia unit as the 3rd Regiment of Militia, in Sumpter’s Brigade. He said his assembly point was Winnsborough, “near which place this declarant then resided.” JAMES lived in Fairfield County of Camden District until about 1784 and then moved to Georgia.

Susan Goynes Tindol Bolgiano Dickerson, granddaughter of James Goyne [5], provided an interesting item of information about her grandfather in a 1905 newspaper interview. At the time, Susan Dickerson lived in La Para, Texas. The article reads, in part:

“In the revolutionary war, her grandfather, James Gaynes, and her four brothers served.” This statement has been interpreted to mean James Goyne’s four brothers, since it obviously does not refer to Susan Dickerson’s four brothers. [Newspaper article provided by Margaret Goynes Olson of Kingsville, Texas.]

James Goyne [5] was most likely the son of John ‘Going’ Jr [4] and the grandson of John Going [3] and Mary Keith ‘Going’ of Lunenburg County, Virginia. John ‘Going’ and Mary Keith ‘Going had only two sons of record: William ‘Going’ [4] and John Jr [4]. Their younger son, John ‘Going’ Jr [4] would have been about age 19, or older, at the time of birth of James Goyne in 1755.

We will now look at records of other ‘Going’ individualss who lived in Fairfield County, South Carolina during the latter part of the 18th and early part of the 19th centuries.

AMOS ‘GOING’

Emos [Amos] Gowen [4] was one of the signers of the 1773 Petition to Partition Orange County, North Carolina. He is not mentioned in the 1775 estate papers of Alexander ‘Going’ Sr [3].

A document in the South Carolina Archives dated November 15, 1779 is signed John Goyne [seal], and Amos Goyne [seal]. The last document in the South Carolina Archives carrying the signature or mark of Amos Going [4] is dated February 24, 1780. It is signed: Amos [A] Goyen.

The microfilm of the estate papers of Amos ‘Going’ [4] is difficult to read. It appears that he died c1781-82. John Burns was administrator of his estate. [Estate Papers, Fairfield County, South Carolina, Apartment 3, File 94, Microfilm #220, SC Archives]

In our opinion, ‘Amos Going’ [4] was a son of Alexander ‘Going’ Sr [3].

DANIEL ‘GOING’

Daniel Gowen [4] and Hugh Gwin [4] were listed on the 1771 Pay Roll of Capt. Nathaniel Hart’s Company of the Orange County, North Carolina Regiment of Militia. Each was paid for 73 days service “against the Insurgents of this Province.” [Walter Clark, “The Colonial Records of North Carolina,” Vol. 17, 1899, p. 416]

In our opinion, Daniel Gowen and Hugh Gwin were sons of Alexander ‘Going’ Sr [3].

Daniel Gowen [4] signed the 1773 Petition for the Partition of Orange County, North Carolina. He was next mentioned in the 1775 estate papers of Alexander Going, Sr [3] in Orange County.

The following is account settlement for the Revolutionary War service of Daniel Gowen [4] in the militia of Fairfield County, South Carolina:

Danied Goyen: Audited Account 2476. May 23, 1785. His account for 90 days Militia duty in 1782, under command of Lt. Jno. Hollis. June 17, 1786. I have this day received from General Richard Winn. Daniel [X] Goyen.  [A document in this file reads: “I Richard Winn of Winnsborough…”] [Microcopy, SC Archives]

“Book. Q, No. 476. Issued the 23 of May 1785 to Mr. Daniel Goyen for Six Pounds Seventeen Shillings and One Penny, Half Penny Sterling for 96 days duty in the Militia in 1782 as pr Account Audited–Principal-L6:17:1½–Annual Interest-L0:7:0” [A. S. Salley, Jr. “Stub Entries to Indents Issued in Payment of Claims against SC,” Books O-Q, The Historical Commission of SC, 1915]

The will of Daniel Going [4] is dated January 1818 in Fairfield District, South Carolina.

In his will Daniel Going [4] named his wife Jean Going. He named his daughter Nancy Lavender and her son Daniel Lavender, and his daughter Polly Harrison and her daughter Jean Harrison. He named his daughter Margaret Going; and his sons Hugh Going, Daniel Going, William Going and Robert Going. He appointed his wife Jean, his son Daniel and Trusty Friend Samuel Whorter Yongue as Executrix and Executors of his will. The will was recorded October 10, 1828 in Volume 2, Section 10, p. 34. [Martha Lou Houston, “Indexes to the County Wills of South Carolina, Baltimore: Gen. Pub. Co., 1970 [1939]. The original will is filed in Fairfield County, Apartment 49, File 755, SC Archives.

In our opinion, the above records are those of Daniel ‘GOING’ Sr[4], son of Alexander Going Sr [3].

HENRY ‘GOING’ [5]

The following is yhe account settlement for the Revolutionary War service of Henry ‘Going’ [5] in the militia of Fairfield County:

“HENRY GOYEN. Audited Account 3016 2475. May 23, 1785. For 72 days Militia duty in 1782. Under command of Lt Hollis.May 21, 1784. I have this day received from General Winn. Henry [X] Goyen.  [Copied from SC Archives microfilm.]

Recorded in Book Q, No. 475:

“Issued the 23 of May 1785 to Mr. Henry Goyen for five Pounds two Shillings and ten Pence farthing Sterling for 72 days duty in the Militia as per Account Audited–Principal–L5:2:10 ¼, Annual Interest–L0:7:0.  [A. S. Salley Jr, “Stub Entries to Indents Issued in Payment of Claims Against South Carolina,” Books O-Q, The Historical Commission of SC, 1915, p. 283]

Henry ‘Going'[5] lived in Wilkes County, Georgia for about one year in 1797. While in Wilkes County, he lived in the same militia district with members of the family of William Goyne [4].

Henry ‘Going’ was listed in the 1800 census of Fairfield County, South Carolina:

“Going,Henry white male 26-45
white female 10-16
white male 10-16
white male 0-10
white male 0-10
white male 0-10”

The will of Henry Going is dated February 12, 1807 in Fairfield District, South Carolina. Mentioned in the will were his three sons: Hesekiah, Lewis and Dillard; and one daughter Laadice. His wife was not mentioned. Executors were John Hall and Daniel Going. It was proved for administration by John Hall, and recorded July 29, 1807 in Volume 1, Section 5, p. 44. [Martha Lou Houston, “Indexes to the County Wills of South Carolina, Baltimore: Gen. Pub. Co., 1970 [1939]]. The original copy of this Will is filed in Fairfield County. Apartment 16, File 175, SC Archives. A typed copy was obtained from the Genealogy Room, Fairfield County Museum, Winnsboro, South Carolina.

In our opinion, Henry ‘Going'[5] was the son of John ‘Going’ Jr [4].

John ‘Going’

The following is the settlement for Revolutionary War service of John Goyen in the militia of Fairfield County, South Carolina.

“John Goyen, Audited Account 3017:

The State of South Carolina: To Jno. Goyen Dr.

To: One horse lost in the service under the command of Lieut. James Pickett in Gen’l Henderson’s Brigade. Appraised to:L2.3.  To: 42 days service under Lieut PickettL3
21 days service under Capt LewisL1.16.  63 days in all. L6.19. Kep? on 21 days duty 6L6.13
Appeared Wm. Gladden & Wm. Goyen & made Oath that the above mentioned horse was appraised by them to the value of two pounds three shillings Sterling. Wm. [~] Goyen ; Wm [X] Gladon.

Sworn to before me Chas Pickett JP

Appeared Jno. Goyen & made oath that the above horse was lost or taken by the enemy in the service of the State in the expedition agnst the enemy under the command of Genl Henderson & that no monies have been Received for him & this Depon’t also makes oath that the other service is justly due to him from the State. Sworn before me this 4th day of Decmr 1783. Chas Pickett JP I certify the service was done. Chas Lewis Capt [Microcopy, SC Archives]

Book. Q, No. 474. Issued the 23 of May 1785 to Mr. John Goyen for One pound ten Shillings Sterling for Militia duty as pr Part of Account Audited Principal–L23:3:11. Annual Interest–L1:12:2”

[A S Salley, Jr, “Stub Entries to Indents Issued in Payment of Claims Against SC,” Bks. O-Q, The Historical Commission of SC, 1915, p. 283)

In our opinion, John Goyen was a son of John Going Jr [4].

William ‘Going’ [5]

The following is the settlement for Revolutionary War service of William Goyen in the militia of Fairfield County:

“William Goyen Audited Account 3018.  “The State of South Carolina: To Wm. Goyen Dr
To: 50 days service under Capt LewisL3.11.5

Appeared Wm Goyen & made oath that the above service is just Due him from the State. Sworn before me this 4th Day of Decmr 1783.  Chas Pickett JP.  I certify the service was done. Chas Lewis Capt.

[Cover folder] Mr Willm Goyen his Accot of 50 Days Duty in the Militia in 1782. Amounting to L3.11.5 [Microcopy, SC Archives]

In our opinion, William Going [5] was a son of John ‘Going’ Jr [4].

James Goyne [5] was “drafted” into active service in the militia of Fairfield County in June 1776, the month after his 21st birthday. We have estimated that James Goyne [5] was the eldest son of John ‘Going’ Jr [4]. If our estimate is correct, the younger brothers of James Goyne [5] may have been too young to serve in the militia in 1776, but had achieved that age by 1782. Another possible explanation for their absence from the militia rolls of 1776 is that the brothers of James Goyne [5] had not yet arrived in Fairfield County. We favor the first explanation.

There is no record that James Goyne [5] filed for payment for his Revolutionary War service in the militia of Fairfield County. Only in old age did he file for a pension. One historian has written that many of South Carolina’s militiamen believed they fought for principle, rather than for money, and did not file claims for payment for military service in the Revolutionary War. [Bobby Gilmer Moss, Roster of South Carolina Patriots in the American Revolution, 1983].

We have identified a group of ‘Going’ brothers and cousins who were close friends.  At times they lived near each other, visited together, and otherwise maintained contact with one another, even into the mid-19th century. If the story about the ‘five’ brothers serving together in the Fairfield County militia is true, we must look elsewhere for the brother of James Goyne [5].

The 1790 census of Camden District, Fairfield County, South Carolina lists the following ‘Going’ individuals:

Name FWM FWM FWF Slaves
16 up under 16

1. Daniel Gowen 1 3 2
2. Alexr Gowin 1 3 5
3. Henry Gowin 1 1 3
4. John Goin 1 1 3
5. Jesse Goin 1 2 1
6. Daniel Goin 1 3 2 2

Of the above:

1. Daniel Gowen is Daniel ‘Going’ Jr [5], the son of Daniel ‘Going’ Sr   [4].
2. Alexr Gowin is Alexander ‘Going’ Jr [4], the son of Alexander ‘Going’ Sr [3].
3. Henry Gowin is considered to be a son of John ‘Going’ Jr [4]. He lived in Capt. Turners’ District [MM-38] in Warren [formerly Wilkes] County, Georgia in 1797. He returned to Fairfield County, South Carolina where he died.
4. John Goin [5] is considered to be the son of John ‘Going’ Jr [4].
5. Jesse Goin has not previously been seen in Fairfield County records. A Jesse ‘GOING’ lived in Wilkes County, Georgia in Capt. Smith’s District [II-3] in 1793. He may be the ‘fourth’ brother of James Goyne [5].
6. Daniel Goin is Daniel ‘Going’ Sr[4], the son of Alexander ‘Going’ Sr [3]. He died in Fairfield County, South Carolina.

Other ‘Going’ individuals living in South Carolina during this period of time have not been connected with the family of William Goyne [4]. There were those with the Gaelic Gowen surname, and there were Going individuals who claimed to be of Ireland whose ancestors had originated in France. There is at least one record in Fairfield County that refers to a ‘Going’ family as mulatto. Is it any wonder, then, that researchers have had difficulty in sorting out the South Carolina ‘Going’ individuals. We hope this paper has made a small contribution to research of the larger ‘Going’ family, whatever the preferred spelling of the name.

[To Be Continued] . . .

From: “Arlee Gowen” <gowen@llano.net>
Subject: [Gowen] Electronic Newsletter, Volume 4, No. 10
Date: Thu, 8 Nov 2001 17:59:02 -0600

(Web Location:  http://archiver.rootsweb.ancestry.com/th/read/GOWEN/2001-11/1005263942 )

Gowen Research Foundation Electronic Newsletter

October 2001 Volume 4 No. 10

THE ANCESTRY OF WILLIAM GOYNE OF WILKES/WARREN COUNTY, GEORGIA

By Col. Carroll Heard Goyne, Jr. & Betty Brantley Goyne
Editorial Boardmembers
10019 Canterbury Drive Shreveport, Louisiana, 71106
318/798-7108 cgoyne@softdisk.com

CONCLUSION

In the summer of 1989, Betty and I visited with friends in Linlithgow, Scotland. Ian Gray and I had been classmates at a British Royal Air Force pilot training school during World War II. On this visit Ian and his wife Margaret took us to a small, secluded lodge in a narrow valley in the north of Scotland. That first evening after dinner we retired to the lounge to enjoy an after dinner drink. As my eyes surveyed the back-bar to ascertain the refreshments available, a particular bottle caught my attention. It was a bottle  of  Glengoyne [Goyne Valley] Whisky. I asked the lodge manager to hand me the bottle, which he so kindly did. The label on the bottle revealed that Lang Brothers, Ltd. of Glasgow was the owner of Glengoyne Distillery.

Later that year, Ian and Margaret visited Glengoyne Distillery in  Stirlingshire, Scotland, and also communicated with Lang Brothers, Ltd. An official of Lang Brothers, Ltd. became interested in our quest to determine the origin of the Goyne name. The official contacted several sources for information, including Edinburgh University. Some of the more fascinating information sent to us from Scotland has been reported in this paper.

Anyone who has attempted to trace a common given name knows that it  can be tedious work. It becomes all the more tedious when a surname is spelled in a variety of ways. This research project was further complicated because the surnames Gowen [Smith] and Goyne [White] are sometimes used interchangeably.

We had previously surmised that William Goyne, who signed his Will on January 4, 1816 in Warren County, Georgia was either the William who had lived on Ward’s Creek in Rutherford County, North Carolina between 1773 and 1789, or he was the William who had served in the militia of Fairfield Co., South Carolina in 1782. After a considerable amount of research, and with the assistance of several people, we are reasonably confident that the ancestry of William Goyne has been determined.

Elements used in determining William Goyne’s ancestry may be summarized as follows:

a. Land Records prove that the William who lived in Orange County, North Carolina between ca. 1762 and 1773 was the son of John[3] ‘Going’ and Mary [Keith] Going of Lunenburg County, Virginia. They also prove that the John Going who lived in Orange Couny, North Carolina during that period was the son of John [3] ‘Going’ and Mary [Keith] Going.

b. The William ‘Going’ who lived in Orange County, North Carolina was the same as the William ‘Going’ who lived in Rutherford County, North Carolina. William departed from the records of Orange County, North Carolina and soon after appeared in the records of Rutherford County, North Carolina. This connection is verified by the move of Alexander ‘Going’ Jr. from Orange County, North Carolina to live with or near his first cousin William ‘Going’ in Rutherford County, North Carolina.

c. Alexander ‘Going’ Jr. moved from Orange Co., North Carolina, to Rutherford County, North Carolina, to Fairfield County,  South  Carolina, and later returned to Rutherford County, North Carolina. These actions by Alexander Jr. link the ‘Going’ families of those areas.

d. A comparison of dates on courthouse documents in Rutherford County, North Carolina with dates on documents in Fairfield County, South Carolina proves that the two Williams were not the same person.

e. The William who served in the militia of Fairfield County South Carolina in 1782 was not William Goyne of Wilkes/Warren Counties, Georgia based on a comparison of their marks. The mark of William of Fairfield County, South Carolina is found in his Audited Accounts records located in the South Carolina Archives. The mark of William of Wilkes/Warren County, Georgia is found in the estate files of his second wife’s mother located in the Georgia Archives.

f. William of Rutherford County, North Carolina lived on or near the east-west public road, as confirmed by his assignment to supervise the maintenance of a portion of that road. This William lived on Ward’s Creek, northeast of its juncture with First Broad River, near the Lincoln County line. Two families having the surnames of William Goyne’s two married daughters lived in the same area of Lincoln Co., North Carolina.

g. In 1799, two of William Goyne’s second wife’s brothers, Alexander and William Stroder, traveled from Wilkes County, Georgia to Lincoln County, North Carolina to be married. This is persuasive evidence that the Stroder family had lived in Lincoln County prior to their move to Wilkes County. This also suggests that William may have known the Stroder family in North Carolina.

h. According to census records, William Goyne’s two oldest sons, John and Drury, were born between 1760 and 1770. Considering the apparent birth year of William’s third son, John and Drury were probably born prior to 1764. If this assumption is correct, John and Drury would have become subject to a North Carolina poll tax between 1781 and 1785. William and Alexander Jr. were the only persons with the Going name listed in the 1782  Tax List of Rutherford County, North Carolina. This suggests that John and Drury had not reached the age of 21 by 1782. The 1785 Tax List of Rutherford County, North Carolina listed William as the only person with the Going name. This suggests that John and Drury either had not reached the age of 21 by 1785, or that they had moved from Rutherford County. Alexander Jr. moved from Rutherford County to Fairfield County, South Carolina between 1782 and November 1784. Thus, the possibility exists that John and Drury moved to South Carolina with their cousin Alexander Jr. John and Drury first appeared in the tax records of Wilkes County, Georgia in 1796, six years after their father first appeared in the Wilkes County tax records. This confirms that John and Drury had lived apart from their father for several years.

i. William of Rutherford County, North Carolina did not serve in the militia of that county during the Revolutionary War, suggesting that he was too old. William of Fairfield County, South Carolina served in the militia of that county in 1782, but was not drafted for militia service in 1776. By comparison, James Goyne was drafted into the militia of Fairfield County, South Carolina in 1776, one month after his 21st birthday. This suggests that William of Fairfield County, South Carolina was not drafted in 1776 because he was too young. By our estimates, William [4] Going, son of John [3] Going and Mary [Keith] Going of Lunenburg County, Virginia, was born in 1732 or earlier, and thus would have been age 44 or older in 1776.

In our considered opinion, William Goyne of Wilkes/Warren Counties, Georgia was the William who had lived on Ward’s Creek in Rutherford County, North Carolina. He was the oldest son of John [3] ‘Going’ and Mary [Keith] Goyne of Lunenburg County, Virginia.

It is also our opinion that James Goyne, who served with his four brothers in the militia of Fairfield County, South Carolina during the Revolutionary War, was the son of John [4] Goyne Jr. and the grandson of John [3] and Mary Keith] Goyne of Lunenburg County, Virginia. Other than the five sons of John Goyne Jr., we believe that the Goyne men who lived in Fairfield County, South Carolina during the Revolutionary War were the sons of Alexander Goyne r. [3].

==O==

I call attention to some errors in the section on Daniel ‘Going’ in my article, “The Ancestry of William Goyne of Wilkess/Warren Counties, Georgia” published in the September 2001 Newsletter.

The first paragraph of the manuscript I submitted reads: “Daniel [4] and Hugh [4] Gwyn were listed on the 1771 Pay Roll of Capt. Nathaniel Hart’s Company of the Orange County, North Carolina Regiment of Militia.” The published version read: “Daniel Gowen [4] and Hugh Gwin [4] were listed on the 1771 Pay Roll of Capt. Nathaniel Hart’s Company of the Orange County, North Carolina Regiment of Militia.”

The second paragraph of the manuscript I submitted reads: “In our opinion, Daniel and Hugh were sons of Alexander ‘Going” Sr. [3]. The published version reads: “In our opinion, Daniel Gowen and Hugh Gwin were sons of Alexander ‘Going’ Sr. [3].”

The fourth paragraph of the manuscript I submitted reads: “The following is Daniel Going’s acount settlement for his Revolutionary War service in the militia of Fairfield County, South Carolina.” The published version reads: “The following is account settlement for the Revolutionary War service of Daniel Gowen [4] in the militia of Fairfield County, South Carolina.”

ISAAC GOING REPORTED ON CONDITIONS IN ANTEBELLUM SOUTH CAROLINA

Isaac Going, son of Drury Going and Sarah “Sallie” Baxter Going, was born April 28, 1775 in Chester District. He was baptized at the June meeting of the Pacolet [later Skull Shoals] Baptist Church in 1803, according to the research of Fredrick M. Tucker, a descendant of Duncan, South Carolina. He was married August 21, 1804 to Rebecca Palmer, seventh child of John Palmer and Martha “Patty” Williams Palmer of Union District, South Carolina. Rebecca Palmer Going was born February 1, 1789. She died August 31, 1855.

Isaac Going wrote a letter February 3, 1857 to his nephew Alfred Elijah Going of Pickens County, Alabama.:

“Union District, South Carolina
To Alfred E. GoingFebruary 3, 1857
Dear Nephew,

It is with the kindest feeling of respect that I undertake to answer your kind letter which came safe to hand. I was truly glad that you were prompted to write me so interesting a letter respecting my relatives. I believe yours is the first letter that I have received from the family; sometime I have heard of you verbally. I feel sorrow to hear of your blindness and can sympathise with you, for I know the lack of eyesight. I have not been totally blind as you, to be led about. The roads that I have been accustomed to travel I can of a light day make my way along with a staff.

My wife died last day of August 1855 after a few hours of sickness, we lived a long life together, we had eleven children. I am eighty-two years old the 28th day of next April–if I should live to see it.

I joined the Baptist Church and was baptised June 1803, of which I have been a member ever since. I served the church as deacon forty-five years. During the time since I became acquainted with myself and blessed Redeemer, I have met with many a sore conflict, but by the grace of God enabling me I have continued to this day. I have served as an active magistrate twenty-four years.

Negro men rate in this area from one thousand to twelve hundred dollars, likely young girls rate at nine hundred dollars. The price of land is from ten to twelve dollars an acre. We have had several bad crop years; corn brings 75c per bushel readily, flour eight dollars per barrel. Pork sells at 7c gross.

Our country is nearly all cleared and worn out, but reclaimed land with proper cultivation produces tolerably well. The settlement your father moved from does not look like the same country; the generation of people that then lived are near all dead and moved away, the country nearly cleared and covered with swarms of negroes.

If these few lines should be so fortunate as to reach you, please write me on receipt of the same about all of the relations, who is dead and who is alive, who is rich and who is poor, and the current news of the country. I have one grandson who follows overseeing, spoke of visiting you this winter, wishes to know what he could get per year for overseeing in your country. I think he is declined going away till next winter.

I would be very glad if I could enjoy myself in your company, but I will never expect it as my days will soon be numbered according to the course of nature.

I believe I have written most of the general news. I must come to a close shortly. I am bouyed up to think that I have not much longer to stay here in a state of blindness, but I expect a day soon when I shall be received up into heaven, when I shall not need these poor blind eyes to give sight, for the Lord God in his dazzling glory is the light of that place. I must come to a close by wishing you prosperity through life, and at last be received at the right hand of God.

Give my best wishes to all of my inquiring friends, so farewell.

Isaac Going”

Isaac Going died January 27, 1861, according to a letter written by his son, Thomas Baxter Going March 16, 1879.

Eleven children were born to Isaac Going and Rebecca Palmer Going:

Thomas Baxter Going born May 13, 1806
Sarah Palmer Going born July 13, 1808
John Madison Going born July 14, 1810
Elijah Bobo Going born January 15, 1813
Drury Dobbins Going born November 24, 1815
Isaac McKissick Going born September 2, 1818
Rhoda Going born August 24, 1821
William George Washington Going born July 17, 1824
Amasa Vernon Going born January 30, 1827
Elisha Palmer Going born December 22, 1829
Martha Kerenhappuch Going born July 4, 1835

 

 

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