Going families of color – (listed as “mol”, black, or “other, not white”)

(Under Construction)

Several Going familes (and other various spellings, Goin, Gowen, Goyens, etc), have done research on the Going families of color.  I’ll try to list all the different documents I have found that indicate this for any Going people I have found.  This listing could mean Indian, African, Hispanic, someone who was a dark Mediteranean, Arabic/Persian, from India, or Asian.  Anyone who didn’t fit the typical “white” definition was usually placed in one of these categories.  Which one is not usually defined in the documents more than the notation “Mol or Mul”, “other than white”, “negro”, “M”, etc.  Some listings may be in error as well, as they weren’t perfect.  You would need to follow up with the individual listed and see if further documents listed them the same way, and then look at their ancestors and descendants to confirm the listing.   This is only a list of where I found the notation in some document – what variety of “other than white” or whether correct or not would need to be researched.

Another tricky thing is that in large counties like Granville Co, NC in the 1750s, etc, there were several people with the same names.  Names like William, Thomas, John, James, etc., were very common among any person, white or black.  For example, there are several times when looking at the tithe records that it is clear there is both a white “William Going”, and a black or mullato “William Going” in Granville County, NC.   Before claiming one or the other purchased a particular property, or showed up in court for a certain thing, if the document itself does not indicate one way or the other, look for other clues (such as family members or close family friends) that may also be in the documents, in order to differentiate what belonged to which person.  Several times this isn’t possible, so it should be noted that it is possibly one or the other person – unsure.

Families: 

___________________________________

William Goingb. abt 1670-1685 – “a free negro” appears to have lived in South Carolina at least from  1717-1719.  He signed a petition in 1717 in Charles Towne, South Carolina, and in 1719 was sued by William Wallace (or William Edward Clarke) in Charles Towne, South Carolina:  unknown info on his family.

__________________________________________

Michael Gowen – b. abt 1720 – lived in Granville Co, NC and Butte Co, NC

Children:

Michael Gowen Jr. b. abt 1738
Elizabeth Gowen b. abt 1742
David Gowen b. abt 1750

___________________________________________

Edward Gowen b. abt 1727 lived in Brunswick Co 1744, Va and Granville Co, NC 1753-57, Butte Co NC 1764 – 1771, Granville Co 1788 (uncle of Thomas Goin – conveyed his interest in Elizabeth Bass decd property to Thomas Goin).

James Goin- parent: b. abt 1708
Thomas Goin 1729 mul (Granville 1753-1755, 1786)
Joseph Goin 1727 mul (Granville 1755-1767)
Joseph Goin Jr b. abt 1747-57
Jacob Going b. abt 1747-57
Mourning Going b. abt 1765-1776
Sarah Going b. abt 1765-1776
Elizabeth Going b. abt 1765-1776
Anne Going b. abt 1765-1776
Cyntha Going b. abt 1765-1776
William Goin 1742 mul
Henry Going – 1763 (9 other free)
Edward Goin b. 1766 (in 1820 2 male, 2 female under 16)
William Going (1800)
Bob Going (1805-1816)
Neill Going (1813)
Daniel Going 1733 m Rebecca (who remarried to John Elliot)
David Goin – b. 1755? died 1780 killed by Indians
Levi Going – b. abt 1760. (in 1820 2 male children 16-23, 1 under 16, 2 female 16-23, 1           female under 16)
Hubbard Going (1786-1804)
James Going (1792)
John Going (1795-1804)

Edward Goin Sr b. 1702 mul
Edward Goin Jr 1742 mul (no evid he ever left Granville other than service) (1770                  Berkely Co, SC deed?) (Daniel Goyning also in 1770 Berkely Co, SC)
Reeps Goin b. abt 1745 mul
Michael Goin 1730 mul (Granville 1753-1762)(Bute Co, NC 1771) – wife unk name – died      Oct 1778.
Michael Goin (1754-1760) mul
David Goin (1754-1760) mul
Elizabeath Goin (1754-1760) mul
William Wilson Goin (1754-1760) mul
Jenkins Goin b. abt 1752-54 mul

______________________________________

Edward Goin Sr b. 1702 mul

Parents: 

Unk

Children:

Edward Goin Jr 1742 mul (no evid he ever left Granville other than service) (1770                  Berkely Co, SC deed?) (Daniel Goyning also in 1770 Berkely Co, SC)
Reeps Goin b. abt 1745 mul
Michael Goin 1730 mul (Granville 1753-1762)(Bute Co, NC 1771) – wife unk name – died      Oct 1778.

Siblings:

Edward Goin Sr b. 1702 mul
James Goin b. abt 1708
Elizabeth Goin 1710 m. Moses Bass

____________________________________

James Goin b. abt 1708

Parents:

Unk

Children:

Thomas Goin 1729 mul (Granville 1753-1755, 1786)
Joseph Goin 1727 mul (Granville 1755-1767)

Siblings:

Edward Goin Sr b. 1702 mul
James Goin b. abt 1708
Elizabeth Goin 1710 m. Moses Bass

_________________________________

Elizabeth Goin 1710 m. Moses Bass

Parents:

Unk

Children:

(no children)

Siblings:

Edward Goin Sr b. 1702 mul
James Goin b. abt 1708
Elizabeth Goin 1710 m. Moses Bass

GRANVILLE COUNTY, North Carolina:

Granville County, North Carolina:  Granville County is especially confusing – it has at least two separate Going families living in the same county with several people having the same names.  I have created a chart based on tithe records I have located to attempt to differentiate the families:

Granville County NC tithe chart for black and/or mulatto and white Going families

Granville County NC tithe chart for black and/or mulatto and white Going families

This chart is based on the following tithe records:

Census and Tithe Repts: Blacks and Mulattos

Michael Gowen appeared in the 1750 tax list of Granville County, paying a tax on two tithables.

1753 Granville Co, NC
List of Robert Harris (“one of his lists”)
William Going and his son 2 0
Robt. Mitchell, John Going 2 tithes
List of Osborn Jeffreys
Thomas Going 1 1
Michal Going 0 1
Edward Going 0 1
List of Lemuel Lanier
Thomas Going 1
Michall Going 1
Michall Going 1
http://lumbeeindiansandgoinsfamily.blogspot.com/2007/12/granville-county-nc-early-records.htmlhttp://www.freeafricanamericans.com/Granville.htmhttp://files.usgwarchives.net/nc/granville/court/tax1753.txt

1754 Oct 8 – Muster roll of the regiment in Granville, under the command of Colo William Eaton, as taken at a general muster of the said regiment on Oct 8, 1754 William Person, Lieut. Col.James Paine, Major Capt Osborn Jeffrey’s Company:
78. THOMAS GOWAN – Malatto
79. MICHAEL GOWAN – Malatto
80. EDWARD GOWAN – Malatto
Granville Co, NC
http://lumbeeindiansandgoinsfamily.blogspot.com/2007/12/granville-county-nc-early-records.html
1754 Oct 18 – Granville Co, NC
Capt John Sallis’ Company:
47. WILLIAM GOWEN
78. JOSEPH GOWEN
http://lumbeeindiansandgoinsfamily.blogspot.com/2007/12/granville-county-nc-early-records.html
List of Osborn Jeffreys
Michal Going 1 0
Thomas Going 0 1
http://files.usgwarchives.net/nc/granville/court/tax1754.txt

 

1755 Granville Co, NC
summary list (from microfilm) C.044.70012 NC Archives
Thomas Going 0/1/1
Edward Gowen 0/1/1
Michael Gowen 0/1/1
Joseph Gowen 0/1/1
William Going & Son Joseph 2/0/2
William Going & Son Joseph 2/0/2
http://lumbeeindiansandgoinsfamily.blogspot.com/2007/12/granville-county-nc-early-records.htmlhttp://www.freeafricanamericans.com/Granville.htm

1757 Granville Co, NC
Tax List of Richard Harris
William Gowen List Son Joseph & William 3 0
List of Samuel Henderson
Joseph Gowen 1
Gideon Gowen 1
List of Gid. Macon
Thos: Goeing, Jno. Seemore [torn]
List Retd. by William Johnson [shf.]: perhaps insolvents
Christopher Goin 1 http://files.usgwarchives.net/nc/granville/court/tax1757.txt,
http://lumbeeindiansandgoinsfamily.blogspot.com/2007/12/granville-county-nc-early-records.htmlhttp://www.freeafricanamericans.com/Granville.htm

1759 Granville Co, NC
List of John Pope
Joseph Goin, Mulattoe 1
Edward Goin, Mulattoe 1
Thomas Goin, William Gray White 2
James Goin Mulattoe, William Goin Mulattoe 2
Michael Goin, Mulattoe, John Wilson, Mulattoe 2
Delinquent and insolvent list
James Goin 2
http://lumbeeindiansandgoinsfamily.blogspot.com/2007/12/granville-county-nc-early-records.htmlhttp://www.freeafricanamericans.com/Granville.htm

1761 Granville Co, NC
whites/Blacks male/Blacks f/ Blacks 12-16
List of John Pope
Thomas, Moses Gowin. Refuses to List his wife 2 tithes
Michael Gowin, John Wilson. Refuses to list his wife 2
Joseph Gowin. Refuses to list his wife 1
List of Robt. Harris for Granville Parish
Edward Going sons Edwd. Reeps 0 white/3black males
Country Line District by Larkin Johnston
William Gowin, James Gowin 2
William Gowin Junr, Jesse Chandlor 2
http://lumbeeindiansandgoinsfamily.blogspot.com/2007/12/granville-county-nc-early-records.htmlhttp://www.freeafricanamericans.com/Granville.htm

1762 Granville Co NC
Michael Gowin mulattoe
Thomas Gowin and Moses Gowin 2 tithes
Edward Gowin Sr, Reps Gowin, Edward Gowin 3 mulattoe
James Gowing, son William, refs to list his wife – 2 white, 0 black, 0 fem, 2 over 16, 2 total
William Gowin Jr 2 white
Joseph Going refuses to list wife 1 mulattoe
James Gowen 2 insolvent
Michael Going 2 insolvent
Edward Going 2 insolvent
Jos. Going 1 insolvent
http://www.freeafricanamericans.com/Granville.htmhttp://lumbeeindiansandgoinsfamily.blogspot.com/2007/12/granville-county-nc-early-records.htmlhttp://files.usgwarchives.net/nc/granville/court/tax1762.txt

1763 Granville Co NC
James Gowen 2 insolvent
Edward Going 2 insolvent
Wm Going 1 insolvent
http://www.freeafricanamericans.com/Granville.htmhttp://lumbeeindiansandgoinsfamily.blogspot.com/2007/12/granville-county-nc-early-records.html

1764 Granville Co NC
Joseph Gowen 1 white
William Gowen 1 white
William Gowen and John Cape 2 white
Jas. Gowen, James Lunceford 2 white
Thomas Going and Moses Going 2 white
Joseph Going and James Harrison mulattoe 1 white 1 mulattoe
Edward Going and Edward Going 2 mulattoe
Jos. Gowen 2 insolvent
James Gowen 2 insolvent
http://www.freeafricanamericans.com/Granville.htmhttp://lumbeeindiansandgoinsfamily.blogspot.com/2007/12/granville-county-nc-early-records.html

1765 Granville Co, NC
William Burford’s District
William Going Molatto not listed 2
County Line district by James Yancy
Joseph Gions 1, 0
Wm. Gions 1,0
http://lumbeeindiansandgoinsfamily.blogspot.com/2007/12/granville-county-nc-early-records.htmlhttp://www.freeafricanamericans.com/Granville.htm

1766 Granville Co, NC
Box CR 44.601.20 1766 gives alphabetical summary only:
Goin, Joseph 2
Gowin, Thomas 1
Gowing, Joseph 1
Gowin, Edward 1
Gowin, Reps 1
Memo of those as has not listed with John Pope
Joseph Gowin (Mullattoe, has a wife and other Family not listed)
Edward Gowin (Mullattoe, has a wife &c not listed)
http://lumbeeindiansandgoinsfamily.blogspot.com/2007/12/granville-county-nc-early-records.htmlhttp://www.freeafricanamericans.com/Granville.htm

1767 Granville Co, NC
List of Philips Pryor
Joseph Gowen, Presley Harrison John Cunningham, Minor Cockram 4w, 0B
list of John Pope (white, Black male, Black female)
Thomas Gowin 2-0-0
Moses Gowin 1-0-0
Joseph Gowin 0-2-0
Edward Gowin 0-1-0
Edward Gowin Jr.0-1-0
Separate List later in reel, Philip Pryors List
Joseph Gowen, Prisly Morrison, John Cunningham, Minor Cocer? 4 white
http://lumbeeindiansandgoinsfamily.blogspot.com/2007/12/granville-county-nc-early-records.htmlhttp://www.freeafricanamericans.com/Granville.htm

1768 Granville Co, NC
list of John Pope
Thomas Gowin, John Gowin, Alston Hopkins 3 tithes
Moses Gowin [torn]
Joseph Gowin his Nat 2
http://lumbeeindiansandgoinsfamily.blogspot.com/2007/12/granville-county-nc-early-records.html

1769 Granville Co, NC
Summary list from microfilm white/ Black/ Carriage wheels
Gowen, Thomas 3/0/0
Gowen, Moses 2/0/0
Gowen, William 1/0/0
Gowen, Edward 0/1/0
http://lumbeeindiansandgoinsfamily.blogspot.com/2007/12/granville-county-nc-early-records.htmlhttp://www.freeafricanamericans.com/Granville.htm

1771 Granville Co NC.
Thomas Gowin 2 unk
Moses Gowin 1 unk
John Gowin 1 unk
Edward Gowin 1 unk
Joseph Gowin 2 unk
http://www.freeafricanamericans.com/Granville.htmhttp://lumbeeindiansandgoinsfamily.blogspot.com/2007/12/granville-county-nc-early-records.html
1771 Sept 7 – Granville Co, NC
list of insolvents for 1762 taxremaining in arrears as of 7 Sept. 1771
Michael Gowen  2
Edward Gowen 3
Joseph Gowen 1
http://lumbeeindiansandgoinsfamily.blogspot.com/2007/12/granville-county-nc-early-records.html
1771 – Granville Co, NC. List of Granville Co Militia.
Company of Capt Sol. Alston, dec’d. Soldiers:
THOMAS GOING, Sen
THOMAS GOING, Jun
JOHN GOING
MOSES GOING
JOSEPH GYNE
EDWARD GYNE, absent
NATHANIEL GYNE
Capt Sol. Alston now dead, returned by his Lt Sol. Fuller. (Clark, Walter. Chief Justice of the Supreme Court of NC, The State Records of NC, Vol XXII, p 162, 1907).
http://lumbeeindiansandgoinsfamily.blogspot.com/2007/12/granville-county-nc-early-records.html

1778 Granville Co, NC
Jenkins Goins was a seventeen-year-old “mullato” who enlisted in Captain John Rust’s Company of Granville County militia in 1778 [The North Carolinian VI:726 (Mil. TR 4-40)].
http://lumbeeindiansandgoinsfamily.blogspot.com/2007/12/granville-county-nc-early-records.html

1779 July 1 – Reeps Goins was taxable in the Granville County household of his father Edward Goins in 1761 (with his brother Edward). He was called Rapes Going when he enlisted in the Second South Carolina Regiment under Captain Thomas Hall on 1 July 1779 [Moss, Roster of S.C. Patriots in the American Revolution, 367]. Granville Co, NC
http://lumbeeindiansandgoinsfamily.blogspot.com/2007/12/granville-county-nc-early-records.html

1786 Granville Co, NC
Thomas Gowen was head of a Granville County household of 4 free males and 5 free females in the 1786 state census in Dutch District. http://www.freeafricanamericans.com/Gibson_Gowen.htm

1788 Granville Co, NC.  Granville County Tax List
Jenkin Gowin
1 taxable
http://files.usgwarchives.net/nc/granville/court/tax1788.txt

Several of the above mulatto Going/Goin families moved to Moore County, North Carolina – the 1790 – 1850 census was used for the following – these are the Going families listed as “other free” – meaning not white:

Moore Co, NC census chart for Going families

Moore Co, NC census chart for Going families

Based on the above two charts (and other information below), the following families are identified from Granville County, North Carolina:

James Goin- parent: b. abt 1708
Thomas Goin 1729 mul (Granville 1753-1755, 1786)
Joseph Goin 1727 mul (Granville 1755-1767)
Joseph Goin Jr b. abt 1747-57
Jacob Going b. abt 1747-57
Mourning Going b. abt 1765-1776
Sarah Going b. abt 1765-1776
Elizabeth Going b. abt 1765-1776
Anne Going b. abt 1765-1776
Cyntha Going b. abt 1765-1776
William Goin 1742 mul
Henry Going – 1763 (9 other free)
Edward Goin b. 1766 (in 1820 2 male, 2 female under 16)
William Going (1800)
Bob Going (1805-1816)
Neill Going (1813)
Daniel Going 1733 m Rebecca (who remarried to John Elliot)
David Goin – b. 1755? died 1780 killed by Indians
Levi Going – b. abt 1760. (in 1820 2 male children 16-23, 1 under 16, 2 female 16-23, 1           female under 16)
Hubbard Going (1786-1804)
James Going (1792)
John Going (1795-1804)

Edward Goin Sr b. 1702 mul
Edward Goin Jr 1742 mul (no evid he ever left Granville other than service) (1770                  Berkely Co, SC deed?) (Daniel Goyning also in 1770 Berkely Co, SC)
Reeps Goin b. abt 1745 mul
Michael Goin 1730 mul (Granville 1753-1762)(Bute Co, NC 1771) – wife unk name – died      Oct 1778.
Michael Goin (1754-1760) mul
David Goin (1754-1760) mul
Elizabeath Goin (1754-1760) mul
William Wilson Goin (1754-1760) mul
Jenkins Goin b. abt 1752-54 mul

Elizabeth Goin 1710 m. Moses Bass

 

(Other info on Granville Co, NC Going families of color):

By 1782 Edward Gowen was back in Granville County where he was taxed on 90 acres on Ford Creek District. Paul Heinegg considered Edward Gowen related to Elizabeth Bass because on October 14, 1788 he conveyed his interest in her estate to his nephew, Thomas Gowen, according to Granville County Will Book 2, page 79.

“October 14, 1788. Know all men by these presents that I Edward Gowen of the County of Granville for divers good causes and considerations thereunto [me] moving more especially for the sum of £25 to me in hand paid, the receipt of which I do hereby acknowledge, hath bargained, sold & made over, and by these presents, do bargain, sell and make over to my nephew, Thomas Gowen all the estate, right and interest I have or hereafter may have to the estate of Elizabeth Bass, deceased, or any part thereof, and do hereby make over the same to the said Thomas Gowin, his heirs and assigns from the claim of me, the said Edward Gowen or any other person whatever claiming under me. In witness whereof I have hereunto set my hand & seal the 15th day of October, 1786.
Edward Going
Witnesses:
Henry Meghe, Allin Hudson, Jhn. [X] Simmons”

John Simmons later appeared in Granville County Court to prove the deed of “Edward Gowing” to “Thomas Gowing,” according to “Court Minutes of Granville County, North Carolina, 1746-1820,” page 28 by Zoe Hargett Gwynn.

Two months earlier, “Thomas Goin,” regarded as kin of Edward Gowen, applied to the County Court of Greene County, Tennessee for the administration of the estate of Elizabeth Bass, according to “Bulletin of the Watauga Association,” Volume 10:

“August 1788. On motion of W. Avery, Esqr. atto. for Thomas Going for obtaining letter of administration on the Estate of Elizabeth Bass, decd. ordered that the same be laid over until next term, for proof of sanguinity [kinship, blood relationship] & that a dedimus potestatem [a commission to take testimony] issue in favour of said Thomas Going to Anson & Richmond Counties & to the State of South Carolina by giving fifteen days notice to Jeremiah Bass of the time & place where such testimony will be taken, ditto for Levi Bass to South Carolina giving Thos. Going fifteen days notice at least.”

Edward Gowen was enumerated in the 1786 state census of Granville County as the head of a household composed of “2 free males and three free females.”

Moses Bass’ will written Feb 28, 1777, and probated June 28, 1786 – Prince Georges Parish, George Town Dist, South Carolina
wife Elizabeth Bass
cousin Jeremiah Bass – 100a granted to John Smith, a negro Peter, negro woman Fann, negro boy Jack (but property to be held by wife Elizabeth Bass until her death)
cousin Wright Bass – eldest son of Edward Bass (who was eldest brother of Moses Bass testator)
– 444 acres along with mill. Negro Jane. (but for wife Elizabeth Bass until she dies).
Moses Bass died without issue.

Parent:
Jacob Going – 50acres granted to John Crawford

Children of Jacob Going:
Mourning Going – cow
Sarah Going – cow
Elizabeth Going – cow
Anne Going – cow
Cyntha Going – cow

Henry Harrison – son of James Harrison.
– negro woman Cate (wife Elizabeth Bass use until her death)

Joseph Going Jr.
– negro girl Judah (wife Elizabeth Bass to have use until death)

Executors: wife Elizabeth Bass, friends Luke Whitefield, and James Harrison.

Wits: Malachi Murfee, Jeremiah Bass, Right Bass.
Wright Bass is the eldest son of Edward Bass, and Edward Bass is the eldest brother of Moses Bass testator,
since Moses Bass departed life without issue, it makes Wright Bass heir at law.

Moore Co, NC:

Bute County was organized in 1764 with land from Granville County, and Michael Gowen found himself in the new county. He was taxed there in the 1771 tax list of Philemon Hawkins. His household appeared in the Bute County court records as “Michle Gowine & wife & Sons, Michle & David & Daughter, Elizabeath, William Wilson, 0 white/6 black/6 total.”

“Michael Gowin, of Prince George Parish, Craven County, North Carolina” gave a deed to “Jenkins Gowin” of Granville County, North Carolina June 3, 1778 to 80 acres in Granville County, “being part of 600 acres, part in Bute County, North Carolina and part in Granville County on the south side of Taylor Creek,” according to Granville County Deed Book 1, page 193.

The deed also stipulated that “Edward Gowin and wife were to live on said plantation until their decease” then it was to devolve to “Jenkins Gowin.” The deed was witnessed by John McKissick and William McBee.

On the same date “Michael Gowin, planter of Prince George Parish,” wrote his will June 3, 1778, according to Craven County Will Book I, pages 193 and 194. The will, which was probated in November 1778, left 80 acres, “being part of 600 acres in Bute and Granville County,” to “Jenkins Gowin” of Granville County.

Jenkins Gowen is regarded as the nephew of Michael Gowen and the son of Edward Gowen. (Note: More likely, Jenkins is son of Michael, grandson of Edward).

The deed conveyed the land to Jenkins Gowen upon the death of Edward Gowen and his wife who had been given permission to live there by Michael Gowen. The will repeated the stipulation that “Edward Gowin and wife” were to live on the plantation until they were deceased and then the property was to pass to “Jenkins Gowin, “mulatto”, according to “Abstracts of Granville County Wills” by Joseph W. Watson.

Michael Gowen died about October 1778, probably in Craven County.

Jenkins Gowen apparently lost the property in the following year.

“Michael Gowing” was mentioned in a sheriff’s deed dated August 3, 1779, according to Granville County Deed Book M, page 179. The deed conveyed property that “Edward Gowing formerly lived on, and his brother, Michael Gowing, formerly owned” to Charles Yarbrough by the Granville County sheriff apparently in a tax default.

Abstract of the deed was reproduced in “Kinfolks of Granville County, North Carolina 1765-1826” by Zoe Hargett Gwynn. The volume contained abstracts of Granville County Deed Books H through Z.

Jenkins Gowen was in the Granville County militia on May 25, 1778 and later served in the North Carolina Continental Line during the Revolutionary War

AFFIDAVIT AND LAND AND DEATH OF DAVID:

1792 Sept 17: David Gowen, son of Daniel Gowen and Rebecca Gowen, was born about 1763 in Fairfield County, according to an affidavit of his mother September 17, 1792.

He served in the militia regiment commanded by Col. Benjamin Roebuck of adjoining Spartanburg County about 1779.

1786 Aug 9: The estate of David Gowen received “12 pounds, 4 shillings and 3 and one-half pence sterling for duty in Roebucks Regiment,” according to a state indent dated August 9, 1786, appearing in “Stub Entries to Indents.” The beneficiaries of the estate were not identified.

In a power of attorney signed by Levi Gowen, his brother, it is stated that “four mulatto went to the Cumberland River in the year 1779 and were killed by the Indians in the year 1780.”

It is believed that David Gowen accompanied William Gowen, believed to be his grandfather, in a move to the new settlements on the Cumberland River at Ft. Nashboro, Tennessee.

David Gowen received from the state of North Carolina Preemption Claim No. 260 to “640 acres on the south side of the Cumberland River” in Davidson County, according to “North Carolina Land Grants in Tennessee, 1778-1791.” A preemption claim indicates actual residence.

“David Goin and Risby Kennedy were killed at Mansco’s Lick Station by Indians in the winter of 1780,” according to “Old Days of Nashville” by Jane Thomas. She adds “In the morning when Mansco’s Lick Station was broken up, two young men who had slept a little later than their companions were shot by two guns pointed through a port-hole by the Indians. These were David Goin and Patrick Quigley.”

J. T. Moore, writing in his book, “Tennessee, the Volunteer State,” page 180, reported the incident as, “David Goin and a companion were killed at Mansco’s Station near Nashville by Indians while they were sleeping. Unaware that the other members of their party had pulled out of the fortress before dawn, the two slept late and were shot by Indians through the portholes of the fort’s walls in 1780.” John Carr in his book “Early Times in Tennessee” states that “David Goin was killed in 1778.”

In the official records of Nashville it was recorded that “David Gowine was killed in the settlement and defense of Nashville by Indians.” He is believed to have been 18 years old and unmarried. The attacks of the Creeks were fierce and savage during the period, and many of the Davidson County settlers withdrew back eastward for safety.

1783 March 4: On March 4, 1783 “William Goings entered into bond with James Shaw, security, in penalty of 200 pounds specie” and was granted the administration of “the estate of David Goings, deceased” by the Nashville committee.

In Davidson County Will Book 1, Entry 11, is recorded:

“An inventory of the estate of David Gowine, deceased, “who died in the year 1781.” Recorded in the proceedings of the committee, Davidson County, North Carolina, 1781, was “To wit: some cows and calves, one gun, one bull, weeding hoe, one buckskin, one handkerchief, one pair breeches [or buckles?]. Total value, 19 pounds, one shilling.”

The return of the estate was signed by William Gowen, administrator.

Shortly afterwards “William Gowens” sued John Gibson in a “plea of detinue” [action to regain personal property wrongfully detained] as administrator of the estate of “David Gowens, deceased” and was awarded “two pounds for a heifer he disposed of,” according to Nashville court records.

1784 May 10: On May 10, 1784 the Nashville Committee voted that “640 acres of land in the Nashville area be deeded “to the heirs or devisees of David Gowin killed in the settlement and defense of Nashville.” This was probably done in conjunction with Land Grant No. 260 issued to “David Gowan” for 640 acres.

1785: (Rebecca Elliot / (same as Becky Elliot?)
He died before October 24, 1785 when “Rebecca Elliot formerly the wife of Daniel Gowen, present wife of John Elliot, appeared in Fairfield County Court Monday,” according to Fairfield County Court Minute Book A, page 4:
“The Court met according to adjournment whereupon Isaac Young appeared and produced Rebecca Elliot, formerly wife to Daniel Gowen, deceased from whom the said Young rented a tract of land and had engaged to pay her and her present husband, John Elliot the rent of 55 bushels of corn. The said Rebecca Elliot satisfied the court that her former husband purchased the said land and that she had been 17 years in possession of the same.”
A writ of attachment had been granted by Judge John Buchanan Esq. to Thomas Nelson against Isaac Young for an unpaid rental of 50 bushels of corn. In court “Isaac Young appeared and produced Rebeccah Elliot formerly wife to Daniel Gowen decd, from whom the said Young rented a tract of land and had engaged to pay her and her present husband John Elliot, the rent of 55 bushels of corn.”
The judgement of the court read: “It appears to the court that the plaintiff had no cause of action against the defendant as the said Rebeccah Elliot had never given up possession of the said land for which the plaintiff demanded rent. Therefore ordered to pay cost.”

1788: The Davidson County Court Minute Book records that “William Gowens” sued the heirs of “David Gowens” in the January, 1788 session of court. The defendants did not appear in court, and the court awarded to the plaintiff “27 pounds, 14 shillings and three pence in damages.”

Edythe Rucker Whitley in “Tennessee Genealogical Records of Davidson County, Tennessee” wrote:

“David Gowen, who was killed by Indians in defense of Tennessee about 1779-80, received a posthumous land grant of 640 acres in 1783. His father [error], William Gowen, was one of the signors of the Cumberland Compact entered into by settlers on the Cumberland River May 1, 1780.”

1792 Sept 17: The property of David Gowen was inherited by his brother, Levi Gowen, September 17, 1792, according to Fairfield County Deed Book A, pages 162-164:

Cleve Weatthers, an attorney of Nashville, Tennessee and a Gowen descendant wrote an analysis of the power of attorney executed by Levi Gowen”

Comments on the 1792 Power of Attorney by Levi Goyen and the Supporting Affidavit by Becky Elliot
by Cleve Weathers — March 2001

My comments are followed by the copies of the documents that I have transcribed as carefully as possible. If you are reading these documents as e-mail rather than as an attached file, then some of the formatting will be off. However, the I think the substance of data will remain. Where you see words abbreviated, the last character of the word was in superscript in the original document with the period directly under the superscripted letter. I do not know how to duplicate that “directly underneath period” in my word processor. I have attached this file in RTF format to achieve as universal compatibility in form as possible.

After studying the following power of attorney executed by Levi Goyen and the supporting affidavit if Becky Elliot in 1792, I think it is clear that both instruments were drawn either by a lawyer or by good court clerk. My perception is that although the Fairfield County area of South Carolina may no longer have been frontier territory in 1792, it was still more or less backwoods country. Considering this, I think both documents were well crafted for their place and era.

My guess is that Levi and Becky came to either the attorney or clerk and told a rather long rambling story of their son and brother going to Davidson County many years earlier and that as a result of David being killed that his heirs had inherited his rights to a cheap preemption grant of 640 acres from the State of North Carolina. The original pioneers who did not flee elsewhere, even temporarily because of the Indian attacks, were also entitled to the same preemption grants. The attorney or clerk then reduced the long rambling story to its essentials either composing it in their presence or asking them to come back later.

I think that neither Becky nor Levi would have had any effective control over the specific wording of the documents even if they had been literate. I think there should be little doubt that it was the drafter of the documents who decided that David and Levi should be identified as Mulatto and John Gowen (John Goyen in the power of attorney) as “gentleman.” I have seen enough Tennessee and Virginia early legal documents using the terminology “well beloved friend” and “trusty friend” to suspect these may have been boilerplate language. No doubt powers of attorney were not granted to enemies or to those one knew to be frequently unfair in his dealings. However, I think it is inappropriate to assume that those terms necessarily were entirely accurate in describing a personal relationship between the grantor and grantee of the power. One of several possibilities is that John Gowen was the only person that Levi Goyen knew in Davidson County, Tennessee or the entire region. It is also possible that he only knew him by reputation, rather than personally.

In Davidson County, the use the term “gentleman” was used somewhat sparingly to refer to persons who had both achieved considerable material success and had a reputation for gentlemanly behavior. My ancestor Capt. John Rains, for instance, achieved quite a bit of material success, and was a highly respected, even legendary, Longhunter and militia leader. He appears to have been honest but was a bit of a ruffian. (Actually he may have been the baddest ruffian in a frontier town that had many ruffians including Andrew Jackson, who served as private under Capt. John. Capt. John’s usual defense to assault and battery charges was that the victim deserved it.) Although quite a bit has been written about Capt. John, I have never seen him referred to as a “gentleman” even though he had a son who was also a captain in the militia, one son-in-law who was sheriff of the county and another who was an early Mayor of Nashville. Unlike Capt. John Rains, I really do not have sufficient information to have an opinion about John Gowen’s character, but he was reasonably successful in his material affairs.

However, knowing generally how the white power structure in South Carolina worked in this era and its more harsh racial code, as opposed to say Virginia, it crosses my mind that we cannot assume the same sparing use of the term occurred in this instance. It is possible that drafter would require a mulatto to refer to pretty much any white person as a “gentleman.” I suspect that if Levi Goyen had suggested that to the clerk or attorney that John Gowen of Davidson County was of mixed race descent, then the drafter would not only have avoided the use of the term “gentleman,” he would have refused to have used it even if requested.

I do not think we can draw any conclusions from the variable spellings of surnames found in these documents.

Finally, I have learned one new interesting tidbit of genealogical history from these documents, which is that David/Daniel Goyen, Sr. and wife Becky were presumably living in Fairfield County at least by 1774 since Levi was reportedly born there. I am assuming he was at least 18 years old when this power of attorney was granted.

Fairfield County, South Carolina Deeds
Book A, pp. 162-164
Power of Attorney granted by Levi Goyen to John Goyen
followed by Affidavit of Becky Elliot

Know all Men by these presents, that I Levi Goyen of the State of South Carolina Fairfield County and for divers and good causes & considerations me herewith____ing [receiving?], have made[,] ordained[,] Constituted and appointed and by these presents for me, my heirs Extr ____ and any of them do make and ordain Constitute and appoint my trusty and well beloved friend, John Goyen of the state of North Carolina Daverson County, Gentm. my true and lawful attorney for me to take out the rights in him, the said John Goyen’s own name to sell, make over, convey and confirm at his pleasure unto whoever may or shall agree with & purchase of him the said John Goyen a certain tract or parcel of land lying & being on Mill Creek of the east side of Daverson County aforesaid, the said land being first in the name of David Goyen, decd. Four Mullato went to Cumberland River in the year 1779, and were killed by the Indians in the year 1780, and left the said Mulatto Levi Goyen, his proper heir in law[,] the said parcel of land contg six hundred and forty acres and I do hereby grant unto my said Attorney, my sole and full power & authority to take, persue and follow such legal course for transferring the Right of sd land unto himself as I myself might or could do were I personally present[,] Ratifying & Confirming whatsoever my said attorney shall lawfully do or cause to be Done in & about the Execution of the foresaid by virtue of these presents. In witness whereof I have herewith set my hand & seal the 17th September in the year of our Lord, one thousand, seven hundred and ninety two.

Signed, sealed in the presence aforesd McMinn Easley.

his
Levi X Gowen (LG)
mark

Levi Gowen made his mark as his Signature to the above
Instrument of writing in my presence.
Benjm. Boyd

Fairfield
County Before me personally appeared Becky Elliot formerly Becky Gowen by a former Husband David [Daniel?] Gowen & after be[ing] duly sworn Deposeth and saith that she had a son by the afsd. David named David Goyen who about fourteen years ago left this county and as she was informed went to Cumberland River in N Carolina was there killed by the Indians sd. deponent further saith on oath that Levi Gowen who now appoints John Gowen as his atty is the full & oldest Brother of the afsd. David Gowen

her
Becky X Elcot
mark
Sworn & subscribed this }
17 day of Sept. 1792. before me }
Benjm. Boyd JFC

Fairfield
County

I do hereby certify that the above named Levi Gowen passeth in this County aford. as free Mulatto and it is said was Born here.

Given under my hand this 17th day of Septemr. 1792.
Benjm. Boyd J.F.C.

Fairfield County, South Carolina

I do hereby certify that Benjamin Boyd Esqr. is one of the Judges of this our County Court & that full faith and credit is to be given to the above and to his signature the being his proper handwriting.

Given under my hand & seal of office
this 18th day of September the year
of our Lord 1792. & the 16th of American
Independence.

Recorded 18th Sept: 92 D. C. Evans C.F.C.

“I, Levi Goyen of Fairfield County, give power of attorney to my trusty and well-beloved friend, John Goyen of Daverson County, North Carolina, gentleman to sell a certain tract of land on Mill Creek of the East Side of Daverson County aforesaid, the said land being first in the hands of David Goyen, decd. . . . . Four mulatto went to Cumberland River in the year 1779 and were killed by the Indians in the year 1780 and left the said Mulatto, Levi Goyen, his proper heir-at-law, tract of land containing 640 acres. Dated September 17, 1792.
Levi [X] Goyen
Witnesses: William Easley, Benj. Boyd

On the same date, Beckey Gowen, the mother of David Gowen and Levi Gowen, filed an affidavit to support his power of attorney:

“Fairfield County, South Carolina. Personally appeared Beckey Eliot, Beckey Gowen by a former husband Daniel Gowen, and deposeth that she had a son by the said Daniel Gowen named David Goyen who about 14 years ago left this county and, as she was informed, went to Cumberland River in North Carolina and was there killed by the Indians. Said deponent further saith that Levi Gowen who now appoints John Gowen as his attorney is the full and oldest brother of the aforesaid David Gowen.

Signed by Becky Eliot September 17, 1792 before Benj. Boyd, J.F.C. [Boyd also certified on the same date that the above named Levi Gowen passeth in the county for a free mulatto, and it is said was born here.'”

1780 May 12 – Levy Goines – Enters Revolutionary War (affids below from 1852 application for pension):
Transcribed by Tracy Hutchison. Not to be copied or reproduced in any format for profit. While I have tried my best, I am sure there are errors in the transcription.
Thutchison10@gmail.com
Start Your Free Trial with Footnote.com
Revolutionary War Pension of Levi Goines
Declaration in order to obtain the benefit of the acts of Congress for the benefit of Revolutionary Soldiers.
State of North Carolina
County of Moore
On this 26th day of April AD1852 personally appeared before the court of Pleas and Quarter Sessions held for the county and State of aforesaid, Levi Goines a resident of said County of Moore, and State of N.C. aged, about ninety years, who being first duly sworn according to Law, doth on his oath, make the following declaration in order to obtain the benefit, of the provision made by the acts of Congress for Soldiers who served in the Revolutionary war. That he volunteered in Fairfield County, State of South Carolina, and agreed to serve until the end of the war, the time he entered the service he does not recollect, but believes it was about the time that the British took Charleston that he served as a private in a Company Commanded by Captain John Gray and was attached to a Regiment which was Commanded by Col. John Winn, and Gen. Richard Winn. He continues in actual service for about the time of twelve months though his recollection is not very distinct as to the time he served but he was honorably discharged as he believes, at the close of the sad Revolutionary War by his said Captain, having been marched back to said Fairfield County, which was also the residence of his Captain. He obtained no written discharge. He was engaged in a battle near the confluence of the Congaree and Santee Rivers. Gen. Lee he (note at bottom of page reads “He thinks two year, but is determined to be written bounds”) believes was the commander though his memory as to this is indistinct. Says the town surrendered here without much fighting. His services was entirely confined to the Sate of South Carolina, marching from Wyns borough to the Congaree Fort. And various other parts of said state under his officers. He recollects the names of many officers and soldiers with whom he served but does not know any regulars the following are some of them. Gen. Sumpter, Majr John Pearson, William W. Morey, James Steel, Joseph Kennedy, John Greggs, Liut Andrew Gray, & Saml Croslin (the latter was a regular). He knows of no person living, whose testimony he can procure who can testify to his service having removed from the state of South Carolina to North Carolina Moore County soon after the close of the Revolutionary War where he has resided ever since he has never been positive until recently that he was entitled to a Pension. Several years since a gentleman informed him that he was entitled to anything and made no further effort until now. He hereby relinquishes every claim whatever to a pension except the present and declares that his name is not on the pension roll of the agency of any state.
Sworn to and subscribed the day and year aforesaid in open court.
Test. Aron A. F. Leavell Levi (X) Goines
Sworn to in open court this 26th day of April A.D. 1852. A. C. Curry clerk of Moore County Court.
State of North Carolina
Moore County
On this 19th day of February A.D. 1852 personally appeared before me a justice of the peace, within and for the County and the state aforesaid Duncan Murchison, who, being duly scorn according to Law, declares that he has been acquainted with Levi Goines for forth five years during which time he has resided in the County and state aforesaid. That when he came to this county he understood and believed that he came from the state of South Carolina. He is a man of good character where oath may be relied on, he is reputed to have been a soldier in the Revolutionary War while living in south Carolina of which there is no doubt.
Sworn to and subscribe before me this 19th day of February AD 1852.
Duncan Murchinson
Jno. C Jackson JP
State of North Carolina
Moore County
Pension office department
The declaration of Levi Goines, a Revolutionary Soldier, with the proof of his services here unto annexed, is respectfully submitted for you consideration, it is believed that under the several acts of Congress he is entitled to a Pension for life from the 4th day of March 1831. To back pay since that time and to bounty lands having volunteered during the war and served as he believes until its close or until discharged by his officers which several claims he respectfully asks the department to allow him. He has no living nor documentary evidence of his services but has transmitted a correct statement under oath showing as near as frail memory will allow the time place and manner of his services the officer under whom he served and with whom he was acquainted. He also produces the certificate of three of the most respectable and intelligent men in his county who establish beyond doubt his food character and general reputation as a soldier and I imagine there are but few of those Veterans who have been mercifully spared until this day that would swear falsely. This proof I trust will be sufficient to establish his claim. Time has so reduced the number of Veterans and of the witnesses of their services and sufferings that to require of them positive proof independently of their own statement would be to deprive them of the benefit of the act. An early investigation of this claim is respectfully solicited. If consistent with the regulations of the department, his humble condition in life and very feeble health require it. All of which is respectfully subscribed. My address is Carthage, N.C.
W. C. Thagard
State of North Carolina
Moore County
On the 28th day of June A.D. 1852 personally appeared before me a justice of the peace within and for the county and state aforesaid Gen W. D. Dawd who being duly sworn according to law declared that he is well acquainted with Levi Goines of said county and from his general character has no hesitation in saying that he is entitled to full credit upon his oath. That he has recently been requested to examine said Goines relation to his services as a soldier in the Revolutionary war. That he has examined and conversed with him on that subject at various times and with great particularity and has no doubt that said Goines volunteered in the state of So. Carolina for and during the war and continued in actual service in the Revolutionary war for nearly or quite two years. That he inquired of said Goines when he entered the service. Said he could not tell but it was about the time the British took Charleston that he inquired what was his age now, he said he was ninety years this month. That he discovered he discovered he must have been under twenty one years when Charleston was surrendered to the British, that without making a single interaction to said Goines of that fact (nor can he read a word of history) that he inquired how old he was when he volunteered, to which he replied that he was about nineteen years old, that he then referred to the history of the revolution and found that the time Charleston was surrendered (12th May 1780). Said Goines was about nineteen. That he then inquired what general officers he knew. He said Green, Sumpter, Wynn, Lee. That he then inquired what battles he was in. He said he was in but one which was at the Cangaree fort. That he again referred to the history and finds that this fort was called Moltes near the confluence of the Congaree & Santee Rivers. Gen Lee was dispatched to this place. That from these facts together with many other incidents of said war related by said Goines. The conclusion was irresistible that said Goines is one of these Veterans who stood up for his country in the hour of danger and has never yet received a pension. That said Goines with his aged companion are living alone in a very humble condition in life barely able to afford themselves the comforts which their advanced age require. That it is in the universal opinion of all who conversed with him that he was a faithful soldier in the Revolutionary war.
W. D. Dowd
Sworn to and subscribed before me this day and was above written.
D Street JP (Seal)
By reference to history I find that the battle of Kings Mountain was fought 7th October 1780 after which Lord Cornwallis left Charlotte and fell back to Winnsboro: the very place and years that Mr. Goines mentions in his declaration
W. C. T.
State of North Carolina
Moore County
On this 16th day of July AD1852 personally appeared before me a justice of the peace within and for the County and State aforesaid Duncan M. R. McIntosh Esqr who being duly sworn according to law declare that he has been acquainted with Levi Goines for about twenty five years. That he is a man of good character for truth and veracity. There are but five men whom to be believed upon on there oath than he is. He is reputed to have served as a soldier in the Revolutionary war in the state of South Carolina. That he has no doubt of that fact. He is a man about ninety years of age.
D. M. R. McIntosh
Sworn to and subscribed before me the day and year above written.
Wm Barrett
State of North Carolina
Moore County
I Alexander C. Curry Clerk of the Court of Pleas and Quarter Sessions in and for the county and state aforesaid do herby certify that the declaration of Levi Goines hereunto annexed was duly executed and sworn in open court by the identical Levi Goines named in said declaration who is reputed and believed to have been a Revolutionary soldier. I further certify that Duncan Murchison Esq, D.M.R. McIntosh Esq, and Genl W. D. Dowd whose names appear to the annexed certificate are citizens of said county of high standings whose varsity for truth cannot be doubted. Said Murchison is a prominent elder in the Presbyterian Church and each of them have been promoted to distinguished places of trust in their county and state. Said signatures being in their own proper handwriting. I further certify that John C. Jackson, William Barret and Donald Street whose names appear to the annexed certificates of Duncan Murchison, D.M.R. McIntosh and W.D. Dawd were at the time of signing the same acting justices of the peace in and for the county aforesaid duly confirmed and qualified accordingly to law and that their signatures to the same are genuine. In testimony wherof I have hereunto affirmed my seal of office and subscribed my name the 6th day of August A.D. 1852
A. C. Curry clerk
Of Moore County Court
Carthage N.C Apr 8th 1853
Dear Sir.
Some months since I presented (through Gen Dockery) to the department the declaration of Levi Goines a soldier in the war of the Revolution asking to be allowed a pension for his services in said war. I stated in my letter that the advanced age and feeble health of the old Veteran presents strong claims to the department for an early investigation. I have waited with great patience and as yet the department has not seen fit to address me on the subject. If there is any informality in the declaration or any lack of testimony that prevents the claim being allowed will the department please to inform me or if it has not yet been investigated or has been allowed and no information given. I ask respectfully to be informed thereof.
Very Respectfully
W. C. Thagard
Original documents for the above can be viewed at Footnote.  Moore Co, NC.

1784 Jan 15 – John Gowan receives 640 acr on the E side of Mill Creek. Other names: Levi Gowan, David Gowan
1793 June 26. Davidson Co., TN. http://www.nclandgrants.com/grant/?mars=12.14.2.1816&qid=82716&rn=3

1784 Jan 15 – John Gowan receives 640 acr on the E side of Mill Creek. Other names: Levi Gowan, David Gowan. 1793 June 26. Davidson Co., TN. http://www.nclandgrants.com/grant/?mars=12.14.2.1816&qid=82716&rn=3

1786 Aug 14 – The indents, issued by the Treasury August 14, 1786, were approved long after the death of David Gowen of Fairfield County, son of Daniel Gowen and Rebecca Gowen. David Gowen was killed by Indians in the winter of 1779-80 at Manskers Station in Davidson County, Tennessee. William Gowen, regarded as his grandfather, was the executor of his estate at Nashville. Levi Gowen, “who passes for mulatto,” brother of David Gowen, applied successful for the administration of the estate in Fairfield County and gave “John Gowen, gentleman of Daverson County” his power of attorney. John Gowen, son of William Gowen, was a kinsman of Levi Gowen and David Gowen. Fairfield Co, SC. http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~gowenrf/Gowenms007.htm

1786 Aug 14 – The indents, issued by the Treasury August 14, 1786, were approved long after the death of David Gowen of Fairfield County, son of Daniel Gowen and Rebecca Gowen.  David Gowen was killed by Indians in the winter of 1779-80 at Manskers Station in Davidson County, Tennessee.  William Gowen, regarded as his grandfather, was the executor of his estate at Nashville.  Levi Gowen, “who passes for mulatto,” brother of David Gowen, applied successful for the administration of the estate in Fairfield County and gave “John Gowen, gentleman of Daverson County” his power of attorney.  John Gowen, son of William Gowen, was a kinsman of Levi Gowen and David Gowen. Fairfield Co, SC.  http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~gowenrf/Gowenms007.htm

1792 – Affidavit / appointment of John Goyen as power of atty to sell land in Davorson County, NC – as David Goyen (father of Levi), had gone to the Cumberland River and was killed by Indians some 14 years earlier – 640 acres of land). Levi called “Mulatto” – John Goyen called “Gentleman”. (see links below for full text – very difficult to read due to shadows on document):
Fairfield County:
“Before me personally appeared Becky Elliot formerly Becky Gowen by a former husband David Gowen and after be duly sowrn deposith and said that she had a son by the afore David ____ David Goyen who about fourteen years ago left this county land as she was informed went to Cumberland River in N Carolina and was there killed by the Indians. The deponent further saith on oath that Levi Gowen who now appoints John Gowen of his attorney is the full and oldest brother to the aforesaid David Gowen.
Sworn tby affidavit this 17th day of Sept 1792 before me Benj Boyd J. FC.
Becky Elliot (x her mark)
Fairfield County: I hereby certify that the above named Levi Gowen ___ as the County for a free Mulatto got i ward was born her.
Given under my hand this 17th day of September 1792.”
Benj Boyd J. FC.  Fairfield Co, SC
http://www.ken-shelton.com/Fairfield/Deeds/Bond_A/Bond_A_0135a.tif
http://www.ken-shelton.com/Fairfield/Deeds/Bond_A/Bond_A_0136a.tif

“Levi Goyen” and James Scott were sued January 17, 1793 by James Craig, according to “Fairfield County, South Carolina Minutes of the County Court, 1785-1799.”  The case was dismissed when the defendants paid the court costs.

1799 Nov 19 – NC Archives; Title: File No. 1124, William Gowen. Parent Records: State Records; Secretary of the State Record Group; Land Office: Land Warrants, Plats and Survey, Related Records; Moore County. Call Number: S.108.886; Frames: 808-813. Site: Archives Search Room (Raleigh). MARS Id: 12.14.90.1112 (Folder). Genres/Forms :Warrants, Plats. Index Terms: Geographic Names: Crains Creek – Personal Names: William Gowen. Land Grant Info: Acres: 150 – Grant Number: 1076 – Issued Mar 16, 1799 – Entry Number: 1383 – Entered: Feb 2, 1795 – Book Page: 101:38 – Location: On both sides of Cranes branch. Entered Nov 19, 1799 14 acres on the drains of the Big Pocket Creek to Levy GOYEN (NC Archives  http://www.ah.dcr.state.nc.us/archives/) Moore Co, NC. http://lumbeeindiansandgoinsfamily.blogspot.com/2007/11/moore-county-nc-early-records.html

1799 Nov 19 – Entered for 14 acres on the drains of the Big Pocket Creek to Levy GOYEN (NC Archives http://www.ah.dcr.state.nc.us/archives/) Moore Co, NC http://lumbeeindiansandgoinsfamily.blogspot.com/2007/11/moore-county-nc-early-records.html

1800 Goin, Allen 7 Person page 621 – US Census North Carolina – “Other Free” Census
Goin, Edward 6 Person page 599
Goin, Godrich 7 Person page 612
Goin, Hinnery 5 Moore County page 60
Goin, Levy 5 Moore County page 62
Goin, Oliva 2 Robeson County page 381
Goin, William 9 Moore County page 60
Going, Burgess 2 whites ( 1001-) Randolph page 353
Going, Isham 4 Orange County page 565
Going, Jacob 6 Stokes 495
Goins?, Judith 1 Nash County page 102
http://www.freeafricanamericans.com/1800NCa.htm

1800 – Levy Goin, Hennery Goin, William Goin
1800 US Census Index:
GOIN:
Hennery , p 60
Levy , p 62
William , p 60
Moore Co, NC
http://lumbeeindiansandgoinsfamily.blogspot.com/2007/11/moore-county-nc-early-records.html

1810 – Edward Goyne, Henry Goyne, Levi Goyne, William Goyne
1810 US Census, Moore Co, p 64:
EDWARD GOYNE: All other free persons=2
HENRY GOYNE: All other free persons=9
LEVI GOYNE: All other free persons=8
WILLIAM GOYNE: All other free persons=6
Moore Co, NC
http://lumbeeindiansandgoinsfamily.blogspot.com/2007/11/moore-county-nc-early-records.html

1790 NC Moore US Census
William Goings with 10 other free

1800 NC Moore US Census
William Goings with 9 other free
Hennery Goings with 4 other free
Levy Goings with 5 other free

Name: Isham Gowing
Home in 1800 (City, County, State): Hillsborough, Orange, North Carolina
Number of All Other Free Persons: 4
Number of Household Members: 4

1810:

1810 NC Moore US Census
Edward Goyne with 2 other free
Henry Goyne with 9 other free
Levi Goyne with 8 other free
Wm Goyne with 6 other free

1820:

1820 NC Moore US Census
Edward Goins (1775-1794) 1 male 26-45, 1 female 26-45, 2 males under 16, 2 females under 16 (p. 308) (other free) (1775-1794)
Edward Goins (1775-1794) 1 male 26-45, 1 female 26-45, 2 males under 16, 2 females under 16 (p. 298) (other free) (1775-1794)
John Goins 1 male 16-25, 1 female 16-25, 1 male under 16 (other free) (1795-1804)
Levi Goins 1 male over 45, 1 female 26-45, 2 males 16-25, 2 females 16-25, 1 male under 16, 1 female under 16. (other free)

1830:

1830 NC Moore US Census
Levy Goins
Home in 1830 (City, County, State): Moore, North Carolina
Free Colored Persons – Males – Under 10: 4
Free Colored Persons – Males – 10 thru 23: 1
Free Colored Persons – Males – 24 thru 35: 2
Free Colored Persons – Males – 55 thru 99: 1
Free Colored Persons – Females – Under 10: 4
Free Colored Persons – Females – 10 thru 23: 3
Free Colored Persons – Females – 24 thru 35: 3
Free Colored Persons – Females – 55 thru 99: 1
Total Free Colored Persons: 19
Total – All Persons (Free White, Slaves, Free Colored): 19

Edward Goins (1776-1794)
Home in 1830 (City, County, State): Moore, North Carolina
Free Colored Persons – Males – Under 10: 2
Free Colored Persons – Males – 10 thru 23: 2
Free Colored Persons – Males – 36 thru 54: 1 (1776-1794)
Free Colored Persons – Females – Under 10: 2
Free Colored Persons – Females – 24 thru 35: 2
Total Free Colored Persons: 9
Total – All Persons (Free White, Slaves, Free Colored): 9

1840:

1840 NC Moore US Census
Bob Gowens
Home in 1840 (City, County, State): Moore, North Carolina
Free Colored Persons – Males – Under 10: 2
Free Colored Persons – Males – 24 thru 35: 1 (1805-1816)
Free Colored Persons – Females – Under 10: 2
Free Colored Persons – Females – 10 thru 23: 1
Free Colored Persons – Females – 24 thru 35: 1
Persons Employed in Agriculture: 4
Total Free Colored Persons: 7
Total All Persons – Free White, Free Colored, Slaves: 7

Hubbard Gowens
Home in 1840 (City, County, State): Moore, North Carolina
Free Colored Persons – Males – Under 10: 3
Free Colored Persons – Males – 10 thru 23: 4
Free Colored Persons – Males – 36 thru 54: 1 (1786-1804)
Free Colored Persons – Females – Under 10: 2
Slaves – Males – Under 10: 1
Slaves – Males – 24 thru 35: 1
Slaves – Females – Under 10: 1
Slaves – Females – 24 thru 35: 2
Persons Employed in Agriculture: 4
Total Free Colored Persons: 10
Total Slaves: 5
Total All Persons – Free White, Free Colored, Slaves: 15

Neill Gowens
Home in 1840 (City, County, State): Moore, North Carolina
Free Colored Persons – Males – Under 10: 1
Free Colored Persons – Males – 24 thru 35: 1 (1805-1816)
Free Colored Persons – Females – Under 10: 3
Free Colored Persons – Females – 24 thru 35: 1
Persons Employed in Agriculture: 2
Total Free Colored Persons: 6
Total All Persons – Free White, Free Colored, Slaves: 6

John Gowins
Home in 1840 (City, County, State): Moore, North Carolina
Free Colored Persons – Males – Under 10: 1
Free Colored Persons – Males – 36 thru 54: 1 (1786-1804)
Free Colored Persons – Females – Under 10: 2
Free Colored Persons – Females – 24 thru 35: 1
Persons Employed in Agriculture: 1
Total Free Colored Persons: 5
Total All Persons – Free White, Free Colored, Slaves: 5

Neill Gowins
Home in 1840 (City, County, State): Moore, North Carolina
Free Colored Persons – Males – Under 10: 2
Free Colored Persons – Males – 10 thru 23: 1
Free Colored Persons – Males – 24 thru 35: 1 (1805-1816)
Free Colored Persons – Females – Under 10: 1
Free Colored Persons – Females – 24 thru 35: 1
Persons Employed in Agriculture: 1
Total Free Colored Persons: 6
Total All Persons – Free White, Free Colored, Slaves: 6

1850:

Name: Levi Goings
Age: 87
Birth Year: abt 1763
Birthplace: North Carolina
Home in 1850: Moore, North Carolina, USA
Race: Mulatto
Gender: Male
Family Number: 690
Household Members:
Name Age
Levi Goings 87
Amy Goings 77
Nutty Goings 47
Joseph Goings 10

Name: James Goings
Age: 58
Birth Year: abt 1792
Birthplace: North Carolina
Home in 1850: Moore, North Carolina, USA
Race: Mulatto
Gender: Male
Family Number: 775
Household Members:
Name Age
James Goings 58
Andrew Goings 22
Henry Goings 21
Ursula Goings 15
Amy Goings 12
John Goings 8
James Goings 6
Mary Goings 4

Name: William Goings
Age: 50
Birth Year: abt 1800
Birthplace: North Carolina
Home in 1850: Moore, North Carolina, USA
Race: Mulatto
Gender: Male
Family Number: 652
Household Members:
Name Age
William Goings 50
Martha Goings 39
Sarah A Goings 17
David Goings 13
Sidney Goings 11
Lucinda Goings 8
Elizabeth Goings 6
Andrew Goings 1

Name: Neill Goings
Age: 37
Birth Year: abt 1813
Birthplace: North Carolina
Home in 1850: Moore, North Carolina, USA
Race: Mulatto
Gender: Male
Family Number: 691
Household Members:
Name Age
Neill Goings 37
Mary Goings 36
Delilah Goings 16
Amy Goings 15
Chaney Goings 12
Sarah Goings 10
Celia Goings 8
Catharine Goings 6
Eliza Goings 3